College of Psychology Catalog

College of Psychology Catalog
Nova Southeastern University
College of Psychology
2015–2016 Catalog
Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501)
to award associate's, bachelor's, master's, specialist, and doctoral degrees. Nova Southeastern University
was first accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) as Nova University in
1971. The Ph.D. and Psy.D. programs in Clinical Psychology are accredited by the Commission on
Accreditation of the American Psychological Association. In addition, the College of Psychology has two
American Psychological Association accredited pre-doctoral internship programs. The Center's master's
degree program in school counseling and specialist and doctoral programs in school psychology are
approved by the Florida Department of Education. In addition, the specialist program in school psychology
holds the designation of National Recognition by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).
Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced
educator preparation programs at all university locations and online. However, the accreditation does not
include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional
development, re-licensure, or other purposes.
The information contained in this catalog is effective through June 30, 2016. Nova Southeastern
University’s administration reserves the right without advance notice to change at any time the requirements
for admission and graduation, modify the curriculum, adjust tuition or fees, and change regulations affecting
the student body.
Nova Southeastern University
College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-5700
www.psychology.nova.edu
Table of Contents
President’s Message .............................................................................................................. 1
Dean’s Message ..................................................................................................................... 2
Nova Southeastern University ............................................................................................. 3
Nova Southeastern University Mission Statement............................................................. 3
Vision 2020 Statement .......................................................................................................... 3
Core Values ........................................................................................................................... 3
Notices of Accreditation, Membership, and Nondiscrimination ...................................... 4
College of Psychology Mission Statement ........................................................................... 5
Academic Programs.............................................................................................................. 6
Masters of Science Programs ........................................................................................ 6
Specialist Degree Program (Psy.S.) in School Psychology........................................... 7
Doctoral Programs in Clinical Psychology ................................................................... 7
Concentrations/Tracks ................................................................................................... 8
Joint Doctoral/MBA ...................................................................................................... 8
Doctoral Program in School Psychology ...................................................................... 9
Licensure ....................................................................................................................... 9
Graduate Training Programs ............................................................................................ 10
Institute of Trauma and Victimization ........................................................................ 10
Professional Development Institute............................................................................. 10
Southeast Institute for Cross-Cultural Counseling and Psychotherapy....................... 10
Pre-doctoral Internship Programs ................................................................................ 11
Psychological Services Center Internship Program
Consortium Internship Program
Continuing Education Series ....................................................................................... 11
Research............................................................................................................................... 11
Computer/Statistical Lab ............................................................................................. 12
Protection of Human Subjects ..................................................................................... 12
Clinical Services .................................................................................................................. 13
Nova Southeastern University Psychology Services Center ....................................... 13
NSU Support Services ........................................................................................................ 17
Library Resources........................................................................................................ 17
Computer Facilities ..................................................................................................... 17
Career Resources ......................................................................................................... 18
Office of Innovation and Information Technology ..................................................... 18
College of Psychology Testing Library....................................................................... 18
Financial Aid ............................................................................................................... 18
Veteran’s Benefits ....................................................................................................... 19
International Students .................................................................................................. 20
Students with Disabilities ............................................................................................ 21
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) .............................................. 22
Academic Regulations ........................................................................................................ 24
Nova Southeastern University Statement of Academic Rights and Responsibilities.. 24
Academic Standards .................................................................................................... 24
Conduct Standards....................................................................................................... 26
Supplementary Standards ............................................................................................ 28
Violations .................................................................................................................... 28
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Acceptable Use of Computing Resources ................................................................... 28
Drug-Free Schools and Campuses .............................................................................. 29
Cellular Phone Policy .................................................................................................. 29
Tobacco-Free Policy………………………………………………………………….29
Privacy of Records ...................................................................................................... 30
Reservation of Power .................................................................................................. 30
Policies Governing Student Relations ......................................................................... 31
Institutional and Academic Information...................................................................... 31
Notice of Nondiscrimination ....................................................................................... 31
Grievances ................................................................................................................... 31
Student Publications .................................................................................................... 31
Student Participation in University Governance ......................................................... 32
Master’s Programs ............................................................................................................. 33
Experimental Psychology…………………………………………………………….33
General Psychology (Online) ...................................................................................... 33
Forensic Psychology (Online) ..................................................................................... 33
Mental Health Counseling ........................................................................................... 34
School Counseling....................................................................................................... 34
Certification/Endorsement Option .............................................................................. 35
Counseling (Online) .................................................................................................... 35
Course Formats ........................................................................................................... 35
Master’s Programs Admissions ......................................................................................... 37
Requirements Experimental Psychology………………………….………………….37
Requirements General Psychology ............................................................................. 38
Requirements Forensic Psychology ............................................................................ 39
Requirements Mental Health Counseling or School Counseling ................................ 40
Application Procedures ............................................................................................... 40
Degree-Seeking Students ........................................................................................ 40
Special Students (non-degree seeking).................................................................... 41
Requirements Counseling online................................................................................. 42
Application Deadlines ................................................................................................. 43
Admission of Master’s Students to Doctoral Programs .............................................. 43
Transfer of Credits....................................................................................................... 43
Provisional Admissions ............................................................................................... 45
Master’s Program Regional Campus Information .......................................................... 46
Master’s Programs Academic Policies.............................................................................. 47
HIPAA Training ................................................................................................................. 47
Professional Liability Insurance ........................................................................................ 47
Evaluation of Master’s Students ....................................................................................... 47
Professional Standing Committee ..................................................................................... 47
Master’s Counseling Programs Academic Policies.......................................................... 49
Registration ................................................................................................................. 49
Candidacy (Matriculation) .......................................................................................... 49
Mental Health Counseling Program ........................................................................ 49
School Counseling Program .................................................................................... 50
Counseling (Online) Program ................................................................................. 50
Mental Health Counseling Program Practicum/Internship Requirements .................. 54
Main Campus Format .................................................................................................. 54
Regional Campus-Based Format ................................................................................. 54
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School Counseling Program Practicum/Internship Requirements ................................ 55
Counseling Practicum and Internship Requirements (Online Program) ..................... 56
Mental Health Counseling Degree Completion Requirements....................................... 56
Counseling (Online) Degree Completion Requirements ................................................. 56
Experimental Psychology Program Academic Policies…………………………………57
Program Requirements .…………………...…………………………………………58
Grade Requirements ………..………………………………………...……………...59
Model Curriculum ………………………………………………………………..….60
Course Descriptions ………………………………………………………………....60
Forensic Psychology Program Academic Policies............................................................ 64
Program Format .......................................................................................................... 64
Curriculum Requirements ........................................................................................... 64
Model Curriculum ....................................................................................................... 64
Core Courses ............................................................................................................... 65
General Psychology Program Academic Policies ............................................................ 71
Registration ................................................................................................................. 71
Candidacy (Matriculation) ........................................................................................... 71
General Psychology Degree Completion Requirements.................................................. 71
Master’s Programs Model Curricula & Course Descriptions ........................................ 72
General Psychology Program Model Curriculum ....................................................... 72
General Psychology Program Course Descriptions .................................................... 73
Mental Health Counseling Program Model Curriculum ............................................. 76
Mental Health Counseling Course Descriptions ......................................................... 76
School Counseling Program Model Curriculum ......................................................... 80
School Counseling Course Descriptions ..................................................................... 80
Counseling Program Model Curriculum ..................................................................... 83
Applied Behavior Analysis Non-Degree Program Model Curriculum ....................... 85
Counseling Program Course Descriptions .................................................................. 86
Licensure and Certification/ Endorsement ...................................................................... 95
State of Florida Licensure for Mental Health Counselors .......................................... 95
Certification/ Endorsement in Guidance and Counseling........................................... 95
Master’s Programs 2015-2016 Estimated Expenses ........................................................ 96
Specialist Program in School Psychology ......................................................................... 97
Specialist Programs Admissions ........................................................................................ 97
Requirements ............................................................................................................... 97
Admission Status ......................................................................................................... 98
Traditional Degree Seeking Students .......................................................................... 98
Alternative Degree Seeking Students .......................................................................... 98
Non-Degree Seeking/Specialist Students .................................................................... 99
Application Procedures ............................................................................................... 99
Degree Seeking Students ......................................................................................... 99
Non-Degree Seeking/Specialist Students .............................................................. 100
Transfer of Credit ...................................................................................................... 101
Provisional Admissions ............................................................................................. 102
School Psychology Specialist Program Academic Policies............................................ 102
Registration and Residency ....................................................................................... 102
En-Route Master of Science in School Psychology .................................................. 102
Matriculation Requirements (Degree Candidacy) ..................................................... 103
Academic Standing (Following Matriculation) ......................................................... 103
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Attendance ................................................................................................................. 104
School Psychology Specialist Program Clinical Training ............................................. 104
Practica ...................................................................................................................... 104
HIPAA Training ........................................................................................................ 104
Specialist Program Internship ................................................................................... 105
Evaluation of Specialist Students .................................................................................... 105
Professional Standing Committee ................................................................................... 105
Degree Completion Requirements .................................................................................. 106
Comprehensive Examination .................................................................................... 106
Certification/Licensure .............................................................................................. 107
Specialist Program in School Psychology Curriculum & Course Descriptions .......... 108
2015- 2016 School Psychology Program Estimated Expenses ...................................... 114
Doctoral Program in School Psychology ........................................................................ 115
Program Goals ........................................................................................................... 115
Doctoral Program in School Psychology Admissions .................................................... 116
Minimum Requirements for Admissions .................................................................. 116
Application Procedures ............................................................................................. 116
Provisional Admissions ............................................................................................. 117
Transfer of Credits..................................................................................................... 118
School Psychology Doctoral Program Academic Policies ............................................. 119
Residency & Full-Time Status .................................................................................. 119
Failure to Register ..................................................................................................... 119
En-Route Master of Science in School Psychology ................................................. 119
En-Route Specialist Degree in School Psychology ................................................... 119
Grading & Academic Standing ................................................................................. 120
Attendance ................................................................................................................. 120
Leave of Absence ...................................................................................................... 120
Comprehensive Examinations ................................................................................... 121
School Psychology Doctoral Program Applied Training .............................................. 121
Practica ...................................................................................................................... 121
School Psychology Internship ................................................................................... 121
HIPAA ....................................................................................................................... 121
Professional Liability Insurance ................................................................................ 122
Time Limits ............................................................................................................... 122
Failure to Register ..................................................................................................... 122
Evaluation of School Psychology Doctoral Program Candidates ................................ 122
Professional Standing Committee
......................................................... 122
School Psychology Doctoral Program Curriculum & Course Descriptions ............... 124
Doctoral Programs in Clinical Psychology ..................................................................... 138
Doctoral of Psychology Program in Clinical Psychology .............................................. 138
Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data (Psy.D.) ........................................ 140
Doctoral of Philosophy Program in Clinical Psychology .............................................. 144
Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data (Ph.D.) ......................................... 145
Clinical Psychology Concentrations/Tracks................................................................... 149
Clinical Forensic Psychology ................................................................................ 149
Clinical Health Psychology ................................................................................... 149
Clinical Neuropsychology ..................................................................................... 149
Psychodynamic Psychology .................................................................................. 149
Psychology of Long-Term Mental Illness ............................................................. 150
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Child, Adolescent, and Family Psychology .......................................................... 150
Multicultural/Diversity .......................................................................................... 150
Trauma .................................................................................................................. 150
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs Admissions..................................................... 150
Requirements ............................................................................................................. 150
Application Procedure ............................................................................................... 151
Transfer of Credits..................................................................................................... 152
Provisional Admissions ............................................................................................. 153
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs Academic Policies ......................................... 153
Registration and Residency ....................................................................................... 153
Failure to Register ..................................................................................................... 154
Candidacy .................................................................................................................. 154
En-Route Master of Science in Clinical Psychology ................................................ 154
Grading and Academic Standing............................................................................... 155
Attendance ................................................................................................................. 155
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Curricula ......................................................................... 155
Clinical Training........................................................................................................ 156
HIPAA Training ........................................................................................................ 156
Professional Liability Insurance ................................................................................ 156
Research Training...................................................................................................... 156
Time Limits ............................................................................................................... 157
Evaluation of Doctoral Students................................................................................ 157
Professional Standing Committee ............................................................................. 157
Clinical Psychology Psy.D. Program Curriculum & Course Descriptions ................. 159
Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Curriculum & Course Descriptions ................... 181
2014 - 2015 Doctoral Programs Estimated Expenses .................................................... 203
Refund Policy ............................................................................................................ 203
Selected Clinical Psychology Internship Site Placements ............................................. 204
College of Psychology Organization................................................................................ 206
Benefactors and Supporters ....................................................................................... 206
Full-Time Faculty ...................................................................................................... 207
Professors Emeriti ..................................................................................................... 213
Contributing Faculty.................................................................................................. 213
Part-Time Core Faculty ............................................................................................. 214
Clinical Faculty ......................................................................................................... 215
Adjunct Faculty ......................................................................................................... 216
Correspondence Directory ............................................................................................... 220
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President’s Welcome Message
Welcome to Nova Southeastern University!
NSU’s main campus is located in Greater Fort Lauderdale with locations around Florida, the
Bahamas and Puerto Rico. We are at the heart of the region’s academic and research hub, and just
minutes from some of the world’s best beaches. With more than 26,000 students and 152,000
alumni around the world, you will find Shark Friends in every corner of the country – and beyond.
Nova Southeastern University is the largest independent, not-for-profit university in the Southeast,
and the seventh largest in the United States. As president of NSU, I invite you to become an
ambassador of this extraordinary educational institution that is in its fourth decade of existence.
NSU’s undergraduate programs are diverse and all serve as a conduit into more than 100 graduate
and professional programs. NSU boasts a strong health professions division and our dual-admit
program for undergraduate students is great for those with who wish to pre-apply to our nationally
ranked graduate and professional programs. Our business school is the largest in Florida and caters
to future business leaders and entrepreneurs who seek a personalized real-world education. Alumni
from our school of education are teachers and administrators across the county, including more
than 300 sitting superintendents and 38 college presidents hold our Ed.D. degree. NSU’s programs
in psychology, conflict resolution and family therapy are nationally renowned. So, whether you
are preparing to study law, computer sciences or marine biology – NSU is the best choice to pursue
higher education.
We are proud to be classified as one of only 37 universities, out of more than 4,000, that have the
dual designation of both “high research” and “community engaged.” This did not happen by
accident. Our faculty and student researchers are changing the world in areas such as coral reef
preservation, cancer drug therapies, autism, neuro-immune medicine, and many others. And our
students, faculty and staff give back to the community each year through approximately 2,000
different community events. NSU is committed to providing the highest quality faculty in small
classroom environments where interaction is a key ingredient in the learning process.
I invite you to take a few minutes and look around our website and discover NSU. Get to know
our faculty, our students and programs – I am sure you will like what you see. Our virtual campus
map will give you building-by-building access to our classrooms, athletics facilities, student union,
and libraries. And, if you are in town, please stop by to say hello and join us for a tour of our
beautiful 300-acre campus.
Sincerely,
George L. Hanbury II, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Nova Southeastern University
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Dean’s Message
I am pleased to extend you a warm welcome to Nova Southeastern University and the College of
Psychology. We hope to guide you through a rich and transformative journey where you will grow
personally, academically and socially on the road to becoming major contributors to our society.
Our aim is to guide you in your development of skills needed to impact the quality of life of
individuals, families, institutions, and communities.
Our College offers bachelor’s degree programs in psychology and behavioral neuroscience, as well
as graduate programs in clinical and school psychology, counseling, experimental psychology,
forensic psychology, and general psychology, along with other specialized training experiences.
Our outstanding faculty guide students, not only in discovering and appreciating the factual content
of their respective fields of study, but also in developing the critical and creative thinking skills
essential to producers or consumers of science and the investigative skills of aspiring professionals,
researchers, and clinicians.
The scope of psychology, counseling, neuroscience and related fields is expansive, as our
disciplines describe and explain the effects of psychological processes from the level of individual
brain cells to the scale of complex social interactions. The areas of expertise our faculty
collectively possess are similarly diverse. Regardless of the specific field or subfield of study,
however, our students benefit from the greater involvement that small classes provide and from
the related opportunities for research collaborations and for experiential placements in community
settings.
While the lasting memories of one’s years at a university surely include many events beyond the
confines of the classroom, one’s day-to-day enjoyment while enrolled as a university student
depends largely on his or her chosen field of study and engagement with its particular subject
matter. The College of Psychology is proud to house engaging undergraduate majors, an array of
highly regarded graduate programs and related training opportunities and a clinic that serves our
community. We hope that these opportunities at our university will figure positively in the
memories our students of their university experience.
Conducting basic and applied research and providing quality assessment and treatment of
psychological problems is one of the greatest challenges facing modern society. The College seeks
to address these challenges by providing a broad range of training, by conducting research that
addresses society’s pressing problems, and by offering services to the community through its
clinics.
On behalf of the faculty and staff of the College of Psychology, I am pleased to welcome you to
Nova Southeastern University. It is my sincere belief and hope that you will find your time here
richly rewarding, both during your enrollment with us and, retrospectively, as alumni entering the
workforce or continuing to pursue your educational goals.
Karen S. Grosby, Ed. D.
Dean, College of Psychology
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NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
Situated on 300 beautiful acres in Davie, Florida, Nova Southeastern University is a dynamic
institution dedicated to providing high-quality educational programs of distinction from preschool
through the professional and doctoral levels. NSU has more than 26,000 students and is the seventh
largest not-for-profit independent institution nationally.
The university awards associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, doctoral, and first-professional
degrees in a wide range of fields, including the arts and humanities, business, counseling, computer
and information sciences, education, medicine, dentistry, various health professions, law, marine
sciences, psychology, and other social sciences. The university has been offering distance
education programs for more than 45 years. To date, the university has produced more than
152,000 alumni.
The university’s programs are administered through academic centers that offer courses at the Fort
Lauderdale campuses as well as at locations throughout Florida, across the nation, and at selected
international sites in the Bahamas, Bermuda, the Dominican Republic, Greece, Jamaica, Korea,
Mexico, and Puerto Rico.
Mission Statement: Nova Southeastern University
The mission of Nova Southeastern University, a private, not-for-profit institution, is to offer a
diverse array of innovative academic programs that complement on-campus educational
opportunities and resources with accessible, distance-learning programs to foster academic
excellence, intellectual inquiry, leadership, research, and commitment to community through
engagement of students and faculty members in a dynamic, lifelong learning environment.
Vision 2020 Statement:
By 2020, through excellence and innovations in teaching, research, service, and learning, Nova
Southeastern University will be recognized by accrediting agencies, the academic community, and
the general public as a premier, private, not-for-profit university of quality and distinction that
engages all students and produces alumni who serve with integrity in their lives, fields of study,
and resulting careers.
Core Values:
Academic Excellence
Student Centered
Integrity
Innovation
Opportunity
Scholarship/Research
Diversity
Community
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The Mission Statement, Vision 2020 Statement, and Core Values were adopted by the NSU
Board of Trustees on March 28, 2011.
Notices of Accreditation, Membership and Nondiscrimination
Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097: Telephone
number 404-679-4501) to award associate's, bachelor's, master's, specialist, and doctoral degrees.
Nova Southeastern University was first accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools (SACS) as Nova University in 1971.
The Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Commission on accreditation of
the American Psychological Association. The Psy.D. Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited
by the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association. The College of
Psychology has two APA accredited doctoral internship programs, the South Florida Consortium
Internship Program and the Psychology Services Center internship program.
Questions related to the programs' accredited status should be directed to the Commission on
Accreditation:
Questions related to the programs’ accredited status should be directed
to the Commission on Accreditation:
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 1st Street, NE, Washington, D.C., 20002-4242
Phone: 202-336-5979/E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation
The College of Psychology offers two programs, (1) the M.S. in School Counseling and (2) the
Psy.S. in School Psychology, for practitioners in P-12 schools that were reviewed by the National
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Nova Southeastern University is
accredited by NCATE. NCATE accreditation is awarded to the university through the Fischler
School of Education as follows: The Fischler School of Education at Nova Southeastern
University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
(www.ncate.org). This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced
educator preparation programs at all university locations and online. However, the accreditation
does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for
professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.
Nova Southeastern University’s College of Psychology offers continuing education workshops to
psychologists, clinical social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists,
and school psychologists. These courses, which are presented by leading mental health
professionals, contribute to the lifelong learning of our students and faculty as well as the
professionals in our community.
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•
•
•
Psychologists
Nova Southeastern University’s College of Psychology is approved by the American
Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Nova
Southeastern University’s College of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program
and its content.
Clinical social workers, mental health counselors, and marriage and family therapists
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved to offer continuing
education by the State of Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family
Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling. Provider # BAP 330 – exp. 03/31/2017
School psychologists
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved to offer continuing
education by the State of Florida Board of Medical Therapies/Psychology, Office of
School Psychology. Provider # SCE 11 – exp.11/30/2017.
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved by the National
Association of School Psychologists to provide continuing education for school
psychologists. Nova Southeastern University maintains responsibility for the program.
Provider number 1024.
Nova Southeastern University’s College of Psychology has been approved by NBCC as an
Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No.4548. Programs that do not qualify
for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Nova Southeastern University’s College of
Psychology is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs
Mission Statement: College of Psychology
The mission of the College of Psychology is to offer degree programs that provide a range of
academic and practical opportunities to students in the field of psychology and closely allied
disciplines, from the bachelor’s to the doctoral level, and to train future researchers and
practitioners. Through these opportunities, students will develop knowledge and professional
growth in the science of psychology and its application to the understanding of human activity and
will be prepared for success in a variety of professional and academic pursuits. The intimate
interplay between our Psychology Services Center and academic programs provides educational
opportunities rooted in real problems and research activities that attempt to find answers to extant
concerns. The center seeks to offer programs of excellence in educating future scientists and
mental health practitioners, in advancing knowledge about psychology and the treatment of
psychological problems, and in providing high-quality services that address society’s current
mental health needs.
5
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Master of Science Programs
The master’s degree in Counseling offers individuals the opportunity to earn a degree online.
Concentrations are available in the Mental Health Counseling, Substance Abuse Counseling,
Substance Abuse and Education, and Applied Behavior Analysis (regular and advanced track).
The master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling provides education and training for those who
will seek employment in such diverse settings as social agencies, mental health clinics, hospitals,
personnel offices, and schools. This program is offered either on the main campus in a semester
format or at one of other NSU campuses in a weekend format. Currently, there are field-based
programs offered in Florida at Jacksonville, Orlando, and Tampa. Many graduates go on to seek
licensure in Florida as mental health counselors.
The master’s degree in School Counseling provides training to individuals seeking positions as
professional school counselors in school systems. At this time the program is offered on the main
campus and in Jacksonville, Orlando, and Tampa in a weekend format.
School Counseling – Certification Option
The School Counseling program is approved by the Florida Department of Education
(FLDOE). Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
Teachers, educators, and counselors who hold an eligible master’s degree in a related area
other than school counseling may apply for admission as a “special (non-degree) student”
for the purpose of taking courses in the master’s program in school counseling that meet
the requirements for Florida certification as a school counselor under Plan 2, Rule 6A4.0181, Florida Statues (course by course basis). All requirements for certification in the
Guidance and Counseling subject specialty will be fulfilled prior to degree conferral,
including all curriculum and examination requirements.
Special (non-degree) students seeking admission to the school counseling program for the
purpose of seeking certification by the Florida Department of Education will be required
to complete twelve 3-credit hour courses, including Counseling Practicum and Internship,
regardless of previous internship experiences. Please be advised that waiver of the
practicum and internship experience for any reason will not be permitted.
The master’s of science degree program in Experimental Psychology is a 33-credit program
offered on main campus that provides students with a strong academic foundation in the theories
and concepts of experimental psychology. Through focused coursework and the experience of
mentored independent research, students are equipped with comprehensive skills in scientific
inquiry and research methodology. These skills prepare students for admission into a doctoral
program in psychology or for career opportunities that include teaching and research in industrial,
government, private consulting, health care, and community settings.
6
The master’s degree program in Forensic Psychology is a 36-credit online program that will
present information at the intersection of legal issues and psychology. Students will be prepared
to understand what forensic psychologists do, as well as to apply this training in a variety of
professional contexts. This degree program will provide students with the professional training
necessary to function at an optimal level in a variety of forensic settings where psychology is used
including court cases, law enforcement, criminal justice, national security offices, prisons, social
services agencies, child welfare agencies, and treatment facilities.
The master’s degree in General Psychology is an online program that will prepare students to
develop foundational knowledge in psychological theory and research as an opportunity to obtain
prerequisite courses to meet eligibility requirements for application to other psychology programs,
including advanced doctoral studies.
Specialist Degree Program (Psy.S.) in School Psychology
The Specialist Program (Psy.S.) in School Psychology was developed in response to the national
and state shortage of school psychologists and the increased public attention being paid to the
important role that psychologists play in the schools. The curriculum was designed following
consultation with district departments of psychological services, the Florida Department of
Education (DOE), the Florida Association of School Psychologists (FASP), the National
Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and the American Psychological Association
(APA).
The program consists of 79 semester hours that span three years of course work (including
practica) and one year of internship. The program is housed within the College of Psychology,
which is enriched through its more than 40 distinguished full-time faculty members that include
nationally renowned professionals. Students also enjoy the benefits of a diverse student body,
hands on training within the center’s outpatient mental health facility and other facilities, and
variety of clinical training and research opportunities.
The Specialist Degree in School Psychology program is approved by the Florida Department of
Education. Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation
of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher
preparation programs and advanced educator preparation programs at all university locations and
online. However, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the
institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, re-licensure, or other purpose.
The program is also designed to meet the current educational requirements for licensure as a school
psychologist under Chapter 490, Florida Statutes. At this time the program is offered in Fort
Lauderdale and Tampa
Doctoral Programs in Clinical Psychology
The college offers two doctoral programs in clinical psychology, both accredited by the American
Psychological Association (APA). Each program prepares students for the practice of clinical
psychology. The doctor of philosophy also provides preparation for academic and research
7
activities. Both the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) and the doctor of psychology (Psy.D.) programs
are full-time, on campus programs with a three-year residency requirement. The doctoral
programs typically require a minimum of four years of on-campus post baccalaureate study,
including course work, clinical practica, the clinical competency exam, and a Dissertation (Ph.D.)
or Directed Study: Research (Psy.D.). In addition, both programs require a 2,000-hour pre-doctoral
clinical internship at an APA-approved or APPIC-approved site anywhere in the country.
Concentrations/Tracks
Although the college’s doctoral programs are committed to the general training of clinical
psychologists, we also give students the option of beginning to specialize. Concentrations and
tracks have been developed in recognized areas of psychology. Each concentration accepts a
limited number of students at admission or during the first or second year of study and therefore a
student is not guaranteed a slot in a particular concentration. Students are permitted to participate
in one concentration only. Each concentration consists of a set of electives, a practicum in an
approved clinical program related to the concentration, and research activities with faculty in the
concentration.
Concentrations include: Clinical Forensic Psychology, Clinical Health Psychology, Clinical
Neuropsychology, Psychodynamic Psychology, and the Psychology of Long-Term Mental Illness.
The Child, Adolescent & Family Psychology track requires students to participate in pre-practicum
research, and clinical practica with core faculty. Students will complete 18 hours of specified
coursework.
The Multicultural/Diversity track requires students to participate in pre-practicum research,
research, and clinical practica with core facility. Students will complete 12 hours of specified
coursework.
The Trauma track requires students to participate in trauma research and clinical practica with core
faculty. Students will complete 12 hours of specified coursework.
Joint Clinical Psychology Doctoral/MBA
This program was established in response to the interest of clinical psychologists to be trained in
the practice of business. Current College of Psychology clinical psychology students interested in
admittance to the M.B.A. program should contact the programs’ director of Academic Affairs. The
student will fulfill the typical clinical psychology admissions process by completing the
application packet obtainable at the College of Psychology and indicate, at that time, that they
intend to be admitted to the joint psychology and M.B.A. program. Typically students will begin
M.B.A. classes during the 3rd year of their psychology studies if they are in good standing and will
pay the respective current tuition rates for both the clinical psychology program and the M.B.A.
Program.
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Doctoral Program in School Psychology
The doctor of psychology program (Psy.D.) in school psychology builds upon the College’s
specialist program and is a full-time, on campus program with a three-year residency requirement.
The program typically requires a minimum of three years of on-campus post baccalaureate study,
including course work, practica, and a Professional Research Project. In addition, the program
requires a minimum of a 1500-hour pre-doctoral school psychology internship (1200 hours of
which must be in a PK-12 setting) at an approved site anywhere in the country.
The curriculum of the doctoral program is consistent with the Guidelines and Principles for
Accreditation of Programs in Professional Psychology as defined by the American Psychological
Association and the National Standards for graduate education as delineated by the NASP.
Furthermore, the curriculum meets the credentialing requirements of the Florida Department of
Education (DOE) for certification in school psychology, as well as the criteria for licensure as a
school psychologist and as a psychologist within the state of Florida, as delineated in Chapter 490
of the Florida Statutes. Certification allows graduates to be employed in the public or private
schools, while licensure allows for employment in private practice, hospitals and community
agencies.
Licensure
Licensure for programs offered at the College of Psychology are regulated at the state level and as
such may vary from state to state. Individual eligibility should be verified periodically through
careful review of state licensure regulations, which are subject to change. Degree conferral from
the College of Psychology does not ensure automatic acceptance of program curricula by a given
state for the purpose of licensure. Individual eligibility should be verified through careful review
of the state licensure regulations for the state in which you plan to reside to determine its specific
requirements.
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GRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMS
Professional Development Institute
The Professional Development Institute, part of the center’s Quality Enhancement Plan, is held
annually on the main campus in Ft. Lauderdale. In a conference format students gain additional
practical knowledge that can be applied in their clinical experiences. The purpose of the Institute
is to help students bridge the gap from theory to practice. Topics covered apply to practice with
children and adults as well as within a variety of settings, such as mental health clinics, and are
designed to provide to students with very practical information for use in clinical settings.
Institute of Trauma and Victimization
The Institute of Trauma and Victimization (ITV) was founded to create a focus of interest in the
area of trauma and victimization and to form a network for collaboration between students and
colleagues from both within and outside of the College of Psychology. The mission of the institute
is to stimulate research and sponsor training and service delivery in the field of trauma and
victimization, to develop and evaluate innovative interventions for those exposed to trauma, and
establish links with relevant groups, organizations and colleagues in the local, national, and
international community, and involving students in existing College of Psychology trauma-related
programs that share a three-fold mission:
1. Provision of specialized psychological services to a particular population of clients
exposed to trauma;
2. Doctoral level clinical training in the provision of psychological services to the
population of traumatized clientele;
3. Execution of an ongoing program of research on that population of traumatized
clientele.
Southeast Institute for Cross-Cultural Counseling and Psychotherapy
The Southeast Institute for Cross-Cultural Counseling is committed to enhancing the cause of
multiculturalism at the College of Psychology. It strives to promote a welcoming climate for ethnic
minority students and for those mainstream students who are particularly interested in pursuing
cross-cultural studies. Nontraditional methodologies in counseling and assessment specifically
targeted for minority groups are introduced. Courses and in-service colloquia in the area of
multiculturalism and cross-cultural counseling and psychotherapy are provided.
The institute seeks to promote multicultural and international research. In addition, students are
encouraged to initiate projects and dissertations that validate existing and newly constructed
assessment methods with diverse populations.
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Pre-doctoral Internship Programs
The College of Psychology has two American Psychological Association accredited pre-doctoral
internship programs; the South Florida Consortium Internship Program provides services to a vast
array of clinically diverse populations within local community settings. The Psychology Services
Center Internship program provides opportunities for supervised clinical experiences and research
within the NSU Psychology Services Center.
Questions related to the internship programs’ accreditation status should be directed to the
Commission on Accreditation:
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 1st Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202-336-5979/E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation
Continuing Education Series
The College of Psychology offers the professional community a series of continuing education
programs each year, featuring nationally recognized speakers. Constantly seeking the expert
knowledge of the center’s faculty and other leading professionals within the field, these courses
offer the latest information in psychology and mental health in both a practical lecture and handson format. Workshops are specifically designed to meet the needs of postgraduate professionals in
the field.
•
•
•
Psychologists
Nova Southeastern University’s College of Psychology is approved by the American
Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Nova
Southeastern University’s College of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program
and its content.
Clinical social workers, mental health counselors, and marriage and family therapists
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved to offer continuing
education by the State of Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family
Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling. Provider # BAP 330 – exp. 03/31/2017
School psychologists
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved to offer continuing
education by the State of Florida Board of Medical Therapies/Psychology, Office of
School Psychology. Provider # SCE 11 – exp.11/30/2017.
Nova Southeastern University's College of Psychology is approved by the National
Association of School Psychologists to provide continuing education for school
psychologists. Nova Southeastern University maintains responsibility for the program.
Provider number 1024.
Nova Southeastern University’s College of Psychology has been approved by NBCC as an
Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No.4548. Programs that do not qualify
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for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Nova Southeastern University’s College of
Psychology is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs
RESEARCH
In addition to training individuals in the core foundational domains of psychology and to provide
care and treatment for those with psychological problems, the college is equally committed to
encouraging sophisticated basic and applied research. The college is distinguished by its special
commitment to research geared toward understanding and resolving problems confronting modern
society. In addition to ongoing faculty research, undergraduate students may and every doctoral
student must engage in research activities, thereby multiplying the efforts and expertise required
to understand the complexities of psychological disorders. Examples of research areas in which
the center is currently engaged are the following:
Alcohol and substance abuse
Anxiety disorders
Assessment of minority students
Attention deficit and anxiety disorder
Behavioral assessment and treatment
Child-clinical psychology
Clinical biofeedback
Community mental health
Co-Occurring Disorders
Dissociation
Detecting Deception
Eating disorders
Family violence
Forensic psychology
Gender issues
Geriatric mental health
Health psychology
Long-term mental illness
Marital and family systems
Mood disorders
Multicultural assessment and intervention
Neuropsychology
Pediatric psychology
Physical abuse
Posttraumatic stress disorder
Psychoanalytic therapy
Psychodiagnostic assessment
School phobia
Sexual abuse
Sexual addiction
Sleep disorders
Social-clinical psychology
Stress disorders
Computer/Statistical Lab. Research in the college is supported by extensive computer facilities,
including mainframe, workstation, and microcomputer environments. Methodological, statistical,
and computer consultation is available to faculty members and students engaged in research or
related course work.
Protection of Human Subjects
The college adheres to published professional and governmental guidelines and regulations for
protecting human subjects in research. Any research that involves human subjects conducted
by NSU faculty members, staff members, or students, whether funded or unfunded, must be
submitted to a College of Psychology representative for decision about possible Institutional
Review Board (IRB) review. All faculty members, staff members and students involved in
research studies must complete an on-line course with regard to the protection of human
subjects (CITI course). To obtain more information visit the NSU IRB website at
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www.nova.edu/irb/manual/ All IRB policies and procedures can be accessed at the IRB website:
http://www.nova.edu/irb/manual/policies.html
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CLINICAL SERVICES
Nova Southeastern University Psychology Services Center
The Psychology Services Center, housed within the College of Psychology, provides services to
all residents of the tri-county area, including children, adolescents, adults, and elderly clients,
regardless of race, color, sex, age, non-disqualifying disability, religion or creed, sexual
orientation, or national or ethnic origin.
The Psychology Services Center’s clinical staff consists of professionals in psychology and mental
health counseling. More than 100 College of Psychology masters, specialist, and doctoral students
receive practicum training within the Psychology Services Center.
Services offered by the Psychology Services Center include the following:
Assistance with smoking, gambling and overeating issues
Behavioral modification
Biofeedback
Counseling for older adults
Family and multifamily therapy
Information and referral
Multilingual services (when available)
Neuropsychological assessment and
evaluation
Psychodynamic psychotherapy
Psychoeducational evaluations for gifted and
school related issues
Psychological testing
Stress management
Testing and treatment for ADHD
Treatment for adolescent drug abuse and
prevention
Treatment for adults with issues resulting
from traumatic experiences
Treatment for children and adolescents
experiencing behavioral and emotional issues
Treatment for children and adolescents who
have experienced a trauma
Treatment for depression, anxiety and
emotional disturbances
Treatment for serious emotional disturbance
Treatment for victims, perpetrators or
children affected by domestic violence
Adult Services Program. Adult Services Program treatment providers are committed to working
with individuals motivated to improve their level of functioning and mental health well being.
Services available include individual and group psychotherapy as well as psychological
assessments as it relates to treatment recommendations. A comprehensive biopsychosocial
diagnostic and treatment approach is used to help adults 18 and older with a wide variety of
psychological problems/difficulties including.
 anxiety
 depression
 severe and persistent mental illness
 social skills problems
 stress
 other mental health issues
Adolescent Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program. This program provides
comprehensive assessment and treatment to adolescents who have been arrested for minor
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offenses, have substance abuse problems, or are at risk for developing such problems. Services
include individual, group, and family therapy. Treatment components include social skills training,
parent-child relationship enhancement, anger management, communication skills training, and
behavioral contracting.
ADHD Assessment Consultation & Treatment Program. This program serves children and
adolescents and their families that demonstrate behavioral problems consistent with a diagnosis of
ADHD. Empirically supported assessment and treatment is emphasized.
Anxiety Treatment Center. This program specializes in the treatment of anxiety and obsessive
compulsive disorders. The mission of the clinic is to provide state-of-the-art treatments with
proven efficacy based on empirically supported research. Domains of treatment include phobias,
generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and panic disorders. In addition, a specialized track within the
program offers treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding,
hair pulling and skin picking, and tic disorders.
Biofeedback and Health Psychology Center. This program offers psychological evaluation,
intervention, and consultation for the optimum management of an ongoing health related concern
as well as for the optimum maintenance of a healthy lifestyle. Biofeedback and other health
psychology interventions can be provided to assist individuals with the management of a chronic
disease, headaches and other types of chronic pain, healthy eating and exercise, changing health
compromising behaviors, coping with aversive medical/dental procedures, and overall health
promotion. When indicated and with appropriate release of information, interaction with the
clients’ significant others and/or other health care providers can be encouraged. This program also
offers EEG feedback for ADD and ADHD. Psychoeducational workshops will periodically be
made available for clients to increase their skills for stress management, relaxation, mindfulness
meditation, and/or assertive communication.
Child, Adolescent, and Family Services Program. Child, Adolescent, and Family Services
Program treatment providers are committed to working together with children, adolescents, and
their families toward the goal of improving their quality of life. Services include individual, group,
play therapy, and psychological assessment, as well as parenting skills training.
A comprehensive diagnostic and treatment approach is used to assist families with children ages
4 through 17 with varying emotional, cognitive, and/or behavioral difficulties such as.
 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
 school and behavioral problems
 childhood bedwetting and incontinence
 other mental health issues facing children and adolescents
Child and Adolescent Traumatic Stress Program. The Child and Adolescent Traumatic Stress
Program provides psychological services to pediatric patients and their families. These services
are provided when the child or adolescent experiencing acute, chronic, and/or genetic medical
disorders is exhibiting a psychological reaction directly related to the medical problem; physical
symptoms as a function of behavioral and psychological problems; and psychological problems
and physical complaints due to a trauma such as child abuse. Assessment and treatment services
15
are available for depression and anxiety; adjustment disorders; medical noncompliance;
elimination disorders; eating disorders; and psychosomatic illness.
Family Violence Program. The Family Violence Program provides psychological services to
children, adolescents, and adults in: 1) offering assistance in identifying and overcoming effects
of abuse, while also helping perpetrators learn nonviolent behaviors, 2) assisting children who
have witnessed violence to overcome its effects, and 3) helping adolescents learn anger
management skills and promoting nonviolent ways of resolving conflicts. Individual and/or group
therapy sessions are offered on a sliding scale fee basis. Treatment techniques such as:
assertiveness skills, communication skills, and problem solving skills are emphasized.
Healthy Lifestyles Guided Self-Change Program. This program provides services to
individuals who have alcohol, cocaine, or marijuana problems that are not severe. Smoking
cessation services are also available. Guided Self Change treatment is a motivational intervention
involving an assessment, four sessions, and two aftercare contacts, with additional sessions
available. This program is based on evidence showing that many persons meeting the above criteria
prefer and are able to take responsibility for dealing effectively with their alcohol or drug abuse.
Intensive Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Center. This program provides diagnostic and indepth treatment services to adolescents and adults with moderate to severe characterological
disorders who would benefit optimally from more intensive treatment. Treatment emphasizes the
use of a variety of techniques including ego-psychology, self-psychology, object relations and
others.
Neuropsychology Assessment Center. The goals of the Neuropsychology Assessment Center
are to diagnose disorders of the central nervous system; to provide consultation on the etiology,
rate of progression, and prognosis of known or suspected cerebral pathology; and to offer
recommendation or referral for the patient’s treatment. Examples of typical referrals include
differential diagnosis or organic versus functional psychiatric symptoms; differential diagnosis of
dementia versus depression; evaluation to determine cognitive, emotional, or behavioral symptoms
subsequent to head injury; diagnosis of learning disability, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity
Disorder, or mental retardation; determination of mental competence; diagnosis of Alzheimer’s
disease, seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, stroke, and organic mood syndrome; evaluation of
headache; determination of appropriate school placement; and identification of malingering or
symptom exaggeration.
Nova Southeastern University Counseling Center for Older Adults (NCCOA). This program
provides psychotherapy to individuals who are 55 and over. Client services include treatment of
anxiety, depression, insomnia, psychosexual dysfunction, interpersonal difficulties, substance
abuse, or some other form of psychopathology. Treatment consists of individual, group, family,
and/or marital therapy.
Psychological Services for the Emotionally Distressed (PSED). The Psychological Services for
the Emotionally Distressed program offers treatment and assessment for children, adolescents, and
adults who have psychotic disorders. These patients have a range of psychotic sequelae such as
hallucinations, delusions, isolation, regressive and/or bizarre behavior, poor social and daily living
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skills, and restricted, inappropriate or labile affect. Psychotic diagnosis may include schizophrenia,
schizophreniform disorder, bipolar disorder, affective disorders, etc. Treatment comparison
research with these special patients is being conducted.
School-Related Psychological Assessments and Clinical Interventions. This program offers
comprehensive psychoeducational evaluations for school related academic, developmental, behavioral, and
learning problems. These evaluations include: parent and child interviews; behavioral observations; formal
test administration; psychoeducational reports; personal feedback to parents; and school consultation as
appropriate.
Trauma Resolution Integration Program. This specialized clinical program serves men and
women ages 18 and above who: 1) are experiencing adjustment problems resulting from childhood
sexual or physical abuse; 2) have posttraumatic stress disorder in response to a single event trauma
(e.g., crime, natural disaster, serious injury) in adulthood; or 3) manifest serious dissociative
symptoms.
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NSU SUPPORT SERVICES
Library Resources
The Alvin Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology Center, which is a joint-use
facility with the Broward County Board of County Commissioners, opened in October 2001. This
library has five floors, 325,000 square feet, a 3,800-square-foot atrium lobby, 1,200 user seats
(1,000 with Internet access), 100 reference computer workstations, space for 1.4 million volumes
(books, journals, and periodicals), and a centralized circulation area. It is one of the largest library
buildings in Florida. A multistory parking garage with more than 1,500 spaces is near the library.
The university library system is composed of the Alvin Sherman Library, Health Professions
Division Library, Law Library, Oceanographic Library, and four school libraries on the main
campus. The catalogs of all NSU libraries are accessible via computers to local and distance
education students and faculty members, wherever they may be located. Online databases
complement the paper-based holdings and provide full-text resources. Interlibrary loan
arrangements through networked organizations such as the Online Computer Library Center
(OCLC), the Southeast Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN), the Consortium of
Southeastern Law Libraries (COSELL), and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) provide
broad access to a wide range of materials.
To augment the libraries’ print materials, the Office of Media Services has an extensive collection
of more than 1,200 items of nonprint materials (principally audiovisual materials), and a video
production studio to support classroom instruction. In addition, the center provides technical
assistance for distance learning delivered by teleconferencing. The university’s microcomputer
laboratory resources include a growing inventory of instructional software for use by students and
faculty members.
For further information on the campus libraries, visit www.nova.edu/library.
Computer Facilities
MicroLabs and electronic classrooms are located on the main campus in the Parker Building (first,
second, and third floors), the Sonken Building, the Leo Goodwin Sr. Residence Hall, University
Park Plaza, the Health Professions Division, the NSU Library, Research, and Information
Technology Center and the Maltz Building. The multilab design of the MicroLabs and the choice
of technology platforms provide flexibility for faculty and students to apply technology to meet
course requirements. Computer systems include Microsoft Windows and access to a wide choice
of applications programs. The MicroLabs are equipped with multimedia workstations. Peripherals
such as CD-ROMS, color scanners, and digital cameras are also available for student use. The
MicroLabs have online connectivity with all systems linked to the Campus Wide Information
System (CWIS), the NSU Electronic Library, the Internet, and the World Wide Web. An extensive
collection of software housed in the MicroLabs provides access to a broad range of programs and
multimedia applications. Field-based students are provided with access to computer labs in their
area.
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In order to access the university’s computing resources, all Nova Southeastern University students
must obtain Internet access service through a suitable Internet service provider.
Career Resources
The purpose of the Career Resource Center is to assist students and alumni in all aspects of the
career decision making, planning, and job search process. Its mission is to support Nova
Southeastern University undergraduate students, graduate students, and alumni in the
implementation of successful career plans.
The Career Resource Center encourages personal responsibility on the part of students and alumni
in planning a career and exploring opportunities as they relate to educational and personal
development throughout the college years into the future.
Further information can be found at www.nova.edu/career.
Office of Innovation and Information Technology
The purpose of the Office of Innovation and Information Technology (OI2T) is to provide the
University community with the technological resources to support and complement teaching,
learning, and research regardless of geographic location; to maintain a leadership role in
instructional technology by providing quality services that facilitate, enhance, and support the
goals and objectives of a diverse university community; to provide and support a strong student
centered administrative system.
OIT staff is dedicated to helping its clients overcome personal, psychological, social, and
geographical obstacles to learning through the effective use of technology, particularly
teleconferencing and videoconferencing.
In addition to video production, OIT circulates films, videos, and other non-print resources to
faculty from an extensive in-house collection as well as from other university and commercial
rental sources.
College of Psychology Testing Library
The college maintains its own library of testing instruments and kits for doctoral and specialist
level assessment courses. Loan arrangements may vary according to the course and equipment
involved.
Financial Aid
Financial Aid information can be found at http://www.nova.edu/financialaid.
Nova Southeastern University Assistantships: A limited number of on-campus graduate
assistantships will be available in residential life and student life. These assistantships include
19
housing, meal plan, a partial tuition waiver ($7,000-$8,000), and a monthly stipend of $450-$500.
To apply and receive priority consideration, send a letter of interest and resume to:
Residential Life
Nova Southeastern University
Office of Residential Life
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Student Life
Nova Southeastern University
Student Affairs
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Federal Work-Study: Part-time jobs in the work-study program on campus are available for
students demonstrating need. Generally, students work 10 to 20 hours per week. Federal workstudy awards are based on financial need.
Student Employment: Part-time employment is available in many departments on campus.
Several positions are open to students regardless of financial need. In addition, part-time clinical
positions in the community are developed and made available to doctoral students throughout the
center.
College of Psychology Student Aid Programs
Scholarships: The College of Psychology maintains a limited amount of scholarship funds.
Information on various scholarships, is available at:
http://www.nova.edu/financialaid/scholarships/.
Assistantships: Assistantships are available for advanced doctoral students through the center.
Included are clinical positions within clinical services and faculty directed specialty clinical
training programs, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships.
Student Employment: Student employment opportunities are available within the College of
Psychology. These positions are generally awarded on a competitive basis and usually require a
10 to 20 hour time commitment per week.
Veterans’ Benefits
Standards of Progress: A student receiving veterans’ benefits must maintain satisfactory
progress. Students will be considered to be making satisfactory progress as long as they meet the
academic standards set by their school for retention in their degree programs.
A student who, at the end of any evaluation period, has not attained and maintained satisfactory
progress will be certified, in a probationary status, for only one additional evaluation period.
Should this student not attain and maintain satisfactory progress by the end of the probationary
period (one evaluation period), the student’s VA educational benefits will be terminated for
unsatisfactory progress.
A student whose VA educational benefits have been terminated for unsatisfactory progress may
petition the school to be re-certified after one evaluation period has elapsed. The school may re-
20
certify the student for VA educational benefits only if there is a reasonable likelihood that the
student will be able to attain and maintain satisfactory progress for the remainder of the program.
For VA payment of benefits purposes, an “I” (Incomplete) designation for a course must be
converted to a credit grade counting toward graduation, or a failing grade, by the end of one
calendar year unless permission for a delay is granted by the Academic Dean for that program. An
“NG” (no grade) designation for a course must be converted to a credit grade counting toward
graduation, or a failing grade, by the end of one regular semester unless permission for a delay is
granted by the Academic Dean for that program.
Grade/Progress Reports: Each VA student will be provided a grade/progress report at the end of
every evaluation period (e.g. term, semester). A copy of each report will be placed in the student’s
permanent file maintained by the school. The university periodically furnishes each student with
a working transcript that shows current status of grades and earned semester hours for all courses
completed and/or attempted, plus grades for courses in which the student is currently enrolled.
Credit for Prior Training (CPT): Nova Southeastern University complies with federal
regulations for veterans’ training that it is mandatory for all veterans’ benefit recipients to report
either prior education and/or training. A student receiving veterans’ benefits that has previous postsecondary educational training/experience must request official transcript(s) be sent to the school.
If the transcript has not been received prior to the end of the student’s second term here at Nova
Southeastern University, the student cannot be certified for veterans’ benefits for the upcoming
term. The student can be certified for veterans’ benefits after the transcript has been received.
The school will evaluate the student’s previous training and/or experience and grant credit as
appropriate. Should credit(s) be accepted and/or granted, the student’s tuition and training time
will be reduced proportionately, with the veteran and VA so notified.
Nova Southeastern University programs are approved for the training of veterans and other eligible
persons by the Bureau of State for Approving Veterans’ Training, Florida Department of Veterans’
Affairs. Eligible veterans and veterans’ dependents should contact:
Nova Southeastern University
Office of the University Registrar
Coordinator of V.A. Benefits
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-7236 or toll free 800-541-6682, ext. 27236
International Students
International students who intend to reside in the United States and who are required to obtain an
I-20 form must be full-time, degree-seeking students and must attend the main campus in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida. For further information, contact:
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Nova Southeastern University
Office of the University Registrar
International Student Advisor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-7240 or toll free 800-541-6682, ext. 27240
Students with Disabilities
Nova Southeastern University complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and
the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. No qualified individual with a disability shall be
excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of
the university, or be subjected to discrimination by reasons of his or her disability.
If an applicant self discloses his or her disability to the university, the university will ensure that
the applicant is advised of the procedures to seek accommodation. The procedure the student
applicant is to follow is the same as that for those existing students who request an accommodation.
As such, the procedures set forth herein would apply to a student applicant. In the event it is
determined that a student is qualified to apply following the consideration of an accommodation
request, that student will then be placed into the applicant pool and treated as any other applicant.
For additional information on the university ADA policy and obtaining reasonable
accommodations, please contact the Office of Student Disability Services at (954) 262-7185.
Student’s requests for accommodation will be considered on an individual basis in accordance
with the center’s procedures.
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Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), also known as the Buckley
Amendment, afford students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights
include:
•
The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day
the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar's
Office written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar's
Office will arrange for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records
may be inspected.
•
The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student
believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students who believe that their education records
contain information that is inaccurate or misleading, or is otherwise in violation of their
privacy or other rights, may discuss their problems informally with the University
Registrar. If the decision is in agreement with the students' requests, the appropriate records
will be amended. If not, the student will be notified within a reasonable period of time that
the records will not be amended, and will be informed by the Office of the University
Registrar of their right to a formal hearing.
•
The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the
student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without
consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school
officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by
the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff
position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company
with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, collection agent,
loan servicing agent, or the National Student Clearinghouse); a person serving on the Board
of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or
grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.
•
The right to file a complaint with the Family Policy Compliance Office, US Department of
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605 concerning alleged
failures by Nova Southeastern University to comply with the requirements of FERPA.
Nova Southeastern University hereby designates the following student information as public or
"Directory Information." Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any purpose, at
its discretion.
Student name
Local and home address
Telephone numbers
Major field of study
Participation in Sports
Place of birth
Dates of attendance
Degrees, Honors and awards received
Enrollment Status
Year in School
Anticipated Graduation Date
E-mail address
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1.
Release of Student Information
Students can give consent to permit Nova Southeastern University to discuss and/or release
personal identifiable information to a third party such as a spouse, a parent, a guardian, etc. This
consent must be provided in writing with the student’s signature. To provide a written consent,
complete the Authorization for Release of Information form.
Students may also withhold directory information (as defined above) by completing the Request
to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information form. Students are warned; however, prior to
making a decision to withhold personally-identifiable data, that undesirable consequences
frequently occur, such as, names of students on the Dean's List are not published, names are not
listed in commencement bulletins, and requests from prospective employers are denied. After
completing the form, submit it to the University Registrar's Office, 3301 College Avenue, Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33314.
2.
Deceased Student Records
Records of deceased students will be made available to the parent(s), spouse, or executor/executrix
of the deceased student and other authorized parties upon written request. The request must include
the need for the records; must identify the requestor's relationship to the deceased student; and
must be accompanied with an official record certifying authorization to receive the student records,
i.e., assignment as executor/executrix. An official copy of the death certificate must accompany
the request, if the university does not have prior notice of the student's death. The university
reserves the right to deny the request.
For further assistance on this matter, students should contact the University Registrar's Office.
*Acrobat Reader is needed to view any form that is designated with PDF.
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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
Nova Southeastern University Statement of Academic Rights and Responsibilities
Nova Southeastern University, as a community of women and men, is committed to furthering
scholarship, academic pursuits, and service to our society. As an institution, our purpose is to
ensure all students an equal opportunity to fulfill their intellectual potential through pursuit of the
highest standards of academic excellence.
Certain rights and obligations flow from membership in any academic community committed to
such goals:
•
•
•
the rights of personal and intellectual freedom, which are fundamental to the idea of a
university
a scrupulous respect for the equal rights and dignity of others
dedication to the scholarly and educational purposes of the university and participation in
promoting and ensuring the academic quality and credibility of the institution
Students are responsible for obtaining, learning, and observing the established university and
academic center policies as listed in all official publications. In addition, students must comply
with the legal and ethical standards of the institution, as well as those of Broward County and the
State of Florida, as well as any other laws, rules and/or regulations of other jurisdictions. All
members of the community should inform the appropriate official of any violation of conduct
regulations.
A.
Academic Standards
The university expects its students to manifest a commitment to academic integrity through rigid
observance of standards for academic honesty. The university can function properly only when its
members adhere to clearly established goals and values. Accordingly, the academic standards are
designed to ensure that the principles of academic honesty are upheld.
The following acts violate the academic honesty standards:
1. Cheating - intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or
study aids in any academic exercise
2. Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information
or citation in an academic exercise
3. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty – intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to
help another to violate any provision of this code
4. Plagiarism – the adoption or reproduction of ideas, words, or statements of another person
as one’s own without proper acknowledgment
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Students are expected to submit tests and assignments that they have completed without aid or
assistance from other sources. Using sources to provide information without giving credit to the
original source is dishonest. Students should avoid any impropriety or the appearance thereof in
taking examinations or completing work in pursuance of their educational goals.
Students are expected to comply with the following academic standards:
1. Original Work.
Assignments such as course preparations, exams, texts, projects, term papers, practicum,
or any other work submitted must be the original work of the student. Original work may
include the thoughts and words of another author. Entire thoughts or words of another
author should be identified using quotation marks. At all times, students are expected to
comply with the university and/or program center’s recognized form and style manual and
accepted citation practice and policy.
Work is not original that has been submitted previously by the author or by anyone else for
academic credit. Work is not original that has been copied or partially copied from any
other source, including another student, unless such copying is acknowledged by the person
submitting the work for the credit at the time the work is being submitted or unless copying,
sharing, or joint authorship is an express part of the assignment. Exams and tests are
original work when no unauthorized aid is given, received, or used before or during the
course of the examination, re-examination, and/or remediation.
2. Referencing the Works of Another Author.
All academic work submitted for credit or as partial fulfillment of course requirements
must adhere to each program center’s specific accepted reference manuals and rules of
documentation. Standards of scholarship require that the writer give proper
acknowledgement when the thoughts and words of another author are used. Students must
acquire a style manual approved by their center and become familiar with accepted
scholarly and editorial practice in their program. Students’ work must comport with the
adopted citation manual for their particular center.
At Nova Southeastern University, it is plagiarism to represent another person’s work,
words, or ideas as one’s own without use of a center-recognized method of citation.
Deviating from center standards (see above) is considered plagiarism at Nova Southeastern
University.
3. Tendering of Information.
All academic work must be the original work of the student. Knowingly giving or allowing
one’s work to be copied, giving out exam questions or answers, or releasing or selling term
papers is prohibited.
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4. Acts Prohibited
Students should avoid any impropriety, or the appearance thereof, in taking examinations
or completing work in pursuance of their educational goals. Violations of academic
responsibility include, but are not limited to the following:
•
plagiarism
•
any form of cheating.
•
conspiracy to commit academic dishonesty
•
misrepresentation
•
bribery in an attempt to gain an academic advantage
•
forging or altering documents or credentials
•
knowingly furnishing false information to the institution
Students in violation will be subjected to disciplinary action.
5. Additional Matters of Ethical Concern
Where circumstances are such as to place students in positions of power over university
personnel, inside or outside the institution, students should avoid any reasonable suspicion
that they have used that power for personal benefit or in a capricious or arbitrary manner.
B. Conduct Standards
1. Students should not interfere with the rights, safety, or health of members of the university
community nor interfere with other students’ right to learn. Students are expected to abide
by all university, center, and program rules and regulations and all local, state, and federal
laws. Students are responsible for adherence to the university code of conduct and all
university policies and procedures while attending or participating in university-sponsored
programs, activities, and/or events off the main campus or at any NSU sites.
Violations of conduct standards include, but are not limited to
a. theft (including shoplifting at any university service center, e.g. bookstore, food service
facility), robbery, and related crimes
b. vandalism or destruction of property
c. disruptive behavior/disorderly conduct (e.g., in residence halls and classrooms, or at
university-sponsored events, on or off campus)
d. physical or verbal altercation, assault, battery, domestic violence, or other related
crimes
e. gambling
f. possession or use of firearms; pellet, air soft, and paint ball guns, fireworks, explosives,
or other dangerous substances or items
27
g. possession, transfer, sale, or use of illicit and/or illegal drugs or alcohol of a minor
h. appearance in class or on campus under the apparent influence of drugs or alcohol,
illegal illicit drugs or chemicals
i. any act or conspiracy to commit an act that is harassing, abusive or discriminatory or
that invades an individual’s right to privacy; sexual harassment; discrimination and
abuse against members of a particular racial, ethnic, religious, on the basis of
sex/gender, sexual orientation, marital status or cultural group and/or any other
protected group or as a result of an individual’s membership in any protected group
j. sexual misconduct
k. stalking
l. unacceptable use of computing resources as defined by the university. Students are also
subject to the Acceptable Use of Computing Resources policy at
www.nova.edu/common-lib/policies/aucr.policy.html.
m. impeding or obstructing NSU investigatory, administrative, or judicial proceedings
n. threats of or actual damage to property or physical harm to others
o. “hazing”
Any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or
physical health or safety of a student for purposes including, but not limited to,
initiation or admission into or affiliation with any organization operating under the
sanction of a postsecondary institution. Hazing includes, but is not limited to,
pressuring or coercing the student into violating state or federal law; any brutality of a
physical nature, such as whipping, beating, branding, or exposure to the elements;
forced consumptions of any food, liquor, drug, or other substance or other forced
physical activity that could adversely affect the physical health or safety of the student;
and any activity that would subject the student to extreme mental stress, such as sleep
deprivation, forced exclusion from social contact, forced conduct that could result in
extreme embarrassment, or other forced activity that could adversely affect the mental
health or dignity of the student. Hazing does not include customary athletic events or
other similar contests or competitions or any activity or conduct that furthers legal and
legitimate objective. (Florida Hazing Law, 1006.63) Engaging in, supporting,
promoting, or sponsoring hazing or violating university rules governing hazing is
prohibited.
p. failure to pay tuition and fees in a timely manner
q. embezzlement or misuse of NSU and/or student organizational funds or monies
r. failure to comply with the directives of NSU officials
s. violation(s) of the terms or condition of a disciplinary sanction(s) imposed
t. violation of any policy, procedure, or regulation of the university or any state
or federal law, rule, regulation, or county ordinance
u. fraud, misrepresentation, forgery, alteration or falsification of any records,
information, data, or identity
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v. plagiarism
w. possession of drug paraphernalia
x. use of another student’s ID card
2. Students must have authorization from the university to have access to university documents,
data, programs, and other types of information and information systems. Any use of the
above without authorization is prohibited.
C. Supplementary Standards
Students are expected to comply with the legal and ethical standards of this institution and those
of their chosen field of study, including the Code of Ethics for Computer Usage. The university
and each center or program may prescribe additional standards for student conduct. Reasonable
notice may be provided when additions or changes are made to the standards for student conduct.
Students should refer to their center and/or Student Affairs Web site for policy updates or changes.
D. Violations
Any violation(s) of any of the academic standards, conduct standards, or supplemental standards
may result in a complaint being filed against a student to enforce the Code of Student Conduct and
Academic Responsibility. Deans, associate deans, or directors may, in their discretion,
immediately suspend students pending a hearing on charges of academic misconduct or
supplementary standards violations. Violations of academic, conduct, or supplemental standards
are subject to disciplinary action, up to and including, expulsion from the university. Violations of
academic standards will be handled through the student’s academic college, school, or department.
Violations of conduct or supplementary standards will be handled by the Office of the Vice
President of Student Affairs or by the individual academic college, school, or center as deemed
appropriate.
Acceptable Use of Computing Resources
This policy provides guidelines for the appropriate and inappropriate use of the computing
resources of Nova Southeastern University. It applies to all users of the university’s computing
resources including students, faculty and staff members, alumni, and guests of the university.
Computing resources include all computers, related equipment, software, data, local area
networks, and listservs for which the university is responsible as well as networks throughout the
world to which the university provides computer access.
The computing resources of Nova Southeastern University are intended to be used for its programs
of instruction and research and to conduct the legitimate business of the university. All users must
have proper authorization for the use of the university’s computing resources. Users are
responsible for seeing that these computing resources are used in an effective, ethical, and legal
manner. Users must apply standards of normal academic and professional ethics and considerate
conduct to their use of the university’s computing resources. Users must be aware of the legal and
29
moral responsibility for ethical conduct in the use of computing resources. Users have a
responsibility not to abuse the network and resources, and to respect the privacy, copyrights, and
intellectual property rights of others.
In addition to the policy contained herein, usage must be in accordance with applicable university
policies (see Related policies listed at the end of this section) and applicable state and federal laws.
Among the more important laws are the Florida Computer Crimes Act, the Federal Computer
Abuse Amendment Act 1994, the Federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and the U.S.
Copyright Act. Copies of these laws and the NSU copyright policy may be examined in the Office
of Academic Affairs. Unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized
peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject the student to civil and criminal liabilities.
For more detailed information on Nova Southeastern University’s Acceptable Use of Computing
Resources, please consult the Student Handbook. (www.nova.edu/cwis/studentaffairs)
Drug-Free Schools and Campuses
In order to comply with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (Pub. L. No. 101-226, Title
34 C.F.R., part 86), Nova Southeastern University has adopted the following policy for all
workplace, school, campus, and field-based programs.
The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illicit drugs and the
abuse of alcohol are prohibited in and on property owned by Nova Southeastern University and as
a part of any of its activities. No Nova Southeastern University employee or student is to report to
work or school while under the influence of illicit drugs or alcohol.
For more detailed information on this policy, please consult the programs’ Student Handbook.
Tobacco-Free Policy
Smoking and tobacco use are prohibited in all Nova Southeastern University facilities and on all
university property and other properties owned or leased by the University with no exception. For
a complete description of NSU’s tobacco-free policy refer to http://www.nova.edu/tobaccofree/policy.html.
Cellular Phone Policy
The university recognizes the growing trend regarding student possession of cellular phones with
video, camera, or voice recording capabilities. In support of each individual’s reasonable
expectation of privacy, the copyright and intellectual property laws, the use of these cellular phone
features by NSU students must be in conjunction with express consent. Students are expressly
forbidden to video, use camera or voice recordings without the express consent of the subject(s)
being photographed or recorded. You may not place any pictures or videos of people on a Web
page without the expressed permission of the people in the pictures or videos. Any student whose
use of their cellular phone violates another’s reasonable expectation of privacy or produces any
media as a result of the cellular phone capabilities without express consent may be found in
30
violation of this policy. Violations of this policy may lead to disciplinary action that may result in
confiscation of the cellular phone and referral to Student Affairs as a violation of the NSU Code
of Student Conduct. Students are instructed to refer to their center’s or college’s individual
program policies regarding cellular phone use and possession, because additional restrictions may
apply.
Privacy of Records
Nova Southeastern University maintains a system of records that includes application forms,
admission test scores, and transcripts of students’ previous academic records and performance
while in residence. These records are available for review by current and former students upon
written request to the Office of the University Registrar. However, the registrar will not release
transcripts of students’ academic records until all accounts, both academic and nonacademic, have
been paid.
The law limits access by and disclosure to a third party. Such access is given only upon consent of
the student or if required by law, except for the following information, which may be released as
directory information: a) student’s name, b) address, c) dates of attendance, d) degree and awards
received. Requests for such information must be submitted in writing to the university. The
university reserves the right to refuse the above information if the reason for the request is not
considered to be a sufficient need to know.
Any student or parent not wishing to have this information disclosed should notify the Office of
the University Registrar in writing before September 1 of the relevant school year.
Students do not have the right of access to educational records until they have been admitted to
and have actually begun attending Nova Southeastern University. There is no prohibition from
disclosing such information to the parents of students who are listed on their parents’ federal
income tax forms.
Parents or eligible students will be provided a hearing by the university if they wish to challenge
the content of the record. If they are still not satisfied, the parents or eligible students may add
explanatory or rebuttal matter to the record.
If the students or parents are denied access to a hearing or if the records are alleged to have been
illegally disclosed to a third party, the students or parents may file a complaint with the U.S.
Department of Education.
Reservation of Power
Nova Southeastern University reserves the right to amend, modify, add to, or delete its rules,
policies, and procedures affecting its institutional relationship with students as deemed necessary
by the administration. Any such amendment, modification, addition, or deletion shall not be
considered a violation of the relationship between the university and the student. Such right
includes modification to academic requirements, curriculum, tuition, and/or fees when in the
31
judgment of the administration such changes are required in the exercise of its educational
responsibility.
Policies Governing Student Relations
General
Nova Southeastern University has established specific policies, procedures, and guidelines
defining its relationship with its students. The term a student as used in this catalog defines the
student, or parents of the student if the student qualifies as a dependent under the provisions of the
Internal Revenue Code.
Institutional and Academic Information
NSU and its composite academic units periodically publish bulletins or catalogs describing the
university and its academic programs. These bulletins are available to enrolled and prospective
students through the various admissions offices associated with the academic units or from the
Office of the University Registrar. Each academic unit, group of units, and/or the Office of the
University Registrar maintain at least one full-time employee to assist all students in obtaining
information.
Notice of Nondiscrimination
Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, sex, age, non-disqualifying
disability, religion or creed, or national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and
activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school, and does not discriminate
in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs,
and athletic and other school-administered programs.
The Office of the University Registrar is designated as the policy coordinator to assure compliance
with all federal, state, and local laws and regulations relative to nondiscrimination.
Grievances
When questions about procedures, decisions, or judgments occur, counseling is available for
discussion and resolution of differences. Students may also have recourse to more formal avenues
of appeal and redress. Grievance procedures are explained in the Student Handbook.
Student Publications
Nova Southeastern University, as publisher, bears the legal responsibility for the contents of
student publications. In the delegation of editorial responsibility to students, the university
provides sufficient editorial freedom for the student publications to maintain their integrity of
purpose as vehicles of free inquiry and free expression in the Nova Southeastern University
academic community.
32
The delegated editorial freedom of student editors and managers is subject to corollary
responsibilities to be governed but the canons of responsible journalism, such as the avoidance of
libel, indecency, undocumented allegations, attacks on personal integrity, and the techniques of
harassment and innuendo.
As safeguards for the delegated editorial freedom of student publications, the following provisions
are made:
1. The student press shall be free of censorship and advance approval of copy, and its editors
and managers shall be free to develop their own editorial policies and new coverage.
2. Editors and managers of student publications shall be protected from arbitrary suspension
and removal because of student, faculty, administrative, or public disapproval of editorial
policy or content. Only for proper and stated causes shall editors and managers be subject
to removal, and then by orderly and prescribed procedures.
3. All university-published and financed student publications shall explicitly state on the
editorial page that the opinions therein expressed are not necessarily those of Nova
Southeastern University or of the student body.
Student Participation in University Governance
In furtherance of its commitment to teaching and learning, Nova Southeastern University
encourages student participation in institutional decision making.
Within each center, elected student government bodies provide vehicles for student expression of
views and opinions on issues of institutional policy. Additionally, students are regularly appointed
to committees, task forces, and ad hoc groups dealing with issues of concern to students,
33
MASTER’S PROGRAMS
Experimental Psychology*
The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program provides students with a
strong academic foundation in the theories and concepts of experimental psychology. Through
focused coursework and the experience of mentored independent research, students are equipped
with comprehensive skills in scientific inquiry and research methodology. These skills prepare
students for admission into a doctoral program in psychology or for career opportunities that
include teaching and research in industrial, government, private consulting, health care, and
community settings. This program is offered as a day program on the main campus with courses
typically offered in 9:00am-12:00 noon and 1:00pm to 4:00pm time slots and with specific thesis
requirements. Student cohorts are accepted into the program each fall.
General Psychology (Online)*
The Master's Program in General Psychology is designed to prepare students to develop
foundational knowledge in psychological theory and research. Local, national, and international
students may select this M.S. degree as an opportunity to obtain prerequisite courses to meet
eligibility requirements for application to other psychology programs, including advanced doctoral
studies. Through its specialty tracks, the program will also allow a variety of professionals within
the fields of education, human services, and allied health to access coursework both as degreeseeking and non-degree seeking students in order to advance their psychological knowledge and
use of psychological applications in their respective fields. In addition to the direct benefit of
obtaining foundational knowledge in psychology, the curriculum is designed to facilitate the
development of basic interpersonal skills, cultural sensitivity, and additional knowledge and skills
that enhance the preparation of students for professional work in increasingly diverse social
agencies, school and community settings, in business and industry environments, and in hospitals.
Forensic Psychology (Online)*
The Master’s Degree Program in Forensic Psychology is a 36- credit online program that will
present information at the intersection of legal issues and psychology. Students will be prepared
to understand what forensic psychologists do, as well as to apply this training in a variety of
professional contexts. This degree program will provide students with the professional training
necessary to function at an optimal level in a variety of forensic settings where psychology is used
including court cases, law enforcement, criminal justice, national security offices, prisons, social
services agencies, child welfare agencies, and treatment facilities
* Note: Graduate students who earn these degrees will not have met the educational requirements
for certification or licensure in the state of Florida and should not expect to provide psychological
services as an independent practitioner. Rather, these degree demonstrate master's-level
achievement and enhance employment opportunities.
34
Mental Health Counseling
The Master’s Program in Mental Health Counseling was designed for the continued professional
development of persons who currently serve or will serve their community in a variety of
counseling capacities. Master’s degree training is based on a developmental model that emphasizes
interdisciplinary collaboration, prevention of dysfunction, and direct service. The field of mental
health counseling, which has experienced a great deal of growth over the past decade, now has
professionals placed in such diverse settings as social agencies, mental health settings, hospitals,
educational settings, personnel settings, business and industry, and private practice. The College
of Psychology is firmly committed to the mission of training competent professionals who will
design and implement prevention and treatment programs and provide direct counseling services.
The course work provides broad-based training designed to equip individuals with the skills
necessary to confront a wide variety of contemporary issues.
School Counseling
The Master’s Program in School Counseling is designed for the continued professional
development of persons who presently serve or are interested in serving our youth and their
families in an educational, Pre-K-12 setting. Master’s training is based on a developmental model
that emphasizes interdisciplinary collaboration, prevention, and responsive services. The
professional school counselor, based on the American School Counselor Association National
Model, delivers a comprehensive school counseling program that addresses the academic, career,
and social/emotional needs of all students.
The Master’s Degree in School Counseling program is approved by the Florida Department of
Education. Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation
of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher
preparation programs and advanced educator preparation programs at all university locations and
online. However, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the
institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, re-licensure, or other purposes.
This program is designed for the continued professional development of persons who presently
serve or are interested in serving our youth and their families in an educational, Pre-K-12 setting.
Master’s training is based on a developmental model that emphasizes interdisciplinary
collaboration, prevention, and responsive services. The professional school counselor, based on
the American School Counselor Association National Model, delivers a comprehensive school
counseling program that addresses the academic, career, and social/emotional needs of all students.
The course work provides broad based training designed to equip individuals with the skills
necessary to confront a wide variety of contemporary issues facing today’s youth.
The master’s programs in Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling are offered on the
main campus in Fort Lauderdale and in the field-based format at various locations in Florida.
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Certification/Endorsement Option
Teachers, educators, and counselors who hold an eligible master’s degree in a
related area other than school counseling may apply for admission as a “special
(non-degree) student” for the purpose of taking courses in the master’s program in
school counseling that meet the requirements for Florida certification as a school
counselor under Plan 2, Rule 6A-4.0181, Florida Statutes (course by course basis).
Special (non-degree) students seeking admission to the school counseling program
for the purpose of seeking certification by the FL Department of Education will be
required to complete the following courses at NSU. All students will be required
to complete PYCL 685 and PYCL 688/689 (School Counseling Practicum and
Internship) at NSU regardless of previous internship experiences. Please be
advised that waiver of the practicum and internship experience for any reason will
not be permitted.
Counseling (Online)
The Counseling program, offers an innovative academic program designed for the working
professional actively involved in or entering the field of counseling or related fields. The program
offers individuals the opportunity to earn a degree in counseling with concentrations in mental
health counseling, substance abuse counseling, substance abuse counseling and education, applied
behavioral analysis or advanced applied behavioral analysis. The online program is particularly
designed to serve the training needs of administrators and practitioners who seek advanced
training, but who cannot access quality training without the interruption of ongoing work
responsibilities.
Course Formats
Main campus classes in mental health counseling are typically offered in two regular semesters of
approximately 15 weeks each and two summer semesters. Classes typically meet once per week
during the fall and winter semesters and twice per week during the summer semesters. Most
courses are scheduled from 4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. or 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m., Monday through
Thursday, with some additional daytime and weekend offerings. Applicants should note that
course schedules vary each semester.
The Master of Science degree programs and course work are offered at selected locations in a
field-based format. Accessibility to main campus administrators, advisors, faculty members,
library resources, and information is maintained through on-site coordinators, faculty members,
and on line services. In addition to main campus personnel, on-site personnel assist students and
provide an effective liaison between the main campus and students and are available to students
during classes and throughout the program.
In the field-based format for a master’s degree in mental health counseling and school counseling,
courses are taken one at a time (except during practicum/internship). Each individual threesemester-hour course begins with registration and spans an eight-week period. Forty-five hours
are required and are scheduled into two full weekends. Courses for a given cluster of students are
36
typically scheduled from August through late June. Each course is offered once for each cluster
during the course of the approximately three-year program. Students admitted at a specific fieldbased site must begin the program within the first scheduled course offered for their cluster
as course work is sequenced throughout the program. Instructors are accessible to students
throughout course work.
Students register for scheduled courses at the beginning of each semester. Course preparation
begins approximately one month before the first class meeting of each course. Class meetings
(except the practicum/internship) are scheduled on Fridays (6:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.), Saturday (8:30
a.m.-6:00 p.m.), and Sundays (8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.). Practicum/internship classes will be scheduled
over a 15-week format.
Schedules will be affected by official university holidays, such as Labor Day and Thanksgiving
Day, as posted in the academic calendar.
Important: See detailed description of master’s practicum information in this catalog.
Note: Courses in the Master’s in Counseling program, the Forensic Psychology program, and the
General Psychology program are offered online in a 15 week semester format (winter, summer
and fall). Chat times are required and scheduling is up to the discretion of the instructor. Length
of the program is contingent on choice of concentration. For the Master’s in Counseling program,
the average length of time to complete the program is 2 ½ to 3 years (taking two courses each
semester). For the Master’s in Forensic Psychology program and the Master’s in Experimental
Psychology program, the average length of time to complete the program is 2 years. For the
General Psychology program, the average length of time to complete the program is 1 ½ years.
For further specific information on the Master’s in Counseling program, please refer to the website
at: http://www.psychology.nova.edu/programs/csi/index.htm.
For further specific information on the Master’s in Forensic Psychology program, please refer to
the website at: http://psychology.nova.edu/forensicpsychology/index.html
For further specific information on the Master’s in General Psychology program, please refer to
the website at: http://psychology.nova.edu/programs/generalpsychology/index.html.
For further specific information on the Master’s in Experimental Psychology program, please
refer to the website at: http://www.psychology.nova.edu/graduate/experimentalpsychology/index.html.
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Master’s Program Admissions
Requirements for Experimental Psychology
To be considered for admission to graduate study in the master’s program in Experimental
Psychology, the applicant is required to present evidence of scholastic ability and a strong
interest in the area of psychology and research. The preferred applicant should have a GPA of
3.0 in the last 60 credits of undergraduate study OR completion of a minimum of 18 credits of
graduate study with a GPA of 3.0 or better and combined verbal and quantitative GRE score of
1000.
To apply for admission to this program, prospective students must each submit:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
completed online application
$50 nonrefundable application fee (due at time of application)
transcripts from all previously attended higher-education institutions
official GRE report
official GRE score for the Subject Test in Psychology (required only for applicants who
did not major in psychology as undergraduates)
personal statement of approximately 500 words on the applicant’s objectives in applying
to the program
three letters of recommendation on official letterhead from professionals who can speak to
the applicant’s academic and scholarly accomplishments (e.g., professors familiar with
students previous academic work)
For non-native English speakers and graduates of foreign institutions (where English is not
the primary language of instruction): Demonstrate English-language proficiency by
submitting documentation of one of the following: successful completion of a degree at an
approved U.S. institution of higher education where English is the primary language of
instruction; Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) official score of at least 213
on the computerized test, at least 550 on the paper test format, or at least 79 on the Internet
format; official IELTS score of at least 6.0. Note: The university accepts the Pearson Test
of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative option to the TOEFL as proof of
English proficiency. The minimum required overall score for the PTE-Academic is 54.
All required documentation must be submitted to Enrollment Processing Services (EPS) at the
following address:
Enrollment Processing Services
Nova Southeastern University
Attn: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
P.O. Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
38
Prospective graduate students must submit all required application materials prior to June 1st in
order to be evaluated for fall admission. Official transcript(s) showing all post-secondary
coursework to date must be submitted as part of these materials.
Requirements for General Psychology
To be considered for admission to graduate study in the master’s program in General Psychology,
the applicant is required to present evidence of scholastic ability, interest in the area of psychology,
personal stability, and strong character. Minimum requirements include an undergraduate GPA of
3.0 in the last 60 credits of undergraduate study OR completion of a minimum of 18 credits of
graduate study with a GPA of 3.0 or better OR completion of the GRE test with a preferred score
of 300 (verbal and quantitative).
Note: All students are admitted into graduate study only. Upon completion of the first 4
courses with a 3.0 GPA or better, they will be matriculated into the degree program. Students
who do not meet this standard cannot continue in the program.
1. Complete the master’s programs application form.
2. Include, with the application, a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made payable to
Nova Southeastern University.
3. Submit two letters of recommendation with completed forms from professors, employers,
supervisors, or similar persons most familiar with your work.
4. Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities attended,
including agency evaluation of foreign degrees for determination of U.S. equivalence
(including Canadian transcripts) to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
International Students should visit http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/ for further
information.
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s transcript, you are
still required to submit an official transcript from the college or university where you originally
completed the course work. If the initial transcript forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or
final semester grades, you must forward a final transcript as soon as this information becomes
available.
5. Submit official scores from the GRE (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing). This
submission is optional and may be used to supplement the application (i.e. academic record.
39
6. Provide a personal statement of up to 500 words indicating your goals in pursuing a masterslevel degree in psychology.
•
Where applicable for foreign nationals, applicants should submit TOEFL scores. Note: The
University accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an
alternative option to the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required
overall score for the PTE-Academic is 54. International Students should visit
http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/prospective/ i20.html for further information.
Requirements for Forensic Psychology
To be considered for admission to graduate study in the master’s program in Forensic Psychology,
the applicant must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally-accredited or internationallyrecognized institution. The applicant must also have a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 credits of
undergraduate study OR completion of a minimum of 18 credits of graduate study with a GPA of
3.0 or better OR completion of the GRE test with a preferred score of 300 (verbal and quantitative).
Applicants with an undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 or higher who have proven work
experience in law, law enforcement, corrections, criminal justice, or a related field may be
considered. An interview will be required.
Note: All students are admitted into graduate study only. Upon completion of the first 4 courses
with a 3.0 GPA or better, they will be matriculated into the degree program. Students who do not
meet this standard cannot continue in the program.
The program will accept applications for non-degree seeking students (special students) who may
take up to four courses without applying for full admission to the degree program. These students
will need approval of the program director. They will be required to follow all procedures if they
wish to apply for full admission to the program.
1. Complete the master’s programs application form.
2. Include, with the application, a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made payable to
Nova Southeastern University.
3. Submit two letters of recommendation with completed forms from professors, employers,
supervisors, or similar persons most familiar with your work.
4. Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities attended,
including agency evaluation of foreign degrees for determination of U.S. equivalence
(including Canadian transcripts) to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
40
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
International Students should visit http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/ for further
information.
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s transcript, you are
still required to submit an official transcript from the college or university where you originally
completed the course work. If the initial transcript forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or
final semester grades, you must forward a final transcript as soon as this information becomes
available.
5. Submit official scores from the GRE (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing). This
submission is optional and may be used to supplement the application (i.e. academic record.
6. Provide a personal statement of up to 500 words indicating your goals in pursuing a masterslevel degree in psychology.
7. Where applicable for foreign nationals, applicants should submit TOEFL scores. Note: The
university accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative
option to the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required overall score
for the PTE-Academic is 54. International Students should visit
http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/prospective/ i20.html for further information.
Requirements for Mental Health Counseling or School Counseling
To be considered for admission to graduate study in the master’s programs in Mental Health
Counseling or School Counseling, the applicant is required to present evidence of scholastic
ability, interest in the area of counseling, personal stability, and strong character. Minimum
requirements include an undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or a 3.25 graduate GPA in a minimum of twelve
credits of graduate course work. Students may seek admission to main campus programs for fall,
winter, or summer sessions. Field-based cluster start dates vary.
Application Procedures
Degree-Seeking Students
1. Complete the master’s programs application form.
2. Include, with the application, a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made payable to
Nova Southeastern University.
3. Submit two letters of recommendation with completed forms from professors, employers,
supervisors, or similar persons most familiar with your work.
41
4. Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities attended,
including agency evaluation of foreign degrees for determination of U.S. equivalence
(including Canadian transcripts) to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
International Students should visit http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/ for further
information.
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s transcript, you are
still required to submit an official transcript from the college or university where you originally
completed the course work. If the initial transcript forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or
final semester grades, you must forward a final transcript as soon as this information becomes
available.
5. Submit a 500 word minimum, typed professional statement that includes information about
experience in the field of counseling, professional interests, and career goals. Describe how
your professional, academic, and personal experiences led you to apply to this program.
Include your full name on the essay. The personal statement helps us get to know you beyond
the objective data provided in review of your courses, grades and other objective information.
It also demonstrates your ability to communicate your thoughts in a professional, organized
and succinct manner.
6. Include a copy of your teaching certificate (school counseling applicants only). Applicants may
request a waiver of this requirement by contacting the Office of Graduate Admissions.
7. Where applicable for foreign nationals, applicants should submit TOEFL scores. Note: The
university accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative
option to the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required overall score for
the
PTE-Academic
is
54.
International
Students
should
visit
http://www.nova.edu/internationalstudents/prospective/ i20.html for further information.
Special Students (non-degree-seeking)
1. Complete the master’s programs application form.
2. Include, with the application, a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made out to Nova
Southeastern University.
4.
Submit two letters of recommendation with completed forms from professors, employers,
supervisors, or similar persons most familiar with your work.
42
5.
Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities attended
to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s transcript, you are
still required to submit an official transcript from the college or university where you originally
completed the course work. If the initial transcript forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or
final semester grades, you must forward a final transcript as soon as this information becomes
available.
6.
For the Mental Health Counseling Program, submit a letter specifying desired course work.
7.
For the School Counseling Program, submit Florida Department of Education Statement of
Eligibility for Certification, indicating course work required. Include a copy of your teaching
certificate (school counseling applicants only). Applicants may request a waiver of this
requirement by contacting the Office of Graduate Admissions (954) 262-5760.
8.
Where applicable for foreign nationals, applicants should submit TOEFL scores.
An interview or additional documentation may be required for purposes of screening or
advisement. Applicants are responsible for ensuring that their file is complete and received by
the announced deadline. Check on the status of your file with the Office of Graduate
Admissions, (954) 262-5760, before the application deadline.
Note: The university accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an
alternative option to the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required
overall score for the PTE-Academic is 54.
Requirements Counseling (online)
1.
Complete online application form
2.
Baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. Official transcripts from all
schools attended and/or agency evaluation of foreign degree.
3.
An undergraduate or master’s degree in psychology, education, behavioral science, social
work, or a related field, and/or demonstrate aptitude to work in counseling through
professional, volunteer, research, or personal experience.
4.
A grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher in last 60 semester hours of undergraduate
coursework or a total score of 1000 or higher on the combined verbal and quantitative
sections of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) taken within the past five years, or other
43
similar measures or a master’s degree with an overall GPA of 3.25 or better in a minimum
12 credits of graduate coursework.
5.
Please briefly explain (500 word minimum) your interest in the field of mental health
counseling, substance abuse or applied behavior analysis. Describe how your professional,
academic, and personal experiences led you to apply to this program. Include your full name
on the essay. The personal statement helps us get to know you beyond the objective data
provided in review of your course grades and other objective information. It also
demonstrates your ability to communicate your thoughts in a professional, organized and
succinct manner.
6.
Two academic or professional letters of recommendation.
7.
TOEFL score (if applicable) Note: The university accepts the Pearson Test of EnglishAcademic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative option to the TOEFL as proof of English
proficiency. The minimum required overall score for the PTE-Academic is 54.
8.
An interview is required for admission to the program
* Students admitted to the master’s programs must have access to a computer and their own
Internet service provider account. Students will be required to demonstrate technological
competence and computer literacy during the program, including the use of the electronic library.
NSU requires that all students maintain one official university-assigned computer account that is
used to access major computing resources, including electronic mail. All official electronic mail
communications directed to CPS students will be sent exclusively to NSU-assigned computer
accounts to ensure timely and accurate delivery of information. Students may forward their NSU
generated electronic mail to external locations, but do so at their own risk.
Application Deadlines
Students may be admitted to main campus programs for fall, winter, or summer sessions. Fieldbased cluster admission periods will vary. Specific application information related to site(s) is
included in a separate application packet available from the College of Psychology.
Admission of Master’s Students to Doctoral Programs
Acceptance to or completion of the College of Psychology master’s program implies neither
automatic admission to the center’s doctoral program in clinical psychology nor transfer of credit
to a doctoral program. Applicants may apply to both programs, but must do so via separate
application procedures. Potential master’s applicants considering applying for doctoral program
admission should seek advisement at the earliest possible date.
Master’s Counseling and Forensic Programs Transfer of Credits
All transfer credit must be awarded during the student’s first academic year in the Master’s
program. Students requesting transfer of credit must submit a written request for transfer along
44
with supporting documentation to the master’s program administration. Sufficient documentation
should be presented to allow for evaluation by the Office of Academic Affairs, including an official
transcript from the institution where the course was taken and a course description as listed in the
institution’s catalog. Other documentation may include syllabi, course notes, or other material as
requested.
The number of transfer credits that will be credited toward graduation is six.
A. Transfer of credits will be awarded when the course being evaluated meets all of the following
criteria:
1. It is a graduate-level course taken at an institution accredited as degree granting by a
recognized regional accrediting body for higher education at the time the course work was
taken, or an APA professional school. A graduate-level course is defined as one that would
be credited toward a master’s degree at the institution where the course was taken. This
must be verified in the school’s catalog or letter from the chair of the department.
2. It is equivalent in content to a required course in the curriculum.
3. It was completed no longer than five years before the student’s first enrollment in the
program.
4. A grade of B or higher was received. A grade of P (pass) or CR (credit) or other such grade
cannot be accepted as equivalent unless it can be officially verified as such.
It will be the responsibility of the student to satisfactorily demonstrate the equivalence of the
course(s) proposed in order for credits to be awarded. Course work submitted from a foreign
institution will be evaluated for equivalency in accordance with accreditation standards.
Courses completed at other institutions after the student has enrolled in the Master’s Program will
be considered only if there has been prior approval by the Office of Academic Affairs. Typically,
such transfer credit is granted only under special circumstances. Transfer credits are not taken into
account when computing the student’s grade point average. No transfer credit may be applied
to practicum, internship or for portfolio-based experiential learning.
Federal Regulations require that veteran students MUST report all prior credit and training, and
that the school MUST evaluate such and grand credit as appropriate, with training time and tuition
reduced proportionately and with the VA and student so notified.
Credits earned at Nova Southeastern University are transferable only at the discretion of the
receiving school
45
Master’s in General Psychology and Master’s in Experimental Psychology Program
Transfer of Credits
Applicants with previous graduate coursework in psychology from a regionally accredited or
international equivalent may transfer up to 2 courses toward a M.S. degree. Only courses with a
grade of B or better can be transferred. No courses transferred will receive more than 3
credits. Consideration will only be given to graduate level courses taken within the past 5 years.
No transfer credit will be applied to a thesis requirement. Transfer credits are not taken into account
when computing the student’s grade point average.
Provisional Admissions
Students may be provisionally admitted to a degree-seeking program based on a review of
unofficial transcripts or other specific program admission requirements. However, this admission
includes a condition that final and official documents and requirements must be received within
90 calendar days from the start of the term. If these final and official documents and/or
requirements are not received by that time, the student will not be allowed to continue class
attendance. Financial aid will not be disbursed to a provisional/conditional student until he or she
has been fully admitted as a regular student (all admissions requirements have been approved by
the college/program admissions office). Students who have an unpaid balance 30 days from the
start of the term will be assessed a $50 fee.
46
Master’s Programs
Regional Campus Information
Site
Jacksonville
Location
Nova Southeastern University
Jacksonville Campus
6675 Corporate Center Parkway, #115
Jacksonville, Florida 32216
(904) 245-8910
Miami*
Nova Southeastern University
Miami Campus
8585 SW 124 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33183
(305) 275-2600
Orlando*
Nova Southeastern University
Orlando Campus
4850 Millennia Boulevard
Orlando, Florida 32839
(407) 264-5601
Palm Beach
Nova Southeastern University
Palm Beach Campus
11501 North Military Trail
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410
(561) 805-2100
Tampa*
Nova Southeastern University
Tampa Campus
3632 Queen Palm Drive
Tampa, Florida 33619
(813) 574-5200
For information regarding site locations, start dates, or deadlines, please refer to the College of Psychology
application packet or contact the College of Psychology at (954) 262-5760.
*Current location of Master’s Program in School Counseling
47
Master’s Programs Academic Policies
HIPAA Training
Students entering practicum training are required to complete the NSU online HIPAA training
(Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996).
Professional Liability Insurance
Each semester College of Psychology students will be charged a nominal fee for liability insurance
coverage provided under the university’s group policy.* All students are required to abide by the
ethical standards of the American Counseling Association, the ethical standards of their respective
professions, the policies and procedures of the College of Psychology, and agency placement rules
and regulations.
*Excludes General Psychology, Forensic Psychology, and Experimental Psychology program
students
Evaluation of Master’s Students
Each student is evaluated on an ongoing basis while enrolled in the program. In addition, there
are course evaluations, review for matriculation, evaluation of readiness for practicum, and a
comprehensive examination. Evaluation provides students with relevant feedback concerning their
performance and ensures high standards for the profession of counseling. Areas of evaluation
include academic achievement, responsible behavior and interpersonal behavior. Student
advisement on relevant information, including practicum evaluations, is available through the
program office.
Professional Standing Committee
The Professional Standing Committee of the College of Psychology is appointed by the dean of the
college and serves in a variety of capacities related to the review of student professional standing
matters. The committee consists of faculty, a student representative and other members as appointed
by the dean.
The committee may be asked to review alleged violations of the University Student Code of
Conduct, including academic standards and ethical standards of the field. In addition, the committee
may conduct reviews concerning emotional behavior problems serious enough to suggest
interference with professional functioning, academic performance, or performance in a clinical
practicum or internship setting.
The purpose of the committee’s review and recommendations are not limited to disciplinary actions,
but may encompass efforts to remediate a deficiency or problems so that the student can continue
his or her education and function competently as a professional. Committee activities are designed
to insure a process by which all relevant facts can be determined, including providing the student
with full opportunity to present important information. Actions the committee may recommend to
48
the dean could include, but are not limited to remediation, referral, warning, or sanctions up to
suspension or termination.
In instances of complaints regarding violations of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility,
the dean may charge the committee with conducting a formal investigation into the facts pertaining
to allegations of misconduct. In such cases, the committee will adhere to professional standing
committee guidelines that insure a timely and complete review of the facts. The process will insure
that the student and involved parties have opportunity to present relevant information.
49
Master’s Counseling Programs Academic Policies
Registration
All students admitted to graduate study are to be in continuous registration every fall and winter
semester until they receive their degree unless prior approval is received from the program office.
Once candidacy is achieved, in order to remain an active and matriculated student, registration is
required in every semester until the completion of degree requirements, unless a leave of absence
has been granted. Failure to remain in continuous registration will be deemed as the student’s
formal withdrawal from the program. All other programs, center, and university requirements will
be in effect.
Candidacy (Matriculation)
Mental Health Counseling Program. Students are admitted into graduate study at the master’s
level and are reviewed for degree candidacy (matriculation) after completion of the designated
four courses (12 credits), which must be completed within the first six courses (18 credits) or two
semesters for which the student is enrolled.
These four designated courses require demonstration of written, quantitative, and interpersonal
skills, as well as overall professional functioning. The designated four courses for matriculation
include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
PYCL 502
PYCL 507
PYCL 511
PYCL 570
Counseling Theories and Practice
Research and Evaluation for Counselors
Introduction to Counseling Techniques
Ethical , Legal, and Professional Issues for Counselors
During the formal review for matriculation, the students’ academic, behavioral, interpersonal, and
professional performance in the four designated courses listed above will be examined. Students
need a grade point average of 3.0 or above in the four designated courses to be matriculated.
Students who receive two grades below a B or a grade of F in any of the four designated
courses will not be matriculated and will be withdrawn from graduate study.
Prior to the formal matriculation review, should a student receive a second grade below B or a
grade of F, the student will automatically be withdrawn from graduate study. Under no
circumstances will students who achieve a grade point average of 2.5 or below in the four
designated courses be permitted to take graduate level courses in a College of Psychology
Program.
Students with a grade point average greater than 2.5 but less than 3.0 for the four designated
courses will be maintained in a non-matriculated status. No more than four additional courses may
be taken without achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0.
50
School Counseling Program. Students are admitted into graduate study at the master’s level and
are reviewed for degree candidacy (matriculation) after the completion of the first four courses (12
credits) for which the student is enrolled.
During the formal review for matriculation, students’ academic performance and professional
functioning in the first four courses will be examined. Students need a grade point average of 3.0
or above in the first four courses to be matriculated. As stated above, the successful passing of the
General Knowledge Test of the FLDOE Teacher Certification Exam also must be completed
during the matriculation period (by the completion of the first 4 courses). Students will not be
allowed to matriculate and register for a 5th course until this exam is passed.
Students who receive two grades below a B or a grade of F in any one of the first four courses
will not be matriculated and will be withdrawn from graduate study. Prior to the formal
matriculation review, should a student receive a grade of F, the student will automatically be
withdrawn from graduate study. Under no circumstances will students who achieve a grade point
average of 2.5 or below in the first four courses be permitted to take graduate level courses in a
College of Psychology Program. Students with a grade point average greater than 2.5 but less than
3.0 for the first four courses will be maintained in a non-matriculated status. No more than four
additional courses may be taken without achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0.
Counseling (Online) Program. Students are admitted into graduate study at the master’s level
and are reviewed for degree candidacy (matriculation) after completion of the designated four
courses (12 credits) which must be completed within the first six courses (18 credits) or two
semesters for which the student is enrolled.
These four designated courses require demonstration of written, quantitative, and interpersonal
skills, as well as overall professional functioning. The designated four courses for matriculation
are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
PYCL 0502 Counseling Theories and Practice
PYCL 0507 Research and Evaluation for Counselors
PYCL 0511 Introduction to Counseling Techniques (prerequisite-PYCL 0502)
PYCL 0570 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for Counselors (prerequisite
PYCL 0502)
SA 0710 Foundations of SA/MHC in Community Settings (SA concentration)
ABA 0710 Principles of ABA (ABA concentration)
During the formal review for matriculation, the students’ academic, behavioral, interpersonal, and
professional performance in the four designated courses listed above will be examined. Students
need a grade point average of 3.0 or above in the four designated courses to be matriculated.
Students who receive two grades below a B or a grade of F in any of the four designated
courses will not be matriculated and will be withdrawn from graduate study.
Prior to the formal matriculation review, should a student receive a second grade below B or a
grade of F, the student will automatically be withdrawn from graduate study. Under no
circumstances will students who achieve a grade point average of 2.5 or below in the four
51
designated courses be permitted to take graduate level courses in a College of Psychology
Program.
Students with a grade point average greater than 2.5 but less than 3.0 for the four designated
courses will be maintained in a non-matriculated status. No more than four additional courses may
be taken without achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0.
Counseling Practicum and Internship Requirements (Online Program)
Practicum and internship are conceived to be that phase of the master’s in counseling program in
which a counselor-trainee is able to crystallize his or her educational experiences by translating
theoretical constructs into practice. This type of supervised practice in counseling is generally
viewed as an experience that assists the prospective counselor to function within a clinical setting.
It serves as a bridge between the theoretical and the real. It is the first opportunity for the
counselor-trainee to apply what he or she has learned from the more didactic portion of the
counseling program.
Practicum and internship experiences are designed to provide students with a sequential,
supervised field experience in an appropriate clinical setting. Students will be required to complete
the designated clinical training (field) experiences in their concentration. If more than one clinical
training experience is required in a concentration, students are required to complete the practicum
and internships in continuous semesters. Students should be aware that some clinical training sites
require evenings and weekends as well as daytime hours. Students are also expected to meet all
clinical obligations during holidays and academic session breaks. If the student elects to work more
than the required hours per week, it should be discussed during the initial interview. In addition,
the student is required to attend the regularly scheduled class meetings. Students may elect to
complete additional hours as required for licensure or certification in their state.
The applied behavior analysis track practicums are designed to meet the supervision requirements
for the Board Certification in Behavior Analysis. The two practicums in the Applied Behavior
Analysis track are designed to meet the hours for the BCaBA certification requirements. The three
practicums in the Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis are designed to meet the supervision hours
for the BCBA certification requirements. The practicums are electives in this track as students
may be able to pursue supervised Independent Field Work at their current work site to fulfill the
BACB experience requirements. Students should note, however, that if they wish to pursue
licensing in counseling in their state they should assure that their supervised experience of their
practicums in ABA will meet their state’s requirements for experience.
Students eligible to begin practicum will complete and submit a practicum application form to the
master’s in counseling program office (form is available on the College of Psychology website
www.psychology.nova.edu under online programs). Students will be notified by the program
office of their approval or rejection to begin practicum. Those students approved to begin
practicum will be provided with instructions regarding application for site approval. The student
is responsible for providing information on appropriate agencies in their local or surrounding areas.
The student cannot complete his or her practicum experience in a private practice. If the student
would like to do his or her practicum at the same site where he or she is employed, it must be
52
completed in a different department/unit, must involve completely different duties, and must be
supervised by a qualified professional unrelated to his or her present position. The student must
receive permission from the director before requesting a placement in the place of his or her
employment. An NSU representative will contact the agency on behalf of the student. While many
students can complete the requirement while working, they should be prepared to make whatever
arrangements are necessary to complete this requirement including a leave of absence, adjustment
of the work schedule, etc.
Mental Health Counseling Practicum and Internship: The practicum and internship each span
a full 15-week semester. During practicum, the student will spend a minimum of 150 clock hours
(10 hrs/week) with a minimum of 40 hours of direct client contact in a community agency setting
and participate in a weekly practicum class which will include meeting with an instructor for group
and individual supervision. During internship (which will be completed over two continuous
semesters) immediately following practicum, students are required to spend a minimum of 600
hours (20 hrs/week) with a minimum of 240 hours of direct client contact in a community agency
setting and participate in bi-weekly practicum seminar class. To fulfill the 600 clock hour
requirement, a minimum of three hundred (300) total clock hours must be completed for each of
the two semesters with at least one hundred-twenty (120) of those total hours per semester to be
direct client contact.
Three consecutive semesters of clinical, field experience are required to afford students the
opportunity of working with a variety of client populations over time. Students entering
practicum/internship training may find it necessary to make special arrangements with their
employer, including taking a leave of absence, to fulfill this requirement. Students will need to
arrange their schedules to complete this degree requirement. Once placed at a site, students
are expected to remain at the same site for the three consecutive semesters of practicum and
internship. If a change of site occurs, students may have to complete additional hours.
Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum: One semester of practicum is required. The
practicum spans a 15-week semester. The student will spend a minimum of 160 hours (approx.
11 hrs/week) in a community agency setting and participate in a practicum seminar class.
Students may elect to take an additional practicum to gain more experience and to satisfy
certification requirements.
Substance Abuse Counseling and Education Practicum: Three consecutive semesters of
practicum are required to afford students the opportunity of working with a variety of client
populations over time. Each practicum spans a 15-week semester. The student will spend a
minimum of 160 hours (approx. 11 hrs/week) in a community agency setting and participate in a
practicum seminar class each semester.
Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum: Two practicums are offered as electives to meet the
BCaBA certification requirements. Students will be provided with a list of practicum sites in the
local area of the university. For distance education students, practicum sites can be arranged
through the student’s community with supervision provided by BCBAs located at their site.
Distance education students will be responsible for identifying possible practicum sites, and
submitting that information to College of Psychology program office personnel and the ABA
53
Practicum Coordinator. The university faculty will contact the site and determine what types of
support and supervision will be needed. Students will be required to complete 20 hours per week
in the first semester and 25 hours per week in the second course to meet the requirements. When
applying for the certification exam, students will need to submit their transcripts to the BACB as
proof of supervised experience along with the Experience Verification Form signed by their
supervisor. Students may choose to pursue supervision privately through their place of
employment or through contracting with a local BCBA. If choosing this option, the student will
need to complete the Supervised Independent Fieldwork option of the BACB (for information see
www.bacb.com) outside the university. Please be advised that university practicums cannot be
completed as part of employment. Students must complete their practicum outside their workplace
or in a place and time of their workplace apart from their daily activities. Their practicum time
must not be compensated.
Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum: Three semesters of practicum are offered as
electives to meet the BCBA certification requirements. Students will be provided with a list of
practicum sites in the local area of the university. For distance education students, practicum sites
can be arranged through the student’s community with supervision provided by BCBAs located at
that site. Distance education students will be responsible for identifying possible practicum sites,
and submitting that information to College of Psychology program office personnel and the ABA
practicum coordinator. The university faculty will contact the site and determine what types of
support and supervision will be needed. Students will be required to complete 20 hours per week
in the first semester and 25 hours per week in the second and third courses to meet the
requirements. When applying for the certification exam, students will need to submit their
transcripts to the BACB as proof of supervised experience along with the Experience Verification
Form signed by their supervisor. Students may choose to pursue supervision privately through
their place of employment or through contracting with a local BCBA. If choosing this option, the
student will need to complete the Supervised Independent Fieldwork option of the BACB (for
information see www.bacb.com) outside the university. Please be advised that university
practicums cannot be completed as part of employment. Students must complete their practicum
outside their workplace or in a place and time of their workplace apart from their daily
activities. Their practicum time must not be compensated.
Some states may require more practicum hours than required by Nova Southeastern University
for degree completion. Students wishing to meet their respective state requirements for
practicum may increase hours during the regular scheduled practicum or add additional
practicum courses to meet state requirements.
It is the student’s responsibility to check your respective state or local statutes requirements for
supervised practicum experiences in your selected discipline.
Students are responsible for the cost of their own fingerprinting and background checks for
practicum and internships.
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Mental Health Counseling Practicum and Internship Requirements
Practicum and internship are conceived to be that phase of the Master’s in Mental Health
Counseling Program in which a counselor-trainee is able to crystallize his or her educational
experiences by translating theoretical constructs into practice. This type of supervised practice in
counseling is generally viewed as an experience that assists the prospective counselor to function
effectively in a future employment situation. It serves as a bridge between the theoretical and the
real. It is the first opportunity for the counselor-trainee to apply what he or she has learned from
the more didactic portion of the Mental Health Counseling Program.
Three consecutive semesters of clinical, field experience are required to afford students the
opportunity of working with a variety of client populations over time. Students entering
practicum/internship training may find it necessary to make special arrangements with their
employer, including taking a leave of absence, to fulfill this requirement. Students will need
to arrange their schedules to complete this degree requirement.
Main Campus Students - The practicum and internship each span a full semester. During
Practicum, the student will spend a minimum of 150 hours (10 hours/week) with a minimum of
40 hours of direct client contact in a community agency setting and participate in a weekly
practicum class which will include meeting with an instructor for group and individual supervision.
During Internship (which will be completed over two continuous semesters) immediately
following practicum, students are required to spend a minimum of 600 hours (16-20 hrs/week)
with a minimum of 240 hours of direct client contact in a community agency setting and participate
in bi-weekly practicum seminar class. If an agency where an individual would like to complete
practicum does not appear on the main campus approved list, the Associate Director of
Clinical Training must be contacted at least five months prior to any semester, so that the
possibility of arranging a new placement can be determined.
Regional Campus-based Students - Practicum and internship schedules are a departure
from the weekend format. The practicum and internship each span a full semester. During
Practicum, the student will spend a minimum of 150 hours (10 hours/week) with a minimum of
40 hours of direct client contact in a community agency setting and participate in a weekly
practicum class which will include meeting with an instructor for group and individual supervision.
During Internship (which will be completed over two continuous semesters) students are required
to spend a minimum of 600 hours (16-20 hours/week) with a minimum of 240 hours of direct client
contact in a community agency setting and participate in a bi-weekly practicum seminar class.
The practicum and internship seminars typically will be held on evenings during the week.
In the field-based format, practicum/internship is scheduled only once during the curriculum for
each cluster, and typically after a minimum of 10 courses have been scheduled. Currently,
Practicum is scheduled to begin in the fall semester, with Internship following in the winter and
summer semesters. Each site has a local practicum coordinator who assists in all arrangements for
site placements. Please be advised that during practicum/internship, students typically are
also enrolled in regularly scheduled weekend classes.
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School Counseling Practicum and Internship Requirements
Practicum and internship are conceived to be that phase of the Master’s in School Counseling
Program in which a counselor-trainee is able to crystallize his or her educational experiences by
translating theoretical constructs into practice. This type of supervised practice in school
counseling is generally viewed as an experience that assists the prospective counselor to function
effectively in a future employment situation. It serves as a bridge between the theoretical and the
real. It is an opportunity for the counselor-in-training to apply what he or she has learned from the
more didactic portion of the School Counseling Program.
Candidates entering practicum/internship training may find it necessary to make special
arrangements with their employer, including taking a leave of absence, to fulfill this
requirement. Candidates will need to arrange their schedule to complete this degree
requirement.
Local school boards may charge school counseling candidates a fee for practicum/internship
placement in a school with a cooperating school counselor. Should a candidate elect to
complete their practicum/internship in a school district that requires such a fee, it will be the
candidate’s responsibility to submit the fee on the designated day and time stipulated by the
school board staff in accordance with their guidelines.
Practicum responsibilities require candidates to spend 100 hours (40 of which are direct student
contact hours) at a Pre-K –12 grade school setting. It is a distinct experience where candidates gain
basic counseling skills and professional knowledge which may include individual and small-group
counseling, classroom guidance presentations, consultation, parent conferencing, individual and
large group testing, involvement in the exceptional student education process, and other
experiences relevant to the practicum setting. This experience is completed over the course of one
semester (3 credit hours) and is to familiarize candidates with the role of the professional school
counselor prior to internship. Candidates spend approximately 7 to 8 hours per week at a school.
Internship is an experience which requires candidates to spend 600 hours (240 of which are direct
student contact hours) in a Pre-K –12 grade school setting. Candidates integrate knowledge
acquired in the classroom to real, on the job supervised training. This experience enhances basic
professional school counseling skills in the student academic, social/emotional, and career
counseling areas. The six credit hours of internship afford students an opportunity to work with a
variety of students, parents or teachers over time. NSU ascribes to the American School Counselor
Association National Model for school counseling programs and supports experiences that include
leadership, student advocacy, collaboration and teaming, and systemic change.
Candidates may select from the following two scheduling options to fulfill the 600 hours (six
credit hours) of internship experience:
1. Completion of one semester where the candidate will be required to complete a
minimum of 40 hours per week in a school setting.
2. Completion of two continuous semesters where the candidate will be required
to complete a minimum of 20 hours per week in a school setting.
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Candidates employed by the school system will be required to obtain permission from their
principal or designated school official for release time to pursue their internship
requirement. NSU policy does not allow candidates to complete their internship at the school
where they currently work, even if school districts and/or principals provide permission.
Please be advised that waiver of practicum and internship experience for any reason will not
be permitted. The candidate must file an application for practicum and internship and
receive approval prior to registering for these courses.
The practicum and internship class schedule is a departure from the typical intensive weekend
format. In addition to the experiential, in-school work required for practicum over one semester
and for internship over one or two continuous semester/s, candidates will participate in bi-weekly
group supervision meetings with NSU students and faculty members at the university. Additionally
during practicum, individual or triadic supervision will take place on the alternate week with a
faculty supervisor. Individual and group supervision meetings are held at the campus of the
candidate’s enrollment. Supervision meetings are held on evenings during the week. Specific
details on practicum and internship are provided to students at the appropriate time in their program
or upon request. Please be advised that during practicum and internship, students may also be
enrolled in regularly scheduled intensive weekend classes
Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling Degree Completion Requirements
A student must complete all course work required for the degree chosen with a minimum grade
point average of at least 3.0 and successfully complete the comprehensive examination. The
Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling Program requires a minimum of 60 semester hours
of graduate credit. The Master of Science in School Counseling Program requires a minimum of
46 semester hours of graduate credit. A candidate is expected to complete the master’s program
and graduate within five years.
Students must complete their program within five years from the date of first enrollment. This
means that students are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements including the
comprehensive final examination when required and graduate within this time period. In the event
that a matriculated student who has been in continuous enrollment does not complete all
requirements with in the five-year time limit, he or she must enroll in the master’s program and
1. maintain full-time status (minimum six credits per semester, excluding summer sessions)
2. complete remaining degree requirements, which will include any course work that is more
than five years old.
Counseling (Online) Degree Completion Requirements
A student must complete all courses for the degree with a grade point average of at least 3.0.
Degree completion requirements are as follows:
57
•
•
•
•
•
master of science degree program in counseling with a concentration in mental health
counseling requires 60 hours of graduate credit (core courses 33 credit hours + 27 credit
hours mental health counseling) and successful completion of the comprehensive exam
master of science degree program in counseling with a concentration in substance abuse
counseling requires 48 semester hours of graduate credit (core courses 33 credit hours +
15 credit hours substance track)
master of science degree program in counseling with a concentration in substance abuse
counseling and education requires 60 semester hours of graduate credit (core courses 33
credit hours + 15 credit hours substance track + 12 credit hours substance abuse advanced
track)
master of science degree program in counseling with a concentration in applied behavior
analysis requires 42 hours of graduate credit with 9 hours elective practica (core courses
33 credit hours + 9 credit hours applied behavior analysis track; 9 practicum hours are
electives)
master of science degree program in counseling with a concentration in advanced applied
behavior analysis requires 48 hours of graduate credit with 15 hours elective practica (core
courses 33 credit hours + 15 credit hours advanced applied behavior analysis track; 15
practicum hours are electives)
Students who would like to complete more than one concentration must complete all core and
concentration requirements as specified. Students who would like to add on a concentration after
they have begun the program must complete a Specialty Track Request form (www.
psychology.nova.edu; select Online Programs link) and submit to the director of the MS
Counseling program for approval. In each concentration, students must satisfactorily complete all
curriculum requirements.
Students in the mental health counseling concentration are required to take a Comprehensive
Final Examination under the supervision of a proctor. The Comprehensive Final Examination will
be administered in the last semester of classes. Students may be required to travel to a Nova
Southeastern University Educational Center or other specified location.
Experimental Psychology Master’s Program Academic Policies
The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree program is a 33 credit program offered
on the main campus. The successful M.S. in Experimental Psychology graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, theories, and supportive research in the four
non-clinical foundational areas of experimental psychology (biological, cognitive,
developmental, and social psychology) and in experimental design and analysis;
2. Apply research skills in at least one area of experimental psychology by carrying out an
independent piece of research in at least one area of experimental psychology with
collaboration from a faculty mentor;
3. Demonstrate the ability to write experimental reports using APA format and language of
the discipline.
58
Master of Science in Experimental Psychology Program Requirements
(a) Major Course Requirements (33 credits)
Core Courses (12 credits)
PSYC 5100
Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)
PSYC 5200
Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 5300
Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 5400
Social Psychology (3 credits)
Required Methodology Courses (9 credits)
PSYC 5900
Psychological Quantitative Methods I (3 credits)
PSYC 5910
Psychological Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)
PSYC 5920
Research Methods in Experimental Psychology (3 credits)
Thesis (6 credits)
PSYC 6000
Master’s Thesis (3 credits, repeatable)
Elective Courses (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
PSYC 5110
Sleep, Dreams, and Consciousness (3 credits)
PSYC 5120
Comparative Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 5210
Sensation and Perception (3 credits)
PSYC 5310
Seminar in Self-concept Development (3 credits)
PSYC 5320
Seminar in Gender and Development (3 credits)
PSYC 5330
Seminar in Social and Personality Development in Childhood (3
credits)
PSYC 5410
Evolutionary Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 5430
Interpersonal Perception (3 credits)
PSYC 5440
The Social Self (3 credits)
PSYC 5510
Personality and Individual Differences (3 credits)
PSYC 5520
Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
PSYC 5600
History and Systems in Experimental Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 5700
Grant Writing and Getting Published (3 credits)
(b) Comprehensive Examination
Upon completing core content coursework and the first core methodology course, students must
take and pass a comprehensive examination with a score of 70% or better. This examination is
designed to measure acquired knowledge in the core content areas of the program and basic
research methodology. The questions are developed by the psychology faculty members who teach
in these areas.
Students have two opportunities to pass the comprehensive examination. Students who do not pass
the comprehensive examination after the second attempt will be dropped from the degree program.
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(c) Thesis
The thesis represents the culmination of the student’s work in this program. Completing and
successfully defending the thesis demonstrates that the student can work independently, integrate
discipline-specific information, and respond to feedback. The student must complete 6 credits of
thesis coursework (at 3 credits per semester) to meet degree requirements.
If a student has not successfully defended his/her thesis after completing 6 credits of thesis
coursework, the student must remain enrolled in a 3-credit thesis course for each additional
semester during which he/she is working on the thesis, including the semester of defense. During
this time, the student must maintain active status in the degree program. Students may complete a
maximum of 12 credit hours of thesis work.
Grade Requirements:
Full-time graduate student status is six or more credits per semester. Graduate students are allowed
a maximum of five years to complete their master’s degree program.
In all courses, a grade of A, B, C, F, or P will be assigned based upon the individual instructor’s
assessment and evaluation of the student’s work. A grade of “I” (incomplete) indicates that the
student has not completed the course requirements during the scheduled time and is given only
with the instructor’s and Department Chair’s approval. A student will not be permitted to
register for a sequential course when a grade of “I” (incomplete) or “F” (failure) has been
received in a prerequisite course.
Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in each master’s degree course in order for that course
to apply toward the degree. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0
throughout the program. Students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on
academic probation for one semester. Students on probation who fail to raise their GPA to 3.0 or
higher will be dismissed from the program.
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Model Curriculum
Semester
Year 1
Fall
Year 1
Winter
Year 2
Fall
Year 2
Winter
Course #1
Course #2
Course #3
PSYC 5400
PSYC 5200
PSYC 5920
Social Psychology Cognitive Psychology Research Methods in
Experimental
Psychology
PSYC 5100
PSYC 5300
PSYC 5900
Behavioral
Developmental
Psychological
Neuroscience
Psychology
Quantitative
Methods I
PSYC 5910
PSYC 6000
Major Elective
Psychological
Master’s Thesis
Quantitative
Methods II
PSYC 6000
Major Elective
Master’s Thesis
Experimental Psychology Course Descriptions:
PSYC 5100 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)
This course emphasizes the principles of behavioral neuroscience, stressing the methods and
rationales used to acquire information and reach conclusions about brain mechanisms underlying
behavior. Students will survey topics related to the biology of psychology including: the basic
anatomy of the nervous system, the normal physiological functions of the nervous systems, cellular
electrophysiology, behavioral disorders, and brain diseases. The course also reviews current
research on the role of biological basis of behavior. The relative contribution of heredity and
environment will also be examined.
PSYC 5110 Sleep, Dreams, and Consciousness (3 credits)
The focus of this course is to provide students with an in-depth introduction to the biological and
behavioral features of various states of consciousness, with a focus on sleeping and dreaming, as
well as on several altered states of consciousness. Neural correlates of consciousness form the
core of the course.
PSYC 5120 Comparative Psychology (3 credits)
This course will explore research on animal behavior conducted in the field and lab by
psychologists, biologists and anthropologists. The course will cover the comparison of behavior
and cognition across a broad range of animal species. Includes phenomena, principles,
mechanisms, theories, and research techniques. Applications of evolutionary theory emphasized
and implications for humans explored.
PSYC 5200 Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
This seminar reviews historical and current research in cognition. Topics include literature from
cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, cognitive development, and social cognition.
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Students in this course are expected to take an active role in class and express their ideas and
opinions in class.
PSYC 5210 Sensation and Perception (3 credits)
In this course, students are introduced to the relationship between the process of transducing
physical energy into neural energy. This class will also review the interpretation of sensation.
PSYC 5300 Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a broad overview of current theories and
research in developmental psychology. The focus of this seminar is the examination of
development during infancy and childhood, including biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and
cultural aspects. In particular, we will focus on theories, research, and applications for everyday
interactions and contexts to garner an appreciation and understanding of normative and nonnormative patterns of development. The principal goal of this course is to help students develop
foundational knowledge about child development, and also to develop analytical skills for
evaluating and conducting developmental research.
PSYC 5310 Seminar in Self-Concept Development (3 credits)
This course will examine theory and research on self-concept development. Current issues will be
identified and relevant theoretical and empirical work critically examined. Students will gain a
comprehensive overview of the field as well as an introduction to a number of specific empirical
areas of research related to the psychological study of self-concept development. Readings will be
assigned from both the developmental and the social psychology disciplines, with the goal of
integrating information from these two sources so as to identify promising future directions as well
as current trends in the field. Prerequisite: PSYC 5300 and PSYC 5400.
PSYC 5320 Seminar in Gender and Development (3 credits)
This course introduces students to theories and research on gender role expectations and their
influence on the psychosocial developmental experience of men, women, and children. This
course will examine the impact of gender and gender role systems on developmental processes.
Students will survey contemporary theory and research on gender systems and roles and the
impact of gender on psychosocial development and relationship processes. Current gender
research will be applied to understanding self-concept, achievement, work, relationships, and
violence. Students will gain a comprehensive overview of the field as well as an introduction to a
number of specific empirical areas of research related to the psychological study of gender role
development. Prerequisite: PSYC 5300.
PSYC 5330 Seminar in Social and Personality Development in Childhood (3 credits)
This course will survey theory and research in the field of social and personality development. The
general goal of the course is to provide an introduction to the scientific study of processes in
personality and social development with an emphasis on basic theory and research rather than
applied topics such as child rearing and educational practices. Prerequisite: PSYC 5300.
PSYC 5400 Social Psychology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a broad overview of current theories and
research in social psychology. This course will review, in detail, the scientific study of how
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people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the real or imagined presence of other
people. Topics such as self-perception, judgment and decision-making, rationalization, attitude
change, conformity, social influence, obedience, attraction, love, aggression, violence, altruism,
deception, nonverbal communication, and prejudice will be covered.
PSYC 5410 Evolutionary Psychology (3 credits)
This course serves as an overview to the theoretical approach of evolutionary psychology as well
as a survey of the major topics areas that have been approached from an evolutionary perspective.
Adaptationism, the theoretical approach that understands present-day behavior and mental
processes as products of past Darwinian selection pressures, is central to this course. Students are
expected to develop the ability to evaluate adaptationist hypotheses, to understand the fundamental
differences between the evolutionary approach and traditional social science approaches (esp.
tabula rasa behaviorism), and to recognize/avoid the common errors of naïve adaptationism. As
such, the course will also present necessary information from the field of evolutionary biology
(intragenomic conflict, special design criteria, the evolution of sex, etc.).
PSYC 5430 Interpersonal Perception (3 credits)
This course examines the psychological processes involved in our perception of others' behavior,
personality, and affective states. The goal of the course is to provide students with a broad survey
of the factors that influence the way in which we perceive people, and to give students experience
with the methods with which experimental psychology investigates these issues. Readings are from
such diverse fields as nonverbal communication, social cognition, empathy, gender studies,
cognitive development, and personality psychology.
PSYC 5440 The Social Self (3 credits)
This course is a study of the social construction of identity. The focus of the course centers on (a)
an analysis of identity from early theorists (e.g., James, Mead and Cooley) to more contemporary
theorists, and (b) the various social elements of individuals' lives that contribute to a sense of self.
PSYC 5510 Personality and Individual Differences (3 credits)
This course serves as an overview to the study of inter-individual variation among humans and is,
therefore, a complement to most psychology courses, in which the content is based on the group
means from relevant studies. Much of the course will be devoted to personality theories, but
variations in intelligence (e.g., 'g' factor intelligence), sexuality (e.g., sexual orientation), emotions
(e.g., emotional lability), and localization of brain function (e.g., lateralization of language
comprehension) will also be given thorough treatment.
PSYC 5520 Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course introduces students to ABA through readings, lecture, homework assignments, and
exercises; the content, although applicable to the normal population, relates specifically to people
with developmental disabilities. The students will learn about basic principles of behavior and how
to apply them to produce effective, ethical, and meaningful change in the behavior of people they
support. The students learn how to assess the functions or causes of behavior, develop
interventions appropriate to those functions, design behavior intervention programs, and assess
their effectiveness.
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PSYC 5600 History and Systems in Experimental Psychology (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the development of modern psychological thought beginning
with the Greeks. While some topics such as dualism, will be discussed in terms of earlier origins,
the emphasis will be upon the development of post-renaissance concepts such as mechanism,
determinism, and empiricism. The origins of the scientific method and the early attempt to apply
this methodology to the psychological issues will also be presented from several perspectives.
Particular attention will also be given to the antecedents, formal developments and ultimate fate
of the major schools of thought in contemporary psychology.
PSYC 5700 Grant Writing and Getting Published (3 credits)
Students in this course will learn how to research and identify potential grant sources and develop
the skills needed to successfully write competitive grant proposals. Students will practice writing
and reviewing proposals, with specific concentration on the following components: (a) statement
of need/ rationale, (b) implementation strategies, (c) outcomes, (d) personnel, (e) evaluation, and
(f) budget.
PSYC 5900 Psychological Quantitative Methods I (3 credits)
This course will focus on the theory and application of the most commonly used parametric
statistical methods in Psychology. Specifically, this course will explore the relationship between
advanced statistical methods and psychological research methods by providing students with an
advanced understanding of the univariate methods commonly used for the analysis of behavioral
data.
PSYC 5910 Psychological Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)
Study of multiple-response, multi-factor regression analysis, multivariate analysis of variance,
alternative models in factor analysis, moderator/mediator effects, dyadic data analysis, and
statistical classification methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 5900
PSYC 5920 Research Methods in Experimental Psychology (3 credits)
This course covers the methodological tools used in psychological research studies, with specific
emphasis on observational, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs. Students
will develop testable hypotheses, design a quantitative experimental research study, and use APAformat to write a report similar to those found in professional psychological journals.
PSYC 6000 Master's Thesis (3 credits)
In this course, the student will conduct and report an extensive independent research project under
supervision of a faculty advisor. As part of the master's thesis the student will develop scientific
questions and hypotheses, study design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation of the results.
The students will also write a report and successfully defend the study to the master's thesis
committee in an oral colloquium. This course is repeatable. Prerequisites: Permission of
Department Chair.
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Forensic Psychology Master’s Program Academic Policies
Program Format
The master’s program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to
participate in courses from anywhere in the world where internet access is available. In addition,
it allows for the flexibility of completing your master’s degree without interrupting your career.
Master’s students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must
obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web
camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance
library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with
faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of
Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty
and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white
boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students
to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors’ reviews of
assignments online in the same formats.
Curriculum Requirements
The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology degree program requires a total of 36 semester
hours of graduate course work. The program consists of a core of 24 credits and students are
required to complete one of two possible 9-credit specialization tracks, and a 3-credit capstone
course. Students can choose to complete either a thesis or a field experience for their capstone’s
content, although if students are looking to continue their studies it is recommended they chose
the research option.
Master’s in Forensic Psychology Sample Curriculum
Below is a sample of a degree plan for a full-time student who begins their studies in fall term.
Degree plans will be modified based on a student’s enrollment date and pace of study.
Fall (September)
Winter (January)
Summer (April)
Year 1
PSY 0900
PSY 0904
Introduction to
Ethical Concerns &
Forensic Psychological Multicultural Issues in
Science
Forensic Psychology
PSY 0901
PSY 0902
Psychopathology,
Methods & Tools of
Personality Disorders Psychological and
and Behavioral
Violence Risk
Interventions
Assessment
PSY 0907
PSY 0906
Gender Violence
Best Practices and
65
PSY 0903
Evaluation,
Methodology, and
Psychological
Research
PSY 0922
Fall (September)
Winter (January)
Summer (April)
Domestic: Violence,
Policies for the
Sexual Assault & Child Mentally Ill in the
Abuse
Criminal Justice
System
Year 2
Specialty Track
Specialty Track
Course
Course
Specialty Track
Course
Graduation
Communication Skills,
Tools and Expert
Witness Testimony
Forensic Psychology Core Courses (3 Credits Each)
PSY 0900 Introduction to Forensic Psychological Science
This is a survey course designed to provide students with an understanding of psychology's use in
assisting the law with clinical forensic cases. Focus will involve both practical and research
applications in clinical and social-cognitive psychology. Additional topics will include
admissibility of psychologists to provide expert testimony in the courts; assessment of various
mental states to meet legal requirements for competency, insanity, abuse syndromes, and various
other psychological harm; working in the criminal justice system; and child custody and
dependency issues. The legal system itself will be reviewed with a major focus on the unique
aspects of the law as it applies to detained and incarcerated persons. History of the law, the U.S.
Supreme Court cases that determined today’s mandates, parity between physical and mental health
for incarcerated persons, and recent developments will be examined. Students will be expected to
review and to understand the laws and research tools used to conduct legal and psychological
investigation including library databases. The social-cognitive bases of trial consultation, jury
selection, and the limits of eyewitness type of testimony will also be explored.
PSY 0901 Psychopathology, Personality Disorders, and Behavioral Interventions in Forensic
Settings
This course is designed to provide an understanding of the various psychological disorders and
their impact on behavior. Legal issues raised in both criminal and civil cases that involve mental
illness will be discussed. Psychological interventions that have been determined to have empirical
evidence in helping to reduce the symptoms of the various illnesses will be covered, including how
to adapt them to various legal settings. In particular, group therapy and cognitive-behavioral
interventions commonly used in corrections settings will be discussed. Laws dealing with
medication as well as laws associated with the management of violence will similarly be covered.
Students will be expected to learn about the tools used by psychologists to conduct legal and
psychological research.
PSY 0902 Methods & Tools of Psychological & Violence Risk Assessment
This course is designed to review various psychological assessment tools and techniques used by
psychologists in the forensic setting. Focus will include standardization properties and
interpretation of the results. Tests covered will include standardized cognitive assessments
including the Wechsler scales, neuropsychological tests, objective and projective personality tests,
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and other measures specific to forensic settings. Students will not be trained to administer
psychological tests, but rather understand the results and when to choose them for particular
assessments.
PSY 0903 Evaluation, Methodology, and Psychological Research
This course will cover the basics of research tools utilized by psychologists, with a major focus on
program evaluation and testing scientific hypotheses. The course will describe research
methodology and its application in the forensic setting. Basic statistical techniques will also be
addressed in order to review research findings. Additionally, the course will address the grant
writing process, with specific focus on its use to conduct program evaluation or basic research. In
addition, the course will include a review of NSU's electronic databases in the library system, such
as PsychInfo, as well as granting foundations.
PSY 0904 Ethical Concerns & Multicultural Issues in Forensic Psychology
This course will review the ethics of forensic psychology, including the Ethical Principles of
Psychologists and Code of Conduct and the Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists of the
American Psychological Association (APA), as well as the American Bar Association (ABA)
Ethics. Additionally, the APA Guidelines for Multicultural Psychology will be discussed, as well
as their relevance in forensic psychology. Areas of conflict between the rules of legal procedure
and the psychologist's administrative code will be highlighted. Ethical issues pertaining to
supervision and consultation within forensic settings will also be an integral part of the course, as
many psychologists engage in supervision of non-doctoral level associates. Consultation skills will
be highlighted, as they are critical for the harmonious integration of laws and psychology. Finally,
the ethical and legal aspects of detaining and confining people in the corrections system will be
explored, with an emphasis on the responsibilities of those who work in the system.
PSY 0906 Best Practices and Policies for the Mentally Ill in the Criminal Justice System
Studies suggest that communities can develop a best practices model to keep the mentally ill out
of jail or prison, while still maintaining public safety. This course covers the approach to training
law enforcement in crisis intervention skills in order to avoid making an arrest when possible. If
not possible, deferral into a mental health or drug court for treatment rather than incarceration
should follow the arrest. Subsequently, the availability of treatment programs in the jail or prison
is important for those who need to be detained. Finally, this course will discuss practices and
policies and how to implement them for seamless reentry into the community.
PSY 0907 Gender Violence: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault & Child Abuse
This course reviews the victims and the perpetrators of crimes of gender, specifically those of
domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. The focus of this course will address the
growing literature related to the psychological damage caused by these traumatic events, including
the role of mental illness and how it impacts issues in criminal, civil, family and juvenile law.
Specialization Tracks
Students will choose one of the following two specialization tracks:
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Specialization Track 1 Forensic Psychology in the Legal System – 12 credits
(9 credits –3 courses from below PLUS PSY 0914 – Capstone Project - 3 credits)
PSY 0908 Psychological Issues in Dependency & Family Law Cases
This course will focus on reviewing psychological assessment instruments and their use during
child custody and parenting fitness evaluations. The application of psychological tools to assist the
court in development of parenting plans according to family law principles such as the Uniform
Child Custody Act and other such legal documents will be reviewed. Child abuse laws followed
by dependency courts will also be presented.
PSY 0909 Therapeutic Jurisprudence & Problem-Solving Courts
Due to the criminalization of the mentally ill, jails and prisons have transformed into de facto
hospitals for countless inmates with serious mental illness and substance abuse problems.
Innovative diversion strategies have emerged to reduce the disparities in the jails and prisons and
assist with access to community-based mental health and substance abuse care. Students will learn
the philosophies in criminal and juvenile justice relating to the emerging practices of integrated
and collaborative models of problem-solving therapeutic approaches. Focus will integrate theory
and practical applications from a recovery and problem-solving perspective. Various legal
philosophies such as therapeutic jurisprudence and restorative justice will be reviewed. The course
will survey important U.S. and International policy reports, introduce students to leaders and
pioneers in the field, review the consumer movement, and discuss and identify how to translate
and to apply these philosophies and values into key areas from policy development to
implementation.
PSY 0910 Assessment of Psychological Injury for Legal Cases
Psychologists are frequently called upon to assess psychological injury in civil cases. Most
common are tort cases where someone has been in an accident and is claiming psychological
injury. Other areas include competency to enter into contracts, neuropsychological injuries due to
open or closed head trauma or exposure to toxins, and damages from malpractice cases. This
course will explore the signs and symptoms of psychological injuries and the tools/tests
psychologists use to measure what if any damage has occurred. Students will learn to apply them
to understand the concept of proximate cause – that is “but-for” what happened to the person, he
or she would not be in this condition.
PSY 0911 Psychological Issues in Juvenile Justice Assessment & Intervention Programs
Juvenile Court referrals for children and youth may be sent to dependency and juvenile courts
where the goal is rehabilitation necessitating psychological evaluation. This may include
assessment of cognitive, affective, physiological and behavioral development including impact
from social issues such as poverty, culture, trauma, language and immigration status. New
information about brain development has changed the law governing execution and life without
parole for juveniles who commit violent crimes given the recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings.
Drugs, gangs, domestic violence, child abuse necessitating anger management, substance abuse,
sexual health and pregnancy issues will be studied. We will also cover reaching out to parents of
juvenile justice involved children. Psychological interventions for youth involved with the legal
system such as medication, psychotherapy, competency restoration, and cognitive retraining also
will be reviewed.
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PSY 0912 Psychological Evaluation of Competencies, Syndromes, & Sanity Issues:
Forensic psychologists have been assisting attorneys and the courts in assessing criminal
defendants for competency and sanity since the early 1900s. By the 1980s psychologists received
parity with psychiatrists in the U.S. courts. Case law and legislation have informed forensic
psychologists as to what the courts need in order to meet the legal tests for whether or not a
defendant is mentally capable or competent to waive Miranda rights, proceed to trial, assist the
attorney in preparing for a defense, voluntarily accept a plea bargain, know and understand the
consequences of trial outcomes, etc. Additionally, mens rea or the state of mind at the time of trial
is also assessed by a forensic psychological evaluation in order to determine if the defendant meets
the insanity laws or downward departure of sentencing guidelines. Newer syndromes like Battered
Woman Syndrome or Rape Trauma Syndrome are also assessed by psychologists and will be
covered in this course.
PSY 0913/CJI 6230: Behavioral Criminology
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with various techniques for analyzing and
understanding criminal behavior through crime and crime scene analysis. These techniques include
an introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigative analysis and profiling. Critical
thinking skills will be emphasized in crime and crime scene analysis in order to draw logical
inferences regarding any underlying psychopathology, motive, criminal history or other dynamics
unique to that particular offender.
PLUS
PSY 0914 Capstone Project in Forensic Psychology in the Legal System
Pre-requisite: Completion of all core courses. Thesis Option - If the thesis is chosen as the
capstone project, students are expected to choose a topic of research that has been raised during
the student’s experience in this program. The student will be expected to prepare an outline of
what issues will be researched and find a mentor (usually a faculty member in the program) to
work with as the topic is researched. Methodology must be consistent with the skills used by
researchers in the psychology and legal fields. The final paper will be approved by the faculty
member, track coordinator or program director and will follow the format in the student policy
manual that is on-line. Students will prepare papers for publication or presentation. It is expected
that the students who choose this option will wish to go on for further education beyond the
master's degree. Field Experience - If the field experience is chosen as the capstone project, it
must first be approved by a faculty supervisor and track coordinator or program director. The field
experience is expected to be experiential in nature and should be completed over a semester. The
field experience can be a special project connected to the student’s current professional
responsibilities. In the legal track the student may use case experiences in which psychologists act
as consultants or expert witnesses. Clinicians may use a practicum experience in a forensic setting.
An evaluation rubric will be developed by the supervising faculty and used during supervision of
the student's experience. The rubric will include guidelines for the number of hours students are
expected to complete during the field experience, and will detail the clinical skills evaluated.
Specialization Track 2 Forensic Psychology for Mental Health Works, First Responders
and Disaster Teams – 12 credits
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(9 credits –3 courses from below PLUS PSY 0921 – Capstone Project - 3 credits)
PSY 0915 Suicide Prevention & Crisis Intervention Skills
Suicide is one of the most dangerous actions in which depressed people engage that may, in fact,
be preventable. This is true for those with suicidal ideation at all ages. This course will help the
student learn how to identify the potential for suicide and how to respond and refer. Since suicide
is often precipitated by situational crises, early intervention techniques, particularly the
identification of suicide potential, is crucial. Suicide ideation is frequently seen in criminal
defendants, especially those who make suicide attempts when first admitted to jail or prison.
Suicide-by-cop and highly publicized intentional and random multiple shooting events will be
studied to better understand the shooter's motivations and early identification. Effective suicide
prevention and crisis intervention strategies will be explored.
PSY 0916 Trauma Informed Assessment and Intervention
The large numbers of people using the legal system have reported experiencing trauma in their
lives. This includes those in the civil area, those in domestic violence and child abuse cases, and
those in other criminal areas. Most of these people remain in the community or re-enter fairly
quickly. However, it is important to assess for trauma and provide these individuals with traumainformed services, as psychotherapy or substance abuse treatment alone are insufficient. This
course will cover trauma theories and address trauma-informed assessment tools, as well as best
practices in intervention techniques to assist victim/survivors.
PSY 0917 Child Maltreatment and Trauma Assessment and Intervention
Child physical abuse, sexual abuse, and maltreatment can have a lasting impact on lifetime health
and behavior. Assessment of trauma and trauma informed intervention strategies will be explored,
including reduction and elimination of trauma triggers, desensitization, restoration of normal
biochemicals and neurotransmitters in the brain and nervous system, and restoration of
competency. Tools such as sand tray, play therapy, and cognitive-focused groups for older children
will also be explored. Strategies for supporting and strengthening the non-offending parent will
also be covered.
PSY 0918 Intervening in School & Workplace Violence
The high publicity of school and workplace violence over the last decade has resulted in the
development of psychological interventions to prevent and to intervene following such tragic
events. Threat Assessment Teams with security and mental health experts working collaboratively
can identify potential problems early on and intervene to interrupt plans to shoot and kill both
intended and unintentional victims. This course will review the major high publicity cases such as
Columbine H.S. in Colorado, Fort Hood massacre by a military psychiatrist, and the recent
shooting of Congresswoman Gabriella Giffords. Crisis intervention following these tragic events
will also be discussed.
PSY 0919 Substance Abuse, Mental Illness and Trauma
The increased incidence of individuals with triple diagnosis, that is, adding a trauma diagnosis to
the traditionally dual diagnosis term used to describe people with substance abuse and mental
illness, continues to grow as our assessment tools improve. This combination is especially
prevalent in jails, prisons, and those assigned to intervention in the community by the therapeutic
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jurisprudence courts. This course will first review the three areas independently and subsequently
integrate them in the context of treatment.
PSY 0920/CJI 6220: Police Psychology
The purpose of this course is to examine current strategies and issues in the field of police
psychology. Specific topics that will be covered include: selection and fitness for duty evaluations,
mental health issues in law enforcement (e.g., stress, family problems, critical incident debriefings,
and domestic violence), role of psychology in crisis (hostage) negotiations, and supportive
functions of the police psychologist in police operations. Tactical operations and police procedures
relevant to the work of the police psychologist will similarly be covered.
PLUS
PSY 0921 Capstone Course in Forensic Psychology for First Responders and Disaster Team
Workers
Pre-requisite: Completion of all core courses. Thesis - If the thesis is chosen as the capstone
project, it is expected that the student will choose a topic to research that has been raised during
the student's experience in this program. The student will be expected to prepare an outline of what
issues will be researched and find a mentor (usually a faculty member in the program) to work
with as the topic is researched. Methodology must be consistent with the skills used by researchers
in the psychology and legal fields. The final paper will be approved by the faculty member, track
coordinator or program director and will follow the format in the student policy manual that is on
line. Students will be encouraged to prepare papers to be submitted for publication or presentation.
It is expected that students who choose the thesis option will be those who wish to go on for further
education beyond a master's degree. Field Experience - If the field experience is chosen as the
capstone project, it must be approved by a faculty supervisor and track coordinator or program
director. It is expected to be experiential in nature and should be completed over a semester. In
this track, for example, the student may use case experiences where psychologists are used as
consultants or expert witnesses. Clinicians may use a practicum experience in a forensic setting.
An evaluation rubric will be developed by the supervising faculty and the student’s experience
will use it during supervision. The rubric will include number of hours expected during the field
experience and clinical skills evaluated.
PSY 0922 Communication Skills, Tools and Expert Witness Testimony
Communication of psychological evaluation results is a critical part of psychological evaluations.
Most communication is done with the referral source (attorney, client, judge, case manager)
through oral or written reports. If sworn expert testimony is required, usually by deposition or at
trial, the attorney will form the questions usually with the psychologist's assistance. Understanding
the different parts of a report and preparing for expert witness testimony will also be covered
including voir dire, direct, and cross-examination.
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General Psychology Master’s Program Academic Policies
Registration
All students admitted to graduate study are to be in continuous registration every fall and winter
semester until they receive their degree unless prior approval is received from the program office.
Once candidacy is achieved, in order to remain an active and matriculated student, registration is
required in every semester until the completion of degree requirements, unless a leave of absence
has been granted. Failure to remain in continuous registration will be deemed as the student’s
formal withdrawal from the program. All other programs, center, and university requirements will
be in effect.
Candidacy (Matriculation)
Students are admitted into graduate study at the master’s level and are reviewed for degree
candidacy (matriculation) after completion of the first four courses (12 credits).
During the formal review for matriculation, the students’ academic performance in the first four
courses will be examined. Students need a grade point average of 3.0 or above in the first four
courses to be matriculated. Students who receive two grades below a B or a grade of F in any
of the four courses will not be matriculated and will be withdrawn from graduate study.
Prior to the formal matriculation review, should a student receive a second grade below B
or a grade of F, the student will automatically be withdrawn from graduate study. Under no
circumstances will students who achieve a grade point average of 2.5 or below in the first four
courses be permitted to take graduate level courses in the Master’s General Psychology program.
Students with a grade point average greater than 2.5 but less than 3.0 for the first four courses
will be maintained in a non-matriculated status. No more than four additional courses may be
taken without achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0.
General Psychology Degree Completion Requirements
A student must complete all course work required for the degree with a minimum grade point
average of a 3.0 and successfully complete a thesis (if required) and the comprehensive
examination. The Master of Science in General Psychology program requires a minimum of 30
semester hours of graduate credit. A student is expected to complete the program and graduate
within five years from the date of first enrollment.
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Master’s Programs
Model Curricula
Master’s in General Psychology (Online)
30 Semester Hours
Core Foundational Requirements (12
credits):
Core Methodology Requirements (9 credits):
PSY 0600
Cognitive Psychology
PSY 0601
Behavioral Neuroscience
PSY 0605
Human Growth and Development
PSY 0607
Social Psychology
PSY 0609
Individual Evaluation and Assessment
PSY 0611
Research Design
PSY 0614
Adult Psychopathology
PSY 0615
Human Sexuality*
PSY 0616
History and Systems of Psychology
Concentration Requirements (9 credits):
General Psychology (9 credits)
Option A:
(21 core credits + 9 concentration credits = 30 total credits )
Option B:
OR
PSY 0617
Master’s Thesis * (6 credits) PLUS
PSY 0614 OR PSY 0615 OR PSY 0616
Applied Health Science (9 credits)
(21 core credits + 9 concentration credits = 30 total credits)
Diversity Studies (9 credits)
PSY 0620
The Business of Psychology
PSY 0633
Interviewing Techniques*
PSY 0621
Social and Cultural Foundations of Diversity*
PSY 0622
Gay and Lesbian Studies
PSY 0623
Research Topics in Cross-Cultural Psychology*
(21 core credits + 9 concentration credits = 30 total credits)
*Courses that require prerequisites (refer to the handbook for further information)
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General Psychology
Core Foundational Course Descriptions
PSY 0600 Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines the various cognitive processes that affect behavior. Topics include
information processing, memory, attention, unconscious processing, decision making in social
context, language, and self-schemata development.
PSY 0601 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)
This course emphasizes the principles of behavioral neuroscience, stressing the methods and
rationales used to acquire information and reach conclusions about brain mechanisms underlying
behavior. Students will survey topics related to the biology of psychology including: the basic
anatomy of the nervous system, the normal physiological functions of the nervous systems, cellular
electrophysiology, behavioral disorders, and brain diseases. The course also reviews current
research on the role of the biological basis of behavior. The relative contribution of heredity and
environment will also be examined.
PSY 0605 Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
This course examines how developmental maturation and social learning shape personality, both
in childhood and adulthood. Theory and research in social development and learning are covered
in topics such as attachment, aggression, sexuality, morality and self-regulation, and self- concept.
PSY 0607 Social Psychology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a broad overview of current theories and
research in social psychology. This course will review, in detail, the scientific study of how
people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the real or imagined presence of other
people. Topics such as self-perception, judgment and decision-making, attitude change,
conformity, social influence, obedience, attraction, love, aggression, violence, altruism, deception,
nonverbal communication, and prejudice will be covered.
Core Methodology Course Descriptions
PSY 0609 Individual Evaluation and Assessment (3 credits)
This course surveys frequently used psychological tests of aptitude, interest, and personality. Test
content, purpose, psychometric properties, administration, and scoring procedures are compared
and evaluated. Issues of test use with culturally diverse populations are addressed.
PSY 0611 Research Design (3 credits)
The focus of this course is research methodology and scientific thinking. It covers basic
experimental designs (between and within groups), single subject experiments, group experimental
designs, non-experimental designs (correlational research, case studies, meta-analysis), and
program evaluation. Validity issues in research (internal and external) and research ethics are
emphasized throughout.
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PSY 0613 Psychological Quantitative Methods (3 credits)
This course will focus on the theory and application of the most commonly used parametric
statistical methods in Psychology. Specifically, this course will explore the relationship between
advanced statistical methods and psychological research methods by providing students with an
advanced understanding of the univariate methods commonly used for the analysis of behavioral
data.
General Psychology Concentration Courses
PSY 0614 Adult Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course covers descriptive psychopathology and research on the etiology, epidemiology,
dynamics and diversity issues of major adult pathologic syndromes. It provides a thorough
introduction to DSM-IV-TR as a diagnostic tool.
PSY 0615 Human Sexuality (3 credits)
This course is an overview of the basics of sexual anatomy, physiology, and development. The
student will acquire an understanding of human sexual response, concepts of sex therapies, and
human sexual dysfunction. Also included are methods of contraception, sex and family planning,
variations of sexual behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 0605
PSY 0616 History and Systems of Psychology (3 credits)
This course will review some of the major theoretical concepts and schools of thought in the history
of psychology. More specifically, the course covers the history of various psychological concepts
(such as perception, memory, emotions, consciousness, self, mental illness, etc.) as interpreted by
various scholars of the mind over time. A historically-informed perspective of these concepts will
help students realize the subtle changes in interpreting various psychological processes and
phenomena across different time periods and the connections between these changes and the larger
socio-political and intellectual environments at the time.
PSY 0617 Master’s Thesis (6 credits)
Students will work with an NSU faculty member in creating and conducting their own research
project. A thesis is an original contribution to knowledge resulting from the systematic study of a
significant problem or issue. Prerequisites: PSY 0611 and PSY 0613.
Applied Health Science Concentration Course Descriptions
PSY 0619 Psychological Aspects of Treating Disease (3 credits)
This course will explore both the strengths and limitations of utilizing a strict bio-medical model
for treating disease. Current research on the effective management of pain and chronic disease
will be reviewed and discussed from a psychological perspective. Implications for a better
understanding and evaluation of psychological distress associated with chronic disease will be
explored as well as research on the role of psychological support from family members and care
givers.
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PSY 0620 The Business of Psychology (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the business of psychology. Issues related to private practice,
employment, program development, and implementation will be presented. Specific topics will
include: developing a private practice, surviving in a changing marketplace, marketing strategies,
establishing fees, coding and reimbursement, negotiating employment contracts, and development
and implementation of psychological service units.
PSY 0633 Interviewing Techniques (3 credits)
This is a basic course on the theoretical and practical aspects of the clinical assessment interview.
Emphasis is placed on the development of communication skills, rapport building, evaluation
strategies, and the consideration of diagnostic data as well as cultural/ethnic diversity, the mental
status evaluation, and the ability to organize information in written and oral form. Prerequisite:
PSY 0609
Diversity Studies Concentration Course Descriptions
PSY 0621 Social and Cultural Foundations of Diversity (3 credits)
This course addresses cultural diversity and its implications for psychological research. It
considers the psychological impact of factors such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious
preference, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and physical disability in a variety of social
and cultural settings. Prerequisite: PSY 0607
PSY 0622 Gay and Lesbian Studies (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to key concepts, issues, and major themes
related to gay and lesbian studies. Some of the most visible contemporary discussions and debates
concerning homosexuality will be examined including sexual discrimination, civil rights
legislation, coming-out stories, psychological and social identity.
PSY 0623 Research Topics in Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines cultural variations in social behavior, personality, health, child development,
emotion and cognition, stress and coping. Multiple theoretical perspectives as well as research
applications to communication issues, health care, and international relations will be considered.
Prerequisites: PSY 0611 and PSY 0621
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Mental Health Counseling
60 Semester Hours
Required Courses: PYCL 0502
PYCL 0507
PYCL 0511
PYCL 0512
PYCL 0570
PYCL 0582
PYCL 0584
PYCL 0586
PYCL 0608
PYCL 0612
PYCL 0631
PYCL 0632
PYCL 0635
PYCL 0645
PYCL 0660
PYCL 0666
PYCL 0669
PYCL 0680
PYCL 0681
PYCL 0682
PYCL 0683
Counseling Theories and Practice
Research and Evaluation for Counselors
Introduction to Counseling Techniques
Human Growth and Development
Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for Counselors
Human Sexuality
Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Psychopathology
Diagnosis and Treatment of Child and Adolescent
Psychopathology
Psychological Testing for Individual Evaluation
Substance Abuse
Career and Lifestyle Assessment
Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
Group Theory and Practice
Couples and Family Counseling Strategies
Community Mental Health
Case Conceptualization and Treatment Strategies
Advanced Treatment Interventions
Counseling Practicum
Counseling Internship
Continuing Counseling Internship
Counseling Internship Elective
Mental Health Counseling
Course Descriptions
PYCL 0502 Counseling Theories and Practice
This course provides a foundation and overview of the fields of psychotherapy and counseling. It
reviews the various theories and techniques of counseling that are consistent with current
professional research and practice in the field of clinical mental health counseling. Additional
topics include professional roles and functions, credentialing, and general ethics in clinical mental
health.
PYCL 0507 Research and Evaluation for Counselors
This course seeks to prepare mental health and school counselors to be informed consumers of
research and evaluation. It covers basic statistics, research designs, and program evaluation within
the counseling and educational fields. It provides experience in developing accountability
measures and in reading research and evaluating reports applicable to multicultural populations.
PYCL 0511 Introduction to Counseling Techniques
This course is an overview of basic counseling skills. The major focus will be on the development
of fundamental counseling skills, including listening, empathy training, and basic interviewing.
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Issues regarding the development of the therapeutic relationship, cultural diversity, and the impact
of the counselor on the counseling process will be covered. Prerequisite: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0512 Human Growth and Development
This course covers how developmental maturation and social learning impacts individuals across
the lifespan. Theory and research in social development and learning are covered in topics for
mental health and school counselors.
PYCL 0570 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for Counselors
This course covers standards for ethical, legal, and professional conduct in counseling. It considers
ethical and legal decisions that mental health counselors must make. Case examples, current
federal and state laws/statutes, ethical codes, and standards on assessment, diagnosis, practice, and
placement data are discussed in relation to counseling a variety of populations in multiple settings.
Prerequisite: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0582 Human Sexuality
This course is an overview of the basics of sexual anatomy, physiology, and development. The
student will acquire an understanding of human sexual response, concepts of sex therapies, and
human sexual dysfunction. Also included are methods of contraception, sex and family planning,
variations of sexual behavior, and the importance of the counselor in the role of the educator.
PYCL 0584 Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Psychopathology
This course provides an introduction to the definition and study of abnormal or maladaptive
behavior, including a broad range of psychopathology relevant to the adult and aged populations.
Emphasis will be placed on a descriptive review of the major DSM-5 disorders, supplemented
with theoretical considerations of etiology and treatment approaches including the use of
psychopharmacological interventions.
PYCL 0586 Diagnosis and Treatment of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
This course provides an introduction to the specific DSM-5 disorders and problematic
psychological states manifested during childhood and adolescence. It will also provide an
overview of currently used behavioral and psychopharmacological interventions with
psychologically troubled youth.
PYCL 0608 Psychological Testing for Individual Evaluation
This course surveys frequently used tests of aptitude, interest, and personality. Test content,
purpose, psychometric properties, administration, and scoring procedures are compared and
evaluated. Issues of test use with culturally diverse populations are addressed. Prerequisite:
PYCL 0507.
PYCL 0612 Substance Abuse
This course investigates the etiology of substance-related and addictive disorders. Attention is
given to assessment and treatment in both individual and family therapy approaches. The course
examines the role of co-occurring disorders in diagnosis and treatment planning and the role of the
professional counselor in working with this population. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511.
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PYCL 0631 Career and Lifestyle Assessment
This course surveys the major theories of career choice, planning, and development as well as
standardized methods of assessing vocational interests and aptitudes. Social, psychological, and
economic factors influencing career choice are examined. Emphasis will be placed on individual
and group career counseling skills across diverse populations.
PYCL 0632 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
This course addresses cultural diversity and its implications for counseling. It considers the
psychological impact of factors such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious preference,
socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and physical disability in a variety of counseling and
educational settings. Finally, it reviews counseling issues and strategies for counseling diverse
clients.
PYCL 0635 Group Theory and Practice
This course addresses group theory and practice in multiple settings with a variety of diverse
populations and age groups. Major themes include group dynamics, group process, and group
states for mental health and school counselors. Prerequisites for clinical mental health
counselors: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511 - For school counselors: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0645 Couples and Family Counseling Strategies
This skills course surveys current approaches to couples and family counseling with an emphasis
on a systemic conceptual model of family functioning and culturally sensitive therapeutic
interventions. It is designed to develop specific intervention competencies. Prerequisites: PYCL
0502; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0584 or consent of adviser.
PYCL 0660 Community Mental Health
Principles, theories, and practices of community needs assessment and community interventions
are reviewed with a focus on the history, events, and attitudes that led to the development of
community mental health delivery systems. This course surveys the design and utilization of public
and private programs, networks and facilities within the mental health continuum of care, as well
as the interplay of public and private funding and service utilization. This course acquaints students
with the various approaches (prevention, consultation) and techniques (needs assessment, program
evaluation) used by counselors in community settings across diverse populations.
PYCL 0666 Case Conceptualization and Treatment Strategies
This course focuses on the processes of conceptualizing clinical cases from a variety of theoretical
orientations and translating them into effective treatment strategies. Clinical interviews, case
studies, and role-plays will be utilized to assist students in formulating hypotheses about client
difficulties and developing appropriate clinical interventions, which address those difficulties in a
culturally sensitive manner. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0584 or consent of
adviser.
PYCL 0669 Advanced Treatment Interventions
This course will present advanced training in counseling approaches and techniques. Students
will learn more about an integrative approach to counseling to further the development of their
own personal counseling model. Students will integrate their knowledge of case
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conceptualization, treatment planning, and diagnosis with the practice of counseling techniques.
Presentations, recorded role-plays, and case studies will be utilized. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502;
PYCL 0511; PYCL 0584; PYCL 0666.
PYCL 0680 Counseling Practicum
The student is required to spend a specified number of hours per week at a selected agency working
under supervision with clients. During that time, the student is expected to increase his or her
competence in the areas of basic interviewing, assessment, and counseling skills. Furthermore, the
student will be made more aware of the ethical, legal, and professional issues inherent in the
counseling process. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0507; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0570; PYCL
0584; PYCL 0586; PYCL 0635; PYCL 0666 with a grade of B or better. The student must file
an application for practicum and receive approval prior to registering for a practicum
PYCL 0681 Counseling Internship
This course is an extension of Counseling Practicum. The student will be expected to develop more
advanced skills in interviewing, assessment, and intervention. Simultaneously, continued
emphasis will be placed upon ethical, legal, and professional issues, as well as development of a
personal theory of clinical mental health counseling. Prerequisite: PYCL 0680 with a grade of
B or better.
PYCL 0682 Continuing Counseling Internship
This course is a continuation of Counseling Internship. Prerequisite: PYCL 0681 with a grade
of B or better.
PYCL 0683 Counseling Internship Elective
This course is a continuation of Continuing Counseling Internship. Prerequisite: PYCL 0682
with a grade of B or better.
•
Course descriptions are subject to change
80
School Counseling
48 Semester Hours
Required
Courses:
PYCL 0503
PYCL 0507
PYCL 0510
PYCL 0511
PYCL 0512
PYCL 0515
PYCL 0550
PYCL 0560
PYCL 0571
PYCL 0585
PYCL 0632
PYCL 0635
PYCL 0665
PYCL 0685
PYCL 0688
PYCL 0689
Counseling Theories for School Counselors
Research and Evaluation for Counselors
Career Development and College Planning
Human Growth and Development
Introduction to Counseling Techniques
Principles of School Counseling
Contemporary Clinical Interventions
Appraisal and Evaluation in School Counseling
Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for
School Counselors
Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children
Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
Group Theory and Practice
School Consultation Skills
School Counseling Practicum
School Counseling Internship
Continuing School Counseling Internship
School Counseling
Course Descriptions
PYCL 0503 Counseling Theories for School Counselors
This course provides a foundation and overview of theories relevant to the fields of counseling and
psychotherapy. The course focuses on the theories and techniques that are consistent with current
professional research and practice in school counseling.
PYCL 0507 Research and Evaluation for Counselors
This course seeks to prepare mental health and school counselors to be informed consumers of
research and evaluation. It covers basic statistics, research designs, and program evaluation within
the counseling and educational fields. It provides experience in developing accountability
measures and in reading research and evaluating reports applicable to multicultural populations.
PYCL 0510 Career Development and College Planning
This course addresses effective strategies for helping diverse P-12 students develop career,
educational, and postsecondary plans. The course surveys career and lifestyle assessment
instruments, career development theories, and decision-making models. The course will
emphasize college readiness including college exploration, the application process, and financial
aid. Computer-based career development and college planning applications will be studied.
PYCL 0511 Introduction to Counseling Techniques
This course is an overview of basic counseling skills. The major focus will be on the development
of fundamental counseling skills, including listening, empathy training, and basic interviewing.
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Issues regarding the development of the therapeutic relationship, cultural diversity, and the impact
of the counselor on the counseling process will be covered. Prerequisite for mental health
counselors: PYCL 502; Prerequisite for school counselors: PYCL 503
PYCL 0512 Human Growth and Development
This course covers how developmental maturation and social learning impacts individuals across
the lifespan. Theory and research in social development and learning are covered in topics for
mental health and school counselors.
PYCL 0515 Principles of School Counseling
This course covers the history, philosophy, functions, management, and operation of
comprehensive school counseling programs in elementary and secondary schools with emphasis
on the role of the professional school counselor.
PYCL 0550 Contemporary Clinical Interventions
This course focuses on an understanding of critical psychological, academic, and socioeconomic
issues when working with children, adolescents, and adults in school settings. Topics covered
include substance abuse, suicide, violence, teen pregnancy, and other issues affecting the wellbeing and academic success of students. Primary and secondary prevention strategies will be
examined for suitable school-based interventions. Prerequisite: PYCL 503.
PYCL 0560 Appraisal and Evaluation in School Counseling
This course covers basic measurement concepts, test content and purpose, psychometric
properties, administration, and scoring procedures. Frequently used tests of aptitude, interest,
achievement, and personality are reviewed. Issues involved with standardized and nonstandardized assessment of achievement, educational diagnostic tests, and vocational interest tests
are examined from the school counseling perspective. Issues of ethical test use and use with
culturally diverse students are also addressed. Prerequisite: PYCL 507.
PYCL 0571 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for School Counselors
This course covers standards for ethical, legal, and professional conduct in counseling. It considers
ethical and legal decisions that school counselors must make. Case examples, current federal and
state laws/statutes, ethical codes, and standards on assessment, diagnosis, practice, and placement
data are discussed in relation to counseling a variety of populations in multiple settings.
Prerequisite: PYCL 503.
PYCL 0585 Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children
This course covers the etiology and characteristics of exceptionalities and children at risk for
underachievement and dropping out. Also covered is the role of the school counselor in identifying
such problems, drawing on available resources, and making appropriate referrals.
PYCL 0632 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
This course addresses cultural diversity and its implications for counseling. It considers the
psychological impact of factors such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious preference,
socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and physical disability in a variety of counseling and
educational settings. Finally, it reviews counseling issues and strategies for diverse clients.
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PYCL 0635 – Group Theory and Practice
This course addresses group theory and practice in multiple settings with a variety of diverse
populations and age groups. Major themes include group dynamics, group process, and group
states for mental health and school counselors. Prerequisites for mental health counselors:
PYCL 502 & PYCL 511; Prerequisites for school counselors: PYCL 503 & PYCL 511.
PYCL 0665 School Consultation Skills
This course focuses on developing specific techniques in consultation, leadership, and advocacy.
It integrates the various aspects of a developmental comprehensive school counseling program
with particular reference to problem-solving and the utilization of available data and resources
PYCL 0685 School Counseling Practicum
This course provides students with knowledge and exposure to educational K-12 settings and
requires an in-school field experience.
PYCL 0688 School Counseling Internship
Students are required to spend a specified number of hours per week at a selected K-12 public
school setting working under the supervision of a professional school counselor. During that time,
students are expected to become advocates for and increase competence in providing services to
youth and their families in the personal/social, academic, and career domains. Furthermore,
students will be made aware of the ethical, legal, and professional issues inherent in the counseling
process. Prerequisites: PYCL 503; PYCL 511: PYCL 512; PYCL 515; PYCL 550; PYCL
571; PYCL 635; PYCL 665; PYCL 685 with a grade of B or better and consent of adviser.
PYCL 0689 Continuing School Counseling Internship
This course is a continuation of School Counseling Internship. Student will be expected to develop
more advanced skills in working with students and families in school settings. Simultaneously,
continued emphasis will be placed upon ethical, legal, and professional issues. Prerequisite:
PYCL 0688 with a grade of B or better.
•
Course descriptions are subject to change
83
Master’s in Counseling (Online)
Core Course Requirements (33 credits)
PYCL 0502
PYCL 0507
PYCL 0512
PYCL 0570
Counseling Theories and Practice
Research and Evaluation for Counselors
Human Growth and Development
Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for
Counselors*
PYCL 0584
PYCL 0511
PYCL 0582
PYCL 0586
Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult
Psychopathology
Psychological Testing for Individual
Evaluation*
Substance Abuse*
Career and Lifestyle Assessment
Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
Group Theory & Practice
Couples and Family Counseling Strategies*
Introduction to Counseling Techniques*
Human Sexuality
Diagnosis and Treatment of Child and
Adolescent Psychopathology
Community Mental Health
PYCL 0660
PYCL 0666
Case Conceptualization and Treatment
Strategies*
PYCL 0669
PYCL 0680
PYCL 0681
PYCL 0682
PYCL 0683
Advanced Treatment Interventions*
Counseling Practicum*
Counseling Internship
Continuing Counseling Internship
Counseling Internship (Elective)
SA 0710
SA 0720
SA 0730
SA 0740
SA 0770
SA 0780
Foundations of Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Counseling in Community Settings
Issues in Clinical Supervision
Treatment of Co-occurring Disorders
Psychopharmacology of Illicit and Licit Drugs
Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum I
SA 0750
Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum II
(Elective)
PYCL 0608
PYCL 0612
PYCL 0631
PYCL 0632
Concentrations
Mental Health Counseling (60 total credits
includes 33 credits core courses and 27
credits required MHC course credits)
•
Only students in the mental health
counseling concentration are required
to successfully complete the
Comprehensive Final Examination
Substance Abuse Counseling (48 total
credits includes 33 credits core courses and
15 credits required SA course credits)
Substance Abuse Counseling and Education
(60 total credits includes 33 credits core
courses, 15 credits Substance Abuse
Counseling concentration and 12 credits
required SAED course credits)
PYCL 0635
PYCL 0645
SA 0770
SA 0780
SA 0790
MHC
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Substance Abuse Counseling Courses (15
credits)
Prevention Programming and Education
Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum I
Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum II
Substance Abuse Counseling III
Effective: Fall 2014
Applied Behavior Analysis (BCaBA) (45
total credits included 33 credits core courses
and 12 credits required ABA course credits)
Course
Elective from MHC Track
ABA 710
ABA 720
ABA 730
Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis
Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis
Behavioral Models of Assessment in Applied
Behavior Analysis
Professional Issues in Applied Behavior
Analysis
Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I
(Elective)
Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II
(Elective)
Seminar on Advanced Topics in Applied
Behavior Analysis (Elective)
ABA 750
ABA 760
ABA 770
EABA 0800
Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis
(BCBA) (51 total credits includes 33 credits
core courses and 18 credits required ABA
course credits )
ABA 710
ABA 720
ABA 730
ABA 740
ABA 750
ABA 0755
ABA 760
ABA 770
ABA 780
EABA 0800
85
Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis
Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis
Behavioral Assessment Models in Applied
Behavior Analysis
Evaluating Interventions in Applied Behavior
Analysis
Professional Issues in Applied Behavior
Analysis
Ethical Conduct for Applied Behavior
Analysts
Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I
(Elective)
Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II
(Elective)
Advanced Practicum in Applied Behavior
Analysis I (Elective)
Seminar on Advanced Topics in Applied
Behavior Analysis (Elective)
Applied Behavior Analysis/Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis Non-Degree Program
Applied Behavior Analysis (BCaBA) NonDegree Program
ABA 710
ABA 720
ABA 730
ABA 750
ABA 760
ABA 770
EABA 0800
ABA 710
Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis
(BCBA) Non-Degree Program
ABA 720
ABA 730
ABA 740
ABA 750
ABA 0755
ABA 760
ABA 770
ABA 780
EABA 0800
Principles of Applied Behavior
Analysis
Applications of Applied Behavior
Analysis
Behavioral Models of Assessment in
Applied Behavior Analysis
Professional Issues in Applied
Behavior Analysis
Practicum in Applied Behavior
Analysis I (Elective)
Practicum in Applied Behavior
Analysis II (Elective)
Seminar on Advanced Topics in
Applied Behavior Analysis (Elective)
Principles of Applied Behavior
Analysis
Applications of Applied Behavior
Analysis
Behavioral Assessment Models in
Applied Behavior Analysis
Evaluating Interventions in Applied
Behavior Analysis
Professional Issues in Applied
Behavior Analysis
Ethical Conduct for Applied Behavior
Analysts
Practicum in Applied Behavior
Analysis I (Elective)
Practicum in Applied Behavior
Analysis II (Elective)
Advanced Practicum in Applied
Behavior Analysis I (Elective)
Seminar on Advanced Topics in
Applied Behavior Analysis (Elective)
**Students can opt to combine tracks. All required course work must be completed.**
Students who would like to add or change tracks must complete a Specialty Track Request form
and submit to the Program Office for approval. In each concentration, students must satisfactorily
complete all curriculum requirements.
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MS Counseling Program
Core Course Descriptions
(Required for All Concentrations - 33 credits)
PYCL 0502 Counseling Theories and Practice
This course provides a foundation and overview of the fields of psychotherapy and counseling. It
reviews the various theories and techniques of counseling that are consistent with current
professional research and practice in the field of clinical mental health counseling. Additional
topics include professional roles and functions, credentialing, and general ethics in clinical mental
health.
PYCL 0507 Research and Evaluation for Counselors
This course seeks to prepare mental health and school counselors to be informed consumers of
research and evaluation. It covers basic statistics, research designs, and program evaluation within
the counseling and educational fields. It provides experience in developing accountability
measures and in reading research and evaluating reports applicable to multicultural populations.
PYCL 0512 Human Growth and Development
This course covers how developmental maturation and social learning impacts individuals across
the lifespan. Theory and research in social development and learning are covered in topics for
mental health and school counselors.
PYCL 0570 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for Counselors
This course covers standards for ethical, legal, and professional conduct in counseling. It considers
ethical and legal decisions that mental health counselors must make. Case examples, current
federal and state laws/statutes, ethical codes, and standards on assessment, diagnosis, practice, and
placement data are discussed in relation to counseling a variety of populations in multiple settings.
Prerequisite: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0584 Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Psychopathology
This course provides an introduction to the definition and study of abnormal or maladaptive
behavior, including a broad range of psychopathology relevant to the adult and aged populations.
Emphasis will be placed on a descriptive review of the major DSM-5 disorders, supplemented with
theoretical considerations of etiology and treatment approaches including the use of
psychopharmacological interventions.
PYCL 0608 Psychological Testing for Individual Evaluation
This course surveys frequently used tests of aptitude, interest, and personality. Test content,
purpose, psychometric properties, administration, and scoring procedures are compared and
evaluated. Issues of test use with culturally diverse populations are addressed. Prerequisite:
PYCL 0507.
PYCL 0612 Substance Abuse
This course investigates the etiology of substance-related and addictive disorders. Attention is
given to assessment and treatment in both individual and family therapy approaches. The course
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examines the role of co-occurring disorders in diagnosis and treatment planning and the role of
the professional counselor in working with this population. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL
0511.
PYCL 0631 Career and Lifestyle Assessment
This course surveys the major theories of career choice, planning, and development as well as
standardized methods of assessing vocational interests and aptitudes. Social, psychological, and
economic factors influencing career choice are examined. Emphasis will be placed on individual
and group career counseling skills across diverse populations.
PYCL 0632 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
This course addresses cultural diversity and its implications for counseling. It considers the
psychological impact of factors such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious preference,
socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and physical disability in a variety of counseling and
educational settings. Finally, it reviews counseling issues and strategies for counseling diverse
clients.
PYCL 0635 Group Theory and Practice
This course addresses group theory and practice in multiple settings with a variety of diverse
populations and age groups. Major themes include group dynamics, group process, and group
states for mental health and school counselors. Prerequisites for clinical mental health
counselors: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511 - For school counselors: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0645 Couples and Family Counseling Strategies
This skills course surveys current approaches to couples and family counseling with an emphasis
on a systemic conceptual model of family functioning and culturally sensitive therapeutic
interventions. It is designed to develop specific intervention competencies. Prerequisites: PYCL
0502; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0584 or consent of adviser.
Mental Health Counseling Concentration Course Descriptions
(27 credits)
PYCL 0511 Introduction to Counseling Techniques
This course is an overview of basic counseling skills. The major focus will be on the development
of fundamental counseling skills, including listening, empathy training, and basic interviewing.
Issues regarding the development of the therapeutic relationship, cultural diversity, and the impact
of the counselor on the counseling process will be covered. Prerequisite: PYCL 0502.
PYCL 0582 Human Sexuality
This course is an overview of the basics of sexual anatomy, physiology, and development. The
student will acquire an understanding of human sexual response, concepts of sex therapies, and
human sexual dysfunction. Also included are methods of contraception, sex and family planning,
variations of sexual behavior, and the importance of the counselor in the role of the educator.
PYCL 0586 Diagnosis and Treatment of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
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This course provides an introduction to the specific DSM-5 disorders and problematic
psychological states manifested during childhood and adolescence. It will also provide an
overview of currently used behavioral and psychopharmacological interventions with
psychologically troubled youth.
PYCL 0660 Community Mental Health
Principles, theories, and practices of community needs assessment and community interventions
are reviewed with a focus on the history, events, and attitudes that led to the development of
community mental health delivery systems. This course surveys the design and utilization of public
and private programs, networks and facilities within the mental health continuum of care, as well
as the interplay of public and private funding and service utilization. This course acquaints students
with the various approaches (prevention, consultation) and techniques (needs assessment, program
evaluation) used by counselors in community settings across diverse populations.
PYCL 0666 Case Conceptualization and Treatment Strategies
This course focuses on the processes of conceptualizing clinical cases from a variety of theoretical
orientations and translating them into effective treatment strategies. Clinical interviews, case
studies, and role-plays will be utilized to assist students in formulating hypotheses about client
difficulties and developing appropriate clinical interventions, which address those difficulties in a
culturally sensitive manner. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0584 or consent of
adviser.
PYCL 0669 Advanced Treatment Interventions
This course will present advanced training in counseling approaches and techniques. Students will
learn more about an integrative approach to counseling to further the development of their own
personal counseling model. Students will integrate their knowledge of case conceptualization,
treatment planning, and diagnosis with the practice of counseling techniques. Presentations,
recorded role-plays, and case studies will be utilized. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0511;
PYCL 0584; PYCL 0666.
PYCL 0680 Counseling Practicum
The student is required to spend a specified number of hours per week at a selected agency working
under supervision with clients. During that time, the student is expected to increase his or her
competence in the areas of basic interviewing, assessment, and counseling skills. Furthermore, the
student will be made more aware of the ethical, legal, and professional issues inherent in the
counseling process. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0507; PYCL 0511; PYCL 0570; PYCL
0584; PYCL 0586; PYCL 0635; PYCL 0666 with a grade of B or better. The student must file
an application for practicum and receive approval prior to registering for a practicum.
PYCL 0681 Counseling Internship
This course is an extension of Counseling Practicum. The student will be expected to develop more
advanced skills in interviewing, assessment, and intervention. Simultaneously, continued
emphasis will be placed upon ethical, legal, and professional issues, as well as development of a
personal theory of clinical mental health counseling. Prerequisite: PYCL 0680 with a grade of
B or better.
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PYCL 0682 Continuing Counseling Internship
This course is a continuation of Counseling Internship. Prerequisite: PYCL 0681 with a grade
of B or better.
PYCL 0683 Counseling Internship Elective
This course is a continuation of Continuing Counseling Internship. Prerequisite: PYCL 0682
with a grade of B or better.
Substance Abuse Counseling Concentration Course Descriptions
(15 credits)
SA 0710 Foundations of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Counseling in Community
Settings (3 credits)
This course will examine the public policy prevention strategies, treatment philosophies, and
legislative history of rehabilitation. Emphasis will be placed on federal legislation, state laws and
social action and their impact on the historical, current and future trends in the development of
organizational models and the delivery services in rehabilitative settings.
SA 0720 Issues in Clinical Supervision (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the many issues facing those who undertake
the professional practice of mental health and substance abuse counseling. This course will cover
ethical, legal and professional issues in clinical supervision as well as theoretical models,
supervision interventions and approaches. Other factors inherent in the development of a
professional identity will be addressed.
SA 0730 Treatment of Co-occurring Disorders (3 credits)
This course will describe the philosophies, theory and practices in the diagnosis, treatment, and
recovery and relapse prevention for individuals diagnosed with co-occurring disorders.
SA 0740 Psychopharmacology of Illicit and Licit Drugs (3 credits)
This course will review the physical and psychodynamic effects of legal and illegal drugs. Mental
disorders, symptomology, assessment measure for addicts and dual diagnosis, along with a
thorough examination of the DSM-IV.
SA 0770 Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum I (3 credits)
This course reviews the many facets of counseling the addicted client. Several topics will be
included while focusing on the individual such as, developmental models and dual diagnosis.
Discussions regarding other forms of compulsive behaviors will also be introduced. Methods
and techniques for intervention, evaluation and treatment will also be covered. Students are
encouraged to present topics of interest that arise at their field experience sites and discuss cases
for group discussion. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0507; PYCL 0584; PYCL 0570;
PYCL 0612; SA 0740 with a grade of B or better.
90
Elective Practicum
SA 0780 Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum II (3 credits)
This course reviews the many facets of counseling the addicted client. Several topics will be
included while focusing on the individual such as, developmental models and dual diagnosis.
Discussions regarding other forms of compulsive behaviors will also be introduced. Methods and
techniques for intervention, evaluation and treatment will also be covered. Students are encouraged
to present topics of interest that arise at their field experience sites and discuss cases for group
discussion. Prerequisites: SA 0770 with a grade of B or better.
Substance Abuse Counseling and Education Concentration Course Descriptions
(27 credits)
Substance Abuse Counseling Concentration Courses (15 credits)
SA 0710 Foundations of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Counseling in Community
Settings (3 credits)
This course will examine the public policy prevention strategies, treatment philosophies, and
legislative history of rehabilitation. Emphasis will be placed on federal legislation, state laws and
social action and their impact on the historical, current and future trends in the development of
organizational models and the delivery services in rehabilitative settings.
SA 0720 Issues in Clinical Supervision (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the many issues facing those who undertake
the professional practice of mental health and substance abuse counseling. This course will cover
ethical, legal and professional issues in clinical supervision as well as theoretical models,
supervision interventions and approaches. Other factors inherent in the development of a
professional identity will be addressed.
SA 0730 Treatment of Co-occurring Disorders (3 credits)
This course will describe the philosophies, theory and practices in the diagnosis, treatment, and
recovery and relapse prevention for individuals diagnosed with co-occurring disorders.
SA 0740 Psychopharmacology of Illicit and Licit Drugs (3 credits)
This course will review the physical and psychodynamic effects of legal and illegal drugs. Mental
disorders, symptomology, assessment measure for addicts and dual diagnosis, along with a
thorough examination of the DSM-IV.
SA 0750 Prevention Programming and Education (3 credits)
This course will describe the philosophies, practices, policies, and outcomes of the most generally
accepted and scientifically supported models of prevention programming.
SA 0770 Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum I (3 credits)
This course reviews the many facets of counseling the addicted client. Several topics will be
included while focusing on the individual such as, developmental models and dual diagnosis.
Discussions regarding other forms of compulsive behaviors will also be introduced. Methods and
91
techniques for intervention, evaluation and treatment will also be covered. Students are encouraged
to present topics of interest that arise at their field experience sites and discuss cases for group
discussion. Prerequisites: PYCL 0502; PYCL 0507; PYCL 0584; PYCL 0570; PYCL 0612;
SA 0740 with a grade of B or better.
SA 0780 Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum II (3 credits)
This course reviews the many facets of counseling the addicted client. Several topics will be
included while focusing on the individual such as, developmental models and dual diagnosis.
Discussions regarding other forms of compulsive behaviors will also be introduced. Methods and
techniques for intervention, evaluation and treatment will also be covered. Students are encouraged
to present topics of interest that arise at their field experience sites and discuss cases for group
discussion. Prerequisites: SA 0770 with a grade of B or better.
SA 0790 Substance Abuse Counseling Practicum III (3 credits)
This course reviews the many facets of counseling the addicted client. Several topics will be
included while focusing on the individual such as, developmental models and dual diagnosis.
Discussions regarding other forms of compulsive behaviors will also be introduced. Methods and
techniques for intervention, evaluation and treatment will also be covered. Students are
encouraged to present topics of interest that arise at their field experience sites and discuss cases
for group discussion. SA 0780 with a grade of B or better.
Elective Course from Mental Health Counseling concentration
Applied Behavior Analysis Concentration Course Descriptions
(45 credits)
ABA 0710 Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on the basic tenets of the science of applied behavior analysis that are the
underpinnings of effective teaching strategies. Students will study the philosophy and science of
applied behavior analysis, an overview of the areas of the field of ABA and its relation to education
and psychology, basic vocabulary and concepts in the field, strategies for measuring behavior,
basic strategies for increasing and decreasing behaviors of students, and ethical considerations in
the application of ABA in a variety of settings.
ABA 0720 Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will extend the Basic Principles and Concepts course to include application of the
principles of applied behavior analysis in educational and other therapeutic settings. It will focus
on behavioral intervention strategies and change procedures, evaluation and assessment strategies,
and methods of accountability in ABA interventions. In addition, focus will be placed on the
ethical use of intervention strategies and making decisions regarding ethical treatment for
individuals with a variety of challenges. The course will emphasize applications in applied
behavior analysis in education as well as other areas of study. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0730 Behavioral Models of Assessment in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on the variety of delivery models for services within the ABA model. Areas
of focus will include the behavioral models of development disabilities, treatment of autism,
92
organizational behavior management, school psychology, sports psychology, and education.
Principles and research in each area will be addressed and participants will employ a variety of
strategies from each area in the course assignments. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0750 Professional Issues in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on issues of professionalism and ethics for the practice of applied behavior
analysis in research and clinical settings. It will also address issues of working with systems to
effect positive change in organizations and for individuals through consultation and collaboration
with other professionals. Using applied behavior analysis to provide systems support and change
to enhance work as a consultant will be the underlying basis for the course. Prerequisite: ABA
0710
ABA 0760 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I (3 credits) (ELECTIVE)
This introductory practicum is designed to meet the supervision requirements for the BCBA or
BcaBA certification. Students must be engaged in practicum activities at least 20 hours per week
in a job that requires the application of ABA principles. Supervision will take place weekly in both
group and individual formats and will address both increasing and decreasing behaviors. Students
will be expected to collect and share data on their cases and employ strategies of behavioral
assessment and intervention with input from their supervisor. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0770 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II (3 credits) (ELECTIVE)
This course is designed to continue the supervision begun in ABA 0760 and has similar
requirements. Students will be expected to provide written reports and intervention plans as part
of their supervision. Students must be engaged in practicum activities at least 20 hours per week
in a position that requires the application of ABA principles. Supervision will take place weekly
in both group format and individual formats and will address both increasing and decreasing
behaviors.
EABA 0800 Seminar on Advanced Topics in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
(ELECTIVE)
This course will provide a comprehensive guided review of the necessary content required to fulfill
Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) requirements. As such, it is designed to prepare
students for this type of professional certification. Students will enhance their knowledge and skills
of the following areas of applied behavior analysis (ABA): principles of behavior analysis,
evaluating interventions, professional issues, behavioral assessment models, and applications of
ABA.
Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis Concentration Course Descriptions
(51 credits)
ABA 0710 Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on the basic tenets of the science of applied behavior analysis that are the
underpinnings of effective teaching strategies. Students will study the philosophy and science of
applied behavior analysis, an overview of the areas of the field of ABA and its relation to education
and psychology, basic vocabulary and concepts in the field, strategies for measuring behavior,
basic strategies for increasing and decreasing behaviors of students, and ethical considerations in
93
the application of ABA in a variety of settings.
ABA 0720 Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will extend the Basic Principles and Concepts course to include application of the
principles of applied behavior analysis in educational and other therapeutic settings. It will focus
on behavioral intervention strategies and change procedures, evaluation and assessment strategies,
and methods of accountability in ABA interventions. In addition, focus will be placed on the
ethical use of intervention strategies and making decisions regarding ethical treatment for
individuals with a variety of challenges. The course will emphasize applications in applied
behavior analysis in education as well as other areas of study. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0730 Behavioral Models of Assessment in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on the variety of delivery models for services within the ABA model. Areas
of focus will include the behavioral models of development disabilities, treatment of autism,
organizational behavior management, school psychology, sports psychology, and education.
Principles and research in each area will be addressed and participants will employ a variety of
strategies from each area in the course assignments. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0740 Evaluating Interventions in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on evaluation strategies used in both research and in the ethical provision
of interventions. It will cover a variety of measurement and assessment strategies for determining
the effectiveness of interventions on a single-subject and small group design. Additional focus will
be placed on the interpretation of the research literature to make sound decisions about assessment
and intervention strategies for a variety of populations.
ABA 0750 Professional Issues in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course will focus on issues of professionalism and ethics for the practice of applied behavior
analysis in research and clinical settings. It will also address issues of working with systems to
effect positive change in organizations and for individuals through consultation and collaboration
with other professionals. Using applied behavior analysis to provide systems support and change
to enhance work as a consultant will be the underlying basis for the course. Prerequisite: ABA
0710
ABA 0755 Ethical Conduct of Applied Behavior Analysts (3 credits)
This course will focus on the ethical practice of applied behavior analysis across clinical, research
and professional settings. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Guidelines for Responsible
Conduct for Behavior Analysts and Professional Disciplinary and Ethical Standards will be
reviewed, explored and applied. Additional focus will be given to common ethical dilemmas that
may arise during clinical research and practice in applied behavior analysis and strategies and
guidelines for resolving ethical issues. Prerequisite: ABA 0710 – REQUIRED for Advanced
ABA (BCBA) students who begin the program Fall 2014 and thereafter
ABA 0760 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I (3 credits) (ELECTIVE)
This introductory practicum is designed to meet the supervision requirements for the BCBA or
BcaBA certification. Students must be engaged in practicum activities at least 20 hours per week
in a job that requires the application of ABA principles. Supervision will take place weekly in both
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group and individual formats and will address both increasing and decreasing behaviors. Students
will be expected to collect and share data on their cases and employ strategies of behavioral
assessment and intervention with input from their supervisor. Prerequisite: ABA 0710
ABA 0770 Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II (3 credits) (ELECTIVE)
This course is designed to continue the supervision begun in ABA 0760 and has similar
requirements. Students will be expected to provide written reports and intervention plans as part
of their supervision. Students must be engaged in practicum activities at least 20 hours per week
in a position that requires the application of ABA principles. Supervision will take place weekly
in both group format and individual formats and will address both increasing and decreasing
behaviors.
ABA 0780 Advanced Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I (3 credits) (ELECTIVE)
This advanced practicum is designed to meet the supervision requirements for students seeking
their BCBA and will continue the work begun in the previous two practicums. Students must be
engaged in a position requiring the application of ABA principles at least 20 hours per week.
Supervision will take place weekly or bi-weekly in a group or individual format and will address
both increasing and decreasing behaviors. Students will be expected to collect and share data on
their cases and employ strategies of behavioral assessment and intervention with input from their
supervisor.
EABA 0800 Seminar on Advanced Topics in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
(ELECTIVE)
This course will provide a comprehensive guided review of the necessary content required to fulfill
Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) requirements. As such, it is designed to prepare
students for this type of professional certification. Students will enhance their knowledge and skills
of the following areas of applied behavior analysis (ABA): principles of behavior analysis,
evaluating interventions, professional issues, behavioral assessment models, and applications of
ABA.
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Licensure and Certification/Endorsement
State of Florida Licensure for Mental Health Counselors
Students interested in State of Florida licensure should request in writing a copy of licensure
requirements from the
Department of Health
Medical Quality Assurance
Board of Clinical Social Work,
Marriage and Family Therapy and
Mental Health Counseling
4052 Bald Cypress Way
BIN # C08
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3250
(850) 245-4474
www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa
Individual eligibility should be verified periodically through careful review of the state licensure
regulations, which are subject to change.
State of Florida Certification in Guidance and Counseling
The Master’s Degree in School Counseling program is approved by the Florida Department of
Education. Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation
of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher
preparation programs and advanced educator preparation programs at all university locations and
online. However, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the
institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, re-licensure, or other purposes.
All requirements for certification in the Guidance and Counseling subject specialty will be fulfilled
prior to degree conferral, including all curriculum and examination requirements.
Students who do not hold an active and valid teaching certificate will be required to complete
additional course work or submit documentation as required by the state. Students are responsible
for verifying requirements for certification in Guidance and Counseling with their local school
board certification office or with the Florida Department of Education. State of Florida approval
for certification does not necessarily apply to certification requirements in other states.
Certification requirements are subject to change.
Applicants who do not hold a current State of Florida Teaching Certificate must also complete
the following courses at NSU unless the respective course(s) was (were) taken previously in an
approved teacher education program:
1. RED 550 – Foundations of Reading for Content Area Teachers (3 credits)
2. TSOL 510 – Classroom TESOL, Theory and Strategies for Teachers (3 credits)
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2015 – 2016 Master’s Programs in Counseling,
Mental Health Counseling, Forensic Psychology
School Counseling, Experimental Psychology, and General Psychology
Estimated Expenses
The total expenses of students enrolled in master’s programs vary greatly depending upon
individual circumstances. While tuition, registration, the cost of books, and other fees* are
relatively constant for all students, other individual expenses may differ.
Tuition
Student Services Fee
Application Fee
Registration Fee
Late Registration Penalty
Late Payment Penalty
Textbooks
Practicum Fee
Professional Liability Insurance
Fingerprinting/Background Checks
Comprehensive Final Examination
Application for Degree Fee
Transcript Fee
$670 per credit hour**
$350 per semester (4 credits or more)
$175 per semester (less than 4 credits)
$50 (non-refundable)
$25 per semester
$30 per semester
$100 per semester
$90-200 per course (approximate cost)
$750 (Online Counseling Students - ONE TIME FEE)
$10 per semester
Fee determined by agency
No fee
$100
$10 per transcript
* Please note that all above fees are subject to change without notice.
** 2015-2016 tuition for the Experimental Psychology Program is $600 per credit hour
Refund Policy
Students have three working days from the date of signing an enrollment contract or financial
agreement with the university to cancel the contract and receive a full refund of any tuition and
registration fees paid. Further, a student shall receive a full refund of tuition and registration fees
paid by the student before the commencement of instruction if the student submits a written request
to the institution within three working days of the payment.
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SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
The Specialist Program (Psy.S.) in School Psychology was developed in response to the national
and state shortage of school psychologists and the increased public attention being paid to the
important role that psychologists play in the schools. The curriculum was designed following
consultation with the district department of psychological services, the Florida Department of
Education (DOE), the Florida Association of School Psychologists (FASP), the National
Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and the American Psychological Association
(APA).
The program consists of 79 semester hours that span three years of course work (including
practica) and one year of internship. The program is enriched through its more than 40
distinguished full-time faculty members that include nationally renowned professionals. Students
also enjoy the benefits of a diverse student body, hands on training within the center’s outpatient
mental health facility and other facilities, and variety of clinical training and research
opportunities.
The specialist program in school psychology is approved by the Florida Department of Education
(DOE). In addition, the specialist program in school psychology holds the designation of national
Recognition by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and has been approved
by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Nova Southeastern
University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation programs and
advanced educator preparation programs at all university locations and online. However, the
accreditation does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12
educators for professional development, re-licensure, or other purposes.
Specialist Program Admissions
Requirements
To be considered for admission to graduate study in the Specialist (Psy.S) Program in School
Psychology, applicants are required to present evidence of scholastic ability, significant interest
in the area of school psychology, interpersonal sensitivity, personal stability, and sound moral
character. Minimum requirements for admission for all applicants include a baccalaureate
degree in psychology, education or related field from a regionally accredited institution and the
completion of three credit hours in research and evaluation or statistics prior to the start of the
Psy.S. program. Additional criteria reviewed will include the following:
•
•
•
•
Relevant experience; professional accomplishment, or exceptional credentials
The quality of the applicant’s written statement of professional experiences
Professional/faculty letters of recommendation
Personal interview
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Admission Status
Applicants may be eligible for admission to the program in one of the following three
categories: Traditional Degree Seeking, Alternative Degree Seeking (based on relevant,
professional, or exceptional experience or accomplishment) and Non-Degree Seeking/Special
Student.
Traditional Degree Seeking – applicants who meet the following set of criteria in
addition to the above minimum requirements for admission may be considered for
acceptance into the program as a degree seeking student.
• A baccalaureate degree in psychology, education, or related field from a
regionally accredited institution.
• A 3.0 GPA based upon the last two years of undergraduate study preferred or a
3.4 GPA from a regionally accredited graduate program in psychology, education,
or related field based upon a minimum of 18 credit hours.
• Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) with a preferred
combined verbal and quantitative score of 297 (verbal 153, and quantitative 144)
or higher or a fortieth percentile score or better on the Miller’s Analogies Test
(MAT).
• Completion of three credit hours of undergraduate or graduate course work in
research and evaluation or statistics.
Alternative Degree Seeking – applicants who do not meet one or more of the criteria
for the degree seeking status listed above but have a baccalaureate degree in psychology,
education, or related field from a regionally accredited institution may be considered on
the basis of relevant, professional, or exceptional experience or accomplishment.
Applicants accepted into the program under Alternative Degree Seeking status must
meet the minimum requirements of three (3) credit hours of undergraduate or graduate
course work in research and evaluation or statistics. Admitted students will be required
to meet the standards for matriculation (See section on Degree Candidacy). Individuals
applying under this category must include a resume or other documentation
supporting their experience and credentials.
Non-Degree Seeking/Special Student – applicants who are graduates of or who are
currently enrolled in the following programs may request to take courses as a nondegree seeking student:
•
•
Clinical, counseling, or school psychology doctoral program
Specialist or master’s programs in school psychology
Requests for non-degree seeking/special student status will be accommodated on a seat
available basis. Course offerings will vary each semester. See the section of Admissions
Procedure Checklist for the Non-Degree Seeking/Special Student for information on
admissions procedures.
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A student must complete all courses for the degree with a grade point average of at least
3.0. The Specialist Program in School Psychology requires 79 semester hours of
graduate credit, including two practica and a full-time internship. All students will
be required to pass the comprehensive examination requirement as part of their degree
requirements. A candidate is expected to complete and graduate from the specialist
program within seven years from the date of first enrollment.
Application Procedures
Degree Seeking Students
1. Complete the specialist’s program application from.
2. Submit a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made payable to Nova
Southeastern University.
3. Submit two letters of recommendation with completed forms from professors,
employers, supervisors, or professionals most familiar with your work.
4. Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities
attended to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s
transcript, you are still required to submit an official transcript from the college or
university where you originally completed the course work. If the initial transcript
forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or final semester grades, you must forward
a final transcript as soon as this information becomes available.
5. Have official GRE or MAT scores mailed directly to the NSU Enrollment
Processing Services (EPS) (or provide documentation for alternative admission).
6. Complete the GPA calculation worksheet in its entirety.
7. Submit a two-page, typed statement of your professional experiences, including a
description of your clinical experience, background or experience within school
systems, research or program evaluation experience, and/or aspects of school
psychology in which you have greatest interest. Additionally, briefly describe your
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professional goals. A resume and supporting documentation for those applying
under the experience category.
8. If applicable, include a copy of your teaching certificate or other relevant
certificates.
•
Where applicable, applicants should submit TOEFL scores. Please refer to the section on
the
TOEFL.
International
Students
should
visit
http://www.nova.edu/
internationalstudents/prospective/i20.html for further information. Note: The university
accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative option to
the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required overall score for the
PTE-Academic is 54.
Non-Degree Seeking/Special Students
1. Complete the specialist’s program application form for non-degree seeking students.
2. Submit a check for $50 (nonrefundable application fee) made payable to Nova
Southeastern University.
3. Arrange for official transcripts from all regionally accredited colleges or universities
attended to be mailed to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
PO Box 299000
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
If courses from one college/university appear on another college’s/university’s
transcript, you are still required to submit an official transcript from the college or
university where you originally completed the course work. If the initial transcript
forwarded does not reflect degree conferral or final semester grades, you must forward
a final transcript as soon as this information becomes available.
4. Submit a typed letter explaining your needs, courses in which you wish to enroll,
and applicable timetables.
Transfer of Credit
All transfer credits must be awarded during the student’s first academic year in the specialist
program. Consideration will be given only to courses taken before matriculation in the specialist
program. For students entering during the fall semester, a request for transfer credit for first
semester courses must be made by August 15. Request for all other transfer credit must be made
by October 15. For students entering during the winter semester, a request for transfer credit for
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first semester courses must be made by December 15. Request for all other transfer credit must
be made by February 15.
Students requesting transfer of credit must submit a written request for transfer along with
supporting documentation to the specialist program administration. The student must provide
the Office of Academic Affairs with a syllabus and catalog description of courses for which
transfer is sought. Faculty members evaluating transfer courses may require the student to
provide further documentation and supporting material, such as class notes, and to meet with
them. Transfer credits are not taken into account when computing the student’s grade point
average. The maximum number of credits transferred that will be credited towards graduation
is fifteen (15).
Transfer of credits will be awarded when the course being evaluated meets all of the following
criteria:
1. It is a graduate level course taken at an accredited college, or university as a postbaccalaureate student. A graduate course is defined as one that would be credited
towards a post-bachelor’s degree at an institution where the course was taken. This
must be verified in the school’s bulletin or a letter from the chair of the department
and an official transcript.
2. It is evaluated as equivalent to a course in the program’s required curriculum.
3. It was completed no longer than five years before first enrollment in this program.
4. A grade of B or higher was received. A grade of P (Pass) or CR (Credit) or other
such grades cannot be accepted as equivalent to B unless it can be officially verified
as such.
5. The student must successfully demonstrate competence to the evaluating faculty
member for assessment courses.
It will be the responsibility of the student to satisfactorily demonstrate the equivalence of the
course(s) proposed in order for credits to be awarded. Course work submitted from a foreign
institution will be evaluated for equivalency in accordance with accreditation standards.
No transfer credit may be applied to practicum or internship.
Federal Regulations require that veteran students MUST report all prior credit and training, and
that the school MUST evaluate such and grant credit as appropriate, with training time and
tuition reduced proportionately and with the VA and student so notified.
Credits earned at Nova Southeastern University are transferable only at the discretion of the
receiving school.
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Provisional Admissions
Students may be provisionally admitted to a degree-seeking program based on a review of
unofficial transcripts or other specific program admission requirements. However, this
admission includes a condition that final and official documents and requirements must be
received within 90 calendar days from the start of the term. If these final and official documents
and/or requirements are not received by that time, the student will not be allowed to continue
class attendance. Financial aid will not be disbursed to a provisional/conditional student until
he or she has been fully admitted as a regular student (all admission requirements have been
approved by the college/program admissions office).
School Psychology Specialist Program Academic Policies
Registration and Residency
All degree-seeking and alternative degree-seeking students are considered full-time students
when they register for two or more courses per semester. This requirement is independent of
the number of transfer credits the student may receive. During the final internship year, students
are considered full-time when enrolled in the internship seminar course and completing an
approved internship.
In order to maintain an active student status, all students are to be in continuous registration
until they receive their degree unless prior approval is received from the program office.
Failure to remain in continuous registration will be considered formal withdrawal from
the program. Students who do not complete courses for two consecutive semesters will be
considered not in continuous enrollment and will be reviewed by the program office.
Students are considered to be full-time if they complete six credit hours each semester, with the
exception of the internship year when completion of two credit hours per semester (fall, winter,
summer) is required. A student on financial aid considering completing less than the scheduled
credit hours in any given semester, should discuss this with the specialist program office. It is
the responsibility of the student to seek advisement of options available for completing the
specialist program.
For certain forms of financial aid, full-time and part-time status may be defined differently. Aid
during the summer semester may require summer registration. Students applying for financial
assistance MUST clarify this with the Office of Student Financial Planning.
En Route Master of Science in School Psychology
Students enrolled in the Psy.S. program in school psychology may earn as an intermediate
degree, the Master of Science in School Psychology. The curriculum for this degree consists of
all courses in the first two years of the model specialist curricula (51 credit hours). Courses
transferred into the Nova Southeastern specialist program do not count toward this degree.
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Conferral of this degree will not have met the educational requirements for certification or
licensure in the State of Florida and individuals should not expect to provide psychological
services as an independent practitioner. Rather, this degree should be utilized by the Psy.S.
student to demonstrate master’s level achievement in school psychology, or qualify for master’s
level of employment.
Students completing the above requirements may complete a degree application from and pay
the required fee to receive the degree, however they may not participate in the graduation
ceremony.
Matriculation Requirements (Degree Candidacy)
Students who are admitted into graduate study at the specialist level under the alternative
degree-seeking plan are reviewed for degree candidacy (matriculation) after completion of the
first four courses (12 credits) in which they are enrolled.
During the formal review for matriculation, students’ academic performance in their first four
courses will be examined. Students must earn a grade point average of 3.0 or above in the four
designated courses to be matriculated. Students who receive two grades below a “B” or a
grade of “F” in any of the four designated courses will not be matriculated and will be
withdrawn from graduate study.
Prior to the formal matriculation review, should a student receive a second grade below “B” or
a grade of “F”, the student will automatically be withdrawn from graduate study. Under no
circumstances will students who achieve a grade point average of 2.5 or below in the four
designated courses be permitted to take graduate level courses in the College of Psychology
Program.
Students with a grade point average greater than 2.5 but less than 3.0 for the four designated
courses will be maintained in a non-matriculated status. No more than four additional courses
may be taken without achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0.
Academic Standing (Following Matriculation)
The grading policy for all graduate programs in the College of Psychology requires students to
maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. In addition, other minimum
requirements are in existence. Failure to meet these requirements will result either in academic
probation or dismissal as detailed in the student handbook.
In all courses, a grade of A, B, C, F, or P will be assigned based upon the individual instructor’s
assessment and evaluation of the student’s work. A grade of “I” (incomplete) indicates that the
student has not completed the course requirements during the scheduled time and is given only
with the instructor’s approval. A student will not be permitted to register for a sequential course
when a grade of “I” (incomplete) or “F” (failure) has been received in a prerequisite course.
104
Attendance
Students are expected to attend all scheduled learning activities including classes, lectures, and
seminars. Anticipated absences should be cleared in advance with the instructor. Absences from
any part of eight-weekend format courses will necessitate a withdrawal from the course.
Excessive absences from semester length courses may result in a lower grade at the instructor’s
discretion or may necessitate a withdrawal from the course.
Clinical Training
Practica
The practicum sequence in the specialist program is intended to provide the student with
exposure to a broad range of school psychological service delivery models and closely
supervised assessment and intervention experiences. Practicum settings include placements in
local school districts and clinics. These practicum settings give students the opportunity to work
with a diverse range of clients and problems. Students must be matriculated and complete the
prerequisite course work prior to enrolling in the practica.
Practicum responsibilities may include small-group skills training, behavioral and academic
observations and screenings, consultation, teacher in-service, individual and test administration
and scoring, involvement in the exceptional student education process, and other experiences
relevant to the practicum setting. Students employed by the school system will be required
to obtain permission from their principal or designated school official for release time to
pursue their practicum. Students may be required to take some leave or make other
necessary arrangements to fulfill this requirement. Please be advised that waiver of the
practicum experience for any reason will not be permitted.
Two practicum courses are required to afford students an opportunity to work with a variety of
students, parents, and teachers over time. Students are ineligible for practicum if they have not
completed prerequisites courses, have not passed or remediated all DOE accomplished practices
associated with prerequisite courses, are on academic probation, or have been evaluated as not
ready. Practica are generally taken in the second and third year of the program.
The student will complete the designated experience and hours in a public school or applied
setting and participate in a regular seminar class. Seminars are typically held on evenings during
the week and/or on weekends. Specific details on practicum are provided to students at the
appropriate time in their program. Please be advised that during practicum, students will
also be enrolled in regularly scheduled classes. Further practicum instructions, and
paperwork for security clearance procedures will be provided to students prior to practicum
registration.
HIPAA Training
Students entering the program are required to complete the NSU online HIPAA training (Health
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) during their first semester of enrollment.
Documentation of completion must be provided to the program office during this semester.
105
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Specialist Program Internship
A major applied component of specialist training is the internship in school psychology. All
students are required to successfully complete a supervised field placement in an approved
public or private school consisting of a minimum of 1,200 clock hours. Students should plan to
work 40 hours per week over the course of an academic year. The internship is typically
completed in one calendar year and typically follows the completion of the prerequisite course
work with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
It is the student’s responsibility to investigate and apply for internship opportunities. Prior to
submitting applications, students’ eligibility must be reviewed. The program office will verify
the student’s eligibility to accept and subsequently begin an internship. Specific guidelines and
procedures for the internship application process will be provided to students at the appropriate
time in their curriculum.
To accept an internship placement, a student must be in good academic standing and must have
successfully completed all requirements as described above.
Evaluation of Specialist Students
Each student is evaluated on an ongoing basis while enrolled in the program, including during
the practicum and internship experience. The purpose of evaluation is to provide students with
relevant feedback concerning their performance and to serve as a screening process in order to
ensure high standards for the profession of school psychology. Relevant information including
practicum and internship evaluations is available in the Handbook of Field-based Training
Experiences in School Psychology.
If, for any reason, a faculty member has reason to question the satisfactory progress of any
student in the program, he/she will discuss the problem with the student. If the problem persists,
the faculty member may bring the issue to the attention of the program administration and the
College of Psychology faculty. Appropriate faculty will be asked for additional review and
comment. Students may be referred to the Professional Standing Committee for ethical
violations or on-going behavior concerns.
Professional Standing Committee
The Professional Standing Committee of the College of Psychology is appointed by the dean
of the center and serves in a variety of capacities related to the review of student professional
standing matters. The committee consists of faculty, a student representative and other members
as appointed by the dean.
The committee may be asked to review alleged violations of the University Student Code of
Conduct, including academic standards and ethical standards of the field. In addition, the
committee may conduct reviews concerning emotional, or behavioral problems serious enough
to suggest interference with professional functioning, academic performance, or performance
in a clinical practicum or internship setting.
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The purpose of the committee’s review and recommendations are not limited to disciplinary
actions; but may encompass efforts to remediate a deficiency or problems so that the student
can continue his or her education and function competently as a professional. Committee
activities are designed to insure a process by which all relevant facts can be determined,
including providing the student with full opportunity to present important information. Actions
the committee may recommend to the dean could include, but are not limited to remediation,
referral, warning or sanctions up to suspension or termination.
In instances of complaints regarding violations of Student Conduct and Academic
Responsibility, the dean may charge the committee with conducting a formal investigation into
the facts pertaining to allegations of misconduct. In such cases the committee will adhere to
professional standing committee guidelines that insure a timely and complete review of the
facts. The process will insure that the student and involved parties have the opportunity to
present relevant information.
Degree Completion Requirements
Students must complete the program within seven years from the date of first enrollment. This
means that students are expected to graduate with the specialist degree within this time period.
In the event that a matriculated student who has been in continuous enrollment does not
complete all requirements within the seven year time limit, he or she must enroll in the specialist
program and:
1. Maintain full-time status (minimum six (6) credits per semester, excluding summer
sessions).
2. Complete remaining degree requirements, which will include any course work that
is more than seven (7) years old.
In order to remain an active and matriculated student, registration is required in every semester
until the completion of degree requirements unless a leave of absence has been granted. Failure
to remain in continuous registration will be deemed the student’s formal withdrawal from
the program. All other program, center, and university requirements will be in effect.
Comprehensive Examination
To demonstrate mastery of subject area competencies in school psychology and as part of the
degree requirements, all specialist students will be required to sit for the following written
comprehensive examinations:
1. Florida Teacher Certification Examination – General Knowledge Test (GK) (Year
One)
2. Florida Teacher Certification Examination - Professional Education Test (PED)
(Year Two)
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3. Florida Teacher Certification Examination - Subject Area Test in School
Psychology (SAE) (Year 3/4) (required for certification in the state of Florida)
4. Praxis II Subject Assessment Examination – School Psychologist (Year 4) (required
for licensure in the state of Florida and NCSP certification)
Passing scores are required on the FTCE General Knowledge Test, The FTCE Professional
Education Test, and the FTCE Subject Area Test in School Psychology in order to graduate.
Further information will be provided to students at the appropriate time in their curriculum.
Certification/Licensure
The certification and licensure of school psychologists is regulated at the state level and as such
may vary from state to state. Individual eligibility should be verified through careful review of
the certification and licensure regulations for the state in which you plan to reside to determine
its specific requirements.
The School Psychology Program meets Florida certification requirements and is DOE
approved. For additional information about certification, contact the Florida Department of
Education at (850) 488-2317 (www.firn.edu/doe). The State of Florida currently licenses school
psychologist under Chapter 490, Florida Statutes. Applicants interested in licensure may
contact the Department of Health, School Psychology at (850) 488-0595 (www.doh.state.fl.us)
for additional information.
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Specialist Degree (Psy.S.) Program in School Psychology
Model Curriculum
Course # Course Name
General Required Courses:
PSY 0700 Learning and Human Development
PSY 0710 Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children
PSY 0715 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
PSY 0720 Biological Bases of Behavior
PSY 0735 Organization and Operation of Schools
PSY 0750 Counseling Theories and Techniques
PSY 0770 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for School Psychologists
PSY 0798 Seminar in School Psychology: Introduction
PSY 0799 Seminar in School Psychology: Current Topics
Assessment Required Courses:
PSY 0765 Applied Behavioral Assessment
PSY 0780 Academic Assessment for Intervention
PSY 0782 Cognitive Assessment I: Theory, Research, and Practice with Lab
PSY 0784 Cognitive Assessment II: Linking Assessment to Intervention
PSY 0786 Assessment of Personality and Social Emotional Functioning for
PSY 0792 Intervention
Comprehensive Data-Based Assessment: Integrated Report
Interventional Required Courses:
PSY 0705 Social and Cultural Bases of Assessment and Counseling
PSY 0730 Instructional Strategies for Students with Diverse Needs
PSY 0755 School Consultation Skills
PSY 0760 Contemporary Clinical Interventions for School Psychologists
PSY 0775 Theories and Research in Reading Instruction, Assessment, and
RED 0550 Intervention
Foundations of Reading for Content Area Teachers
Methodology and Research Required Courses:
PSY 0740 Educational Statistics
PSY 0745 Issues and Techniques in Research Design
Practicum and Internship Required Courses:
PSY 0800 Practicum in School Psychology: School Based
PSY 0805 Practicum in School Psychology: Applied Skills
PSY 0810 Internship in School Psychology
Total Required Credits:
110
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1.5
1.5
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
79 credits
Specialist Degree (Psy.S.) Program in School Psychology
Course Descriptions
PSY 0700 Learning and Human Development (3 credits)
This course covers how developmental maturation and social learning shape personality, in
childhood and adulthood. Theory and research in social development and learning are covered in
topics such as attachment, aggression, sexuality, morality, self-regulation, and self-concept.
Applications to the school setting are examined.
PSY 0705 Social and Cultural Bases of Assessment and Counseling (3 credits)
This course covers issues involved in the assessment and counseling of culturally and linguistically
diverse students. Focus is on the psychological impact of gender, race, ethnicity, culture, religious
preference, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. This course also
examines innovative assessment methods for clients of diverse backgrounds based upon individual
characteristics, strengths, and needs. Emphasis will be placed on differentiating between the
normal stages of second language acquisition and handicapping conditions.
PSY 0710 Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children (3 credits)
This course addresses the history, laws, policies, and practices in exceptional student education.
Included are the definitions, prevalence, causes, and assessment techniques utilized with the
various exceptionalities within special education.
PSY 0715 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the specific disorders and problematic psychological states
manifested during childhood and adolescence. Currently used interventions with psychologically
troubled youths will be examined.
PSY 0720 Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)
This course covers theory, research, and applications for the following topics: structure, function,
and disorders of the nervous system; physiological mechanisms and disorders in vegetative and
intellectual functions; and psychophysiological methods and technology.
PSY 0730 Instructional Strategies for Students with Diverse Needs (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of curriculum development and related research as they apply
specifically to students with various styles, exceptionalities, and achievement levels. Theory and
research regarding teaching and instructional planning for at-risk and exceptional students with
unique needs are emphasized.
PSY 0735 Organization and Operation of Schools (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an overview of educational administration. Emphasis is placed
on issues related to special education, school and community-based resources, and alternative
service delivery systems. The role of the school psychologist as well as that of other support and
itinerant staff is explored.
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PSY 0740 Educational Statistics (3 credits)
This course covers basic inferential and descriptive statistics as it applies to educational data and
problems. Emphasis will be placed on the application of statistics to program evaluation in school
psychology.
PSY 0745 Issues and Techniques in Research Design and Program Evaluation (3 credits)
This course will focus on research methodology and scientific thought. Students will consider a
variety of ways to conduct evaluation and critically evaluate data. Course material will examine
basic experimental design (between and within groups), single subject experiments, group
experimental design, non-experimental design (correlational research, case study, meta-analyses),
and program evaluation. Validity issues in research (internal and external) and research ethics are
emphasized. Focus will be placed upon the evaluation of research, translation of research into
practice, and the ability to plan and conduct program evaluations for the improvement of service
provision within the schools.
PSY 0750 Counseling Theories and Techniques (3 credits)
This course surveys the field of counseling. It considers the various theories of counseling and
issues of counseling in school settings, and focuses on the development of school counseling skills
including basic interviewing and other assessment skills, with an emphasis on therapeutic listening
skills. Stress will also be placed on the acquisition of skills related to empathy, the counselorcounselee relationship, and the establishment of a therapeutic alliance in the context of cultural
diversity. Teaching methods will include modeling and role-playing, along with didactic
presentations and readings.
PSY 0755 School Consultation Skills (3 credits)
This course focuses on developing specific techniques including communication and interpersonal
skills necessary in effective consultation at the individual, group, and systems levels. Integration
of the various aspects of school psychology consultation, including knowledge of behavioral,
mental health, collaborative, and other consultation models and their application within the school
setting are explored. Emphasis is placed upon team building. Case examples are discussed, and
opportunities for skill development are provided through role-playing.
Prerequisite: PSY 0765 or permissions of instructor
PSY 0760 Contemporary Clinical Interventions for the School Psychologist (3 credits)
The course focuses on an understanding of critical psychological issues when dealing with
children, adolescents, and adults in school settings. Topics covered include substance abuse,
suicide, violence, divorce, HIV/AIDS, and other contemporary clinical issues. Primary and
secondary prevention strategies will be examined that promote the mental health and physical well
being of students. Short-term individual psychotherapy techniques as well as structured group
therapy programs will be explored.
Prerequisite: PSY 0750
PSY 0765 Applied Behavioral Assessment (3 credits)
This course covers basic behavior analytic principles and methods in applied settings. The
principles of learning and applied behavior management techniques within the classroom and
school setting will be addressed. Particular emphasis is also placed on the functional assessment
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of behavior as well as techniques in counseling parents and relevant school personnel in behavioral
intervention.
PSY 0770 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for School Psychologists (3 credits)
This course covers standards for professional conduct in school psychology and educational law.
Ethical and legal decisions that school psychologists must make, such as scope of professional
competence, confidentiality, legal rights of students, duty to warn and protect, and value
differences with students are discussed. Ethical use of computer generated reports as well as issues
in report writing will be explored. Case examples, current regulations, standards on utilizing
assessment data, and issues in counseling culturally diverse students are explored. Emphasis will
similarly be placed on the history and foundation of school psychology, service models and
methods, as well as public policy.
PSY 0775 Theories & Research in Reading Instruction, Assessment, and Intervention (3
credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide an analysis of current research and theory in the area of
reading, and to develop an understanding of the implications of this research for assessment and
intervention. Exploration of the various aspects of instruction and curricula that may require
modifications in order to facilitate academic achievement will be discussed. Emphasis will also
be placed on functional academic/instructional assessment and intervention for students
experiencing reading difficulties.
RED 0550 Foundations of Reading for Content Area Teachers (3 credits)
This course is designed for students who are not enrolled in a Reading Education Program. The
focus of this course is to offer a general overview of literacy study, including major aspects of
written, oral, and visual literacy and the reading process. Additionally, students will learn
classroom instructional strategies for reading across the curriculum with specific emphasis on
content areas such as social studies, science, language arts, and mathematics.
PSY 0780 Academic Assessment for Intervention (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the administration, interpretation, and communication of
psychoeducational assessment results and the link to educational intervention. Emphasis is placed
upon planning and conducting comprehensive assessment of learning problems. Focus will
include integrating and presenting results verbally and within the context of a psychoeducational
report. Candidates will identify appropriate data gathering methods (e.g., background information,
checklists, record reviews, assessment instruments, interviews, behavioral observations, and
curriculum-based assessments). Candidates will synthesize data from multiple sources to make
appropriate recommendations and to determine response to evidence-based interventions via
progress monitoring.
PSY 0782 Cognitive Assessment I: Theory, Research, and Practice with Lab (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide an in-depth overview of the theories, research, and practice in
assessing the cognitive functioning of children, adolescents, and adults. Fundamentals of test
construction, its psychometric properties, and the history and current status of cognitive theory
will be examined. Candidates will be trained to administer, score (including computer scoring),
interpret and communicate the results of cognitive assessment data to answer educationally
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relevant questions. Psychological issues in intelligence testing, as well as ethical and legal
considerations will be explored. Emphasis is placed upon the principal aspects of interviewing,
establishment of rapport, behavioral observation, interpretation, and report writing. Special
emphasis will be placed upon developing foundational assessment skills that can be generalized to
other measures.
PSY 0784 Cognitive Assessment II: Linking Assessment to Intervention (3 credits)
This course explores the rationale for selection of cognitive measures based upon the referral
questions, as well as variables such as cultural and linguistic background, and/or handicapping
conditions. Focus will be placed on interviewing, behavioral observations, test interpretation, and
reporting assessment results, with the goal of linking assessment results to intervention.
Prerequisite: PSY 0782
PSY 0786 Assessment of Personality and Social Emotional Functioning for Intervention (3
credits)
This course provides an introduction to the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of
the major implicit or performance-based measures of personality and social-emotional functioning
(including apperception, drawing, and sentence completion measures) as well as major explicit or
self-report measures. The specific values of implicit/performance-based measures and
explicit/self-report measures and associated research findings will be discussed. An introduction
to integrating assessment materials into coherent case conceptualizations, evidence-based
intervention plans, and the writing of psychological test reports that provide personalized,
collaborative, culturally-informed, and highly involving test feedback to clients and families will
be provided.
PSY 0792 Comprehensive Data-Based Assessment: Integrated Report (3 credits)
The primary goal of this course is to teach the candidate how to write a well-integrated and
meaningful psychoeducational report and to learn the art of providing feedback to the person being
evaluated, parents, teachers, and other professional as appropriate. Starting with basic data
obtained through interview and developmental history, the candidate is guided through the process
of clinical inference; learning to select appropriate data collection procedures; to examine and
analyze the data; to formulate integrative hypotheses; and to generate a synthesized, integrated,
and meaningful psychoeducational report useful to all target audiences. Emphasis will also be
placed on understanding the legal issues involved in psychoeducational report writing.
Prerequisites: PSY 0765, PSY 0780, PSY 0782, PSY 0784, PSY 0786
PSY 0798 Seminar in School Psychology: Introduction (1.5 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of school psychology from a
historical and current perspective. The roles and functions of school psychologists will be
emphasized, along with an introduction to the expected competencies required of school
psychologists by state and national accrediting bodies. Legal and ethical issues, professional
association involvement, and research and technology within the practice of school psychology
will also be addressed.
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PSY 0799 Seminar in School Psychology: Current Topics (1.5 credits)
The purpose of this seminar is to discuss contemporary issues and challenges in the field of school
psychology and education. The multiple roles and functions of school psychologists in assessment,
prevention, and intervention contexts will be examined. An introduction to current educational
issues and legislation influencing the profession, the impact of cultural and linguistic diversity in
the provision of school psychology services, and best practices in the field will also be considered.
PSY 0800 Practicum in School Psychology: School Based (3 credits)
This 100 hour practicum is designed to provide a comprehensive field experience in a school
setting which allows candidates to further their understanding of the roles and functions of school
psychologists practicing in PK-12 settings. Under close supervision, candidates will develop skills
in assessment, consultation, and intervention planning, implementation, and evaluation.
Prerequisites: PSY 0700, PSY 0710, PSY 0715, PSY 0735, PSY 0750
PSY 0805 Practicum in School Psychology: Applied Skills (3 credits)
The 150 hour practicum is designed to facilitate the development of competencies in the areas of
assessment, consultation, and intervention with expanded populations in varied settings.
Candidates will complete psychoeducational evaluations, as well as intervention case studies for
students with academic, behavioral, and social emotional difficulties.
Prerequisites: PSY 0755, PSY 0770, PSY 0780, PSY 0782, PSY 0784, PSY 0786, PSY 0792
PSY 0810 Internship in School Psychology (6 credits)
The student is required to complete a supervised field placement in a public or private school
setting or related agency, covering a 30-week period of 1,200 hours. This will provide the student
with an opportunity to demonstrate competencies and refine skills in the areas of assessment,
consultation, and intervention.
Prerequisites: PSY 0760, PSY 0800, PSY 0805
* Course descriptions are subject to change
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2015 – 2016 School Psychology Specialist Program
Estimated Expenses
Students are expected to pay tuition in full at the time of registration. Students receiving
financial aid must familiarize themselves with the requirements of that office with
regard to payments and may defer payment only if they have been officially notified of
an award. Once a loan check is disbursed, students will be responsible for making all
appropriate payments.
Tuition
Application Fee
Registration Fee
Late Registration Penalty
Student Services Fee
Professional Liability Insurance Fee
Transcript Fee
Application for Degree Fee
•
$730 per credit hour
$50 (nonrefundable)
$25 per semester
$30
$350 per semester (4 credits
or more)
$175 per semester (less than
4 credits)
$10 per semester
$10 per transcript
$100
Please note that all above fees are subject to change without notice.
Some courses may require additional fees for laboratory and/or equipment (e.g. calculator,
testing materials) and supplemental course materials. Students need to make arrangements for
Internet access and pay the corresponding fee. NSU requires that all students maintain one
official university-assigned computer account that is used to access major computing resources,
including electronic mail. All official electronic mail communications directed to CPS students
will be sent exclusively to NSU-assigned computer accounts to ensure timely and accurate
delivery of information. Students may forward their NSU generated electronic mail to external
locations, but do so at their own risk.
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DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
The Doctoral Program in School Psychology (Psy.D.) builds upon the Center’s specialist program
in school psychology which is approved by the Florida Department of Education (DOE) and
conditionally approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The doctoral
curriculum meets the Florida state licensure requirements as both a school psychologist and a
psychologist under Chapter 490, Florida Statutes. Moreover, the curriculum is consistent with the
APA Accreditation Guidelines and Principles of the American Psychological Association (APA),
and APA accreditation is currently being sought. School psychology doctoral programs that earn
APA accreditation are eligible for NASP program approval and will be sought by the program
faculty.
The program is committed to a practitioner-informed-by-science training model. Candidates are
prepared as highly competent problem-solvers who draw upon a strong foundation in core
knowledge areas of school psychology to promote the educational and social-emotional
competence of children. Moreover, candidates are prepared to offer the continuum of empirically
supported services, including prevention, assessment, consultation, and intervention. Graduate
education builds upon the crucial base of scientific knowledge and develops the skills necessary
for professional competence. It prepares candidates to be lifelong interpreters and utilizers of
research through a mentorship in the process of scientific investigation. Candidates develop a
capstone Directed Study that demonstrates their research interpretation and utilization proficiency.
Intensive, sequential practica and course-specific tasks are designed to provide candidates with
opportunities for the application and integration of methods of psychological assessment and
intervention under close supervision. Internship provides the culminating training experience in
preparing the candidate as a health service provider. Additional supervised experience may be
required for licensure as a psychologist. Candidates should carefully review state licensure and
certification laws and rules to ensure adequate preparation for credentialing, including the number
of internship hours which must be spent in schools.
Program Goals
The school psychology program espouses a practitioner-informed-by-science model of training
which prepares graduates to serve the educational, behavioral, and emotional needs of all children
and youth. In keeping with this model, three broad goals for training are outlined below.
Curricular objectives are consistent with the state and national standards for the graduate education
of school psychologists as defined by the American Psychological Association (APA) Guidelines
and Principles and Competency Benchmarks; the Adopted Subject Area Competencies and Florida
Educator Accomplished Practices of the Florida Department of Education; the Standards for
Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology (Standards for the Credentialing of
School Psychologists, National Association of School Psychologists [NASP], 2010).
Goal 1: To prepare candidates with comprehensive training in evidenced-based practices in
assessment, consultation, and intervention with diverse populations.
Goal 2: To provide candidates with the training to evaluate scientific findings and evaluate
professional practice.
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Goal 3: To facilitate in candidates a professional identity that incudes ethical practice as well as
leadership advocacy and service in meeting the needs of diverse populations.
School Psychology Doctoral Program Admissions Requirements:
Candidates will be selected for admission based upon the evaluation of the following criteria:
1.
A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution (must be awarded
prior to beginning the doctoral program). Applicants with a professional degree(s) in school
psychology will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
2. A minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point average on a 4.0 scale OR a 3.5 graduate
grade point average on a 4.0 scale based on a minimum of 18 semester hours that must be
completed by the end of the fall semester prior to beginning the doctoral program.
3. Eighteen semester hours of coursework in psychology
4. Three credit hours in statistics (examples of acceptable statistics courses include
Introduction to Statistics, Probability and Statistics, Statistical Methods in Psychology,
Inferential Statistics, and Quantitative Psychology). A course in research methods/design
will not satisfy this requirement.
The standards required for admission reflect concern for the safety and well-being of clients whom
its graduates will eventually serve in clinical/school situations. Candidates for the degree must
possess, with or without reasonable accommodation, multiple abilities and skills including
intellectual, conceptual, integrative, and quantitative abilities. Moreover, intrapersonal,
communication, behavioral, and personal attributes including empathy, emotional self-awareness,
and emotional maturity are similarly crucial for success. The above pre-requisites are necessary
for an applicant to be considered for a doctoral program. Higher GPA and GRE scores indicating
greater potential to complete doctoral-level work, will enhance an application. Other factors
considered include: (1) previous courses taken, (2) previous clinical and research experience, (3)
evidence of interest in psychology, (4) the applicant’s personal statement, and (5) letters of
recommendation.
Application Procedures
The following information is required as part of the application (available to download at
www.cps.nova.edu):
1. A completed and signed application form.
2. A statement of your professional experiences, including a description of your experience
and your professional goals.
3. A check for the $50 nonrefundable application fee ($100 total if applying to both
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programs) made payable to Nova Southeastern University.
4.
The completed application worksheet.
5. The general Graduate Record Examination (GRE), including the verbal, quantitative,
and analytical writing scores. A combination score greater than 1000 (or 297 on the
revised scoring scale) for GRE verbal and quantitative is preferred. The GRE
Psychology test is recommended, but not required.
6. Three letters of recommendation, in addition to the enclosed forms, from professors or
supervisors most familiar with your work must be sent directly to the address listed
below.
7. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities you attended. If an initial transcript
does not reflect degree conferral or final semester grades, you must forward a final
transcript to the below address as this information becomes available.
8. Where applicable, foreign nationals should submit TOEFL scores. Note: The university
accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative option to
the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required overall score for the
PTE-Academic is 54.
9. Curriculum vitae.
10. Prospective students who meet the above requirements must also be selected to be
interviewed in order to determine appropriateness for the program.
Materials should be submitted to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
P.O. Box 299000
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-9905
Provisional Admission
Students may be provisionally admitted to a degree-seeking program based on a review of
unofficial transcripts or other specific program admission requirements. However, this admission
includes a condition that final and official documents and requirements must be received within
90 calendar days from the start of the term. If these final and official documents and/or
requirements are not received by that time, the student will not be allowed to continue class
attendance. Financial aid will not be disbursed to a provisional/conditional student until he or she
has been fully admitted as a regular student (all admission requirements have been approved by
the college/program admissions office).
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The University welcomes applications from all qualified candidates. Applications are reviewed
after all required documents have been received. No waivers of the admission policies stated above
will be offered.
Transfer of Credits
All transfer credits must be awarded during the student’s first academic year in the doctoral
program. Consideration will be given only to graduate level courses taken before beginning
coursework in the doctoral program. A request for transfer credit for first semester courses must
be made by July 15. Request for all other transfer credit must be made by October 15 of the year
in which students enter the program.
Students requesting transfer of credit must submit a written request for transfer along with
supporting documentation to the doctoral program administration. The student must provide the
Program Director with a syllabus and catalog description of courses for which transfer is sought.
Faculty members evaluating transfer courses may require the student to provide further
documentation and supporting material, such as class notes, and may request that they meet with
the student to obtain clarification of materials. The resulting evaluations are reviewed by the
College of Psychology Director of Academic Affairs who makes the final determination. Transfer
credits are not taken into account when computing the student’s grade point average. The
maximum number of credits transferred that will be credited towards graduation is fifteen (15).
Transfer of credits will be awarded when the course being evaluated meets all of the following
criteria:
1. It is a graduate level course taken at an accredited college or university as a postbaccalaureate student. A graduate course is defined as one that would be credited towards
a post-bachelor’s degree at an institution where the course was taken. This must be verified
in the school’s bulletin/catalog or a letter from the chair of the department and an official
transcript.
2. It is evaluated as equivalent in content to a course in the program’s required curriculum.
Credits will not be awarded for electives.
3. It was completed no longer than five years before first enrollment in this program.
4. A grade of B or higher was received. A grade of P (Pass) or CR (Credit) or other such
grades cannot be accepted as equivalent to B unless it can be officially verified as such.
5. The student must successfully demonstrate competence to the evaluating faculty member
for assessment courses.
It will be the responsibility of the student to satisfactorily demonstrate the equivalence of the
course(s) proposed in order for credits to be awarded. Course work submitted from a foreign
institution will be evaluated for equivalency in accordance with accreditation standards.
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No transfer credit may be applied to meet the academic requirements for practica,
internship, the culminating research project, or electives. No transfer credit may be applied
to meet academic requirements in psychological foundations courses taken in a terminal
master’s program.
Federal Regulations require that veteran candidates MUST report all prior credit and training, and
that the school MUST evaluate such and grant credit as appropriate, with training time and tuition
reduced proportionately and with the VA and candidate so notified.
Credits earned at Nova Southeastern University are transferable only at the discretion of the
receiving school.
School Psychology Doctoral Program Academic Policies
Residency and Full-Time Status
Students are considered to be full-time if they complete six (6) credit hours each semester. All
students must complete a minimum of three full-time academic years within the program to be
eligible for the doctoral degree. The final internship year requires completion of two (2) credit
hours each semester in order to maintain full-time status. Students receiving financial aid who are
considering completing less than the scheduled credit hours in any given semester, should discuss
this with the program office. It is the responsibility of the student to seek advisement of options
available for completing the doctoral program.
For certain forms of financial aid, full-time and part-time status may be defined differently.
Students applying for financial assistance MUST clarify this with the Office of Student
Financial Services and Registration.
Failure to Register
Students who fail to register for a regular semester without a leave of absence are considered to
have withdrawn from their program. Such students must make formal application and go through
the entire admission process if they wish to reenter the program at a later date.
En-Route Master of Science in School Psychology
Students enrolled in the Psy.D. program in school psychology may earn as an intermediate degree,
the Master of Science in School Psychology. The curriculum for this degree consists of all courses
(or their equivalents) including practicum and supervision in the first two years of the model
doctoral curriculum (minimum of 73 credit hours). Courses transferred into Nova Southeastern
University’s program do not count toward this degree.
En-Route Specialist Degree in School Psychology
Students admitted to and enrolled in the Doctoral Program (Psy.D.) in School Psychology who
have completed 73 hours in the Specialist Program in School Psychology at Nova Southeastern
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University may earn, as an intermediate degree, the specialist degree in school psychology
(Psy.S.). The curriculum for this degree consists of all courses (or their equivalents), additional
requirements as listed in the Specialist Program in School Psychology Policies and Procedures
Handbook, and the successful completion of six (6) school psychology internship credits and a
minimum of 1200 hours in a PK-12 school setting.
Grading and Academic Standing
The doctoral programs in the College of Psychology assign grades to course work according to
the following system: A, B, C, and F, except for dissertation, and directed study: research, and
internship which receive P, F, PG, or PR (in progress). A grade of I (incomplete) is given only
with instructor’s approval and under exceptional circumstances.
The College of Psychology doctoral programs require that, to remain in good academic
standing, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. In
addition, other minimum requirements will result in academic probation or dismissal, as
detailed in the student handbook. A student is allowed one year (two full semesters excluding
summer session and/or leave of absence) to remove probationary status. Automatic dismissal
will occur if more than two grades below B are recorded, if two grades of F are received, or if
academic probation extends beyond one year. Automatic dismissal will also occur in the clinical
psychology doctoral programs if the clinical competency exam is failed a fourth time or a grade
of C or lower is received for internship.
Attendance
Students are required to attend all scheduled learning activities, including classes, lectures,
seminars and exams. Anticipated absences should be cleared in advance with the instructor.
Excessive absences may result in a lower grade at the instructor’s discretion or may necessitate
a withdrawal from the class. However, it is the policy of the university to excuse, without
penalty, absences due to religious observances and to allow students to make up missed work.
First year doctoral students are required to attend Incoming Student Orientation and the CPS
Professional Development Institute which is typically scheduled to take place during the
summer term.
Leave of Absence
Degree candidates who must interrupt their studies for a sufficient reason such as illness may be
granted a leave of absence. Candidates must apply in writing for a leave of absence to the
Program Office. If granted, the leave shall be for a stated period of time, not to exceed one year.
Candidates who interrupt their studies without a leave of absence or register in absentia will
be assumed to have terminated their studies. Such candidates must make formal application
for readmission if they wish to continue the program at a later date.
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Comprehensive Examinations
To demonstrate mastery of subject area competencies in school psychology and as part of the
degree requirements, all doctoral candidates will be required to sit for and receive passing scores
the following written comprehensive examinations:
1.
Florida Teacher Certification Examination – General Knowledge Test (GK) (Complete
during Year 1)
2.
Florida Teacher Certification Examination – Professional Education Test (PEd)
(Complete during Year 2)
3.
Florida Teacher Certification Examination – Subject Area Test in School Psychology
(SAE)
(required for certification in the state of Florida)
(Complete during Year 3)
4.
Praxis II Subject Assessment Examination – School Psychologist
(required for licensure in the state of Florida and NCSP certification)
(Complete during internship)
Passing scores are required on all the above listed examinations in order to graduate. A minimum
score of 165 is required on the Praxis II Subject Area Exam. Further information will be provided
to candidates at the appropriate time in their curriculum
Applied Training
Practica
The practicum sequence in the school psychology doctoral program is intended to provide the
student with exposure to a broad range of school psychological service delivery models and closely
supervised assessment and intervention experiences. Practicum settings include placements on the
NSU campus, as well as in local school districts, community agencies, and clinics. These
practicum settings provide students the opportunity to work with a diverse range of clients and
problems.
School Psychology Internship
The culminating field based training experience of the doctoral program is the internship in school
psychology. Students are required to complete an internship, covering a 50-week period and a
minimum of 2,000 hours. The internship is typically completed in one academic year following
completion of all prerequisite course work with a GPA of 3.0.
HIPAA Training
Students entering practicum training are required to complete the NSU online HIPAA training
(Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996).
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Professional Liability Insurance
Each semester all College of Psychology students will be charged a nominal fee for liability
insurance coverage provided under the university’s group policy. All students are required to
abide by the ethical standards of the American Psychological Association, the ethical standards
of their respected professions, the policies and procedures of the College of Psychology, and
agency placement rules and regulations.
Time Limits
To assure that an awarded degree represents up-to-date knowledge, skills, and research, students
are required to complete their program and be awarded a doctoral degree within eight years from
the date of first enrollment. In the event that a matriculated candidate who has been in continuous
enrollment does not complete all requirements within the time limit (excluding approved leaves of
absence), he or she must enroll and:
1. Maintain full-time status (minimum six (6) credits per semester, excluding summer
sessions).
2. Complete remaining degree requirements, which will include any course work that is more
than eight (8) years old.
In order to remain an active and matriculated student, registration is required in every semester
until the completion of degree requirements unless a leave of absence has been granted. Failure
to remain in continuous registration will be deemed the student's formal withdrawal from
the program. All other program, center, and university requirements will be in effect.
Failure to Register
Students who fail to register for a regular semester without a leave of absence are considered to
have withdrawn from their program. Such students must make formal application and go
through the entire admission process if they wish to reenter the program at a later date.
Evaluation of School Psychology Doctoral Candidates
Each student is evaluated on an ongoing basis while enrolled in the program, including during the
practicum and internship experiences. The purpose of evaluation is to provide students with
relevant feedback concerning their performance and to serve as a screening process in order to
ensure high standards for the profession of psychology.
Professional Standing Committee
The Professional Standing Committee of the College of Psychology is appointed by the dean
of the center and serves in a variety of capacities related to the review of student professional
standing matters. The committee consists of faculty, a student representative and other members
as appointed by the dean.
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The committee may be asked to review alleged violations of the University Student Code of
Conduct, including academic standards and ethical standards of the field. In addition, the
committee may conduct reviews concerning emotional, or behavioral problems serious enough
to suggest interference with professional functioning, academic performance, or performance
in a clinical practicum or internship setting.
The purpose of the committee’s review and recommendations are not limited to disciplinary
actions; but may encompass efforts to remediate a deficiency or problems so that the student
can continue his or her education and function competently as a professional. Committee
activities are designed to insure a process by which all relevant facts can be determined,
including providing the student with full opportunity to present important information. Actions
the committee may recommend to the dean could include, but are not limited to remediation,
referral, warning or sanctions up to suspension or termination.
In instances of complaints regarding violations of Student Conduct and Academic
Responsibility, the dean may charge the committee with conducting a formal investigation into
the facts pertaining to allegations of misconduct. In such cases the committee will adhere to
professional standing committee guidelines that insure a timely and complete review of the
facts. The process will insure that the student and involved parties have the opportunity to
present relevant information.
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Doctoral Program in School Psychology
Curriculum Requirements*
Course #
PSY 8100
PSY 8105
PSY 8110
PSY 8115
PSY 8117
PSY 8120
PSY 8125
PSY 8220
PSY 8225
PSY 8305
PSY 8135
PSY 8230
RED 550
PSY 4442
PSY 8150
PSY 8165
PSY 8255
PSY 8360
PSY 8190
PSY 8270
PSY 8350
PSY 8182
PSY 8184
PSY 8280
PSY 8286
PSY 8292
PSY 8140
PSY 8145
PSY 8147
PSY 8206
Course Title
Psychological Foundations
Development: Child and Adolescent
Development: Adult and Older Adult
Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children
Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Adult Psychopathology
Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior
History & Systems of Psychology
Psychobiology
Social Aspects of Behavior
Social and Cultural Bases of Assessment and Counseling
Educational Foundations
Organization and Operation of Schools
Instructional Strategies for Students with Diverse Learning Needs
Foundations of Reading for the Content Area Specialist
Interventions and Specialized Techniques
Evidence-Based Treatment of Emotional and Behavioral
Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Counseling Theories and Techniques with Lab
Applied Behavioral Assessment and Intervention
School Consultation Skills
Contemporary Clinical Interventions for the School Psychologist
Professional School Psychology
Practicum in School Psychology: Foundations I
(160 practicum hours + Seminar)
Ethical, Legal, & Professional Issues for School Psychologists
Advanced Professional Skills: Supervision, Administration &
Teaching with Practicum
Psychoeducational Assessment
Cognitive Assessment I: Theory, Research, & Practice with Lab
Cognitive Assessment II: Linking Assessment to Intervention
Academic Assessment for Intervention
Assessment of Personality and Social-Emotional Functioning for
Intervention
Comprehensive Data-Based Assessment: Integrated Report
Statistics, Measurement, and Research Design
Intermediate Statistics with Lab
Issues and Techniques in Research Design and Evaluation
Theories of Measurement
Directed Study
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Credits
Total: 25.5
1.5
1.5
3
3
1.5
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 9
3
3
3
Total: 15
3
3
3
3
3
Total: 8
2
3
3
Total: 16
4
3
3
3
3
Total: 10.5
3
3
3
1.5
Course #
PSY 8195
PSY 8197
PSY 8290
PSY 8295
PSY 8390
PSY 8392
PSY 8394
PSY 8400
Course Title
Practica and Internship
Practicum in School Psychology: Foundations II (160 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: Foundations III (160 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: School-Based I (225 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: School-Based II (225 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and
Interventions I (240 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and
Interventions II (240 hours)
Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and
Interventions III (240 hours)
Internship in School Psychology (2000 hours)
Electives
Elective I
Elective II
Elective III
Total Credits Required for Degree
Credits
Total: 25
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
6
Total: 9
3
3
3
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*Curriculum is subject to change.
Doctor of Psychology Program in School Psychology Course Descriptions
Psychological Foundations
PSY 8100 Development: Child and Adolescent (1.5 credits)
This course covers issues in human development that are especially relevant to children and
adolescents, beginning with the earliest aspects of development during the prenatal period and
ending with the final phase of transition from adolescence to adulthood. In this course will be
selected that focus on normal and accelerated developmental progress, as well as factors that
threaten to impede normal development.
PSY 8105 Development: Adult and Older Adult (1.5 credits)
This course will review developmental theories of aging and personality development in adulthood
and later adulthood. Topics will include perceptual, cognitive, personality and social processes of
aging.
PSY 8110 Psychology of Exceptional and At-Risk Children (3 credits)
This course addresses the history, laws, policies, and practices in exceptional student education.
Included are the definitions, prevalence, causes, and assessment techniques utilized with the
various exceptionalities within special education.
PSY 8115 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth exploration of specific psychological disorders,
emotional/behavioral disabilities, and problematic psycho-social states which occur in childhood
and adolescence. Emphasis will be placed on descriptions, theoretical conceptualizations,
etiologies, and evidence-based interventions for the disorders, disabilities, and states.
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PSY 8117 Adult Psychopathology (1.5 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of contemporary developmental
psychopathology with an emphasis on specific disorders and problematic psychological states in
adults and older adults. Focus will be placed on the description, theoretical conceptualization,
epidemiology, life-course, and etiology of psychological disorders. Areas of physical-motor,
cognitive, social, and personality development will be examined. Strategies for prevention and
intervention will be highlighted.
PSY 8120 Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior (3 credits)
This course examines cognitive and affective processes that affect behavior. Topics include
information processing, memory, attachment, unconscious processing, schemata development,
bias, self-regulations, and attribution theory. The interface of cognitive and affect will be examined
in relation to issues in clinical psychology.
PSY 8125 History and Systems of Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines the historical progression of ideas central to psychology, the philosophical
and empirical roots of those ideas, and their confluence into the predominant systems of the present
day. In so doing, it covers the fundamentals of scientific thinking, their bearing on theory
development, the relationship between philosophical and empirical thought, and theoretical
models of historical and current significance. It also focuses on the dynamic interplay between
theoretical constructs and empirically derived knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on
principles used to examine the merits of evidence that supports or disconfirms theory.
PSY 8220 Psychobiology (3 credits)
This course covers theory, research, and applications for the following topics: structure, function,
and disorders of the nervous system; physiological mechanisms and disorders in vegetative and
intellectual functions; and psychophysiological methods and technology.
PSY 8225 Social Aspects of Behavior (3 credits)
This course studies the social antecedents of human behavior. The main theories of social
psychology are examined in relation to school psychology.
PSY 8305 Social and Cultural Bases of Assessment and Counseling (3 credits)
This course covers issues involved in the assessment and counseling of culturally and linguistically
diverse students. Focus is on the psychological impact of gender, race, ethnicity, culture, religious
preference, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. This course also
examines innovative assessment methods for clients of diverse backgrounds based upon individual
characteristics, strengths, and needs. Emphasis will be placed on differentiating between the
normal stages of second language acquisition and handicapping conditions.
Educational Foundations
PSY 8135 Organization and Operation of Schools (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an overview of educational administration. Emphasis is placed
on issues related to special education, school and community-based resources, and alternative
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service delivery systems. The role of the school psychologist as well as that of other support and
itinerant staff is explored.
PSY 8230 Instructional Strategies for Students with Diverse Learning Needs (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of curriculum development and related research as they apply
specifically to students with various learning styles, exceptionalities, and achievement
levels. Theory and research regarding teaching and instructional planning for at-risk and
exceptional students with unique needs are emphasized.
RED 550 Foundations of Reading for the Content Area Specialist (3 credits)
This course is designed for students who are not enrolled in a Reading Education program. The
focus of this course is to offer a general overview of literacy study, including major aspects of
written, oral, and visual literacy and the reading process. Additionally, students will learn
classroom instructional strategies for reading across the curriculum with specific emphasis on
content areas such as social studies, science, language arts, and mathematics.
Interventions and Specialized Techniques
PSY 4442 Evidence-Based Treatment of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders of Children
and Adolescents (3 credits)
This course focuses on specific evidence-based strategies for child and adolescent disorders
including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Disruptive Behavior Disorders, and Anxiety
Disorders. Specific emphasis will be on the rationale and empirical support for selecting
appropriate interventions, implementation of selected interventions, and assessment of treatment
outcomes.
PSY 8150 Counseling Theories and Techniques (3 credits)
This course surveys the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy and their application to
school settings. Emphasis will also be placed upon developing a theoretical foundation upon
which to base a counseling approach. The acquisition of skills related to empathy, therapeutic
listening skills, the counselor-counselee relationship, and the establishment of a therapeutic
alliance in the context of cultural diversity will similarly be addressed.
PSY 8165 Applied Behavioral Assessment and Intervention (3 credits)
This course covers basic behavior analytic principles and methods in applied settings. The
principles of learning and applied behavior management techniques within the classroom and
school setting will be addressed. Particular emphasis is also placed on the functional assessment
of behavior as well as techniques in counseling parents and relevant school personnel in behavioral
intervention.
PSY 8255 School Consultation Skills (3 credits)
This course focuses on developing specific techniques including communication and interpersonal
skills necessary in effective consultation at the individual, group, and systems levels. Integration
of the various aspects of school psychology consultation, including knowledge of behavioral,
mental health, collaborative, and other consultation models and their application within the school
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setting are explored. Emphasis is placed upon team building. Case examples are discussed, and
opportunities for skill development are provided through role-playing.
Prerequisite: PSY 8165 or permission of instructor & Program Director
PSY 8360 Contemporary Clinical Interventions for the School Psychologist (3 credits)
The course focuses on an understanding of critical psychological issues when dealing with
children, adolescents, and adults in school settings. Topics covered include substance abuse,
suicide, violence, divorce, HIV/AIDS, and other contemporary clinical issues. Primary and
secondary prevention strategies will be examined that promote the mental health and physical wellbeing of students. Short-term individual psychotherapy techniques as well as structured group
therapy programs will be explored.
Prerequisite: PSY 8150
Professional School Psychology
PSY 8190 Practicum in School Psychology: Foundations I (2 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce candidates to the field of school psychology from a
historical and current perspective and to allow for an observational field-based experience to orient
candidates to professional practice. The roles of school psychologists will be emphasized, along
with an introduction to the expected competencies required of school psychologists by state and
national accrediting bodies. Professional association involvement, ethics, and research and
technology within the practice of school psychology will also be addressed.
PSY 8270 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues for School Psychologists (3 credits)
This course covers standards for professional conduct in school psychology and educational
law. Ethical and legal decisions that school psychologists must make, such as scope of
professional competence, confidentiality, legal rights of students, duty to warn and protect, and
value differences with students are discussed. Ethical use of computer generated reports as well as
issues in report writing will be explored. Case examples, current regulations, standards on utilizing
assessment data, and issues in counseling culturally diverse students are explored. Emphasis will
similarly be placed on the role of advocacy in decision-making.
PSY 8350 Advanced Professional Skills: Supervision, Administration, and Teaching with
Practicum (3 credits)
This course will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of supervision, administration, and
teaching. Students will be introduced to the process of clinical supervision to prepare for future
supervisory roles. Functional aspects of the supervisor-supervisee relationship will be examined
through classroom discussion, readings, and supervisory or mentoring activities. This course is
further intended to provide students with skills to be prepared for administrative roles within
national and state agencies, district level psychological services departments and university
settings. Lastly, examination of models of course construction, teaching pedagogy, and
assessment of learning within a university setting will be explored. Students will create an
individual philosophy of teaching with a focus on identity development, both as a psychologist
and educator. Students will be expected to be actively involved in the teaching/learning process
as participants, presenters, and discussion facilitators.
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Psychoeducational Assessment
PSY 8182 Cognitive Assessment I: Theory, Research, and Practice with Lab (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide an in-depth overview of the theories, research, and practice in
assessing the cognitive functioning of children, adolescents, and adults. Fundamentals of test
construction, its psychometric properties, and the history and current status of cognitive theory
will be examined. Students will be trained to administer, score (including computer scoring),
interpret and communicate the results of cognitive assessment data to answer educationally
relevant questions. Psychological issues in intelligence testing, as well as ethical and legal
considerations will be explored. Emphasis is placed upon the principal aspects of interviewing,
establishment of rapport, behavioral observation, interpretation, and report writing. Special
emphasis will be placed upon developing foundational assessment skills that can be generalized to
other measures.
PSY 8184 Cognitive Assessment II: Linking Assessment to Intervention (3 credits)
This course explores the rationale for selection of cognitive measures based upon the referral
question, as well as variables such as cultural and linguistic background, and/or handicapping
conditions. Focus will be placed on interviewing, behavioral observations, test interpretation, and
reporting assessment results, with the goal of linking assessment results to intervention.
Prerequisite: PSY 8182
PSY 8280 Academic Assessment for Intervention (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the administration, interpretation, and communication of
psychoeducational assessment results and the link to educational intervention. Emphasis is placed
upon planning and conducting comprehensive assessment of learning problems. Focus will
include integrating and presenting results verbally and within the context of a psychoeducational
report. Students will identify appropriate data gathering methods (e.g. background information,
checklists, record reviews, assessment instruments, interviews, behavioral observations, and
curriculum-based assessments). Students will synthesize data from multiple sources to make
appropriate recommendations and to determine response to evidence-based interventions via
progress monitoring.
PSY 8286 Assessment of Personality and Social-Emotional Functioning for Intervention (3
credits)
This course provides an introduction to the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of
the major implicit or performance-based measures of personality and social-emotional functioning
(including apperception, drawing, and sentence completion measures) as well as major explicit or
self-report measures. The specific values of implicit/performance-based measures and
explicit/self-report measures and associated research findings will be discussed. An introduction
to integrating assessment materials into coherent case conceptualizations, evidence-based
intervention plans, and the writing of psychological test reports that provide personalized,
collaborative, culturally-informed, and highly involving test feedback to clients and families will
be provided.
PSY 8292 Comprehensive Data-Based Assessment: Integrated Report (3 credits)
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The primary goal of this course is to teach the student how to write a well-integrated and
meaningful psychoeducational report and to learn the art of providing feedback to the person being
evaluated, parents, teachers, and other professionals as appropriate. Starting with basic data
obtained through interview and developmental history; the student is guided through the process
of clinical inference; learning to select appropriate data collection procedures; to examine and to
analyze the data; to formulate integrative hypotheses; and to generate a synthesized, integrated,
and meaningful psychoeducational report useful to all target audiences. Emphasis will also be
placed on understanding the legal issues involved in psychoeducational report writing.
Prerequisites: PSY 8165, PSY 8182, PSY 8184, PSY 8280, PSY 8286
Statistics, Measurements, and Research Design
PSY 8140 Intermediate Statistics with Lab (3 credits)
This course covers basic inferential and descriptive statistics to proficiency. Multivariate statistics
is taught from a consumer perspective. A computer lab is included.
PSY 8145 Issues and Techniques in Research Design and Evaluation (3 credits)
This course will focus on research methodology and scientific thought. Students will consider a
variety of ways to conduct evaluation and critically evaluate data. Course material will examine
basic experimental design (between and within groups), single subject experiments, group
experimental design, non-experimental design (correlational research, case study, meta-analyses),
and program evaluation. Validity issues in research (internal and external) and research ethics are
emphasized. Focus will be placed upon the evaluation of research, translation of research into
practice, and the ability to plan and conduct program evaluations for the improvement of service
provision within the schools.
PSY 8147 Theories of Measurement (3 credits)
This course examines the theories, techniques, and statistics of psychological measurement.
Topics covered include a history and overview of measurement theory, scaling, individual
differences and correlation, dimensionality, reliability and classical test theory, standard error of
measurement, validity, test construction and refinement, and modern test theories.
PSY 8206 Directed Study (1.5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students in preparing for the required professional research project
which requires a systemic review of the existing literature in a specific scholarly area of applied
psychology, an evaluation of a research based intervention project, or an original empirical study.
Students are expected to summarize conceptual and methodological issues in the literature, to
formulate a research problem derived from the literature, to derive research hypotheses and
interpret data, and to write research in APA style.
Practica and Internship
PSY 8195 Practicum in School Psychology: Foundations II (2 credits)
This 160-hour practicum is intended to build upon the foundational knowledge base of
Foundations Practicum I in clarifying the role of the school psychologist in professional practice.
Through field-based placement, candidates will increase their understanding of best practices in
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early childhood education and effective learning environments that support healthy development
of children with diverse needs. Under close supervision, they begin to apply knowledge to collect
behavioral and academic data, provide information to parents and teachers, complete assessment
measures, and support intervention implementation in schools.
Prerequisite: PSY 8190
PSY 8197 in School Psychology: Foundations III (2 credits)
This 160-hour practicum is the third in the sequence intended to clarify the role of the school
psychologist in professional practice. Through field-based placement, candidates develop a further
understanding of effective learning environments and multi-tiered systems of supports while
assisting stakeholders in planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating educational
interventions. In addition, consideration of continuous professional improvement within the
context of the role of school psychologist is addressed.
Prerequisite: PSY 8195
PSY 8290 Practicum in School Psychology: School Based I (3 credits)
This 450 hour, two semester practicum is designed to assist candidates in developing consultation
skills; gathering assessment data relevant to intervention planning; and developing, implementing,
and evaluating interventions within school settings. The practicum is designed as an integrative
experience to blend theory with practice in providing services to children and adolescents, as well
as key stakeholders in their environments. Candidates will complete a minimum of 15 hours per
week at (a) selected school(s).
Prerequisites: PSY 8100, PSY 8110, PSY 8115, PSY 8135, PSY 8150, PSY 8190,
PSY 8195
PSY 8295 Practicum in School Psychology: School Based II (3 credits)
See description of PSY 8290 – Practicum in School Psychology: School Based I.
Prerequisite: PSY 8290
PSY 8390 Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and Interventions I
(3 credits)
This 720 hour, three semester practicum is designed for candidates to further develop
competencies in the areas of assessment, consultation, and intervention with expanded populations
in varied settings. The candidate is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for 48
weeks at (a) selected school(s), agency(cies), or clinic(s).
Prerequisites: PSY 8182, PSY 8184, PSY 8190, PSY 8195, PSY 8255, PSY 8270,
PSY 8280, PSY 8286, PSY 8292
PSY 8392 Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and Interventions II
(3 credits)
See description of PSY 8390 – Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Interventions I.
Prerequisite: PSY 8390
PSY 8394 Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and Interventions III
(3 credits)
See description of PSY 8390 – Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Interventions I.
Prerequisite: PSY 8392
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PSY 8400 Internship in School Psychology (6 credits)
The student is required to complete a 2000-clock hour doctoral internship in an approved setting.
Prerequisites: All coursework, including PSY 8206 – Directed Study
Electives
PSY 4401 Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)
The study of the relationship between brain functioning and behavior. Major topics include
anatomy and physiology of the human brain, behavioral functions associated with the cerebral
hemispheres and lobes, neurobehavioral presentations of common neurological and psychiatric
conditions, administration and interpretation of major neuropsychological test batteries, and
diagnostic examination for brain dysfunction.
PSY 4405 Clinical Neuroanatomy (3 credits)
The understanding of the anatomical organization of the human nervous system is an important
skill for a student of clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects of
neuroanatomy that will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will include
the development, structure, and function of the human nervous system, neuroanatomical correlates
of behavior, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
PSY 4406 Behavioral Neuropathology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to neuropathology. The understanding of the
major diseases and disorders of the human nervous system is an important skill for a student of
clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects of neuropathology that
will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will include the development of
structural and chemical dysfunction of the human nervous system, neuroanatomical correlates of
dysfunction, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
PSY 4409 Pediatric Psychology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the field of
pediatric psychology. Students will be taught the various roles of a pediatric psychologist
functioning within the medical environment and the interface between psychological and medical
services and systems. Also, a significant proportion of the course will address the assessment and
treatment of children who have psychological and adjustment difficulties due to a chronic, acute,
and/or genetic medical diagnosis, and the relevant medical intervention.
PSY 4414 Behavioral Principles of Learning (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of the psychological principles of learning derived
from experimental research and validated by applied experimental/empirical studies. General
topics include the nature of learning, behavior without learning, learning without words, and
learning with words. Specific topics covered include types of behavior, motivational influences on
behavior, respondent behavior and conditioning, operant behavior and conditioning, stimulus
control, schedule influences on behavior, observational learning, verbal behavior and rulegoverned behavior, and behavioral accounts of language and cognition. The course is designed to
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give students a good grounding for assessment and intervention courses with a behavioral
orientation.
PSY 4419 Forensic Psychology: Family Law (3 credits)
Basic principles in concepts of forensic psychology; the relationship between juvenile and family
law and the scientific study of human behavior. Emphasis will also be given to areas of child
physical and sexual abuse and domestic violence. There will be a critical review of pertinent
literature. Special attention will be on the legal-ethical issues in evaluation, treatment, and research
in family and juvenile law.
PSY 4515 Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological Assessment (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to developmental neuroanatomy, and
developmental neuropsychological research and theory in the neuropsychological assessment of
children. Cases of acute brain trauma, chronic brain injury, communicative disorders, learning
disabilities, brain disease, sensory-motor handicaps, and seizure disorders will be presented to
demonstrate the behavioral effects of these conditions.
PSY 4520 Child Sexual Abuse Assessment (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with state-of-the-art knowledge and the tools
necessary to properly assess the validity of allegations of CSA, and to assess the psychological
impact of CSA on known victims.
PSY 4525 Assessment of Culturally Diverse Clients (3 credits)
This course involves a critical review of traditional assessment methods and instruments when
used to measure the intelligence and aptitudes of those persons who differ markedly from the social
and cultural norms. It will demonstrate the counterproductive pitfalls in the application of such
techniques when used to label ethnic minorities and underprivileged clients. Students will learn
to use and apply alternative methods. The theoretical and practical innovations of dynamic
assessment will be analyzed.
PSY 4603 Play Therapy (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to delineate the various theoretical and practical approaches to play
therapy. Conducted in a seminar fashion, class sessions will involve the discussion and instruction
of theory, methods of intervention, and the special therapy issues. Additionally, an applied clinical
approach will also be emphasized via student play therapy case presentations.
PSY 4604 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of Applied Behavior Analysis at an advanced level.
Students will learn the history of behavioral psychology, the experimental analysis of behavior
and applied behavior analysis. The basic principles of behavior are reviewed as a foundation for
the application in ABA methods. Students will design an intervention program using ABA
methods to improve socially meaningful behavior with the approval of the instructor.
PSY 4607 Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
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Group process provides an introduction to the theories and research pertaining to small group
behavior. Experiencing group dynamics first hand and processing these experiences provide
opportunities to become familiar with factors which influence behavior in small groups.
PSY 4608 Advanced Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
This course continues the student’s training and experience in group psychotherapy. It is primarily
focused on group-leader facilitation, empathy, sensitivity, lessening of prejudicial judgment as it
relates to the many hues of human experience and behavior, and anxiety reduction with multipleclient interactions. A paper is required summarizing what was learned about group process and
being a group member and leader.
PSY 4619 Applications of Mindfulness in Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the traditions, practice and applications of Mindfulness in
Psychotherapy. Recent empirical research points to the influence of Mindfulness on both brain
development and therapeutic application. This course will examine some of the empirical research
and help students participate and lead in some of the practices that make this a very rich and lifeenhancing model for both patient and practitioner.
PSY 4629 Health Psychology (3 credits)
This course seeks to define the field of Health Psychology and provides a conceptual overview of
current assessment and treatment models. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships among
affective responses, recurrent behavior patterns, and organ performance. Intervention strategies
directed at lifestyle, as well as specific behavior changes, are highlighted.
PSY 4630 Existential Therapy (3 credits)
Contemporary existential issues are explored as they affect both client and therapist in
psychotherapy. How existential views complement other theoretical orientations, affect the
therapist/client relationship, and lead to implementation of treatment strategies, are of particular
interest and focus.
PSY 4631 Humanistic Therapy (3 credits)
This course is a practitioner-oriented exploration of theories and practices of humanistic
psychotherapy, including Rogers’ person-centered, Bugental’s existential-analytic, Mahrer’s
experiential, and Rollo May’s approaches. Theoretical bases for psychotherapy, the therapist as a
person, core therapeutic conditions, and the therapy relationship receive major emphasis.
PSY 4635 Psychodynamic Therapy I (3 credits)
The introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, range, scope,
and limitations of psychoanalytic psychotherapy as a treatment modality. It is anticipated that by
the end of this course, the student will have acquired the basic concepts necessary to have a fuller
appreciation of this therapeutic approach.
PSY 4649 Autism Spectrum Disorders: Assessment and Intervention (3 credits)
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This course provides an in-depth study of evidence-based practice in assessment and intervention
for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Candidates will examine current best
practice strategies for assessment and diagnosis of ASD, including use of autism-specific screening
and evaluation tools addressing the core and supplemental domains of assessment. Emphasis will
be placed on a comprehensive developmental approach to assessment and interpretation of
assessment data, summarizing and reporting results to interdisciplinary teams, including families,
in a systematic manner that leads directly to intervention and programmatic recommendations for
individuals with ASD. Common co-occurring (comorbid) disorders will be reviewed. Course
content will also include a focus on scientifically-based interventions in the areas of socialemotional, communication, cognitive, academic, sensory, and adaptive development.
PSY 4668 Substance Use, Health, and Mental Health (3 credits)
The major goal of this course is for students to learn about substance use and misuse, and related
prevention and treatment. In addition, because substance use disorders can significantly affect
other health and mental health problems and concerns (e.g., depression, aging, medication use,
diabetes, and hypertension) the course will address a broad range of issues involved in the
assessment and treatment of comorbidity and the relationship of substance use disorders to the
management of different health and mental health problems.
PSY 4669 Clinical Interventions for Anxiety Disorders (3 credits)
This course will cover the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Available
literature on treatment outcome studies, as well as current literature on the theories of anxiety
disorders will be reviewed. The course will focus on actual treatment applications of anxious
patients. Treatment modalities will include cognitive/behavioral therapy, mindfulness, and
motivational interviewing approaches. Students will practice the interventions studied.
PSY 4670 Short Term Therapy (3 credits)
This course will review the history and development of time-limits therapies and survey different
approaches, including brief dynamic therapy, cognitive therapies, solution-oriented models and
others. New developments in brief treatment will be covered, including managed care models and
“HMO therapy.”
PSY 4678 Eating Disorders: Theory and Intervention (3 credits)
This course will review the history of eating disorders and the development of interventions for
the treatment of eating disorders, including psychoanalytic, self-psychological, relational,
systemic and cognitive-behavioral. Individual, familial, socio-cultural and biological aspects of
eating issues and body image difficulties will be addressed as well as relevant research.
PSY 4679 Abuse, Trauma, and Dissociation (3 credits)
This course is primarily designed to provide a comprehensive survey of knowledge and skills
required to treat adult survivors of prolonged childhood abuse (PCA). Identification and treatment
of the problems in adaptation and functioning commonly found among PCA survivors will be
contrasted with forms of intervention more appropriate for survivors of other forms of trauma.
There will be detailed coverage of interpersonal, behavioral, cognitive, emotional and experiential
difficulties associated with PCA, and of strategies for addressing them.
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PSY 4691 Infant and Toddler Mental Health (3 credits)
This course will cover clinical applications of developmental psychopathology, with an emphasis
on infants, toddler and their families. Major theories of development and current research on the
systemic etiological pathways of atypical adaptation will be reviewed. Assessment strategies will
include observing infants and toddlers at play, clinical interviewing of caregivers, identifying red
flags, recognizing 0-3 diagnostic classifications, administered developmental screening tests, and
interpreting results. Implications for appropriate theory driven and empirically based treatment
will be discussed including play techniques and attachment-theory driven interventions.
PSY 4692 Parent Focused Interventions (3 credits)
This course will review current theory and research on parent-focused prevention and intervention
efforts intended to benefit children and adolescents. Topics will include the rationale for a
behavioral/family systems approach to parent training and its application to contemporary
families. Difficulties associated with conducting both research and interventions in family setting
will be reviewed with particular attention to problems of measuring and defining “ideal” parenting
practices and difficulties in translating program objectives into clinically meaningful outcomes.
Parent-focused interventions for both externalizing and internalizing problems will be considered.
PSY 4699 Positive Psychology (3 credits)
The present course will describe how the scope of psychology has recently been broadened beyond
exclusive concern with identifying pathology and treating or preventing disorder. This course will
provide an overview of the emerging field of ‘Positive Psychology. ’ Students will be provided
with opportunities to understand theory and research pertaining to the psychology of human
strengths, assets, abilities and talents as well as the constructs of optimism, happiness, hope and
resiliency. Students will be challenged to use their understanding of this theory and research to
suggest opportunities for intervention with various populations.
PSY 8235 Family/Systems Therapy (3 credits)
This course surveys current approaches to family systems theory and therapy with an emphasis on
systemic conceptual models of family functioning and culturally sensitive therapeutic
interventions. It is designed to develop specific intervention competencies.
PSY 8240 Child and Adolescent Group Interventions (3 credits)
This course seeks to provide a comprehensive guide to counseling children and adolescents with
a variety of problems in a group format designed to improve their emotional, behavioral, and social
functioning. The focus is on both prevention and intervention with emphasis on beginning skills
for conducting group interventions for students in schools. It encompasses both theoretical issues
and practical applications with the latter including concerns pertaining to ethical standards and
legal requirements. In addition, evidence based methods and programs will be taught. Issues
related to group counseling with children and adolescents and implementation issues specific to
school settings will be examined.
PSY 8330 Public Policy, Advocacy, and Ethical Decision-Making (3 credits)
This course introduces students to contemporary educational and mental health policy issues and
ethical principles that affect the practice of psychology. Candidates will review newly proposed
legislation, develop fact sheets on relevant topics, critically evaluate legislative platforms, prepare
138
speeches for committee hearings, contact legislators, and initiate lobbying efforts and letter-writing
campaigns.
PSY 8396 Elective Practicum in School Psychology: Advanced Assessment and Interventions
IV (1-3 credits)
The candidate is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for one semester at (a) selected
school(s), agency(ies), or clinic(s).
PSY 8398 Elective Internship in School Psychology (1-3 credits)
This 600-hour elective internship in school psychology is designed to meet the requirements for
national certification in school psychology (NCSP). Candidates must complete a minimum of 600
hours in a school setting that serves the educational needs of P-12 students of diverse backgrounds,
characteristics, abilities and needs, and provides the full range of school psychological services.
* Course descriptions are subject to change
139
DOCTORAL PROGRAMS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
By offering both the doctor of psychology (Psy.D.) and the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.)
degrees, the College of Psychology demonstrates its commitment to train psychologists both as
researchers and as practitioners. The Psy.D. program is based on a model of the practitioner
informed by science and the Ph.D. program is based on a model of the scientist-practitioner.
Each program has a structured curriculum that develops the knowledge and skills of the doctoral
student relevant to the program’s model. Both require clinical training that includes clinical
practica, the clinical competency exam, and a 2,000-hour pre-doctoral internship at a site where
the student has applied and been accepted.
Beyond the required courses and experiences of each doctoral program, individual interests in
psychology are accommodated through elective course offerings. Students have the option of
seeking admission to a concentration, or specializing in a track in which a series of electives
are taken in a single specialty area.
The center’s faculty is committed to the development of strong collegial relationships with
doctoral students. The development of such relationships facilitates the instructional support
available to students as they strive for scholarship and mastery of the roles of the clinical
psychologist.
Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology
Traditionally, the training model for clinical psychologists has focused on the graduate student
as scientist first and practitioner second. However, with the growing need in society for
practitioners, many graduate students have elected to enter the clinical services arena, rather
than the academic or research area. Consequently, in the 1960s, alternate training procedures
were proposed that led to the development of a professional scientific-practitioner model. This
model was officially accepted by the American Psychological Association at the Vail
Conference in 1973, when it was deemed a more viable foundation for the education and
training of individuals preparing to enter careers whose primary focus is on direct clinical
intervention, delivery of psychological services, and professional practice.
The program is based on the practitioner informed by science model and is distinguished by its
focus on empirical analysis of current topics and problems in clinical psychology. The primary
goal of the Doctor of Psychology Program (Psy.D.) is to offer academic, practicum, internship,
and research experiences directly relevant to the practice of clinical psychology. The training
retains the important scientific base upon which professional competence and knowledge rest,
has students participate in ongoing research, and prepares them to be lifelong consumers of
research. Clinical expertise is molded by a sequence of courses on assessment and intervention,
both theory and technique, supplemented by practicum experiences with clients in a variety of
settings under intensive supervision. The Psy.D. degree, through its curriculum, trains students
to perform as clinicians, private practitioners, supervisors, mental health consultants,
administrators of human service programs, instructors and members of a research team. The
degree of expertise in these various specialties is contingent upon individuals’ educational
concentrations and training exposures, as well as their career aspirations.
140
There are four specific program goals. The successful graduate of the Psy.D. program is
required to:
Goal 1. Demonstrate understanding of the breadth of scientific psychology
Goal 2. Demonstrate understanding of the foundations of practice in clinical
psychology
Goal 3. Demonstrate entry-level clinical skills and competencies necessary for
effective work in practitioner informed by science roles
Goal 4: Understand and apply research methods and statistics to inform professional
practice
141
Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data for Doctor of Psychology Program
In keeping with the center’s philosophy of full disclosure, below is a summary of performance and
outcome data between 2008-2014.
Time to Completion for all students entering the program
Year in which Degrees were Conferred
Outcome
Total number of
students with
doctoral degree
conferred on
transcript
Mean number of
years to
complete the
program
Median number
of years to
complete the
program
Time to Degree
Ranges
Students in less
than 5 years
Students in 5
years
Students in 6
years
Students in 7
years
Students in more
than 7 years
20082009
20092010
20102011
20112012
20122013
20132014
20142015
Total
64
73
73
67
60
75
60
472
5.11
5.25
5.25
5.24
5.24
5.21
5.11
5.20
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
2
2
49
77
50
68
41
87
52
85
49
77
56
75
43
71
340
77
12
19
15
22
3
6
9
15
12
19
14
19
10
16
75
16
1
2
6
8
1
2
0
0
1
2
2
3
3
5
14
3
2
3
2
3
1
2
0
0
2
3
2
3
4
6
13
4
Program Costs
Description
Tuition for full-time students (in-state)
Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state)
Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (if applicable enter
amount; if not applicable enter “NA”)
University/institution fees or costs
Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g. books, travel,
etc.)
2015-2016 1st year
Cohort Cost
$975.
$975.
N/A
$1155.
$1160.
*In the first year of the model curriculum (2015-16) that includes fall, winter and summer
sessions, the total tuition is $37,538.
**Please note that all above fees are subject to change without notice.
142
The college maintains a substantial pool of funds for graduate, research, and teaching assistantships, and
clinic program staff that range from 10-20 hours per week. In addition, student positions are available
through grant funding.
Student employment opportunities and part-time positions are offered throughout the university, including
student employment, part-time positions, and federal work study. Travel stipends are available for students
presenting at international, national, and regional professional associations. The Office of Residential Life
and Student Housing offers assistantships that include housing, meal plan, a partial tuition waiver, and a
monthly stipend.
The center has established student scholarship funds available to advanced students.
*Defined as those who submitted rank-ordered lists, and thus received feedback on Match Day
Internship Placement Table 1
Outcome
Students who obtained
APA/CPA-accredited
internships
Students who obtained
APPIC member internships
that were not APA/CPAaccredited (if applicable)
Students who obtained other
membership organization
internships (e.g. CAPIC)
that were not APA/CPAaccredited (if applicable
Students who obtained
internships conforming to
CDSPP guidelines that were
not APA/CPA-accredited (if
applicable)
Students who obtained other
internships that were not
APA/CPA-accredited (if
applicable)
Students who obtained any
internship
Students who sought or
applied for internships
including those who
withdrew from the
application process
20082009
N %
38 59
20092010
N %
49 59
Year Applied for Internship
2010- 2011- 20122011
2012
2013
N % N % N %
40 55 43 53 29 42
20132014
N %
40 43
20142015
N %
43 51
22 34 30 36 28 37 28 35 28 41 39 43 31 37
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
60 94 79 95 68 92 71 88 57 83 79 86 74 88
64 -
83 -
143
74 -
81 -
69 -
91 -
84 -
Internship Placement – Table 2
Year Applied for Internship
Outcome
20082009
20092010
20102011
20112012
20122013
20132014
20142015
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
%
%
83 -
%
59 93 75 90 62 84 71 88 57 83 79 86 74 88
Students who obtained halftime internships* (if
applicable)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
91 -
%
Students who obtained paid
internships
0
69 -
%
64 -
0
81 -
%
Students who sought or
applied for internships
including those who
withdrew from the
application process
0
74 -
%
0
0
84 -
0
0
Attrition
Variable
Students for whom
this is the year of
first enrollment (i.e.
new students)
Students whose
doctoral degrees
were conferred on
their transcripts
Students still
enrolled in program
Students no longer
enrolled for any
reason other than
conferral of
doctoral degree
20082009
20092010
Year of First Enrollment
2010201120122011
2012
2013
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
73
-
84
-
88
-
84
-
64
88
56
67
0
0
0
5
07
23
27
78
89
4
05
5
06
10
11
144
N
20132014
20142015
%
N
%
N
%
81
-
85
-
89
-
0
1
1.25
0
0
0
0
78
93
76
94
83
98
86
96
6
07
4
05
2
02
3
03
Licensure
Outcome
2005-2013
The total number of program graduates (doctoral degrees
conferred on transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago
The number of these graduates (between 2 and 10 years
ago) who became licensed psychologists
539
451
84
Licensure percentage
Applicant Data
Number of
Applicants
Number
Accepted for
Admission
Actual Size of
Incoming
Class
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
355
408
359
412
340
377
346
149
149
143
158
151
169
160
84
88
84
81
85
87
86
Accepted for Admission
482
2010
513
2011
509
2012
508
2013
153
2014
154
2015
153
470
500
510
510
153
155
153
561
593
587
598
149
155
149
550
610
580
600
149
152
148
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.2
3.9
4.1
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.48
2009
GRE – Verbal
GRE – Quantitative
GRE – Advanced
Mean Undergraduate
GPA
Mean
Score
Median
Score
Mean
Score
Median
Score
Mean
Score
Median
Score
145
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Clinical Psychology
The Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology is based on a scientist-practitioner training model.
Accordingly, its goals are to train future psychologists to (1) understand the core science areas of
the discipline, (2) contribute to the knowledge base through active scholarship and research that
focuses on evaluating, developing, and scientifically examining theories and methods of
assessment, intervention, and other applied aspects of professional practice, (3) understand
foundations for the practice of clinical psychology, and (4) employ skills in evidence based
assessment and intervention techniques for effective and meaningful service to diverse individuals,
groups, and communities. Inherent in these goals is our educational philosophy that psychology is
a scientific discipline rooted in empirical investigation, and that professional practice includes both
advancing such inquiry and applying its results.
It is our view that the clinical psychologist will contribute most to society when trained for the
roles of both scientist and practitioner. Hence, the focus of the program is on the empirical
investigation of current topics and problems in clinical psychology, with a particular emphasis on
the development of sophistication in applied clinical research. This research frequently involves
the development and investigation of innovative assessment and intervention methods. The
research training culminates in the dissertation, a mentored research project proposed to and
defended before a faculty committee. Integrated with research training is a graduated sequence of
courses and experiences with clinical populations in supervised practica. Altogether, the program
prepares the graduate to assume the roles of academician, researcher, and practicing clinical
psychologist.
There are four broad program goals. The successful graduate of the program is expected to:
Goal 1. Demonstrate understanding of the breadth of scientific psychology
Goal 2. Produce clinically relevant scientific research and scholarship
Goal 3. Demonstrate understanding of the foundations of practice in clinical psychology
Goal 4. Demonstrate entry-level clinical skills and competencies necessary for
effective work in scientist-practitioner professional roles
There are some required courses (e.g., Diversity in Assessment & Intervention) that may require
some personal disclosures by the student as part of the course requirements. Other elective courses
(e.g., Group Theory and Process) may require a higher level of ongoing self-disclosure as part of
the class process.
146
Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data for Doctor of Philosophy Program
In keeping with the center’s philosophy of full disclosure, below is a summary of performance
and outcome data between 2008-2014.
Time to Completion for all students entering the program
Year in which Degrees were Conferred
Outcome
20082009
Total number of students
with doctoral degree
conferred on transcript
Mean number of years to
complete the program
Median number of years to
complete the program
Time to Degree Ranges
Students in less than 5
years
Students in 5 years
Students in 6 years
Students in 7 years
Students in more than 7
years
20092010
20102011
20112012
20122013
20132014
20142015
Total
12
15
114
6.26
6.15
6
6
16
14
26
19
12
6.25
6.4
6.4
6.5
5.6
5.7
6
6
6
6
5
6
N % N % N
% N % N % N % N
% N
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
9
0
0
1
1
7
6
0
44
37
0
4
5
3
29 6 23
36 10 38
21 4 16
9
2
3
47
11
16
7
4
0
58
33
0
4
5
2
33
42
16
6
3
3
40
20
20
43
35
15
39
31
13
3
19
2
14
5
26
1
9
0
0
3
20
20
16
0
6
23
Program Costs
Description
Tuition for full-time students (in-state)
Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state)
Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (if applicable
enter amount; if not applicable enter “NA”)
University/institution fees or costs
Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g. books,
travel, etc.)
2015-2016 1st-year Cohort
Cost
$975. per credit hour
$975. per credit hour
N/A
$1155. per semester
$1160. per semester
*In the first year of the model curriculum (2015-16) that includes fall, winter and summer
sessions, the total tuition is $36,075.
**Please note that all above fees are subject to change without notice.
The college maintains a substantial pool of funds for graduate, research, and teaching
assistantships, and clinic program staff that range from 10-20 hours per week. In addition, student
positions are available through grant funding.
Student employment opportunities and part-time positions are offered throughout the university,
including student employment, part-time positions, and federal work study. Travel stipends are
147
%
available for students presenting at international, national, and regional professional associations.
The Office of Residential Life and Student Housing offers assistantships that include housing,
meal plan, a partial tuition waiver, and a monthly stipend.
Internship Placement
Table 1
Outcome
Students who obtained
APA/CPA-accredited
internships
Students who obtained
APPIC member internships
that were not APA/CPAaccredited (if applicable)
Students who obtained other
membership organization
internships (e.g. CAPIC)
that were not APA/CPAaccredited (if applicable
Students who obtained
internships conforming to
CDSPP guidelines that were
not APA/CPA-accredited (if
applicable)
Students who obtained other
internships that were not
APA/CPA-accredited (if
applicable)
Students who obtained any
internship
Students who sought or
applied for internships
including those who
withdrew from the
application process
20082009
N %
20 74
20092010
N %
13 52
Year Applied for Internship
2010- 2011- 20122011
2012
2013
N % N % N %
13 56 14 70 10 53
20132014
N %
11 65
20142015
N %
8 57
5
18 5
20 9
40 2
10 5
26 2
12 5
36
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
25 92 18 72 22 96 16 80 15 79 13 77 13 93
27 -
25 -
148
23 -
20 -
10 -
17 -
14 -
Internship Placement – Table 2
Year Applied for Internship
Outcome
20082009
20092010
20102011
20112012
20122013
20132014
20142015
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
%
%
25 -
%
25 92 18 72 22 96 16 80 15 79 13 77 13 93
Students who obtained halftime internships* (if
applicable)
0
0
0
0
0
0
17 -
%
Students who obtained paid
internships
0
10 -
%
27 -
0
20 -
%
Students who sought or
applied for internships
including those who
withdrew from the
application process
0
23 -
%
0
0
14 -
0
0
0
Attrition
Variable
Students for whom
this is the year of
first enrollment
(i.e. new students)
Students whose
doctoral degrees
were conferred on
their transcripts
Students still
enrolled in
program
Students no longer
enrolled for any
reason other than
conferral of
doctoral degree
2008
2009
N %
20092010
N
%
Year of First Enrollment
2010201120122011
2012
2013
N
%
N %
N
%
20
-
12
-
11
-
10
-
8
-
9
-
15
-
7
35
2
1.67
1
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
06
8
67
10
90
9
90
7
90
9
100
15
100
1
1
2
1.67
0
0
1
10
1
10
0
0
0
0
149
20132014
N
%
20142015
N
%
Licensure
Outcome
2005-2013
Total number of program graduates (doctoral degrees conferred on
transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago
153
Number of these graduates (between 2 and 10 years ago) who became
licensed doctoral psychologists in time period
136
Licensure percentage
89%
Applicant Data
Number of
Applicants
Number
Accepted for
Admission
Actual Size of
Incoming Class
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
233
279
235
227
227
221
175
33
15
14
19
19
18
16
12
10
10
8
9
15
9
Accepted for Admission
556
2010
581
2011
562
2012
508
2013
163
2014
158
2015
156
555
570
570
585
163
157
154
623
688
650
721
156
156
154
625
700
640
745
158
155
155
4.4
4.6
4.3
4.3
4.6
4.3
4.3
4.5
4.5
4.0
4.3
4.5
4.5
4.4
3.58
3.50
3.40
3.40
3.65
3.60
3.46
2009
GRE – Verbal
GRE – Quantitative
GRE – Advanced
Mean Undergraduate
GPA
Mean
Score
Median
Score
Mean
Score
Median
Score
Mean
Score
Median
Score
150
Clinical Psychology Concentration/Tracks
Although the college’s doctoral programs are committed to the general training of clinical
psychologists, we also give students the option of beginning to specialize. Concentrations have
been developed in recognized areas of psychology. Each concentration accepts a limited
number of students at admission or during the first or second year of study and therefore a
student is not guaranteed a slot in a particular concentration. Each concentration consists of a
set of electives, a practicum in an approved clinical program related to the concentration, and
research activities with faculty in the concentration. Below are listed current concentrations
with their required courses.
Clinical Forensic Psychology: Recognizing the crucial need for competent clinical
psychologists working within the justice system, the Clinical Forensic Psychology (CFP)
concentration emphasizes clinical psychological skills applicable in the criminal justice system,
which include issues regarding competency and criminal responsibility; psychological damages
in civil trials; civil competencies; psychological autopsies and criminal profiling; and child
custody and parental fitness. Course work includes: Introduction to Forensic Psychology;
Forensic Psychology: Criminal Law; Forensic Psychology Assessment; Psychological
Interventions in Forensic Settings; Forensic Psychology: Family Law; Special Issues in
Forensic Psychology: Supervision, Consultation, Ethics and Controversial Issues.
Clinical Health Psychology: Clinical Health Psychology (CHP) specializes in the study,
treatment, and professional training in the interaction of physical health with the individual’s
cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social functions. Its broad scope encompasses
intervention maintenance of good health. Significant contributions have been made in chronic
pain management, weight control, cardiovascular rehabilitation, pediatric diseases, and coping
with medical procedures. Course work includes: Health Psychology; Clinical Biofeedback;
Professional and Ethical Issues in CHP/Medical Rounds; Psychology Interventions with
Medical Patients; Anatomy and Physiology; Chronic Pain/Illness Management.
Clinical Neuropsychology: Clinical Neuropsychology (CN) is concerned with the function of
the brain and its relationship to all aspects of behavior, as well as the impact of brain dysfunction
and injury on individuals’ abilities to function. The program not only encompasses the
approaches, perspectives, and practice settings of neuropsychology, but also extends to the
related disciplines of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropathology, neurorehabilitation and
child neuropsychological assessment. Course work includes: Clinical Neuropsychology,
Clinical Neuroanatomy, Behavioral Neuropathology, Advanced Clinical Neuropsychology,
Neuropsychological Case Analysis, and Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological
Assessment. Ph.D. students will complete their major papers and dissertation with a
neuropsychology faculty member. Psy.D. students will complete a research project equivalent
to a major paper, a dissertation-equivalent project in the area of neuropsychology under the
direction of a neuropsychology faculty member, as well as the Ph.D. three-course statistical
sequence.
Psychodynamic Psychology: Psychodynamic Psychology (PP) is a discipline of psychology
that presents a theory of personality and an explanation of the framework for understanding
151
psychopathology. Psychodynamic theory and technique have demonstrated applicability to
conceptualizing and providing treatment for a wide range of interpersonal and intrapsychic
difficulties. This program emphasizes contemporary psychoanalytic theories of personality,
pathology, and psychotherapy. Course work includes: Psychodynamic Psychotherapy I and II;
Narcissistic, Borderline, and Other Character Disorders; Psychodynamic Treatment of
Affective Disorders; Psychodynamic Treatment Approach to Family and Group Therapy;
Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Practice.
Psychology of Long Term Mental Illness: The Psychology of Long Term Mental Illness
(LTMI), an emerging area of specialization in psychology, studies the treatment and evaluation
of severely and persistently mentally ill adults and children and their families. The area focuses
on specialized assessment techniques of psychopathology and level of functioning,
psychotherapeutic interventions and psychosocial rehabilitation, psychopharmacology as well
as program development and public policy. Course work includes: Community Psychology
with Seriously Mentally Ill; Treatment of Serious Mental Illness; Consultative
Psychopharmacology.
Child, Adolescent & Family Psychology Track: Child, Adolescent & Family (CAFP)
addresses the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with significant emotional
and behavioral problems and troubled families. The area focuses on empirically supported
assessment and treatment methods. In addition, the area is concerned with efforts to promote
and better understand healthy child and family development as well as the prevention of
psychological problems of youth. Students wishing to specialize in CAFP will complete all
existing core requirements. Students will participate in pre-practicum research and clinical
practica with core faculty and will complete 18 hours of specified coursework.
Multicultural/Diversity Track: As society becomes increasingly more
ethnically/racially/culturally diverse, psychologists can expect to work with a clientele that
are substantively different in terms of values and expectations about mental health treatment.
The APA guidelines for the effective treatment of cultural and linguistic minorities, advocate
that psychologists develop multicultural awareness, knowledge, and competence. This track is
designed to provide coursework, research, and practicum experiences to better enable students
to work effectively in a demographically changing society. Students wishing to specialize in
the multicultural track will complete all existing core requirements as well as participation in
pre-practicum research and clinical practica with core faculty. Students will also complete 12
hours of specified coursework. In addition the major paper and dissertation will be completed
on a topic in multiculturalism with a track faculty member.
Trauma Track: The object of the Trauma track is to deliver specialized training in trauma as it
pertains to the assessment and treatment of individuals. In addition, research into trauma issues is
stressed. The Trauma track requires students to participate in trauma research and clinical practica
with core faculty. Students will complete 12 hours of specified coursework.
Doctoral Programs Admissions Requirements:
To be considered for admission to a doctoral program in clinical psychology, the applicant is
required to present evidence of scholastic ability, significant interest in the area of psychology
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for which admission is sought, personal stability, interpersonal sensitivity, and sound moral
character. Minimum requirements include a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited
institution; a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average on a 4.0 scale or a 3.5 graduate-level grade
point average on a 4.0 scale based on a minimum of 18 semester hours, which must be
completed by the end of the fall semester; three semester hours of statistics; 18 semester hours
in psychology; a three-credit-hour experimental psychology course is recommended. The
requirement for 18 semester hours of course work in psychology will be waived with a score of
600 or higher on the Graduate Record Examination, Psychology Test. The complete Graduate
Records Examination (GRE) scores (Verbal, Quantitative and Analytical writing) are required.
A combined score greater than 297 for GRE verbal and quantitative is preferred. The GRE
Psychology Test is recommended, but not required.
The standards required for admission keep in mind the safety and well-being of clients whom
its graduates will eventually serve in clinical situations. Candidates for the degree must possess,
with or without reasonable accommodation, multiple abilities and skills including intellectual,
conceptual, integrative, and quantitative abilities; and intrapersonal, communication,
behavioral, and personal attributes including empathy, emotional self-awareness, and emotional
maturity. Achievement of the minimum requirements above is necessary for an application to
be considered for a doctoral program. Higher GPA and GRE scores indicating greater potential
to complete doctoral-level work will enhance an application. A combined GRE verbal and
quantitative score greater than 297 is preferred. Other factors include: (1) previous courses
taken, especially quantitative for Ph.D. and biological for Clinical Health and Clinical
Neuropsychology; (2) previous clinical and research experience; (3) evidence of interest in
psychology; (4) the applicant’s personal statement; and (5) three letters of recommendation.
Personal interviews are required on Interview Day (held in mid-March). Completed
applications and all supporting documents (as listed below) must be complete and received in
the graduate admissions office by January 8th for consideration for admission beginning the
following fall. Students are admitted only once per year for classes starting in the fall semester.
Application Procedure
The following information is required as part of the application (available to download at
www.cps.nova.edu):
1. A completed and signed application form.
2. A statement of your professional experiences, including a description of your clinical
experience, research experience, and those aspects of psychology in which you have
the greatest interest; additionally, describe briefly your professional goals.
3. A check for the $50 nonrefundable application fee ($100 total if applying to both
programs) made payable to Nova Southeastern University.
4. The completed application worksheet.
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5. Official general GRE scores for the verbal and quantitative tests to be sent directly to
the address listed below. Include a photocopy of the GRE scores (if available).
6. Three letters of recommendation, in addition to the enclosed forms, from professors or
supervisors most familiar with your work must be sent directly to the address listed
below.
7. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities you attended. If an initial transcript
does not reflect degree conferral or final semester grades, you must forward a final
transcript to the below address as this information becomes available.
8. Where applicable, foreign nationals should submit TOEFL scores. Note: The University
accepts the Pearson Test of English-Academic (PTE-Academic) as an alternative option
to the TOEFL as proof of English proficiency. The minimum required overall score for
the PTE-Academic is 54.
9. Curriculum vitae.
Materials should be submitted to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services (EPS)
Attention: College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
P.O. Box 299000
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-9905
Transfer of Credits
All transfer credit must be awarded during the student’s first academic year in the doctoral
program. Consideration will be given only to doctoral-level courses taken before matriculation
in the doctoral program. Request for transfer credit for first semester courses must be made
during the summer, before July 15. Request for all other transfer credit must be made during
the fall, before October 15.
Transfer credits will be awarded when the course being evaluated meets all of the following
criteria:
1. It is a doctoral-level course taken at an accredited college, university, or APAapproved professional school as a post-baccalaureate student. A doctoral-level
course is defined as one that would be credited toward a doctoral degree in
psychology at the institution where the course was taken. This must be verified in
the school’s bulletin or a letter from the chair of the department and an official
transcript.
2. It was completed no longer than five years before first enrollment in this program.
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3. A grade of B or higher was received. A grade of P (Pass) or CR (Credit) or other
such grade cannot be accepted as equivalent to B unless it can be officially verified
as such.
4. It is evaluated as equivalent to a course in the program’s required curriculum.
Credits will not be awarded for electives.
5. The student must successfully demonstrate competence to the evaluating faculty
member for assessment courses.
The student must provide the Office of Academic Affairs with a syllabus and catalog
description of courses for which transfer is sought. Faculty members evaluating transfer
courses may require the student to provide further documentation and supporting
material, such as class notes, and to meet with them.
The maximum number of credits transferred that will be credited toward graduation is
15. Although credits awarded beyond this number may be used to excuse a student from
a particular course, an equivalent number of elective credits must be taken in order to
fulfill the degree requirements.
No transfer credits may be applied to pre-practicum, practicum, internship, or electives.
Nova Southeastern University complies with federal regulations for veterans’ training
that it is mandatory for all veterans benefit recipients to report either prior education
and/or training (see catalog section Veterans’ Benefits).
Provisional Admissions
Students may be provisionally admitted to a degree-seeking program based on a review of
unofficial transcripts or other specific program admission requirements. However, this
admission includes a condition that final and official documents and requirements must be
received within 90 calendar days from the start of the term. If these final and official documents
and/or requirements are not received by that time, the student will not be allowed to continue
class attendance. Financial aid will not be disbursed to a provisional/conditional student until
he or she has been fully admitted as a regular student (all admission requirements have been
approved by the college/program admissions office).
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs Academic Policies
Registration and Residency
All students must be in full-time residence for the first three academic years to be eligible for the doctoral
degree. This requirement is independent of the number of transfer credits the student may receive. In
order to maintain student status in either of the clinical psychology programs, students must be
registered continuously under one of the following categories until all program requirements are
met.
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1. While fulfilling the three-year residence requirement, students are considered to be full
time if they complete at least 9 credit hours each of fall and winter semesters.
Completing less than 9 credit hours in each of fall and winter semesters requires special
permission from the director of academic affairs. Students should refer to their
appropriate curriculum (Ph.D. or Psy.D.) to determine residence requirements for each
summer semester.
2. Students who have met the three-year residency requirement are considered full time
by the center if they are registered for at least .5 credit.
For certain forms of financial aid, full-time and part-time status may be defined
differently. Students applying for financial assistance MUST clarify this with the Office of
Student Financial Services and Registration.
Continuous registration for a minimum of 1 credit must be maintained until the degree is awarded.
If only research remains to be completed, the student must enroll for 1 credit of continuing
dissertation advisement. All students going on internship must register for .5 credit of internship
each semester until the completion of that internship.
Failure to Register
Students who fail to register for a required semester and who voluntarily withdraw from the
program without a leave of absence are considered to have withdrawn from their program. Such
students must make formal application and go through the entire admission process if they wish to
reenter the program at a later date.
Candidacy
Upon admission, students are admitted to degree candidacy.
*Students admitted to the doctoral program must have access to a computer and their own
Internet service provider account. Students will be required to demonstrate technological
competence and computer literacy during the program, including the use of the electronic
library. NSU requires that all students maintain one official university-assigned computer
account that is used to access major computing resources, including electronic mail. All
official electronic mail communications directed to students will be sent exclusively to
NSU-assigned computer accounts to ensure timely and accurate delivery of information.
Students may forward their NSU generated electronic mail to external locations, but do so
at their own risk.
Students will not receive transfer credit for required courses taken in their original
doctoral program that are at a lower level than those required in their new program.
En Route Master’s Degree
Students enrolled in the Ph.D. or Psy.D. programs in clinical psychology may earn, as an
intermediate degree, the Master of Science in Clinical Psychology. The curriculum for this
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degree consists of all courses in the first two years of the model doctoral curricula. Courses
transferred into Nova Southeastern University’s program do not count toward this degree. Any
doctoral course with a comparable number of credit hours may be substituted for a transferred
course. Graduates with this degree will not have met the educational requirements for
certification or licensure in Florida and should not expect to provide psychological services as
an independent practitioner. Rather, this degree should demonstrate master’s-level achievement
and enhance employment opportunities.
Grading and Academic Standing
The doctoral programs in the College of Psychology assign grades to course work according to
the following system: A, B, C, and F, except for dissertation, and directed study: research, and
internship which receive P, F, PG, or PR (in progress). A grade of I (incomplete) is given only
with instructor’s approval and under exceptional circumstances.
The College of Psychology doctoral programs require that, to remain in good academic
standing, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. In
addition, other minimum requirements will result in academic probation or dismissal, as
detailed in the student handbook. A student is allowed one year (two full semesters excluding
summer session) to remove probationary status. Automatic dismissal will occur if more than
two grades below B are recorded, if two grades of F are received, or if academic probation
extends beyond one year. Automatic dismissal will also occur in the doctoral programs if the
clinical competency exam is failed a fourth time or a grade of C or lower is received for
internship.
Attendance
Students are required to attend all scheduled learning activities, including classes, lectures,
seminars and exams. Anticipated absences should be cleared in advance with the instructor.
Excessive absences may result in a lower grade at the instructor’s discretion or may necessitate
a withdrawal from the class. However, it is the policy of the university to excuse, without
penalty, absences due to religious observances and to allow students to make up missed work.
First year doctoral students are required to attend Incoming Student Orientation and the
Colleges’ Professional Development Institute which is typically scheduled to take place during
the summer term.
Clinical Psychology Curricula
Clinical psychology doctoral students must complete a minimum of 119.0 (Psy.D) or 118.0
(Ph.D.) credits, successfully pass the Clinical Competency Examination, and complete a oneyear internship to be eligible for the degree. Courses are taken in general psychology,
assessment, intervention, and methodology. Some courses have specific prerequisite
requirements that students must meet; these should be checked to ensure compliance. The
following pages outline the Psy.D. and Ph.D. curricula.
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Clinical Training
Clinical practica provide students with conceptually and empirically based assessment,
intervention, and consultation experiences. Students have the opportunity to review the list of
school-approved placements and indicate their preferences. The director of clinical training then
makes assignments, taking student preferences into account. Students are required to complete
two full years of practicum, typically during their second and third years of residence. Each
practicum placement is for 12 months, beginning in late August for most students, but in early
May for others. Students are required to meet all clinical obligations, some of which occur on
evenings and weekends and during holidays and session breaks. Students’ practicum activities
are covered by the university’s professional liability insurance.
The Clinical Competency Examination must be taken and passed at least 30 days before the
end of the fall semester preceding the calendar year of the internship. This oral and written
examination evaluates the students’ understanding of and skills in assessment and intervention,
along with applicable ethical knowledge. Two faculty members appointed by the director of
clinical training conduct the examination. A student failing the exam can retake it up to three
times. A fourth failure results in automatic dismissal from the doctoral program.
HIPAA Training
Students entering practicum training are required to complete the NSU online HIPAA training
(Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996).
Professional Liability Insurance
Each semester all graduate students within the College of Psychology will be charged a nominal
fee for liability insurance coverage provided under the university’s group policy. All students
are required to abide by the ethical standards of the American Psychological Association, the
ethical standards of their respected professions, the policies and procedures of the College of
Psychology, and agency placement rules and regulations.
Research Training
Clinical Psychology Psy.D. students are expected to demonstrate a capacity for critical
thinking and gain an understanding of appropriate methodology for empirical inquiry and the
utilization of its results. The Directed Study is a milestone project of the Psy.D. program that is
designed to be completed in the spring/summer of the student’s fourth year of study. The
primary objective of the directed study project is to provide the trainee with a supervised
experience that involves gaining special expertise in a specific substantive area of clinical
psychology. The overarching goal is consistent with the Psy.D. program mission of training
professional practitioners to be informed by science. Consistent with the program’s philosophy,
directed study projects are intended to demonstrate the student’s level of facility and
sophistication in synthesizing an empirical knowledge base in a manner commensurate with
doctor-level training.
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Clinical Psychology Ph.D. students are expected to be actively involved in research throughout
their graduate training. With mentors integrally involved in the admissions process, students enter
the program as members of ongoing research teams. These teams provide a critical context for the
research training sequence by introducing newer students to the full spectrum of tasks associated
with research. The developmental sequence from research assistant to independent researcher is
fostered by program expectations that all students be actively involved in research. The student’s
transition to independent researcher is advanced further through work on his or her Major Paper,
which often leads directly to the dissertation. The student’s transition from trainee to independent
researcher culminates during completion of the dissertation.
Time Limits
Students are required to complete their program and be awarded a doctoral degree within eight
years from the time of first enrollment. Students who do not complete all requirements within
the eight-year time limit (excluding approved leaves of absence), must enroll in the College and
complete 18 credits (at least six credits each fall and winter semester unless a defense is
scheduled), as specified in the doctoral students’ Policies and Procedures Handbook and
approved by the Office of Academic Affairs. Failure to remain in continuous registration will
be deemed as the student’s withdrawal from the program. Students whose dissertation adviser
becomes unavailable after the eight-year limit will have to start their dissertation over with a
new chair.
Evaluation of Doctoral Students
Each student is evaluated on an ongoing basis while enrolled in the program. Included are
evaluations during each course, the Clinical Competency Examination, dissertation defense,
and while on internship. In addition, each student receives annually a written evaluation of
progress in the program. The purposes of such evaluations are to provide students with relevant
and timely feedback, to formulate plans for improvement or remediation if needed, and to serve
as a screening procedure for maintaining high-quality standards in the profession of
psychology. Candidates for the degree must possess, with or without reasonable
accommodation, multiple abilities and skills including intellectual, conceptual, integrative, and
quantitative abilities. Areas of evaluation include academic achievement, responsible behavior,
ethical behavior, interpersonal behavior, emotional self-awareness, and emotional maturity.
Professional Standing Committee
The Professional Standing Committee of the College of Psychology is appointed by the dean
of the center and serves in a variety of capacities related to the review of student professional
standing matters. The committee consists of faculty, a student representative and other members
as appointed by the dean.
The committee may be asked to review alleged violations of the University Student Code of
Conduct, including academic standards and ethical standards of the field. In addition, the
committee may conduct reviews concerning emotional behavior problems serious enough to
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suggest interference with professional functioning, academic performance, or performance in a
clinical practicum or internship setting.
The purpose of the committee’s review and recommendations are not limited to disciplinary
actions, but may encompass efforts to remediate a deficiency or problems so that the student
can continue his or her education and function competently as a professional. Committee
activities are designed to insure a process by which all relevant facts can be determined,
including providing the student with full opportunity to present important information. Actions
the committee may recommend to the dean could include, but are not limited to, remediation,
referral, warning, or sanctions up to suspension or termination.
In instances of complaints regarding violations of Student Conduct and Academic
Responsibility, the dean may charge the committee with conducting a formal investigation into
the facts pertaining to allegations of misconduct. In such cases, the committee will adhere to
professional standing committee guidelines that ensure a timely and complete review of the
facts. The process will insure that the student and involved parties have the opportunity to
present relevant information.
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Clinical Psychology Model Curricula and Course Descriptions
Psy.D. Program Model Curriculum
First-Year Fall Semester
1403 Adult Psychopathology
1405 Developmental: Child and Adolescent
1407 Developmental: Adult & Older Adult
1409 Professional Issues and Ethics
1503 Assessment of Child and Adolescent
Intelligence Testing
1505 Assessment of Adult and Older Adult
Intelligence Testing
1603 Systems of Psychotherapy
1605 Diversity in Assessment & Intervention
First-Year Summer Semester
1416 Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior
Elective*
Second-Year Fall Semester
2507 Objective Personality Assessment
2602 Systems/Family Therapy
2604 Child and Adolescent Intervention
2701 Clinical Practicum I
2703 Supervision I
2809 Research Design
3807 Theories of Measurement
Second-Year Summer Semester
2406 Psychopharmacology
270A Summer Practicum I
270B Summer Supervision
Third Year- Fall Semester
Credits
3
1.5
1.5
3
1.5
3605 Adult Intervention II
3501 Integrated Report
3701 Clinical Practicum III
3703 Supervision III
5890 Directed Study: Research
Third Year- Summer Semester
370A Summer Practicum II
370B Summer Supervision II
4499 Advanced Professional Development
Elective
Fourth Year- Fall Semester
Clinical Competency Exam
2 Electives*
Fifth Year
5700 Internship
(.5 credit per semester summer, fall, winter, and
summer)
3
3
3
1
2
First-Year Winter Semester
1401 History & Systems of Psychology
1408 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology
1502 Diagnostic: Interviewing
1610 Adult Intervention I
1703 Pre-Practicum
2806 Intermediate Statistics with Lab
Credits
3
3
3
3
1
3
1.5
1.5
3
3
3
Second Year- Winter Semester
1412 Psychobiology
2509 Behavioral Assessment
2511 Projective Personality
Assessment
2606 Case Conceptualization
2702 Clinical Practicum II
2704 Supervision II
3
3
1.5
3
1
3
3
3
1.5
3
3
3
1
1.5
1
3
Third Year- Winter Semester
3406
3702
3704
3403
5890
Consultation & Supervision
Clinical Practicum IV
Supervision IV
Social Aspects of Behavior
Directed Study: Research
3
3
1
3
2
3
1
1
3
Fourth Year- Winter Semester
Elective*
3
6
2
Total Credit Hours
119
* For the 15 credits of electives, students must complete 6 credits of Intervention (46XX) electives and 9 credits
in any area. Concentration students may be required to complete additional credits.
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Doctor of Psychology Program
Course Descriptions
General Required Courses
PSY 1401 History & Systems of Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines the historical progression of ideas central to psychology, the
philosophical and empirical roots of those ideas, and their confluence into the predominant
systems of the present day. In so doing, it covers the fundamentals of scientific thinking, their
bearing on theory development, the relationship between philosophical and empirical thought,
and theoretical models of historical and current significance. It also focuses on the dynamic
interplay between theoretical constructs and empirically derived knowledge. Particular
emphasis is placed on principles used to examine the merits of evidence that supports or
disconfirms theory.
PSY 1403 Adult Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course covers descriptive psychopathology and research on the etiology, epidemiology,
dynamics and diversity issues of major adult and aged pathologic syndromes. It provides a
thorough introduction to DSM-IV as a diagnostic tool.
PSY 1405 Developmental: Child and Adolescent (1.5 credits)
This course covers issues in human development that are especially relevant to children and
adolescents, beginning with the earliest aspects of development during the prenatal period and
ending with the final phase of transition from adolescence to adulthood. In this course will be
selected that focus on normal and accelerated developmental progress, as well as factors that
threaten to impede normal development.
PSY 1407 Developmental: Adult & Older Adult (1.5 credits)
This course will review developmental theories of aging and personality development in
adulthood and later adulthood. Topics will include perceptual, cognitive, personality and social
processes of aging.
PSY 1408 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive examination of specific disorders and problematic
psychological states during childhood and adolescence. An emphasis will be placed on the
description, theoretical conceptualization, and etiology of disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 1405
PSY 1409 Professional Issues and Ethics (3 credits)
This course acquaints the student with the extant legal and ethical principles and standards of
practice that psychologists have developed for the profession.
PSY 1412 Psychobiology (3 credits)
This course covers theory, research, and applications for the following topics: structure,
function, and disorders of the nervous system; physiological mechanisms and disorders in
vegetative and intellectual functions; and psychophysiological methods and technology.
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PSY 1416 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior (3 credits)
This course examines cognitive and affective processes that affect behavior. Topics include
information processing, memory, attachment, unconscious processing, schemata development,
bias, self-regulations, and attribution theory. The interface of cognitive and affect will be
examined in relation to issues in clinical psychology.
PSY 1603 Systems of Psychotherapy (1.5 credits)
This course covers the scientific and philosophical origins, fundamental principles, and
treatment implications of the primary systems of psychotherapy. It follows the integrative steps
that flow from each system's theory of personality to its theory of psychopathology and
culminates in its therapeutic process and therapy relationship. How these systems utilize
theoretical formulations and assessment data to inform treatment is highlighted
PSY 2406 Psychopharmacology (1.5 credits)
This course covers the basic science, theory, research and clinical applications of
psychopharmacology. It promotes the understanding of psychobiological processes in
medicated patients and emphasizes the special psychotherapeutic requirements that relate to the
currently prevalent combined therapeutic approach. The clinical issues are illustrated by case
presentations and the review of the relevant literature. Prerequisite: PSY 1412
PSY 3403 Social Aspects of Behavior (3 credits)
This course studies the social antecedents of human behavior. The main theories of social
psychology are examined in relation to clinical psychology.
PSY 3406 Consultation and Supervision (3 credits)
This course is intended to increase a student’s awareness and competencies with ethical issues
in therapy. In addition, students’ consultation and supervision skills are developed.
PSY 4499 Advanced Professional Development (1 credit)
To enhance critical thinking, oral and written exposition, and knowledge of career development
needed to enter the profession; this course will focus on enhancing internship application
effectiveness. Students will be directed in preparing a curriculum vita, conducting selfevaluation of personal and professional roles, developing effective interviewing skills, and
synthesizing training, experience, conceptualization models, and philosophy. Students will
learn to make application decisions in terms of goodness of fit. Course assignments include the
development of written products needed for internship application.
Assessment Required Courses
PSY 1502 Diagnostic Interviewing (3 credits)
This is a basic course on the theoretical and practical aspects of the clinical assessment
interview. Emphasis is placed on development of communication skills, rapport building,
evaluation strategies, consideration of diagnostic data, cultural and ethnic diversity, the mental
status evaluation, and the ability to organize information in written and oral form. Prerequisite:
PSY 1403
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PSY 1503 Assessment of Child and Adolescent Intelligence (1.5 credits)
The administration, scoring, and interpretation of the primary measures used to test intelligence in
children and adolescents are the focus of this course. The potential contributions of hereditary,
environmental, developmental, and diversity factors to the interpretation of examination results are
considered.
PSY 1505 Assessment of Adult and Older Adult Intelligence (1.5 credits)
The administration, scoring, and interpretation of the primary measures used to test intelligence in adults
and older adults are the focus of this course. The potential contributions of hereditary, environmental,
developmental, and diversity factors to the interpretation of examination results are considered.
PSY 2507 Objective Personality Assessment (3 credits)
This course examines theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues in objective
personality assessment. An emphasis will be placed upon objective personality tests such as
the MMPI-2, MMPI-A, 16 PF, Millon’s MCMI, and others. Prerequisite: PSY 1501-2
PSY 2509 Behavioral Assessment (1.5 credits)
This course will provide an overview of current strategies and issues in contemporary
behavioral assessment. Included will be self-report and monitoring, direct and naturalistic
observation of behavior and physiological measurement. Application to a variety of clinical
disorders will be addressed and attention directed to collateral factors such as behavioral assets
and limitations and environmental supports and restrictions that often have an impact on the
client.
PSY 2511 Projective Personality Assessment (3 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to the theory, administration, scoring and interpretation
of the major projective assessment measures including the Rorschach, TAT, sentence
completion, and figure drawings. The specific value of the projective measures and associated
research findings will be discussed. The student will also receive an introduction to integrating
assessment materials for the purpose of writing psychological test reports. Prerequisite: PSY
1502, 1503, 1505
PSY 3501 Integrated Report (3 credits)
The primary goal of this course is to help the student write a well-integrated and meaningful
psychological report. Starting with basic data obtained from a well-balanced battery of tests
and other sources, which may include interviews and developmental and social histories, the
student is guided through the process of clinical inference, learning to examine and analyze the
data, formulate integrative hypotheses, and generate a synthesized, integrated and meaningful
psychological report. Prerequisite: PSY 2511
Intervention Required Courses
PSY 1605 Diversity in Assessment and Intervention (3 credits)
This course covers diversity issues and their implications for assessment and intervention.
Specifically, it considers the psychological impact of gender, race, ethnicity, culture, religious
preference, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. It includes
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exploration of common stereotypes and their impact on therapy. This course also includes an
examination of innovative assessment methods for clients of diverse backgrounds.
PSY 1610 Adult Intervention I (3 credits)
This course covers primary approaches to treating adult clinical problems, with emphasis on
treating adult psychological disorders. Interventions with strong empirical and theoretical
support are emphasized; relationship factors are also addressed. Development of treatment
interventions based on a wide range of conceptual models is highlighted. Prerequisite: PSY
1403, 1407; co-prerequisite: 1605
PSY 2602 Systems/Family Therapy (3 credits)
This course will cover systems theory with emphasis on applications to marital and family
therapy. General systems theory, and conceptualizations from such schools as the Bowenian,
Structural, and Strategic will be considered.
PSY 2604 Child and Adolescent Intervention (1.5 credits)
This course covers current intervention strategies for children and adolescents. Application of
theory, methods, and current research in this area will be reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 1408
PSY 2606 Case Conceptualization (3 credits)
This course addresses the processes of conceptualizing case material from diverse theoretical
models and translating these conceptualizations into effective treatment strategies. Videoand/or audiotaped clinical interviews, and written and/or orally presented case histories are used
in class to demonstrate and provide practice in case conceptualization skills. Prerequisite: PSY
1610, 2602-4 2701-3
PSY 3605 Adult Intervention II (3 credits)
This course covers primary approaches to treating personality disorders in adults. Problems
covered include narcissistic, borderline, antisocial, and dependent personality disorders.
Interventions with solid empirical and theoretical support are highlighted.
Practicum and Internship Required Courses
PSY 1703 Pre-Practicum I (1 credit)
This course will expose students to a variety of client populations and will provide some
introductory experiences in a therapeutic context. The course is designed to allow students an
opportunity to observe clinical psychology in practice prior to their being required to assume
an active therapeutic role.
PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 10 hours per week for 12 months at a selected
agency(s). In this course the student is to acquire competency in the areas of interview and
assessment, psychological testing, and psychotherapy. Prerequisite: All first year courses;
exempt 1412, 1416
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PSY 2702 Clinical Practicum II (3 credits)
See description for PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I. Prerequisite: PSY 2701
PSY 270A Summer Practicum (1 credit)
See description for PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I. Prerequisite: PSY 2702
PSY 2703 Supervision I (1 credit)
The student is required to spend approximately one hour face-to-face with a faculty member in
an individual or small group format. The student is expected to present case material and be
prepared to discuss cases each week. Tapes of therapy sessions may be required. If supervision
is provided in a group format, the time is adjusted to account for the multiple members of the
supervision group. For instance, when two students receive 90 minutes of supervision in a
group per week, that would constitute the equivalent of 45 minutes of individual supervision
per week.
PSY 2704 Supervision II (1 credit) See description for PSY 2703 Supervision I. Prerequisite:
PSY 2703
PSY 270B Summer Supervision 1 (3 credits) See description for PSY 2703 Supervision I.
Prerequisite: PSY 2704
PSY 3701 Clinical Practicum III (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for 12 months at a selected
agency(s). Prerequisite: PSY 2507, 9, 11; 2603, 4, 6; 2702, 4; 270A; 270B; co-prerequisite:
3501
PSY 3702 Clinical Practicum IV (3 credits) See description for PSY 3701 Clinical
Practicum III. Prerequisite: PSY 3701
PSY 370A Summer Practicum II (3 credits) See description for PSY 3701 Clinical
Practicum III. Prerequisite: PSY 3702
PSY 3703 Supervision III (1 credit) See description for PSY 2704 Supervision II.
PSY 3704 Supervision IV (1 credit) See description for PSY 3703 Supervision III.
Prerequisite: PSY 3703
PSY 370B Summer Supervision II (1 credit) See description for PSY 3703 Supervision III.
Prerequisite: PSY 3704
PSY 5700 Internship (2 credits)
The student is required to complete an internship, covering a 50-week period of 2,000 hours.
The internship site must be accredited by the American Psychological Association or be a
member of the Association of Psychology Internship Centers. Prerequisite: All course work
including 5890
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Methodology, Research, and Directed Study Required Courses
PSY 2806 Intermediate Statistics with Lab (3 credits)
This course covers basic inferential and descriptive statistics to proficiency. Multivariate
statistics is taught from a consumer perspective. A computer lab is included.
PSY 2809 Research Design (3 credits)
The focus of this course is research methodology and scientific thinking. It covers basic
experimental designs (between and within groups), single subject experiments, group
experimental designs, non-experimental designs (correlational research, case studies, metaanalyses), and program evaluation. Validity issues in research (internal and external) and
research ethics are emphasized throughout.
PSY 3807 Theories of Measurement (3 credits)
This course examines the theories, techniques, and statistics of psychological measurement.
Topics covered include classical test theory, methods of reliability and validity assessment, test
and item analysis, scaling procedures, test construction, item response theory, and
generalizability theory. Both conceptual understanding and practical application are covered.
Prerequisite: PSY 2806
PSY 5890 Directed Study: Research (2 credits)
The Directed Study: Research will be under the direction of one faculty member. Upon
enrollment, the student will submit a prospectus to the Office of Academic Affairs, describing
the planned study. Content of the study can be an empirical study, part of a larger study, a
critical literature review, case study, or other professional activity/product. A scholarly paper
will be required as a final product, submitted by the student to the supervising faculty member.
In order for a student to be eligible to apply for an internship placement, a signed and dated
Research Completion Form with a copy of the Abstract and a complete copy of the directed
study must be submitted to the Office of Academic Affairs no later than the last day of Summer
Session I.
General Elective Courses
PSY 4401 Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)
The study of the relationship between brain function and behavior. Major topics include:
anatomy and physiology of the human brain, behavioral functions associated with the cerebral
hemispheres and lobes, neurobehavioral presentations of common neurologic and psychiatric
conditions, administration and interpretation of major neuropsychological test batteries, and
diagnostic examination for brain dysfunction.
PSY 4405 Clinical Neuroanatomy (3 credits)
The understanding of the anatomical organization of the human nervous system is an important
skill for a student of clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects
of neuroanatomy that will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will
include the development, structure, and function of the human nervous system,
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neuroanatomical correlates of behavior, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
Prerequisite: PSY 1412
PSY 4406 Behavioral Neuropathology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to neuropathology. The understanding of
the major diseases and disorders of the human nervous system is an important skill for a student
of clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects of neuropathology
that will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will include the
development of structural and chemical dysfunction of the human nervous system,
neuroanatomical correlates of dysfunction, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
Prerequisite: PSY 4401
PSY 4409 Pediatric Psychology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the field
of pediatric psychology. Students will be taught the various roles of a pediatric psychologist
functioning within the medical environment and the interface between psychological and
medical services and systems. Also, a significant proportion of the course will address the
assessment and treatment of children who have psychological and adjustment difficulties due
to a chronic, acute, and/or genetic medical diagnosis, and the relevant medical intervention.
PSY 4410 Psychology in Fiction (3 credits)
This course is about psychology, i.e., human experience, as told by fiction writers. By studying
selected works, portions of truth about human behavior are sampled. Class discussions focus
on this truth. Students are helped to experience vicariously different portions of the human
condition, become more empathic with people whose experiences are different from their own,
refine skills of observing and influencing behavior, and internalize values significance in our
work as therapists.
PSY 4414 Behavioral Principles of Learning (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of the psychological principles of learning
derived from experimental research and validated by applied experimental/empirical studies.
General topics include the nature of learning, behavior without learning, learning without
words, and learning with words. Specific topics covered include types of behavior, motivational
influences on behavior, respondent behavior and conditioning, operant behavior and
conditioning, stimulus control, schedule influences on behavior, observational learning, verbal
behavior and rule-governed behavior, and behavioral accounts of language and cognition. The
course is designed to give students a good grounding for assessment and intervention courses
with a behavioral orientation.
PSY 4418 Forensic Psychology: Criminal Law (3 credits)
This course will cover topics dealing with the interaction of psychology and criminal law.
Topics to be covered include: insanity, competency to stand trial, clinical assessment of
dangerousness, delinquency, and the evaluation of malingering.
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PSY 4419 Forensic Psychology: Family Law (3 credits)
Basic principles in concepts of forensic psychology; the relationship between juvenile and
family law and the scientific study of human behavior. Emphasis will also be given to areas of
child physical and sexual abuse and domestic violence. There will be a critical review of
pertinent literature. Special attention will be on the legal-ethical issues in evaluation, treatment,
and research in family and juvenile law.
PSY 4420 Police Psychology (3 credits)
Police psychology is an emergent specialty area in professional psychology. The role of a
police psychologist is complex. This course is designed to provide didactic training for
consultation within law enforcement. Specific topical areas will include: consultant vs. inhouse staff, pre-employment assessment, fitness-for-duty evaluation, critical incident stress
debriefing, hostage negotiation, and psychological profiling.
PSY 4424 The Business of Psychology (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the business of psychology. Issues related to private
practice, employment, program development, and implementation will be presented. Specific
topics will include: developing a private practice, surviving in a changing marketplace,
establishing fees, coding and reimbursement, negotiating employment contracts, and
development and implementation of psychological service units.
PSY 4432 Concepts and Issues in Substance Abuse (3 credits)
This course provides a foundation for understanding clinical efforts aimed at the prevention and
treatment of substance use problems. It examines major perspectives on the nature and etiology
of substance use problems, and how those perspectives translate into social actions and clinical
practices. Explanations of substance use and abuse are presented as exemplifying lay and
scientific views of abnormal behavior.
PSY 4433 Advanced Readings in Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course provides an advanced and in-depth examination of seminal and contemporary
articles in Applied Behavior Analysis and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. The course
is designed to give students with the opportunity to identify, describe and discuss advanced
articles in the field and prepare students to effectively explain behavior analysis to other
professionals and consumers.
PSY 4435 The Teaching of Psychology (1 credit)
This seminar will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching undergraduate and
graduate psychology. Examination of models of course construction, teaching pedagogy, and
assessment of learning will be explored. Students will create an individual philosophy of
teaching with a focus on identity development, both as a psychologist and educator. Didactic
training will be complemented by experiential opportunities for teaching in a variety of formats.
PSY 4441 Object Relations Theories (3 credits)
The primary objectives of this course is to trace back the origin and subsequent development
from the work of Freud through the growth of both British and American object relations
theorists.
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PSY 4449 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
This is a survey course designed to provide students with a knowledge of psychology that can
be used to provide assistance in the law. It will deal with both practical and research
applications in clinical and social-cognitive psychology. Some topics will include admissibility
of psychologists in the courts to provide expert witness testimony; assessment of various mental
states to meet legal requirements for competency; insanity; abuse syndromes and other
psychological harm; ethical guidelines for forensic psychologists; working with police and
others in the criminal justice system; and child custody and dependency issues. The legal
system will be reviewed, as will the ability to conduct legal research.
PSY 4450 Forensic Psychology: Special Issues (3 credits)
This course covers current special issues through the study of various cases in the particular
area of psychology and the law. Each year that the course is offered, the topics and cases chosen
for study may change depending on what is current in the courts, in psychology, and in the
news.
PSY 4460 Basic Anatomy and Pathophysiology (3 credits)
This course is designed for students of clinical health psychology to gain a physiologic
understanding of disease processes. Cellular physiology, neuro-pathology, immunology,
cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculo-skeletal, and endocrine physiology as
well as pertinent disorders in each area will be studied.
PSY 4481 Community Psychology with the Seriously Mentally Ill (3 credits)
This course covers a variety of topics relevant to psychologists specializing in long term mental
illness. The focus will be on developing skills in areas including qualitative research,
supervision, consultation, administration, advocacy and public policy, program development,
grant writing and teaching/workshop planning. Guest speakers, field trips and clinical exercises
will augment class lectures.
PSY 4482 Consultative Psychopharmacology (3 credits)
This course in advanced psychopharmacology emphasizes the selection and coordination of
appropriate pharmacological treatments for specific psychological disorders. It focuses on the
consultation function of psychologists with non-psychiatric medical personnel.
PSY 4490 Military Psychology (3 credits)
This course covers the application of psychology to military environments. It provides an
overview of current assessment and treatment models, covering both clinical operational
psychology. Topics include fitness for duty evaluations, brief psychotherapy in the U.S. Military,
clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine in military healthcare settings, suicide
prevention in the military, combat stress, psychological interventions after disaster or trauma,
assessment and selection of personnel, future directions in military psychology, and military
internship opportunities for graduate students. This course is relevant to those interested in a career
in the military or those providing services to veterans, law enforcement, or intelligence personnel
in the civilian sector.
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PSY 4491 Consultation and Supervision: Medical Rounds (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to professional and ethical issues in the field of
Clinical Health Psychology. The course includes a field-based experience intended to provide
students with an opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary rounds in medical settings. The
field-based aspect of the course will require that the students spend approximately 20 hours
observing medical rounds. Classroom-based work will focus on practical, professional, and
ethical issues specifically related to the practice of health psychology. Relevant issues arising
in the field-based experience will also be discussed in class.
PSY 4501 Advanced Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)
Intensive study of specialized methods of neuropsychological assessment as they apply to the
recognition of central nervous system disorders. Examination results are presented and
discussed in a case conference format. Topics include: administration and interpretation of the
Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery, selection and interpretation of flexible batteries,
functional systems of the brain, and profession issues. Prerequisite: PSY 4401
PSY 4503 MMPI (3 credits)
The MMPI, MMPI-2, and MMPI-A are the most widely used clinical instruments, and the most
widely used personality test. More than 15,000 research studies have been published using the
test, and 1,000 specialized research scales have been developed. The course is intended to help
the advanced student become more familiar with clinical interpretation of the MMPIs. We will
also examine its various forms and the utility of specialized scales. In addition, we will explore
its usefulness in conjunction with other instruments, such as the MCMI.
PSY 4515 Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological Assessment (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to developmental neuroanatomy, and
developmental neuropsychological research and theory in the neuropsychological assessment
of children. Cases of acute brain trauma, chronic brain injury, communicative disorders,
learning disabilities, brain disease, sensory-motor handicaps, and seizure disorders will be
presented to demonstrate the behavioral effects of these conditions.
PSY 4517 Neuropsychology Case Analysis (3 credits)
This course will cover the interpretation of batteries of neuropsychological tests that reflect
classic conditions such as open and closed-head trauma, stroke, dementia, tumor, anoxia,
carbon monoxide poisoning, Parkinson’s disease, and other common conditions seen in adult
acute hospital settings. The class will involve analysis of cases presented in the literature, as
well as cases presented by the students.
PSY 4520 Child Sexual Abuse Assessment (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with state-of-the-art knowledge and the
tools necessary to properly assess the validity of allegations of CSA, and to assess the
psychological impact of CSA on known victims.
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PSY 4525 Assessment of Culturally Diverse Clients (3 credits)
This course involves a critical review of traditional assessment methods and instruments when
used to measure the intelligence and aptitudes of those persons who differ markedly from the
social and cultural norms. It will demonstrate the counterproductive pitfalls in the application
of such techniques when used to label ethnic minorities and underprivileged clients. Students
will learn to use and apply alternative methods. The theoretical and practical innovations of
dynamic assessment will be analyzed.
PSY 4526 Learning Potential Assessment and Instruction (3 credits)
This course will include specific training in the concepts and application of Feuerstein’s
methods for assessing potential in culturally different clients and students and in enhancing
their learning by means of remedial programs of instrumental enrichment.
PSY 4550 Analytic Approaches to Assessment (3 credits)
Frequently used projective tests from the test battery (Rorschach, TAT, SC, Bender, and DAP)
will be examined from a psychoanalytic viewpoint. Test protocols will be reviewed and
analyzed with similar content from different tests pointed out. How to structure will be
accentuated.
Report writing stressing the principal conflict, and showing how
conceptualization of a case begins with the patient’s initial response and builds from this
impression, reinforcing or offering new ideas, will be demonstrated. The work of a number of
outstanding authors will be examined from a conflict/defense orientation. Organization,
synthetization and integration of material will be highlighted.
PSY 4560 Forensic Assessment (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach the basic principles and concepts of forensic psychology as it
relates to assessment. Students will be instructed in the basic areas of forensic assessment,
including how to approach a forensic assessment case, ethical guidelines associated with
forensic assessment, how to prepare a forensic assessment report, and how to testify as an expert
witness. The class will focus on a variety of general psychological tests used in forensic
assessment, such as the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, Wechsler Scales, and Rorschach. In addition, the
use of these tests in particular forensic contexts, such as the MMPI-2 in child custody cases and
the Wechsler Scales in criminal competency cases, will be discussed. Finally, specialized tests
that can be used in forensic evaluations, such as the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI),
Parenting Stress Index (PSI), and the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) will be
covered.
PSY4565 International Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines a variety of contemporary psychological topics in International
psychology. Students evaluate mainstream as well as alternative theoretical, methodological,
and applied approaches that are relevant to the study and practice of psychology within a global
context. Clinical issues are reviewed with regard to trans nationally conceptions of etiology and
treatment of mental health problems.
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Intervention Elective Courses
PSY 3606 Systems/Family Therapy II (3 credits)
This course will explore family-of-origin issues and multigenerational processes as well as their
influences on couples’ relationships. Students will learn to apply family methods to specific
problem areas such as divorce, parenting, chronic illness, phobias, suicide, etc.
PSY 4603 Play Therapy (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to delineate the various theoretical and practical approaches to
play therapy. Conducted in a seminar fashion, class sessions will involve the discussion and
instruction of theory, methods of intervention, and the special therapy issues. Additionally, an
applied clinical approach will also be emphasized via student play therapy case presentations.
PSY 4604 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of Applied Behavior Analysis at an advanced
level. Students will learn the history of behavioral psychology, the experimental analysis of
behavior and applied behavior analysis. The basic principles of behavior are reviewed as a
foundation for the application in ABA methods. Students will design an intervention program
using ABA methods to improve socially meaningful behavior with the approval of the
instructor.
PSY 4607 Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
Group process provides an introduction to the theories and research pertaining to small group
behavior. Experiencing group dynamics first hand and processing these experiences provide
opportunities to become familiar with factors which influence behavior in small groups.
PSY 4608 Advanced Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
This course continues the student’s training and experience in group psychotherapy. It is
primarily focused on group-leader facilitation, empathy, sensitivity, lessening of prejudicial
judgment as it relates to the many hues of human experience and behavior, and anxiety
reduction with multiple-client interactions. A paper is required summarizing what was learned
about group process and being a group member and leader.
PSY 4610 Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy (3 credits)
Addresses topics in the area of human sexuality and sexual functioning from several
perspectives, such as historical, biological, psychosocial, behavioral and clinical intervention.
Various approaches to conducting sex therapy will be presented as well.
PSY 4612 Therapy with HIV/AIDS Patients (3 credits)
The objective of this course is to have students become thoroughly familiar with psychosocial,
medical, and legal aspects of HIV, as well as to examine their own feelings as therapists dealing
with people infected with HIV.
PSY 4613 Intervention in Clinical Geropsychology (3 credits)
This course covers multiple aspects of working with older adults, including psychopathology,
clinical assessment approaches, and psychotherapeutic interventions. The focus is on the
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effects of age upon psychopathology, conceptualization from a biopsychosocial perspective,
the use of instruments in the assessment of mood, personality, and cognition, specialized
psychotherapeutic approaches, and a description of the settings in which a clinical
geropsychologist works. Emphasis is on familiarizing students with evidence-based
interventions designed for the unique problems of the older adult.
PSY 4614 Interventions in Depression (3 credits)
This course will cover the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mood disorders. Available
literature on treatment outcome studies will be reviewed. The course will focus on actual
treatment applications of depressed patients.
Treatment modalities will include
cognitive/behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and group approaches. Students
must be in practicum and should expect to demonstrate some direct patient experience with the
interventions studied.
PSY 4617 Ericksonian Hypnosis and Therapy (3 credits)
Basic skills of Ericksonian hypnosis (e.g., indirect methods of induction, utilization techniques)
and therapy (e.g., use of metaphors, expectation sets, paradoxical interventions) will be taught
through Erickson’s writings, lecture and class discussion, in-class demonstrations and
exercises, and videotaped demonstrations.
PSY 4618 Clinical Applications of Hypnosis (3 credits)
This course is intended to familiarize students with both research issues and clinical
applications of hypnosis. Such topics as the nature of hypnosis; physiological and
psychological manifestations of hypnosis; the effects of hypnosis on physical, cognitive, and
intellectual performance; applications of hypnosis to psychosomatic disorders; hypnotic
amnesia; and applications of hypnosis to a variety of clinical and addictive disorders will be
examined. The second phase of the course will provide students with experience in hypnotic
inductions and in the use of Hypnotic Susceptibility Scales.
PSY 4619 Applications of Mindfulness in Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the traditions, practice and applications of Mindfulness
in Psychotherapy. Recent empirical research points to the influence of Mindfulness on both
brain development and therapeutic application. This course will examine some of the empirical
research and help students participate and lead in some of the practices that make this a very
rich and life-enhancing model for both patient and practitioner.
PSY 4623 Cognitive Behavioral Case Conceptualization
This course addresses the process of conceptualizing case material from a cognitive behavioral
theoretical model and translating these conceptualizations into effective treatment strategies.
Video and/or audiotaped clinical interviews and written and/or orally presented case histories
are used in class to demonstrate and provide practice in case conceptualization skills.
PSY 4628 Clinical Biofeedback (3 credits)
This course provides a review of the areas of clinical application of biofeedback techniques.
Emphasis will be place on integrated biofeedback with general psychotherapeutic processes for
children and adults. Diagnostic categories include general anxiety disorders, chronic and acute
pain conditions, sexual disorders, and autonomic dysregulation disorders. Biofeedback as a
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technique for preventive medicine and health will also be discussed. The course includes
laboratory experiences.
PSY 4629 Health Psychology (3 credit)
This course seeks to define the field of Health Psychology, and provides a conceptual overview
of current assessment and treatment models. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships
among affective responses, recurrent behavior patterns, and organ system performance.
Intervention strategies directed at lifestyle, as well as specific behavior changes, are
highlighted.
PSY 4630 Existential Therapy (3 credits)
Contemporary existential issues are explored as they affect both client and therapist in
psychotherapy. How existential views complement other theoretical orientations, affect the
therapist/client relationship, and lead to implementation of treatment strategies, are of particular
interest and focus.
PSY 4631 Humanistic Therapy (3 credits)
This course is a practitioner-oriented exploration of theories and practices of humanistic
psychotherapy, including Rogers’ person-centered, Bugental’s existential-analytic, Mahrer’s
experiential, and Rollo May’s approaches. Theoretical bases for psychotherapy, the therapist
as a person, core therapeutic conditions, and the therapy relationship receive major emphasis.
PSY 4632 Interpersonal/Systems Approaches to Therapy (3 credits)
An overview of a range of perspectives and treatment approaches (e.g., Sullivanian, family
systems, strategic intervention, Ericksonian, Langian) that have in common an emphasis on the
role of interpersonal, social, cultural, and political forces in their conceptualization of and
response to psychological problems. Conducted in a seminar format, class meetings will consist
of a discussion of concepts, issues, and intervention strategies covered in readings, videotapes,
and case presentations.
PSY 4634 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Practice (3 credits)
The focus of this seminar is the communicative process in psychotherapy. The student will not
only attend to the manifest content of the patient’s communication, but will also learn to hear
and understand the latent (unconscious) message. In order to accomplish this goal each student
must develop a working knowledge of Lang’s text: A Primer of Psychotherapy, or Lang’s
Psychotherapy: A basic text. The first several sessions will be devoted to this task. Students
are required to tape some sessions of interesting, difficult, or troublesome cases for classroom
presentation. Prerequisite: Students must have cases for discussion.
PSY 4635 Psychodynamic Therapy I (3 credits)
The introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, range,
scope, and limitations of psychoanalytic psychotherapy as a treatment modality. It is
anticipated that by the end of this course, the student will have acquired the basic concepts
necessary to have a fuller appreciation of this therapeutic approach.
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PSY 4636 Psychodynamic Therapy II: Classic and Ego (3 credits)
This course explains in depth the concepts of transference and countertransference, starting with
the seminal work of Sigmund Freud in 1912 to the current time.
PSY 4637 Psychodynamic Treatment Approach to Family and Group (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to a dynamic approach to family and group psychotherapy.
The approaches of the leading family and group therapists will be presented and compared.
Students will become familiar with the basic concepts of both family and group therapy, how
to conceptualize case material, and the factors that influence family and group dynamics. These
will include the therapist-client relationship, major family and group resistances, transference
and countertransference. Assessment techniques and intervention strategies with an emphasis
on dynamic case analysis will be highlighted.
PSY 4638 Narcissistic and Borderline Disorders (3 credits)
The main objective of this course is to explore systematically the clinical pictures, the
therapeutic techniques, and the developmental theories of both the borderline and narcissistic
personality disorders.
PSY 4640 Special Problems in Psychotherapy (3 credits)
This course is open to advanced students who are carrying patients in treatment. Clinical
material will be used throughout the course. The following areas will be pursued: setting the
stage for psychotherapy; establishing the frame; early trauma; self-disclosure; special events,
extra-therapeutic contact; negativity; the revenge motive; handing dreams and fantasy; the
metaphor and other poetic dictation; and the erotic transference and countertransference.
PSY 4642 Self-Psychology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the theoretical background and practical
application of self-psychology. Class will be devoted to discussion of readings and case
presentation.
PSY 4644 Psychoanalytic Concepts (3 credits)
This course will offer a survey of concepts and theory of psychoanalysis and review their
application within the psychoanalytic situation. The first part of each session will be devoted
to theory and technique, while the second part of each session will focus on the practical or
clinical application of theory. It is expected that students will participate actively in class
discussions, as well as contribute to the clinical section of each session. Each student will be
expected to present case material relevant to the subject being discussed. In addition, some
written assignments may be given. There will be no examinations in this class.
PSY 4646 The Use of Dreams in Psychotherapy (3 credits)
This course will deal with Freud’s theory from the Interpretation of Dreams brought up to date
to accommodate weekly and brief/time-limited psychotherapy. The concept of “dream work”,
as well as the function, value, and language of the dream will be discussed. Additionally, the
significance of the first or initial dream, the interpersonal/communicative function, and
intrapsychic aspects of the dream will be explored. The dream in psychopathology, the biology
of dreaming, and adaptive aspects of the dream will also be addressed.
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PSY 4647 Psychodynamic Treatment of Affective Disorders (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the genesis, development, and treatment of
affective disorders. Topics covered include anxiety reactions, depression and mania, and allied
disorders. The mechanisms, dynamics and process of depression, despair, loneliness, selfdestructive behavior, boredom, apathy, enthusiasm, and related conditions will be reviewed
critically. Throughout, the students will be helped to understand the impact of resistance,
transference, and countertransference issues in treating affective disorders will also be
discussed.
PSY 4650 Crisis Intervention (3 credits)
This course will consist of an overview of crisis intervention, including differing approaches
and techniques for this type of work. Specific topics will include working with the suicidal
client, coping with grief, divorce, adolescent issues, victimization, aging and illness.
Community resources available for crisis intervention and the process of involuntary
commitment will also be covered.
PSY 4651 Seminar in Eclectic Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Eclecticism refers to the method or practice of choosing what seems best or most likely to have
therapeutic benefit for a client/patient from the variety of available systems, methods, and
techniques. In order to help develop skills in thinking and application to foster an eclectic
orientation, this course will lean heavily on case histories. Students will read, present, and
discuss cases from modern therapists and from their own clinical experiences (e.g., practicum).
In addition to the wealth of knowledge gleaned from analysis of these cases, students will
develop intervention strategies based on recent trends in theory and technique. In addition,
current psychotherapy literature and films will be critically examined.
PSY 4659 Advanced Cross-Cultural Counseling (3 credits)
This course is designed to explore advanced issues related to the counseling and assessment of
culturally diverse clients. Skills will be developed through the use of critical incident analysis
and case study conceptualization. Students will be required to construct a case study, read
weekly assignments and participate in critical-incident analysis.
PSY 4662 Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders (3 credits)
This course surveys the history, research, and treatment approaches of post-traumatic stress
disorder in its many manifestations, including post-combat syndromes, natural disaster
survivors, occupational critical incidents, and victims of crime, sexual abuse, or accidents.
PSY 4663 Counseling in Terminal Care (3 credits)
This course will provide an integrated model for counseling the terminally ill that will include
the patient, the family, and social system. It will acquaint students with both a humanistic and
a cognitive-behavioral thanatology. The needs of therapists dealing with the stresses of terminal
care will also be addressed.
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PSY 4666 Seminar in Forensic Neuropsychology (3 credits)
This course will explore the use of neuropsychological testing and theory in forensic settings.
The focus will include applications to both criminal cases as well as civil cases. The course will
take both a neuropsychological and forensic perspective on the testing procedures and how they
relate to legal as well as neuropsychological data. Applications to mitigation in criminal
sentencing, competency, ability to stand trial, determination of mental retardation, civil
damages, civil liability, and related issues will be discussed along with the appropriate examples
from actual cases. Students with practicum or other experience will be encouraged to present
cases that illustrate the issues described in the case as well. The course will have a seminar
format in which the implications of this information can be thoroughly discussed and debated.
Mock testimony will be presented by students to illustrate the practical applications of the
course material.
PSY 4668 Substance Abuse, Health, and Mental Health (3 credits)
The major goal of this course is for students to learn about substance use and misuse, and related
prevention and treatment. In addition, because substance use disorders can significantly affect
our health and mental health problems and concerns (e.g., depression, aging, medication use,
diabetes, hypertension) this course will address a broad range of issues involved in the
assessment and treatment of comorbidity and the relationship of substance use disorders to the
management of different health and mental health problems.
PSY 4669 Clinical Interventions for Anxiety Disorders (3 credits)
This course will cover the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Available
literature on treatment outcome studies, as well as current literature on the theories of anxiety
disorders will be reviewed. The course will focus on actual treatment applications of anxious
patients. Treatment modalities will include cognitive/behavioral therapy, mindfulness, and
motivational interviewing approaches. Students will practice the interventions studied.
PSY 4670 Short Term Therapy (3 credits)
This course will review the history and development of time-limits therapies and survey
different approaches, including brief dynamic therapy, cognitive therapies, solution-oriented
models and others. New developments in brief treatment will be covered, including managed
care models and “HMO therapy.”
PSY 4671 Psychotherapy with Lesbians and Gay Men (3 credits)
Lesbians and gay men in psychotherapy present to the clinician issues that are unique to this
population. The goal of this course is to make the student aware, sensitive, and knowledgeable
of these salient issues in order to work more effectively using gay affirmative psychotherapy
technique in treating gay men, lesbians, and their family members. These issues will be viewed
through a developmental perspective, i.e., counseling gay adolescents, adults, couples, and the
aging. The course design is an interactive approach to using panel presentations, current
research, case studies and role playing in a small class atmosphere. Students have the
opportunity to volunteer at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center using gay affirmative and
brief psychotherapy techniques. Group supervision is provided as part of the course.
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PSY 4673 Interpersonal Violence (3 credits)
The purpose of this seminar is to examine current strategies and issues in clinical research and
treatment with disparate forms of interpersonal violence with an emphasis on perpetrators of
these acts. Some of these will include: spouse abuse, child maltreatment, incest, (nonfamilial)
sexual assault of children and adults, homicide, and serial rape and murder. Within each area,
empirically based approaches to assessment, prevention, and treatment will be discussed.
Etiologic and maintaining factors for the various types of violence, and psychosocial profiling
procedures with selected subtypes of violent offenders, also will be covered.
PSY 4677 Feminist Therapy (3 credit)
Feminist therapy is an intervention technique based on the social psychology theories of the
new women’s movement. The goal is to help empower women by separating the issues of life
that come from living with discrimination and the resulting feelings of oppression from the
psychobiological and intrapsychic issues that are brought into the therapy session. Feminist
techniques that emphasize analysis of power of dynamics across the lifespan have impacted the
various interventions used in treatment towards mental health as well as in its own therapy
theory. Feminist therapy theory and the various feminist therapy techniques will be surveys in
this course.
PSY 4678 Eating Disorders: Theory and Intervention (3 credits)
This course will review the history of eating disorders and the development of interventions for
the treatment of eating disorders, including psychoanalytic, self-psychological, relational,
systemic and cognitive-behavioral. Individual, familial, socio-cultural and biological aspects
of eating issues and body image difficulties will be addressed as well as relevant research.
PSY 4679 Abuse, Trauma, and Dissociation (3 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive survey of knowledge and skills required to treat adult
survivors of childhood abuse. Identification and treatment of complex post-traumatic stress
disorder, the spectrum of dissociative disorders, and the pervasive impact on personality
functioning of long-standing abuse in childhood will comprise the central focus of the course.
PSY 4681 Chronic Pain/Illness Management (3 credits)
This course will cover the conceptual model and the particular psychological assessment and
intervention methods that have been found to be effective in work with those experiencing
chronic pain and/or illness. Emphasis will be on assisting individuals with chronic pain/illness
to minimize the impact it is having on their mood, lifestyle, productivity, recreational activity,
family and social relationships. The focus will include managing with such clinical examples
of chronic pain/illness conditions as: tension and migraine headaches, back pain,
temporomandibular disorder, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease. Consideration will be given to care delivered as part of an interdisciplinary treatment
team as well as in psychoeducational group and individual treatment settings. Opportunities
will be provided for supervised peer practice with the recommended interventions.
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PSY 4682 Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (3 credits)
This course will cover the history and current practice of treatment of serious mental illness.
Special focus will be placed on the role of psychological interventions in the cure of this
population. The increasingly active role of the psychiatric consumer will be highlighted.
PSY 4683 Interventions with Medical Patients (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with clinical interventions, related assessment
concerns and research relevant to health problems. Topics that will be covered include relevant
assessment issues that need to be considered when evaluating medical patients for
psychological intervention and psychological interventions with specific medical populations.
Students will learn to design and implement intervention protocols for a number of different
physical disorders as well as learns applied techniques, such as various forms of relaxation
procedures.
PSY 4687 Rehabilitation Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of Rehabilitation Psychology as a specialty area within
professional psychology that assists people dealing with chronic, traumatic and/or congenital
injuries or illnesses to achieve optimal physical, psychological and interpersonal functioning.
Students in the course will learn how the field is differentiated from both Neuropsychology and
Health psychology. Furthermore, students will be provided with opportunities to understand the
role of Rehabilitation Psychologist in being an effective member of the central interprofessional
team. Particular attention will be paid to theory and research pertaining to providing services
consistent with the level of impairment, disability and handicap relative to the personal
preferences, needs and resources of the individual. Students will be challenged to use their
understanding of this theory and research to suggest opportunities for intervention with various
populations.
PSY 4690 Psychological Interventions in Forensic Settings (3 credits)
This course will cover psychological intervention techniques that are known to have success
with juvenile and adult offenders in jail, prison and court-ordered treatment programs to
eliminate behavioral problems that are due to mental illness, abuse, and/or substance abuse.
Psychological interventions including medication and therapy can assist in the behavioral
management of those offenders and hopefully prevent recidivism.
PSY 4691 Infant and Toddler Mental Health (3 credits)
This course will cover clinical applications of developmental psychopathology, with an
emphasis on infants, toddler and their families. Major theories of development and current
research on that systemic etiological pathways of atypical adaptation will be reviewed.
Assessment strategies will include observing infants and toddlers at play, clinical interviewing
of caregivers, identifying red flags, recognizing 0-3 diagnostic classifications, administered
developmental screening tests, and interpreting results. Implications for appropriate theory
driven and empirically based treatment will be discussed including play techniques and
attachment-theory driven interventions.
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PSY 4692 Parent Focused Interventions (3 credits)
This course will review current theory and research on parent-focused prevention and
intervention efforts intended to benefit children and adolescents. Topics will include the
rationale for a behavioral/family systems approach to parent training and its application to
contemporary families. Difficulties associated with conducting both research and interventions
in family setting will be reviewed with particular attention to problems of measuring and
defining “ideal” parenting practices and difficulties in translating program objectives into
clinically meaningful outcomes. Parent-focused interventions for both externalizing and
internalizing problems will be considered.
PSY 4693 The Application of Psychology to Organization Settings (3 credits)
The focus of the course is on the application of the principles of psychology to organizational
settings. Students will acquire understanding of interventions at the individual, group and
organizational development levels. Further, concepts, skills, and tools that are essential to
successful organizational interventions will be demonstrated.
PSY 4695 School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families I (3 credits)
This course, which includes both academic and clinical components, is designed to teach
students about the family lives and school experiences of low-income, ethnic minority youth,
then train and supervise students as they co-lead an intervention targeting children’s academic
and mental health outcomes. Coursework is devoted to understanding how families and schools
can better support low-income youth, and the intervention is intended to enhance family and
school support for local ethnic minority and immigrant communities.
PSY 4696 School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families I.
PSY 4699 Positive Psychology (3 credits)
The present course will describe how the scope of psychology has recently been broadened
beyond exclusive concern with identifying pathology and treating or preventing disorder. This
course will provide an overview of the emerging field of ‘Positive Psychology. ’ Students will
be provided with opportunities to understand theory and research pertaining to the psychology
of human strengths, assets, abilities and talents as well as the constructs of optimism, happiness,
hope and resiliency. Students will be challenged to use their understanding of this theory and
research to suggest opportunities for intervention with various populations.
PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for one semester at a selected
agency.
PSY 4702 Clinical Practicum VI (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V.
PSY 470A Summer Elective Practicum (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
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PSY 5701 Clinical Practicum VII (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
PSY 5702 Clinical Practicum VIII (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
PSY 8701 Supplemental Practicum and Supervision (1 credit)
This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and profession-relevant attitudes of
students preparing for the predoctoral internship.
•
•
Course descriptions are subject to change
Prerequisites can be found in Doctoral Policy & Procedures Handbook
182
Ph.D. Program Model Curriculum
First-Year Fall Semester
1403 Adult Psychopathology
1405 Developmental: Child and Adolescent
1407 Developmental: Adult & Older Adult
1409 Professional Issues and Ethics
1501 Assessment: Intelligence Testing with lab
1605 Diversity in Assessment & Intervention
Credits
3
1.5
1.5
3
3
3
First-Year Winter Semester
1408 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology
1412 Psychobiology
1502 Diagnostic: Interviewing
1610 Adult Intervention I
1703 Pre-Practicum
1807 Advanced Statistics
Credits
3
3
3
3
1
3
First-Year Summer Semester
1401 History & Systems of Psychology
1809 Research Design
3
3
Second-Year Fall Semester
2507 Objective Personality Assessment
2509 Behavioral Assessment
2603 Systems/Family Therapy
2604 Child and Adolescent Intervention
2701 Clinical Practicum I
2703 Supervision I
2808 Multivariate Statistics I with Lab
3
1.5
1.5
1.5
3
1
3
Second-Year Summer Semester
270A Summer Practicum I
270B Summer Supervision I
Elective*
Second Year- Winter Semester
1416 Cognitive/Affective Aspects of
Behavior
2511 Projective Personality Assessment
2606 Case Conceptualization
2702 Clinical Practicum II
2704 Supervision II
2812 Multivariate Statistics II with Lab
Psychopharmacology
Clinical Practicum III
Supervision III
Major Paper
Theories of Measurement
Elective*
Third Year- Summer Semester
370A Summer Practicum II
370B Summer Supervision II
4499 Advanced Professional Development
Fourth Year- Fall Semester
Clinical Competency Exam
5850 Dissertation
Fifth Year
5700 Internship
(.5 credit per semester summer, fall, winter, and
summer)
*For the 6 credits of electives, students must take
intervention electives (46XX). Concentration students
may be required to complete additional credits.
3
3
3
1
3
3
1
3
Third Year- Fall Semester
2406
3701
3703
3803
3809
3
Third Year- Winter Semester
1.5
3
1
1.5
3
3
3406
3702
3704
3803
3403
Consultation & Supervision
Clinical Practicum IV
Supervision IV
Major Paper
Social Aspects of Behavior
3
3
1
1.5
3
3
1
1
Fourth Year- Winter Semester
5850 Dissertation
6
6
2
Total Credit Hours
183
118
Doctor of Philosophy Program
Course Descriptions
General Required Courses
PSY 1401 History & Systems of Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines the historical progression of ideas central to psychology, the
philosophical and empirical roots of those ideas, and their confluence into the predominant
systems of the present day. In so doing, it covers the fundamentals of scientific thinking, their
bearing on theory development, the relationship between philosophical and empirical thought,
and theoretical models of historical and current significance. It also focuses on the dynamic
interplay between theoretical constructs and empirically derived knowledge. Particular
emphasis is placed on principles used to examine the merits of evidence that supports or
disconfirms theory.
PSY 1403 Adult Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course covers descriptive psychopathology and research on the etiology, epidemiology,
dynamics and diversity issues of major adult and aged pathologic syndromes. It provides a
thorough introduction to DSM-IV as a diagnostic tool.
PSY 1405 Developmental: Child and Adolescent (1.5 credits)
This course covers issues in human development that are especially relevant to children and
adolescents, beginning with the earliest aspects of development during the prenatal period and
ending with the final phase of transition from adolescence to adulthood. In this course will be
selected that focus on normal and accelerated developmental progress, as well as factors that
threaten to impede normal development.
PSY 1407 Developmental: Adult & Older Adult (1.5 credits)
This course will review developmental theories of aging and personality development in
adulthood and later adulthood. Topics will include perceptual, cognitive, personality and social
processes of aging.
PSY 1408 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive examination of specific disorders and problematic
psychological states during childhood and adolescence. An emphasis will be placed on the
description, theoretical conceptualization, and etiology of disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 1405
PSY 1409 Professional Issues and Ethics (3 credits)
This course acquaints the student with the extant legal and ethical principles and standards of
practice that psychologists have developed for the profession.
PSY 1412 Psychobiology (3 credits)
This course covers theory, research, and applications for the following topics: structure,
function, and disorders of the nervous system; physiological mechanisms and disorders in
vegetative and intellectual functions; and psychophysiological methods and technology.
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PSY 1416 Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior (3 credits)
This course examines cognitive and affective processes that affect behavior. Topics include
information processing, memory, attachment, unconscious processing, schemata development,
bias, self-regulations, and attribution theory. The interface of cognitive and affect will be
examined in relation to issues in clinical psychology.
PSY 2406 Psychopharmacology (1.5 credits)
This course covers the basic science, theory, research and clinical applications of
psychopharmacology. It promotes the understanding of psychobiological processes in
medicated patients and emphasizes the special psychotherapeutic requirements that relate to the
currently prevalent combined therapeutic approach. The clinical issues are illustrated by case
presentations and the review of the relevant literature. Prerequisite: PSY 1412
PSY 3403 Social Aspects of Behavior (3 credits)
This course studies the social antecedents of human behavior. The main theories of social
psychology are examined in relation to clinical psychology.
PSY 3406 Consultation and Supervision (3 credits)
This course is intended to increase a student’s awareness and competencies with ethical issues
in therapy. In addition, students’ consultation and supervision skills are developed.
PSY 4499 Advanced Professional Development (1 credit)
To enhance critical thinking, oral and written exposition, and knowledge of career development
needed to enter the profession; this course will focus on enhancing internship application
effectiveness. Students will be directed in preparing a curriculum vita, conducting selfevaluation of personal and professional roles, developing effective interviewing skills, and
synthesizing training, experience, conceptualization models, and philosophy. Students will
learn to make application decisions in terms of goodness of fit. Course assignments include the
development of written products needed for internship application.
Assessment Required Courses
PSY 1501 Assessment: Intelligence Testing with Lab (3 credits)
The administration, interpretation, and communication of results of major intelligence tests is
the focus of this course. Emphasis is placed on the many aspects of interpretation and report
writing.
PSY 1502 Diagnostic: Interviewing (3 credits)
This is a basic course on the theoretical and practical aspects of the clinical assessment
interview. Emphasis is placed on development of communication skills, rapport building,
evaluation strategies, consideration of diagnostic data, cultural and ethnic diversity, the mental
status evaluation, and the ability to organize information in written and oral form. Prerequisite:
PSY 1403
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PSY 2507 Objective Personality Assessment (3 credits)
This course examines theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues in objective
personality assessment. An emphasis will be placed upon objective personality tests such as
the MMPI-2, MMPI-A, 16 PF, Millon’s MCMI, and others. Prerequisite: PSY 1501-2
PSY 2509 Behavioral Assessment (1.5 credits)
This course will provide an overview of current strategies and issues in contemporary
behavioral assessment. Included will be self-report and monitoring, direct and naturalistic
observation of behavior and physiological measurement. Application to a variety of clinical
disorders will be addressed and attention directed to collateral factors such as behavioral assets
and limitations and environmental supports and restrictions that often have an impact on the
client.
PSY 2511 Projective Personality Assessment (3 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to the theory, administration, scoring and interpretation
of the major projective assessment measures including the Rorschach, TAT, sentence
completion, and figure drawings. The specific value of the projective measures and associated
research findings will be discussed. The student will also receive an introduction to integrating
assessment materials for the purpose of writing psychological test reports. Prerequisite: PSY
1501-2, 2507-9
Intervention Required Courses
PSY 1605 Diversity in Assessment and Intervention (3 credits)
This course covers diversity issues and their implications for assessment and intervention.
Specifically, it considers the psychological impact of gender, race, ethnicity, culture, religious
preference, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. It includes
exploration of common stereotypes and their impact on therapy. This course also includes an
examination of innovative assessment methods for clients of diverse backgrounds.
PSY 1610 Adult Intervention I (3 credits)
This course covers primary approaches to treating adult clinical problems, with emphasis on
treating adult Axis I disorders. Interventions with strong empirical and theoretical support are
emphasized; relationship factors are also addressed. Development of treatment interventions
based on a wide range of conceptual models is highlighted. Prerequisite: PSY 1403, 1407, 1605
PSY 2603 Systems/Family Therapy (1.5 credits)
This course will cover systems theory with emphasis on applications to marital and family
therapy. General systems theory, and conceptualizations from such schools as the Bowenian,
Structural, and Strategic will be considered.
PSY 2604 Child and Adolescent Intervention (1.5 credits)
This course covers current intervention strategies for children and adolescents. Application of
theory, methods, and current research in this area will be reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 1408
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PSY 2606 Case Conceptualization (3 credits)
This course addresses the processes of conceptualizing case material from diverse theoretical
models and translating these conceptualizations into effective treatment strategies. Videoand/or audiotaped clinical interviews, and written and/or orally presented case histories are used
in class to demonstrate and provide practice in case conceptualization skills. Prerequisite: PSY
1610, 2603-4, 2701-3
Practicum and Internship Required Courses
PSY 1703 Pre-Practicum I (1 credit)
This course will expose students to a variety of client populations and will provide some
introductory experiences in a therapeutic context. The course is designed to allow students an
opportunity to observe clinical psychology in practice prior to their being required to assume
an active therapeutic role.
PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 10 hours per week for 12 months at a selected
agency(s). In this course the student is to acquire competency in the areas of interview and
assessment, psychological testing, and psychotherapy. Prerequisite: All first year courses
except PSY 1807, 1809
PSY 2702 Clinical Practicum II (3 credits)
See description for PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I. Prerequisite: PSY 2701
PSY 270A Summer Clinical Practicum (3 credits)
See description for PSY 2701 Clinical Practicum I. Prerequisite: PSY 2702
PSY 2703 Supervision I (1 credit)
The student is required to spend approximately one hour face-to-face with a faculty member in
an individual or small group format. The student is expected to present case material and be
prepared to discuss cases each week. Tapes of therapy sessions may be required. If supervision
is provided in a group format, the time is adjusted to account for the multiple members of the
supervision group. For instance, when two students receive 90 minutes of supervision in a
group per week, that would constitute the equivalent of 45 minutes of individual supervision
per week.
PSY 2704 Supervision II (1 credit)
See description for PSY 2703 Supervision I. Prerequisite: PSY 2703
PSY 270B Summer Clinical Supervision (1 credit)
See description for PSY 2703 Supervision I. Prerequisite: PSY 2704
PSY 3701 Clinical Practicum III (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for 12 months at a selected
agency(s). Prerequisite: PSY 2507-9-11, 2603-4-6; 2702-4; 270A-B
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PSY 3702 Clinical Practicum IV (3 credits)
See description for PSY 3701 Clinical Practicum III. Prerequisite: PSY 3701
PSY 370A Summer Clinical Practicum (3 credits)
See description for PSY 3701 Clinical Practicum III. Prerequisite: PSY 3702
PSY 3703 Supervision III (1 credit)
See description for PSY 2704 Supervision II.
PSY 3704 Supervision IV (1 credit)
See description for PSY 3703 Supervision III. Prerequisite: PSY 3703
PSY 370B Summer Clinical Supervision (1 credit)
See description for PSY 3703 Supervision III. Prerequisite: PSY 3704
PSY 5700 Internship (2 credits)
The student is required to complete an internship, covering a 50-week period of 2,000 hours.
The internship site must be accredited by the American Psychological Association or be a
member of the Association of Psychology Internship .Colleges. Prerequisite: All course work
except PSY 5850
Methodology, Research, and Dissertation Required Courses
PSY 1807 Advanced Statistics (3 credits)
This course will focus on analysis of variance strategies for analyzing data from experimental
and quasi-experimental designs. Topics covered include completely randomized designs,
randomized block designs, repeated measures designs, hierarchical designs, and analysis of
covariance designs. Planned and post-hoc comparisons will be addressed throughout.
PSY 1809 Research Design (3 credits)
The focus of this course is research methodology and scientific thinking. It covers basic
experimental designs (between and within groups), single subject experiments, group
experimental designs, non-experimental designs (correlational research, case studies, metaanalyses), and program evaluation. Validity issues in research (internal and external) and
research ethics are emphasized throughout.
PSY 2808 Multivariate Statistics I with Lab (3 credits)
This course focuses on multivariate statistical analyses through a detailed exploration of
bivariate and multivariate regression and correlation. Other multivariate procedures such as
canonical correlation will also be introduced. The course includes a computer lab that focuses
on the use of statistical package(s) to perform these analyses. Prerequisite: PSY 1807
PSY 2812 Multivariate Statistics II with Lab (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of the content of Multivariate Statistics I and will include such
topics as MANOVA and MANCOVA, classification and discrimination, and factor analytic
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methodology. The course includes a computer lab that focuses on the use of statistical
package(s) to perform these analyses. Prerequisite: PSY 2808
PSY 3803 Major Paper (3 credits)
This course requires the student to design and implement an original research project. It
requires a prospectus at enrollment and a written final research report of results. In order for a
student to be eligible to apply for an internship placement, a signed and dated Research
Completion Form with a copy of the Abstract and a complete copy of the major paper must be
submitted to the Office of Academic Affairs no later than the last day of Summer Session I.
Prerequisite: PSY 1807-9, 2808-12
PSY 3809 Theories of Measurement (3 credits)
This course examines the theories, techniques, and statistics of psychological measurement.
Topics covered include classical test theory, methods of reliability and validity assessment, test
and item analysis, scaling procedures, test construction, item response theory, and generalizability
theory. Prerequisite: PSY 2812
PSY 5850 Dissertation (12 credits)
The dissertation requires the design and implementation of an original significant research
project. Upon enrollment, the student will submit a prospectus to the Office of Academic
Affairs describing the study. Upon securing a Committee, it must be submitted to the Dean’s
office for approval. The student must orally defend the proposal and final product. Bound
copies of the approved dissertation must be submitted to the Office of the Dean and the
University Library. Registration is minimally for two semesters.
PSY 5851 Continuing Dissertation (1 credit)
Continuation of PSY 5850 Dissertation. (If needed)
General Elective Courses
PSY 4401 Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)
The study of the relationship between brain function and behavior. Major topics include:
anatomy and physiology of the human brain, behavioral functions associated with the cerebral
hemispheres and lobes, neurobehavioral presentations of common neurologic and psychiatric
conditions, administration and interpretation of major neuropsychological test batteries, and
diagnostic examination for brain dysfunction. Prerequisite: PSY 1412
PSY 4405 Clinical Neuroanatomy (3 credits)
The understanding of the anatomical organization of the human nervous system is an important
skill for a student of clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects
of neuroanatomy that will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will
include the development, structure, and function of the human nervous system,
neuroanatomical correlates of behavior, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
Prerequisite: PSY 1412
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PSY 4406 Behavioral Neuropathology (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to neuropathology. The understanding of
the major diseases and disorders of the human nervous system is an important skill for a student
of clinical neuropsychology. In this course the focus will be on those aspects of neuropathology
that will aid in neuropsychological assessment and research. Topics will include the
development of structural and chemical dysfunction of the human nervous system,
neuroanatomical correlates of dysfunction, and the anatomical substrates of neuropathology.
Prerequisite: PSY 4401
PSY 4409 Pediatric Psychology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the field
of pediatric psychology. Students will be taught the various roles of a pediatric psychologist
functioning within the medical environment and the interface between psychological and
medical services and systems. Also, a significant proportion of the course will address the
assessment and treatment of children who have psychological and adjustment difficulties due
to a chronic, acute, and/or genetic medical diagnosis, and the relevant medical intervention.
PSY 4410 Psychology in Fiction (3 credits)
This course is about psychology, i.e., human experience, as told by fiction writers. By studying
selected works, portions of truth about human behavior are sampled. Class discussions focus
on this truth. Students are helped to experience vicariously different portions of the human
condition, become more empathic with people whose experiences are different from their own,
refine skills of observing and influencing behavior, and internalize values significance in our
work as therapists.
PSY 4414 Behavioral Principles of Learning (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of the psychological principles of learning
derived from experimental research and validated by applied experimental/empirical studies.
General topics include the nature of learning, behavior without learning, learning without
words, and learning with words. Specific topics covered include types of behavior, motivational
influences on behavior, respondent behavior and conditioning, operant behavior and
conditioning, stimulus control, schedule influences on behavior, observational learning, verbal
behavior and rule-governed behavior, and behavioral accounts of language and cognition. The
course is designed to give students a good grounding for assessment and intervention courses
with a behavioral orientation.
PSY 4418 Forensic Psychology: Criminal Law (3 credits)
This course will cover topics dealing with the interaction of psychology and criminal law.
Topics to be covered include: insanity, competency to stand trial, clinical assessment of
dangerousness, delinquency, and the evaluation of malingering.
PSY 4419 Forensic Psychology: Family Law (3 credits)
Basic principles in concepts of forensic psychology; the relationship between juvenile and
family law and the scientific study of human behavior. Emphasis will also be given to areas of
child physical and sexual abuse and domestic violence. There will be a critical review of
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pertinent literature. Special attention will be on the legal-ethical issues in evaluation, treatment,
and research in family and juvenile law.
PSY 4420 Police Psychology (3 credits)
Police psychology is an emergent specialty area in professional psychology. The role of a
police psychologist is complex. This course is designed to provide didactic training for
consultation within law enforcement. Specific topical areas will include: consultant vs. inhouse staff, pre-employment assessment, fitness-for-duty evaluation, critical incident stress
debriefing, hostage negotiation, and psychological profiling.
PSY 4424 The Business of Psychology (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the business of psychology. Issues related to private
practice, employment, program development, and implementation will be presented. Specific
topics will include: developing a private practice, surviving in a changing marketplace,
establishing fees, coding and reimbursement, negotiating employment contracts, and
development and implementation of psychological service units.
PSY 4432 Concepts and Issues in Substance Abuse (3 credits)
This course provides a foundation for understanding clinical efforts aimed at the prevention and
treatment of substance use problems. It examines major perspectives on the nature and etiology
of substance use problems, and how those perspectives translate into social actions and clinical
practices. Explanations of substance use and abuse are presented as exemplifying lay and
scientific views of abnormal behavior.
PSY 4433 Advanced Readings in Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course provides an advanced and in-depth examination of seminal and contemporary
articles in Applied Behavior Analysis and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. The course
is designed to give students with the opportunity to identify, describe and discuss advanced
articles in the field and prepare students to effectively explain behavior analysis to other
professionals and consumers.
PSY 4435 The Teaching of Psychology (1 credit)
This seminar will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching undergraduate and
graduate psychology. Examination of models of course construction, teaching pedagogy, and
assessment of learning will be explored. Students will create an individual philosophy of
teaching with a focus on identity development, both as a psychologist and educator. Didactic
training will be complemented by experiential opportunities for teaching in a variety of formats.
PSY 4441 Object Relations Theories (3 credits)
The primary objectives of this course is to trace back the origin and subsequent development
from the work of Freud through the growth of both British and American object relations
theorists.
PSY 444 9 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
This is a survey course designed to provide students with a knowledge of psychology that can
be used to provide assistance in the law. It will deal with both practical and research
applications in clinical and social-cognitive psychology. Some topics will include admissibility
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of psychologists in the courts to provide expert witness testimony; assessment of various mental
states to meet legal requirements for competency; insanity; abuse syndromes and other
psychological harm; ethical guidelines for forensic psychologists; working with police and
others in the criminal justice system; and child custody and dependency issues. The legal
system will be reviewed, as will the ability to conduct legal research.
PSY 4450 Forensic Psychology: Special Issues (3 credits)
This course covers current special issues through the study of various cases in the particular
area of psychology and the law. Each year that the course is offered, the topics and cases chosen
for study may change depending on what is current in the courts, in psychology, and in the
news.
PSY 4460 Basic Anatomy and Pathophysiology (3 credits)
This course is designed for students of clinical health psychology to gain a physiologic
understanding of disease processes. Cellular physiology, neuro-pathology, immunology,
cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, muscular-skeletal, and endocrine physiology as
well as pertinent disorders in each area will be studied.
PSY 4481 Community Psychology with the Seriously Mentally Ill (3 credits)
This course covers a variety of topics relevant to psychologists specializing in long term mental
illness. The focus will be on developing skills in areas including qualitative research,
supervision, consultation, administration, advocacy and public policy, program development,
grant writing and teaching/workshop planning. Guest speakers, field trips and clinical exercises
will augment class lectures.
PSY 4482 Consultative Psychopharmacology (3 credits)
This course in advanced psychopharmacology emphasizes the selection and coordination of
appropriate pharmacological treatments for specific psychological disorders. It focuses on the
consultation function of psychologists with non-psychiatric medical personnel.
PSY 4490 Military Psychology (3 credits)
This course covers the application of psychology to military environments. It provides an
overview of current assessment and treatment models, covering both clinical operational
psychology. Topics include fitness for duty evaluations, brief psychotherapy in the U.S.
Military, clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine in military healthcare settings,
suicide prevention in the military, combat stress, psychological interventions after disaster or
trauma, assessment and selection of personnel, future directions in military psychology, and
military internship opportunities for graduate students. This course is relevant to those
interested in a career in the military or those providing services to veterans, law enforcement,
or intelligence personnel in the civilian sector.
PSY 4491 Consultation and Supervision: Medical Rounds (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to professional and ethical issues in the field of
Clinical Health Psychology. The course includes a field-based experience intended to provide
students with an opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary rounds in medical settings. The
field-based aspect of the course will require that the students spend approximately 20 hours
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observing medical rounds. Classroom-based work will focus on practical, professional, and
ethical issues specifically related to the practice of health psychology. Relevant issues arising
in the field-based experience will also be discussed in class.
PSY 4501 Advanced Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)
Intensive study of specialized methods of neuropsychological assessment as they apply to the
recognition of central nervous system disorders. Examination results are presented and
discussed in a case conference format. Topics include: administration and interpretation of the
Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery, selection and interpretation of flexible batteries,
functional systems of the brain, and profession issues. Prerequisite: PSY 4401
PSY 4503 MMPI (3 credits)
The MMPI, MMPI-2, and MMPI-A are the most widely used clinical instruments, and the most
widely used personality test. More than 15,000 research studies have been published using the
test, and 1,000 specialized research scales have been developed. The course is intended to help
the advanced student become more familiar with clinical interpretation of the MMPIs. We will
also examine its various forms and the utility of specialized scales. In addition, we will explore
its usefulness in conjunction with other instruments, such as the MCMI.
PSY 4515 Child and Adolescent Neuropsychological Assessment (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to developmental neuroanatomy, and
developmental neuropsychological research and theory in the neuropsychological assessment
of children. Cases of acute brain trauma, chronic brain injury, communicative disorders,
learning disabilities, brain disease, sensory-motor handicaps, and seizure disorders will be
presented to demonstrate the behavioral effects of these conditions.
PSY 4517 Neuropsychology Case Analysis (3 credits)
This course will cover the interpretation of batteries of neuropsychological tests that reflect
classic conditions such as open and closed-head trauma, stroke, dementia, tumor, anoxia,
carbon monoxide poisoning, Parkinson’s disease, and other common conditions seen in adult
acute hospital settings. The class will involve analysis of cases presented in the literature, as
well as cases presented by the students.
PSY 4520 Child Sexual Abuse Assessment (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with state-of-the-art knowledge and the
tools necessary to properly assess the validity of allegations of CSA, and to assess the
psychological impact of CSA on known victims.
PSY 4525 Assessment of Culturally Diverse Clients (3 credits)
This course involves a critical review of traditional assessment methods and instruments when
used to measure the intelligence and aptitudes of those persons who differ markedly from the
social and cultural norms. It will demonstrate the counterproductive pitfalls in the application
of such techniques when used to label ethnic minorities and underprivileged clients. Students
will learn to use and apply alternative methods. The theoretical and practical innovations of
dynamic assessment will be analyzed.
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PSY 4526 Learning Potential Assessment and Instruction (3 credits)
This course will include specific training in the concepts and application of Feuerstein’s
methods for assessing potential in culturally different clients and students and in enhancing
their learning by means of remedial programs of instrumental enrichment.
PSY 4550 Analytic Approaches to Assessment (3 credits)
Frequently used projective tests from the test battery (Rorschach, TAT, SC, Bender, and DAP)
will be examined from a psychoanalytic viewpoint. Test protocols will be reviewed and
analyzed with similar content from different tests pointed out. How to structure will be
accentuated.
Report writing stressing the principal conflict, and showing how
conceptualization of a case begins with the patient’s initial response and builds from this
impression, reinforcing or offering new ideas, will be demonstrated. The work of a number of
outstanding authors will be examined from a conflict/defense orientation. Organization,
synthetization and integration of material will be highlighted.
PSY 4560 Forensic Assessment (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach the basic principles and concepts of forensic psychology as it
relates to assessment. Students will be instructed in the basic areas of forensic assessment,
including how to approach a forensic assessment case, ethical guidelines associated with
forensic assessment, how to prepare a forensic assessment report, and how to testify as an expert
witness. The class will focus on a variety of general psychological tests used in forensic
assessment, such as the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, Wechsler Scales, and Rorschach. In addition, the
use of these tests in particular forensic contexts, such as the MMPI-2 in child custody cases and
the Wechsler Scales in criminal competency cases, will be discussed. Finally, specialized tests
that can be used in forensic evaluations, such as the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI),
Parenting Stress Index (PSI), and the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) will be
covered.
Intervention Elective Courses
PSY 3605 Adult Intervention II (3 credits)
This course covers primary approaches to treating Axis II disorders in adults. Problems covered
include narcissistic, borderline, antisocial, and dependent personality disorders. Interventions
with solid empirical and theoretical support are highlighted.
PSY 3606 Systems/Family Therapy II (3 credits)
This course will explore family-of-origin issues and multigenerational processes as well as their
influences on couples’ relationships. Students will learn to apply family methods to specific
problem areas such as divorce, parenting, chronic illness, phobias, suicide, etc.
PSY 4603 Play Therapy (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to delineate the various theoretical and practical approaches to
play therapy. Conducted in a seminar fashion, class sessions will involve the discussion and
instruction of theory, methods of intervention, and the special therapy issues. Additionally, an
applied clinical approach will also be emphasized via student play therapy case presentations.
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PSY 4604 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
This course provides a comprehensive review of Applied Behavior Analysis at an advanced
level. Students will learn the history of behavioral psychology, the experimental analysis of
behavior and applied behavior analysis. The basic principles of behavior are reviewed as a
foundation for the application in ABA methods. Students will design an intervention program
using ABA methods to improve socially meaningful behavior with the approval of the
instructor.
PSY 4607 Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
Group process provides an introduction to the theories and research pertaining to small group
behavior. Experiencing group dynamics first hand and processing these experiences provide
opportunities to become familiar with factors which influence behavior in small groups.
PSY 4608 Advanced Group Theory and Processes (3 credits)
This course continues the student’s training and experience in group psychotherapy. It is
primarily focused on group-leader facilitation, empathy, sensitivity, lessening of prejudicial
judgment as it relates to the many hues of human experience and behavior, and anxiety
reduction with multiple-client interactions. A paper is required summarizing what was learned
about group process and being a group member and leader.
PSY 4610 Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy (3 credits)
Addresses topics in the area of human sexuality and sexual functioning from several
perspectives, such as historical, biological, psychosocial, behavioral and clinical intervention.
Various approaches to conducting sex therapy will be presented as well.
PSY 4612 Therapy with HIV/AIDS Patients (3 credits)
The objective of this course is to have students become thoroughly familiar with psychosocial,
medical, and legal aspects of HIV, as well as to examine their own feelings as therapists dealing
with people infected with HIV.
PSY 4613 Intervention in Clinical Geropsychology (3 credits)
This course covers multiple aspects of working with older adults, including psychopathology,
clinical assessment approaches, and psychotherapeutic interventions. The focus is on the effects
of age upon psychopathology, conceptualization from a biopsychosocial perspective, the use of
instruments in the assessment of mood, personality, and cognition, specialized
psychotherapeutic approaches, and a description of the settings in which a clinical
geropsychologist works. Emphasis is on familiarizing students with evidence-based
interventions designed for the unique problems of the older adult.
PSY 4614 Interventions in Depression (3 credits)
This course will cover the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mood disorders. Available
literature on treatment outcome studies will be reviewed. The course will focus on actual
treatment applications of depressed patients.
Treatment modalities will include
cognitive/behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and group approaches. Students
must be in practicum and should expect to demonstrate some direct patient experience with the
interventions studied.
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PSY 4617 Ericksonian Hypnosis and Therapy (3 credits)
Basic skills of Ericksonian hypnosis (e.g., indirect methods of induction, utilization techniques)
and therapy (e.g., use of metaphors, expectation sets, paradoxical interventions) will be taught
through Erickson’s writings, lecture and class discussion, in-class demonstrations and
exercises, and videotaped demonstrations.
PSY 4618 Clinical Applications of Hypnosis (3 credits)
This course is intended to familiarize students with both research issues and clinical
applications of hypnosis. Such topics as the nature of hypnosis; physiological and
psychological manifestations of hypnosis; the effects of hypnosis on physical, cognitive, and
intellectual performance; applications of hypnosis to psychosomatic disorders; hypnotic
amnesia; and applications of hypnosis to a variety of clinical and addictive disorders will be
examined. The second phase of the course will provide students with experience in hypnotic
inductions and in the use of Hypnotic Susceptibility Scales.
PSY 4619 Applications of Mindfulness in Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the traditions, practice and applications of Mindfulness
in Psychotherapy. Recent empirical research points to the influence of Mindfulness on both
brain development and therapeutic application. This course will examine some of the empirical
research and help students participate and lead in some of the practices that make this a very
rich and life-enhancing model for both patient and practitioner.
PSY 4623 Cognitive Behavioral Case Conceptualization (3 credits)
This course addresses the process of conceptualizing case material from a cognitive behavioral
theoretical model and translating these conceptualizations into effective treatment strategies.
Video and/or audiotaped clinical interviews and written and/or orally presented case histories
are used in class to demonstrate and provide practice in case conceptualization skills.
PSY 4628 Clinical Biofeedback (3 credits)
This course provides a review of the areas of clinical application of biofeedback techniques.
Emphasis will be place on integrated biofeedback with general psychotherapeutic processes for
children and adults. Diagnostic categories include general anxiety disorders, chronic and acute
pain conditions, sexual disorders, and autonomic dysregulation disorders. Biofeedback as a
technique for preventive medicine and health will also be discussed. The course includes
laboratory experiences.
PSY 4629 Health Psychology (3 credit)
This course seeks to define the field of Health Psychology, and provides a conceptual overview
of current assessment and treatment models. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships
among affective responses, recurrent behavior patterns, and organ system performance.
Intervention strategies directed at lifestyle, as well as specific behavior changes, are
highlighted.
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PSY 4630 Existential Therapy (3 credits)
Contemporary existential issues are explored as they affect both client and therapist in
psychotherapy. How existential views complement other theoretical orientations, affect the
therapist/client relationship, and lead to implementation of treatment strategies, are of particular
interest and focus.
PSY 4631 Humanistic Therapy (3 credits)
This course is a practitioner-oriented exploration of theories and practices of humanistic
psychotherapy, including Rogers’ person-centered, Bugental’s existential-analytic, Mahrer’s
experiential, and Rollo May’s approaches. Theoretical bases for psychotherapy, the therapist
as a person, core therapeutic conditions, and the therapy relationship receive major emphasis.
PSY 4632 Interpersonal/Systems Approaches to Therapy (3 credits)
An overview of a range of perspectives and treatment approaches (e.g., Sullivanian, family
systems, strategic intervention, Ericksonian, Langian) that have in common an emphasis on the
role of interpersonal, social, cultural, and political forces in their conceptualization of and
response to psychological problems. Conducted in a seminar format, class meetings will consist
of a discussion of concepts, issues, and intervention strategies covered in readings, videotapes,
and case presentations.
PSY 4634 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Practice (3 credits)
The focus of this seminar is the communicative process in psychotherapy. The student will not
only attend to the manifest content of the patient’s communication, but will also learn to hear
and understand the latent (unconscious) message. In order to accomplish this goal each student
must develop a working knowledge of Lang’s text: A Primer of Psychotherapy, or Lang’s
Psychotherapy: A basic text. The first several sessions will be devoted to this task. Students
are required to tape some sessions of interesting, difficult, or troublesome cases for classroom
presentation. Prerequisite: Students must have cases for discussion.
PSY 4635 Psychodynamic Therapy I (3 credits)
The introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, range,
scope, and limitations of psychoanalytic psychotherapy as a treatment modality. It is
anticipated that by the end of this course, the student will have acquired the basic concepts
necessary to have a fuller appreciation of this therapeutic approach.
PSY 4636 Psychodynamic Therapy II: Classic and Ego (3 credits)
This course explains in depth the concepts of transference and countertransference, starting with
the seminal work of Sigmund Freud in 1912 to the current time.
PSY 4637 Psychodynamic Treatment Approach to Family and Group (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to a dynamic approach to family and group psychotherapy.
The approaches of the leading family and group therapists will be presented and compared.
Students will become familiar with the basic concepts of both family and group therapy, how
to conceptualize case material, and the factors that influence family and group dynamics. These
will include the therapist-client relationship, major family and group resistances, transference
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and countertransference. Assessment techniques and intervention strategies with an emphasis
on dynamic case analysis will be highlighted.
PSY 4638 Narcissistic and Borderline Disorders (3 credits)
The main objective of this course is to explore systematically the clinical pictures, the
therapeutic techniques, and the developmental theories of both the borderline and narcissistic
personality disorders.
PSY 4640 Special Problems in Psychotherapy (3 credits)
This course is open to advanced students who are carrying patients in treatment. Clinical
material will be used throughout the course. The following areas will be pursued: setting the
stage for psychotherapy; establishing the frame; early trauma; self-disclosure; special events,
extra-therapeutic contact; negativity; the revenge motive; handing dreams and fantasy; the
metaphor and other poetic dictation; and the erotic transference and countertransference.
PSY 4642 Self-Psychology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the theoretical background and practical
application of self-psychology. Class will be devoted to discussion of readings and case
presentation.
PSY 4644 Psychoanalytic Concepts (3 credits)
This course will offer a survey of concepts and theory of psychoanalysis and review their
application within the psychoanalytic situation. The first part of each session will be devoted
to theory and technique, while the second part of each session will focus on the practical or
clinical application of theory. It is expected that students will participate actively in class
discussions, as well as contribute to the clinical section of each session. Each student will be
expected to present case material relevant to the subject being discussed. In addition, some
written assignments may be given. There will be no examinations in this class.
PSY 4646 The Use of Dreams in Psychotherapy (3 credits)
This course will deal with Freud’s theory from the Interpretation of Dreams brought up to date
to accommodate weekly and brief/time-limited psychotherapy. The concept of “dream work”,
as well as the function, value, and language of the dream will be discussed. Additionally, the
significance of the first or initial dream, the interpersonal/communicative function, and
intrapsychic aspects of the dream will be explored. The dream in psychopathology, the biology
of dreaming, and adaptive aspects of the dream will also be addressed.
PSY 4647 Psychodynamic Treatment of Affective Disorders (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the genesis, development, and treatment of
affective disorders. Topics covered include anxiety reactions, depression and mania, and allied
disorders. The mechanisms, dynamics and process of depression, despair, loneliness, selfdestructive behavior, boredom, apathy, enthusiasm, and related conditions will be reviewed
critically. Throughout, the students will be helped to understand the impact of resistance,
transference, and countertransference issues in treating affective disorders will also be
discussed.
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PSY 4650 Crisis Intervention (3 credits)
This course will consist of an overview of crisis intervention, including differing approaches
and techniques for this type of work. Specific topics will include working with the suicidal
client, coping with grief, divorce, adolescent issues, victimization, aging and illness.
Community resources available for crisis intervention and the process of involuntary
commitment will also be covered.
PSY 4651 Seminar in Eclectic Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Eclecticism refers to the method or practice of choosing what seems best or most likely to have
therapeutic benefit for a client/patient from the variety of available systems, methods, and
techniques. In order to help develop skills in thinking and application to foster an eclectic
orientation, this course will lean heavily on case histories. Students will read, present, and
discuss cases from modern therapists and from their own clinical experiences (e.g., practicum).
In addition to the wealth of knowledge gleaned from analysis of these cases, students will
develop intervention strategies based on recent trends in theory and technique. In addition,
current psychotherapy literature and films will be critically examined.
PSY 4659 Advanced Cross-Cultural Counseling (3 credits)
This course is designed to explore advanced issues related to the counseling and assessment of
culturally diverse clients. Skills will be developed through the use of critical incident analysis
and case study conceptualization. Students will be required to construct a case study, read
weekly assignments and participate in critical-incident analysis.
PSY 4662 Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders (3 credits)
This course surveys the history, research, and treatment approaches of post-traumatic stress
disorder in its many manifestations, including post-combat syndromes, natural disaster
survivors, occupational critical incidents, and victims of crime, sexual abuse, or accidents.
PSY 4663 Counseling in Terminal Care (3 credits)
This course will provide an integrated model for counseling the terminally ill that will include
the patient, the family, and social system. It will acquaint students with both a humanistic and
a cognitive-behavioral thanatology. The needs of therapists dealing with the stresses of terminal
care will also be addressed.
PSY 4666 Seminar in Forensic Neuropsychology (3 credits)
This course will explore the use of neuropsychological testing and theory in forensic settings.
The focus will include applications to both criminal cases as well as civil cases. The course will
take both a neuropsychological and forensic perspective on the testing procedures and how they
relate to legal as well as neuropsychological data. Applications to mitigation in criminal
sentencing, competency, ability to stand trial, determination of mental retardation, civil
damages, civil liability, and related issues will be discussed along with the appropriate examples
from actual cases. Students with practicum or other experience will be encouraged to present
cases that illustrate the issues described in the case as well. The course will have a seminar
format in which the implications of this information can be thoroughly discussed and debated.
Mock testimony will be presented by students to illustrate the practical applications of the
course material.
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PSY 4668 Substance Abuse, Health, and Mental Health (3 credits)
The major goal of this course is for students to learn about substance use and misuse, and related
prevention and treatment. In addition, because substance use disorders can significantly affect
our health and mental health problems and concerns (e.g., depression, aging, medication use,
diabetes, hypertension) this course will address a broad range of issues involved in the
assessment and treatment of comorbidity and the relationship of substance use disorders to the
management of different health and mental health problems.
PSY 4669 Clinical Interventions for Anxiety Disorders (3 credits)
This course will cover the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Available
literature on treatment outcome studies, as well as current literature on the theories of anxiety
disorders will be reviewed. The course will focus on actual treatment applications of anxious
patients. Treatment modalities will include cognitive/behavioral therapy, mindfulness, and
motivational interviewing approaches. Students will practice the interventions studied.
PSY 4670 Short Term Therapy (3 credits)
This course will review the history and development of time-limits therapies and survey
different approaches, including brief dynamic therapy, cognitive therapies, solution-oriented
models and others. New developments in brief treatment will be covered, including managed
care models and “HMO therapy.”
PSY 4671 Psychotherapy with Lesbians and Gay Men (3 credits)
Lesbians and gay men in psychotherapy present to the clinician issues that are unique to this
population. The goal of this course is to make the student aware, sensitive, and knowledgeable
of these salient issues in order to work more effectively using gay affirmative psychotherapy
technique in treating gay men, lesbians, and their family members. These issues will be viewed
through a developmental perspective, i.e., counseling gay adolescents, adults, couples, and the
aging. The course design is an interactive approach to using panel presentations, current
research, case studies and role playing in a small class atmosphere. Students have the
opportunity to volunteer at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center using gay affirmative and
brief psychotherapy techniques. Group supervision is provided as part of the course.
PSY 4673 Interpersonal Violence (3 credits)
The purpose of this seminar is to examine current strategies and issues in clinical research and
treatment with disparate forms of interpersonal violence with an emphasis on perpetrators of
these acts. Some of these will include: spouse abuse, child maltreatment, incest, (nonfamilial)
sexual assault of children and adults, homicide, and serial rape and murder. Within each area,
empirically based approaches to assessment, prevention, and treatment will be discussed.
Etiologic and maintaining factors for the various types of violence, and psychosocial profiling
procedures with selected subtypes of violent offenders, also will be covered.
PSY 4677 Feminist Therapy (3 credit)
Feminist therapy is an intervention technique based on the social psychology theories of the
new women’s movement. The goal is to help empower women by separating the issues of life
that come from living with discrimination and the resulting feelings of oppression from the
psychobiological and intrapsychic issues that are brought into the therapy session. Feminist
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techniques that emphasize analysis of power of dynamics across the lifespan have impacted the
various interventions used in treatment towards mental health as well as in its own therapy
theory. Feminist therapy theory and the various feminist therapy techniques will be surveys in
this course.
PSY 4678 Eating Disorders: Theory and Intervention (3 credits)
This course will review the history of eating disorders and the development of interventions for
the treatment of eating disorders, including psychoanalytic, self-psychological, relational,
systemic and cognitive-behavioral. Individual, familial, socio-cultural and biological aspects
of eating issues and body image difficulties will be addressed as well as relevant research.
PSY 4679 Abuse, Trauma, and Dissociation (3 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive survey of knowledge and skills required to treat adult
survivors of childhood abuse. Identification and treatment of complex post-traumatic stress
disorder, the spectrum of dissociative disorders, and the pervasive impact on personality
functioning of long-standing abuse in childhood will comprise the central focus of the course.
PSY 4681 Chronic Pain/Illness Management (3 credits)
This course will cover the conceptual model and the particular psychological assessment and
intervention methods that have been found to be effective in work with those experiencing
chronic pain and/or illness. Emphasis will be on assisting individuals with chronic pain/illness
to minimize the impact it is having on their mood, lifestyle, productivity, recreational activity,
family and social relationships. The focus will include managing with such clinical examples
of chronic pain/illness conditions as: tension and migraine headaches, back pain,
temporomandibular disorder, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease. Consideration will be given to care delivered as part of an interdisciplinary treatment
team as well as in psychoeducational group and individual treatment settings. Opportunities
will be provided for supervised peer practice with the recommended interventions.
PSY 4682 Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (3 credits)
This course will cover the history and current practice of treatment of serious mental illness.
Special focus will be placed on the role of psychological interventions in the cure of this
population. The increasingly active role of the psychiatric consumer will be highlighted.
PSY 4683 Interventions with Medical Patients (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with clinical interventions, related assessment
concerns and research relevant to health problems. Topics that will be covered include relevant
assessment issues that need to be considered when evaluating medical patients for
psychological intervention and psychological interventions with specific medical populations.
Students will learn to design and implement intervention protocols for a number of different
physical disorders as well as learns applied techniques, such as various forms of relaxation
procedures.
PSY 4690 Psychological Interventions in Forensic Settings (3 credits)
This course will cover psychological intervention techniques that are known to have success
with juvenile and adult offenders in jail, prison and court-ordered treatment programs to
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eliminate behavioral problems that are due to mental illness, abuse, and/or substance abuse.
Psychological interventions including medication and therapy can assist in the behavioral
management of those offenders and hopefully prevent recidivism.
PSY 4691 Infant and Toddler Mental Health (3 credits)
This course will cover clinical applications of developmental psychopathology, with an
emphasis on infants, toddler and their families. Major theories of development and current
research on that systemic etiological pathways of atypical adaptation will be reviewed.
Assessment strategies will include observing infants and toddlers at play, clinical interviewing
of caregivers, identifying red flags, recognizing 0-3 diagnostic classifications, administered
developmental screening tests, and interpreting results. Implications for appropriate theory
driven and empirically based treatment will be discussed including play techniques and
attachment-theory driven interventions.
PSY 4692 Parent Focused Interventions (3 credits)
This course will review current theory and research on parent-focused prevention and
intervention efforts intended to benefit children and adolescents. Topics will include the
rationale for a behavioral/family systems approach to parent training and its application to
contemporary families. Difficulties associated with conducting both research and interventions
in family setting will be reviewed with particular attention to problems of measuring and
defining “ideal” parenting practices and difficulties in translating program objectives into
clinically meaningful outcomes. Parent-focused interventions for both externalizing and
internalizing problems will be considered.
PSY 4693 The Application of Psychology to Organization Settings (3 credits)
The focus of the course is on the application of the principles of psychology to organizational
settings. Students will acquire understanding of interventions at the individual, group and
organizational development levels. Further, concepts, skills, and tools that are essential to
successful organizational interventions will be demonstrated.
PSY 4695 School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families I (3 credits)
This course, which includes both academic and clinical components, is designed to teach
students about the family lives and school experiences of low-income, ethnic minority youth,
then train and supervise students as they co-lead an intervention targeting children’s academic
and mental health outcomes. Coursework is devoted to understanding how families and schools
can better support low-income youth, and the intervention is intended to enhance family and
school support for local ethnic minority and immigrant communities.
PSY 4696 School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of School Based Interventions with Ethnically Diverse Families
I.
PSY 4699 Positive Psychology (3 credits)
The present course will describe how the scope of psychology has recently been broadened
beyond exclusive concern with identifying pathology and treating or preventing disorder. This
course will provide an overview of the emerging field of ‘Positive Psychology. ’ Students will
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be provided with opportunities to understand theory and research pertaining to the psychology
of human strengths, assets, abilities and talents as well as the constructs of optimism, happiness,
hope and resiliency. Students will be challenged to use their understanding of this theory and
research to suggest opportunities for intervention with various populations.
PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V (3 credits)
The student is required to spend a minimum of 15 hours per week for one semester at a selected
agency.
PSY 4702 Clinical Practicum VI (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V.
PSY 470A Summer Elective Practicum (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
PSY 5701 Clinical Practicum VII (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
PSY 5702 Clinical Practicum VIII (3 credits)
See description for PSY 4701 Clinical Practicum V
PSY 8701 Supplemental Practicum and Supervision (1 credit)
This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and profession-relevant attitudes of
students preparing for the pre-doctoral internship.
•
•
Course descriptions are subject to change
Prerequisites can be found in Doctoral Policy & Procedures Handbook
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2015-2016 Doctoral Programs Estimated Expenses
The total expenses of students enrolled in doctoral programs vary greatly depending on
individual circumstances. While, registration, and other fees,* and the cost of books are
relatively constant for all students, other expenses will differ.
Tuition
Application Fee
Registration Fee
Late Registration Penalty
Student Services Fee
$975 per credit hour
$50 (nonrefundable)
$25 per semester
$30
$350 per semester (4 credits or
more)
$175 per semester (less than 4
credits)
$10 per semester
$10 per transcript
$100
Professional Liability Insurance Fee
Transcript Fee
Application for Degree Fee
*Please note that all above fees are subject to change without notice.
Refund Policy
Students have three working days from the date of signing an enrollment contract or financial
agreement with the university to cancel the contract and receive a full refund of any tuition and
registration fees paid. Further, a student shall receive a full refund of tuition and registration
fees paid by the student before the commencement of instruction if the student submits a written
request to the institution within three working days of the payment.
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Clinical Psychology Student Internship Site Placements (APA/APPIC)
Partial Listing
Alexandria Mental Health Center, Alexandria, VA
Arizona State Hospital, Phoenix, AZ
Atascadero State Hospital, Atascadero, CA
Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA
Baltimore VA Medical Center, Baltimore, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA
Biloxi VA Medical Center, Biloxi, MS
Boston University Counseling Center, Boston, MA
Cambridge Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
Central Louisiana State Hospital, Pineville, LA
Child & Adolescent Service Center, Canton, OH
Children’s Hospital at Stanford, Stanford, CA
Children’s Psychiatric Center, Inc., Miami, FL
Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY
Colorado Mental Health Institute, Denver, CO
Devereux Foundation, Villanova, PA
DC Commission on Mental Health, Washington, DC
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, GA
Family Service & Guidance Center, Topeka, KS
Federal Bureau of Prisons, Ayer, MA
Federal Correctional Complex, Butner, NC
Federal Correctional Institution, Petersburg, VA
Federal Medical Center, Rochester, MN
Fifth Avenue Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy, New York, NY
Florida State Hospital, Chattahoochee, FL
Franciscan Hospital & Children’s Center, Boston, MA
Florida State University Student Counseling Center, Tallahassee, FL
Franciscan Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Gainesville VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
George Washington University, Washington, DC
Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital, Greystone Park, NJ
Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury, NC
Henry Ford Health Science Center, Detroit, MI
Indiana University Health Center, Bloomington, IN
Institute of Living, Hartford, CT
James A. Haley VA Hospital, Tampa, FL
Jerry L. Pettis Memorial VA Hospital, Loma Linda, CA
John L. McClellan Memorial VA, Little Rock, AR
Kaiser Permanente – San Diego, Vista, CA
Lexington VA Medical Center, Lexington, KY
Mailman Center for Child Development, Miami, FL
Malcolm Grow Medical Center, Andrews AFB, Washington, DC
Manhattan Psychiatric Center, New York, NY
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
Miami-Dade Department of Human Services, Miami, FL
Miami Children’s Hospital, Miami, FL
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Miami VA Medical Center, Miami, FL
Milwaukee VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI
Mississippi State Hospital, Whitfield, MS
Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY
National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD
Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA
New York University/Bellevue Hospital, New York, NY
Norristown State Hospital, Norristown, PA
Northeast Florida State Hospital, Macclenny, FL
Park Place Behavioral Health Care, Kissimmee, FL
Phoenix Psychology Internship Consortium, Phoenix, AZ
Pittsburgh VA Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA
Pollak MHC/Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ
Psychology Services Center, Nova Southeastern University
Riverbend Community Mental Health Center, Concord, NH
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ
San Bernardino County Behavioral Health, San Bernardino, CA
South Florida Consortium, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Southern Arizona Psychology Internship Consortium, Tucson, AZ
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL
Spokane Mental Health Center, Spokane, WA
St. Mary’s Children & Family Services, Syosset, NY
SUNY Albany Counseling Center, Albany, NY
Texas Women’s University, Denton, TX
Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI
Ulster County Mental Health Services, Kingston, NY
U.S. Medical Center for Federal Prisoners, Springfield, MO
University of Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AZ
University of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
UCLA Neuropsychological Institute, Los Angeles, CA
University of Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AR
University of Colorado Health Science, Denver, CO
University of Houston, Houston, TX
University of Massachusetts/Worchester Forensic, Worchester, MA
University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center, Miami, FL
University of Oklahoma Health Science, Oklahoma City, OK
University of Rochester Counseling, Rochester, NY
University of South Florida Mental Health Institute, Tampa, FL
University of Virginia Counseling Center, Charlottesville, VA
USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX
Vanderbilt University VAMC, Nashville, TN
VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT
VA Medical Center, Togus, ME
VA New Jersey Healthcare System, East Orange, NJ
Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Westchester Jewish Community Services, Hartsdale, NY
Wright-Patterson USAF Medical Center, Dayton, OH
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
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College of Psychology Organization
Karen S. Grosby, Ed.D., Dean
Thomas Fagan, Ph.D., Associate Dean
John E. Lewis, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Clinical & School Psychology
Carolyn Berger, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Counseling Psychology
Glenn Scheyd, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Benefactors/Supporters
Anna H. Maltz
Anne G. Hutt
Eve Rose
Lorraine Thomas
CPS Alumni Association
Howard Spector
The Sol Taplin Charitable Foundation
Albert Miniaci
Rose Miniaci
Virginia Frazier
The Paul Palank Memorial Foundation
Magdalen Berken in Memory of Gilbert Berken
Oscar & Beatrice Bekoff
The McCormick Foundation
The Segal Family
The Lane Family
Albert Goldstein
Sylvan Klein
A. Eugene Shapiro
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Faculty Professional Interests
Full-Time Faculty
2015-2016
Amarilis Acevedo, Ph.D., ABPP, University of California, associate professor. Geriatric
psychology; neuropsychological assessment.
Jonathan Banks, Ph.D., University of North Texas, assistant professor. Impact of stress
on cognitive processes; working memory and executive functioning; mind wandering;
change and inattentional blindness; self-control and ego depletion.
Carolyn Berger, Ph.D., University of Florida, associate professor. Student
underachievement; school counselor accountability practices; counseling gifted students.
Ryan Black, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant professor. Psychometrics,
including Classical Test Theory and Modern Test Theories (e.g., Item Response Theory);
linear and nonlinear mixed effects regression models; research design and methodology;
assessment and treatment of serious and persistent mental illness; post-marketing
surveillance of prescription opioid abuse.
Leanne Boucher, Ph.D., Dartmouth College, associate professor. Behavioral measures of
cognitive flexibility; understanding the neural correlates of response inhibition;
psychophysics.
Paula Brochu, Ph.D., University of Western Ontario, Canada, assistant professor.
Prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, and stigma from the perspectives of both the
perceiver and the target, including the processes underlying the expression of prejudice, as
well as the consequences of stigma on human functioning.
Gordon Broderick, Ph.D., University of Montreal, professor. Physiological, behavioral
and cognitive ramifications of immune dysfunction and autoimmunity from an integrated
systems perspective.
Myron Burns, Ph.D., Tennessee State University, associate professor. HIV/AIDS; minority
health; stress-process of health outcomes; drug prevention; family therapy.
Stephen N. Campbell, Ph.D., Howard University, associate professor. General
clinical/community psychology of social change; dual diagnosed; program design and
consultation; conduct disorder.
Peter Caproni, Ph.D., Adelphi University, assistant professor. Therapeutic/collaborative
assessment; school-based consultation; psychological services within schools;
emotional/behavioral issues with children and adolescents.
Ralph E. (Gene) Cash, Ph.D., ABPP, NCSP, New York University, professor. School
psychology; psychoeducational assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; depression; anxiety
208
disorders; suicide prevention; forensics, including child custody, wrongful death effects,
and disabilities; stress management; and psychology and public policy.
William (Matt) Collins, Ph.D., McMaster University, associate professor. Cognitive
psychology; cognitive neuroscience; memory development
Travis Craddock, Ph.D., University of Alberta, assistant professor. Cellular information
processes: Molecular Neuroscience; biophysics of neurological/neurodegenerative diseases:
Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Traumatic Brain Injury; network theory in systems biology.
Alexandru F. Cuc, Ph.D., New School University, associate professor. Cognitive
psychology; conversational remembering; group dynamics; collective amnesia of
traumatic events; autobiographical memories.
Jennifer Davidtz, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, assistant professor. Community
mental health; the treatment of long-term mental illness, borderline personality disorder, and
complex trauma; countertransference and other intersubjective psychotherapy process
phenomena; psychotherapy integration.
Christian DeLucia, Ph.D., Arizona State University, associate professor. Emergence of
problem behaviors during adolescence, with a particular emphasis on adolescent substance
use and abuse; statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data; and
methodological issues relevant for the design and analysis of psychosocial interventions.
Frank A. De Piano, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, professor. Professional interests
include hypnosis (past president of Division 30, Psychological Hypnosis), community
psychology, health and medicine, and the development of models for professional training
of psychologists.
William Dorfman, Ph.D., ABPP, Ohio State University, professor. Community mental
health; short-term approaches to psychotherapy; eclectic approaches to individual and
marital psychotherapy; psycho-diagnosis; objective personality measurement with the
MMPI-2 and MMPI-A; role of families and primary caretakers in the treatment and
rehabilitation of the chronically and severely mentally ill.
Tom Fagan, Ph.D., Virginia Tech, professor. Correctional mental health issues; crisis
negotiation and critical incident management; training of clinical psychologists; forensic
psychology.
Jan Faust, Ph.D., ABPP, University of Georgia, professor. Child-clinical and pediatric
psychology: child abuse (sexual and physical) and neglect; child treatment outcome
research; PTSD in children and adolescents; child adjustment to acute and chronic
medical conditions; lifespan psychosis.
Mercedes Fernandez, Ph.D., University of Arizona, associate professor.
Neuropsychology; human electroencephalography; executive control in bilinguals.
209
Ana Imia Fins, Ph.D., University of Miami, associate professor. Health psychology,
sleep medicine; insomnia; chronic fatigue syndrome; posttraumatic stress disorder;
periodic limb movement disorder.
Diana Formoso, Ph.D., Arizona State University, assistant professor. Risk and protective
factors that shape youth development within low-income, ethnic minority families; family
conflict, parenting, and child outcome and how they are impacted by families' ecological
and cultural context (e.g., economic hardship, neighborhood risk, immigration and
acculturation); intervention development for ethnic minority children and families
experiencing adversity; the family lives and school experiences of immigrant youth.
Barbara Garcia-Lavin, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant professor. Areas
of clinical and research interests include: psychological assessment, training/supervision,
autism and developmental disabilities, youth aggression and conduct problems, health
psychology, and school psychology.
Steven N. Gold, Ph.D., Michigan State University, professor. Adult survivors of
childhood sexual abuse; dissociative disorders; psychological trauma and post-traumatic
stress disorder; sexual addiction; doctoral level clinical training; hypnotherapy;
interpersonal, family, and systems theory and intervention; psychotherapy case
conceptualization and treatment planning.
Charles Golden, Ph.D., ABPP/ABCN, University of Hawaii,
professor. Neuropsychology of head injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis;
neuropsychological and personality assessment; rehabilitation and community
reintegration following brain injury; neuropsychology in childhood and in school settings;
learning disabilities; hyperactivity; general assessment.
Lena Hall, Ph.D., University of Florida, associate professor. Multicultural psychology;
psychology teaching methods; culture and mental health; culture and romantic
relationships; cultural diversity and prejudice.
Tara Jungersen, Ph.D., University of Tennessee, assistant professor. Counseling
preparation; vicarious trauma; adults in transition; women’s issues.
Shannon Karl, Ph.D., University of Central Florida, associate professor. Community
mental health, chronic pain, eating disorders, domestic violence, child and adolescent
treatment and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Alan D. Katell, Ph.D., West Virginia University, professor. Assessment and treatment of
eating disorders; psychological factors in cardiac rehabilitation; exercise promotion and
maintenance; health psychology; coping with chronic illnesses and other physical
challenges.
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Jeffrey L. Kibler, Ph.D., University of Miami, professor. Cognitive-behavioral
regulation of emotion/mood disorders. Behavioral medicine: biobehavioral aspects of
posttraumatic stress, psychosocial stress, and pain; psychosocial risks for illness (e.g.,
heart disease); health risk reduction; psychophysiology; minority health: predictors of
biobehavioral research participation for individuals of racial minority.
John E. Lewis, Ph.D., Syracuse University, professor. Intercultural psychotherapy and
assessment; counseling and psychotherapy with prison populations; educational and
vocational assessment and counseling; school psychology; international perspectives.
Mindy Ma, Ph.D., University of Miami, associate professor. Cardiovascular behavioral
medicine; HIV prevention; minority health; health risk behaviors; stress and coping.
Madhavi Menon, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University, associate professor. Developmental
costs of high self-esteem; gender identity development; narcissism and psychosocial
adjustment; social development in middle childhood and emerging adulthood; peer and
parental relationships in middle childhood and emerging adulthood.
Stephen C. Messer, MA, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, Oxford, associate
professor. Research methods; multivariable statistics, latent variable models, longitudinal
design and analysis; diagnostic validity and measurement; developmental epidemiology
and psychopathology; military psychology and combat-related PTSD.
Wiley Mittenberg, Ph.D., ABPP-CN, Chicago Medical School, professor.
Neuropsychology of head injury in adults and children, the neuropsychology of age
related dementias, neuropsychological and psychological test construction, interpretation,
and validation, and professional issues in clinical neuropsychology.
Timothy R. Moragne, Psy.D., Wright State University, professor. Minority issues;
health psychology; community psychology; human sexuality; psychological aspects of
AIDS; AIDS and minorities.
Barry Nierenberg, Ph.D., ABPP, University of Tennessee, associate professor.
Rehabilitation and Health Psychology: psychological factors in chronic illness,
biopsychosocial aspects of wellness and disease, healthcare disparities, pediatric
psychology, child and family adaptations to acute and chronic medical conditions. The
business of psychology and professional credentialing.
Jason Piccone, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, assistant professor.
Dehumanization; motivations to accept paranormal beliefs; modern propaganda;
philosophy of social psychological science; identity.
Scott Poland, Ed.D., Ball State University, professor. Professional experience has
included leading national crisis teams and primary interests are suicide intervention, crisis
intervention, youth violence, self-injury, school safety and delivery of psychological and
counseling services in schools.
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Bady Quintar, Ph.D., ABPP, University of Kentucky, professor. Projective techniques;
psychoanalytic psychotherapy; ego psychology; postdoctoral training.
Tim Razza, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant professor. Clinical
psychology; child and adolescent psychopathology; psychological assessment; treatment
of anxiety and disruptive behavior disorders; assessment of suicide in children and
adolescents.
Michael Reiter, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, professor. Family therapy;
solution-focused therapy; intercultural couples; therapeutic interviewing; case
conceptualization.
David Reitman, Ph.D., University of Mississippi, professor. Cross-setting (home and
school) problems involving children and adolescents. Emphasis on disruptive behavior
(i.e., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct
disorder). Interventions are behaviorally-based, empirical, and focus on parent
disciplinary practices, problem-solving, and skills building.
Stephen A. Russo, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, associate professor. Sport
psychology; sports medicine, physical rehabilitation, and recovery from injury;
performance enhancement and coaching consultation; anxiety, anger, and emotional
regulation; counseling college student-athletes, performance artists, and athletes of all
ability levels.
Glenn Scheyd, Ph.D., University of New Mexico, associate professor. Evolutionary
psychology; human mate selection; individual differences in attractiveness perception;
intrasexual competition.
Barry A. Schneider, Ph.D., Columbia University, professor. Psychodiagnosis and
personality evaluation; integrated psychotherapy; medical psychotherapy; rare
neurological disorders.
David Shapiro, Ph.D., ABPP, University of Michigan, professor. Forensic psychology;
mental health law; forensic and clinical assessment; expert witness testimony;
malingering; legal and ethical issues.
Aya Shigeto, Ph.D., University of Illinois, assistant professor. Social and emotional
development in infancy and early childhood; family systems theory; child temperament;
parenting behavior; parent-child relationships.
Jedidiah Siev, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, assistant professor. OCD and related
disorders; scrupulosity; judgment and decision making, cognitions, and information
processing in OCS and related disorders; anxiety disorders; psychotherapy outcome
research; empirically-supported research.
212
Edward R. Simco, Ph.D., Nova University, professor. Applied and computational
statistics; research design and evaluation; cluster analysis; psychometrics.
Linda C. Sobell, Ph.D., ABPP, University of California, Irvine, professor. Alcohol,
tobacco, and other drug use disorders; cognitive-behavior therapy; research dissemination;
assessment and treatment evaluation; natural recovery; motivational interventions;
professional issues.
Mark B. Sobell, Ph.D., ABPP, University of California at Riverside,
professor. Substance use disorders, especially alcohol use disorders; behavior therapy;
motivational interventions; treatment outcome evaluation; public health approach;
processes of persuasion and behavior change; philosophy of science.
Valerie Starratt, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University, associate professor. Evolutionary
psychology; verbal and physical domestic abuse; mate value and mate retention behaviors;
resource management strategies; neurophysiology of evolved psychological mechanisms.
Weylin Sternglanz, Ph.D., University of Virginia, associate professor. Interpersonal
perception; nonverbal decoding accuracy; deception detection; empathic accuracy;
romantic attraction.
Ashley Stripling, Ph.D., University of Florida, Gainesville, assistant professor.
Geropsychology, clinical training, research and advocacy, promotion of successful,
healthy aging through advocacy and clinical interventions; understanding ageism,
subjective aging, and the intersection of aging language and perceptions; combating ageist
stereotypes.
Lourdes Suarez-Morales, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia, assistant professor. Cultural
factors in clinical research. Cognitive, environment, and cultural factors and their relationship to
anxiety in youth.
Jaime Tartar, Ph.D., University of Florida, associate professor. Physiological consequences of
stress; influence of emotion on attention; influence of sleep loss on cognition and emotion.
Mercedes B. ter Maat, Ph.D., LPC, ATR-BC, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University, associate professor. School counseling, mental health counseling, supervision;
multicultural counseling; art therapy.
Eric S. Thompson, Ph.D., University of Florida, assistant Professor. Family-schoolcommunity collaboration, social justice advocacy, the use of data and evaluation to
facilitate comprehensive change in school guidance programs, interdisciplinary research
collaboration with health sciences, advanced statistics, contemplative methods for
attention development and well-being in adults and children.
Isabel A. Thompson, Ph.D., University of Florida. assistant professor. Counselor well-being
and burnout prevention, wellness and stress management, integrating creativity and mindfulness
213
in group counseling, the application of contemplative approaches in counseling, and schoolbased interventions for students at risk.
Jessica Valenzuela, Ph.D., University of Miami, assistant professor. Pediatric psychology;
Disparities in child health outcomes and health care quality; chronic illness prevention and
disease management; Psychologists in medical settings; Community-based participatory research
approaches and academic-community partnerships for health.
Sarah Valley-Gray, Psy.D., ABPP, Nova University, professor. Neuropsychological,
psychological, and psychoeducational assessment; pediatric neuropsychological disorders;
psychological services within the schools; infancy and child development (interaction
with caregiver); issues of professional development including training and supervision.
Vincent B. Van Hasselt, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, professor. Family and
interpersonal violence; police psychology; criminal investigative analysis (psychological
profiling) and apprehension; interviewing and interrogation techniques; cognitive
behavioral interventions with juvenile offenders; behavioral criminology.
Michael Voltaire, Ph.D., Florida International University, assistant professor. Applied Behavior
Analysis; Developmental Disabilities; Life-Span Human Development; Autism
Angela Waguespack, Ph.D., Louisiana State University, associate
professor. Psychological, psychoeducational and functional behavior assessment; schoolbased consultation; psychological services within schools; behavioral interventions with
children and adolescents.
Lenore Walker, Ed.D., ABPP, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey,
professor. Forensic psychology; expert witness testimony; battered women syndrome;
violence against women; family and interpersonal violence; sexual harassment; impact of
trauma; post-traumatic stress disorder; feminist theory.
Professors Emeriti
W. Joseph Burns, Ph.D., ABPP, University of North Dakota. Lifespan developmental
neuropsychology; developmental neuropsychology; neuropsychological effects of toxins,
infections, and head injury in children; neuropsychiatric disorders in the elderly; pediatric
neurorehabilitation.
Bernard Eingold, Ph.D., University of Florida. Individual psychotherapy; marital and
couple therapy; psychodiagnosis.
A. Eugene Shapiro, Ph.D., ABPP, New York University. Psychodynamic psychotherapy;
health services delivery systems; third-party reimbursement for mental health services;
communicative processes in psychotherapy; professional issues.
214
Allan Schulman, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. Animal behavior, ethology,
behavioral ecology.
Contributing Faculty
Maribel Del Rio-Roberts, Psy.D. Nova Southeastern University. Autism and
developmental disabilities, infant mental health, pediatric psychology, play therapy,
parenting, health psychology, and psycho-educational assessment of children and
adolescents.
W. Alex Edmonds, Ph.D., Florida State University. Educational psychology,
performance psychology, program evaluation, statistics and measurement.
Michelle Gagnon Blodgett, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University. Geropsychology,
interdisciplinary healthcare teamwork, mental capacity, elder abuse, well-being in later-life.
Donna Hillier, Psy.D. Nova Southeastern University. Director of academics at the
Mailman Segal Center for Human Development and director of training for the NSU
psychology Post-Doctoral Residency Program. Clinical training, supervision and
professional development; psychotherapy case conceptualization; stress management;
eating disorders.
Elda-Kanzki-Veloso, Ph.D. Barry University. Developmentally and contextually oriented
family based treatment, drug counseling, mediation, crisis intervention, clinical supervision,
MDFT trainer, family-based brief therapy.
Tom Kennedy, Ph.D., University of Miami. Neuropsychological assessments, behavioral
medicine interventions, psychotherapy, group therapy, family therapy.
Michele McGuire, Ph.D., University of Kansas. Emotional and behavioral disorders, alternative
teach education programs, alternative certification programs.
Jose A. Rey, Pharm.D., BCPP, University of Florida. Psychopharmacology,
pharmacoeconomics, pain management.
Part-Time Core Faculty
William L. Day, Ph.D., LMHC, Florida State University. Counselor education and
supervision; counseling with adolescents and adults; development and management of
private practice; ethical and multicultural issues in counseling; psychopharmacology;
nature-nurture considerations; life-span development; political advocacy for the counseling
profession.
Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Nova Southeastern University. Behavioral medicine
(addictions, eating disorders) and dual diagnosis; motivational interviewing; psychological
215
assessment, case conceptualization and intervention strategies with complex cases; development
of an work within a private practice setting; psychotherapy with GLBTQ.
Scott Simon Fehr, Psy.D., Nova University. Group and individual psychotherapy; marriage
counseling, corporate consultation and expert witness testimony.
Mitchell Gordon, Ph.D., ABPP, University of Mississippi. Family marital therapy; group
psychotherapy; child and adolescent therapy, dually diagnosed (emotionally
disturbed/mentally handicapped); relaxation training; assertiveness training; treatment
program design and implementation; staff development; psychological assessment.
Denise Hildebrand, Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan. School psychology; cognitive and
psychoeducational assessment; test development; intervention strategies.
James J. Kaikobad, Psy.D., Nova University. Individual, group and family therapy;
neuropsychology; rehabilitation psychology; behavioral medicine; biofeedback; forensic
neuropsychology.
Traci Schatzburg, Ed.D., NCSP, University of Sarasota. School psychology. Response
to Intervention/Multi-Tiered System of Supports; intervention strategies; bullying
prevention; behavior analysis
Adam Schulman, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University. Individual and group therapy with
adults; marital and family therapy; parenting issues.
Alicia Scott, Ph.D., University of Florida. School psychology; cognitive and
psychoeducational assessment; private practice; intervention strategies; reading; early
childhood and lifespan development; professional development.
Jean Thaw, Ph.D., Louisiana State University. Eating and weight disorders; weight loss
and weight gain prevention in children and adults; physical activity and health promotion;
cognitive behavioral therapy; anxiety disorders
Victor O. Wallen, Ph.D., Florida International University. Social welfare; cross-cultural
understanding; substance abuse; individual and group therapy; family and marital therapy.
Clinical Faculty
Kristen Jones, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant clinical professor; assistant
Director, School Psychology Assessment and Consultation Center. School psychology;
psychoeducational assessment and intervention planning, implementation, and monitoring;
preschool and school mental health; assessment of autism spectrum disorders; parent-mediated
interventions; and developmental-behavioral pediatrics
216
Lisa Lashley, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant clinical professor, Assistant
director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Center.
Ana Martinez, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, associate clinical professor;
Director of Clinical Services. Cognitive-behavioral therapy; child, adolescent, adult, and
family therapy; specialty anxiety disorders, cross-cultural issues.
Leonard Schnur, Psy.D., ABPP, Nova Southeastern University, associate clinical
professor. Clinical supervision and training; interests include treatment of mood disorders
for adult and adolescent populations, time-limited dynamic psychotherapy, and
psychotherapy integration approaches for treatment of personality disorders.
Yukari Tomozawa, Psy.D., Nova Southeastern University, assistant clinical
professor. Provides treatment for children, adolescents, and families as well as
psychological testing. Interests include ADHD, Bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and
other chronic mental illnesses.
Adjunct Faculty
2015-2016
Beatriz Amador, Psy.D.
Carlos Albizu University
Stephanie Camejo, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Erin M. Anderson, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Courtney Cantrell, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Leslie Barnes-Young, Ph.D.
University of Akron
Michael Carifio, Ph.D.
Auburn University
Aurelia Bickler, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Scott Christian, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Joseph Blitch, Ph.D.
University of South Carolina
Carolina Claro, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Alicia Bosley, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Sandra Coiffman-Yohros, Psy.D
Carlos Albizu University
Michael Bourke, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Christine Collado-Acebal, Ph.D.
Barry University
Rhett Brandt, Ph.D.
University of Alabama
Noreen Commella, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
217
James Conti, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts
Amherst
Kevin Glavin, Ph.D.
Kent State University
Migdalia Coubertier, Ph.D.
Barry University
Anna M. Gillard, Ph.D.
Loyola University of Chicago
Arthur Cox, DSW
Columbia University
Manuel Gonzalez-Abreu, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
John Crocitto, Ed.D.
George Washington University
Charlene M. Grecsek, Ed.D.
University of Sarasota
Twila Curren, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Martin Greengrass, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
Joy Davis, Ed.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Rick Gunsallus, Ph.D., LMHC
American Academy of Clinical
Sexology
Bob Decker, Ph.D.
Barry University
Bruce Hartley, Ph.D., LMHC
University of Florida
Nathalie de Fabrique, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Elizabeth S. Ibanez, Ph.D.
University of Toledo
Melissa DeVincentis, Ph.D.,
LMFT, BCBA
Nova Southeastern University
Albert Inclan, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Patricia Jaegerman, Psy.D.
Illinois School of Professional
Psychology
Raymonde Dormezil-Neal, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Sarajo Falk, Psy.D.
Nova University
Rhiannon Jauer, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Maria Fimiani, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
George Kallas, Psy.D.
Carlos Albizu University
Aubrey McLaine Franklin, Ph.D.
Long Island University
Philip Kaplan, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University
Jessica Garcia, Ph.D, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Jodi Katz, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Silvia Garcia-Molinet, Psy.D.
Carlos Albizu University
218
Neil Kenney, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Scott Massaro, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Toby Kleinman, Esq.
Seton Hall University School of
Law
Mark Middlebrooks, Ph.D.
Nova University
Shannon Knight, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Esther Misdraji, Psy.D.
Carlos Albizu University
Sean Leonard, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Limor Mishkit-Ast, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Ginger Lerner-Wren, J.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Jill C. Morris, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Marvin Lew, Ph.D., ABPP
University of Buffalo
Terri Mortensen, Psy.D.
Argosy University
Ryan Liberati, Ph.D.
Old Dominion University
Gretchen Moy, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Susan London, Psy.D.
Yeshiva University
Rachel Needle, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Eileen Lyons, Ph.D
University of South Florida
Joanne Oestmann, Ed.D.
University of Sarasota
Cristina Magalhaes, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Gihan Omar, Psy.D.
Florida Institute of Technology
Lydia Malcolm, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Agatha D. Parks-Savage, Ed.D.,
LPC, RN
The College of William & Mary
Jeffrey Mandelkorn, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Jennifer Paul, Ph.D.
Florida Atlantic University
Craig Marker, Ph.D.
Chicago Medical School
Laura Pierce Marinn, Ph.D.
University of Tennessee
Kimberly Martin-Donald, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Marcia Pita, Ph.D.
George Washington University
Lidia Martinez, Ph.D., LMHC,
CAP
Nova Southeastern University
Alison Polly, Ed.D.
Nova Southeastern University
219
Thomas Smith, Ph.D.
Barry University
Amanda Prive, Ph.D.
University of South Florida
Kenneth Smylie, Ph.D., LMFT
LMHC
University of Florida
L. Dennison Reed, Psy.D.
Nova University
Catherine Stower, Ph.D.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute &
State University
Justin Rigsbee, Ph.D., Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Giovanna Rivano-Gomez,
Nova Southeastern University
Robert Templeton, Ed.S.
Nova University
Scott Rosiere, Ph.D.,
Nova Southeastern University
Abigail Tucker, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Stephen Rudin, Ed.D.
University of Illinois
Gregory Vecchi, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Michele Sanchez, Psy.D.
Miami Institute of Psychology
Joan M. Vermillion, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Lisa Saponaro, Ph.D.
University of Memphis
Leanne Shapiro,
Nova Southeastern University
Manuela Villa, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
George Wallace-Barnhill, Ph.D.
University of Maryland
Kenneth Shamlian, Ph.D.
University of Southern Maine
Michelle R. Watts, Ph.D.
University of South Florida
Donald Sheehan, M.A.
Catholic University
Camellia Westwell, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Tara Sheehan, Ph.D.
Florida International University
Chad Waxman, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Nurit Sheinberg, Ed.D.
Harvard University
Ellen Whelan, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
George Shepheard, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Tamara White, Ed.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Michael Simonds, Psy.D.
Carlos Albizu University
Lee Wilkinson, Ph.D.
University of Newcastle
220
Ayala Winer, Ph.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Marlene Zychowicz, Ed.D.
Northern Illinois University
David Womack, Ed.D.
Nova Southeastern University
Shannon Worton, Psy.D.
Nova Southeastern University
221
Correspondence Directory
Program Information
Nova Southeastern University
College of Psychology
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-5790
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 25790
Email: [email protected] nova.edu
www.cps.nova.edu
Admissions
Information
Nova Southeastern University
College of Psychology
Graduate Admissions Office
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-5760
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 25760
Fax: (954) 236-3893
Email: [email protected]
www.cps.nova.edu
Financial Aid
Information
Nova Southeastern University
Office of Student Financial Assistance
Horvitz Administration Building
First Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-3380
Toll free: 1-800-806-3680
www.nova.edu/cwis/finaid
Housing Information
Nova Southeastern University
Office of Residential Life & Housing
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-7052
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 27052
www.nova.edu
International Student
Advisement
Nova Southeastern University
Office of the University Registrar
International Student Advisor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
(954) 262-7240
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 27240
Veterans’ Benefits
Information
Nova Southeastern University
Office of the University Registrar
Coordinator of V.A. Benefits
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Other Nova
Southeastern
University Programs
Nova Southeastern University
Office of the University Registrar
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
222
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 27236
(954) 262-7255
Toll free: 1-800-541-6682
Ext: 27255
www.nova.edu
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