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IBM PC Servers
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
Models 11Y, 21Y, PB0, PM0, PT0
Hardware Maintenance
Manual Supplement
February 1998
Use this supplement with
the PC Servers
Hardware Maintenance Manual
We Want Your Comments!
(Please see page 165)
IBM
S84H-8035-01
Note
Before using this information and the product it
supports, be sure to read the general information
under “Notices” on page 169.
Second Edition (February 1998)
The following paragraph does not apply to the United
Kingdom or any country where such provisions are
inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of
express or implied warranties in certain transactions,
therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or
typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to
the information herein; these changes will be incorporated
in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the
program(s) described in this publication at any time.
This publication was developed for products and services
offered in the United States of America. IBM may not offer
the products, services, or features discussed in this
document in other countries, and the information is subject
to change without notice. Consult your local IBM
representative for information on the products, services,
and features available in your area.
Requests for technical information about IBM products
should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
 Copyright International Business Machines
Corporation 1997, 1998. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government users–Documentation related to
Restricted rights–Use, duplication, or disclosure is subject
to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
ii
PC Server HMM
About This Supplement
This supplement contains diagnostic information,
Symptom-to-FRU Index, service information, error codes,
error messages, and configuration information for the PC
Server 330 Type 8640.
This supplement should be used with information in the
IBM Personal System/2 Hardware Maintenance Manual
(part number 83G8990, form number S52G-9971) and IBM
PC Servers Hardware Maintenance Manual (part number
70H0751, form number S30H-2501 to troubleshoot
problems effectively.
Important
This manual is intended for trained servicers who are
familiar with IBM PC Server products.
Before servicing an IBM product, be sure to review
“Safety Information” on page 154.
iii
Related Publications
The following publications are available for IBM products.
For more information, contact IBM or an IBM Authorized
Dealer.
iv
For Information About
See Publication
PC Servers
IBM PC Servers Hardware
Maintenance Manual
(S30H-2501)
PS/2 Computers
IBM Personal System/2
Hardware Maintenance
Manual (S52G-9971)
PS/ValuePoint Computers
IBM PS/ValuePoint
Hardware Maintenance
Service and Reference
(S61G-1423)
Laptop, Notebook, Portable,
and ThinkPad Computers
(L40, CL57, N45, N51,
P70/P75, ThinkPad 300,
350, 500, 510, 710T,
Expansion Unit, Dock I,
Dock II)
IBM Mobile Systems
Hardware Maintenance
Manual Volume 1
(S82G-1501)
ThinkPad Computers
(ThinkPad 340, 355, 360,
370, 700, 701, 720, 750,
755)
IBM Mobile Systems
Hardware Maintenance
Manual Volume 2
(S82G-1502)
ThinkPad Computers
(ThinkPad 365, 560, 760,
SelectaDock)
IBM Mobile Systems
Hardware Maintenance
Manual Volume 3
(S82G-1503)
Monitors (Displays)
(February 1993)
IBM PS/2 Display HMM
Volume 1 (SA38-0053)
Monitors
(December 1993)
IBM Color Monitor HMM
Volume 2 (S71G-4197)
IBM Monitors (P/G Series)
(July 1996)
IBM Monitor HMM
Volume 3 (S52H-3679)
IBM 2248 Monitor
(February 1996)
IBM Monitor HMM
Volume 4 (S52H-3739)
Disk Array technology
overview and using the IBM
RAID Configuration Program
Configuring Your Disk Array
booklet (S82G-1506)
Installation Planning for
Personal System/2
computers
Personal System/2
Installation Planning and
Beyond (G41G-2927)
Installation Planning for
Advanced Personal
System/2 Servers
Advanced PS/2 Servers
Planning and Selection
Guide (GG24-3927)
PC Server HMM
Online Support
Use the World Wide Web (WWW) or the IBM PC
Company BBS to download Diagnostic, BIOS Flash, and
Device Driver files.
File download address is:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/files.html
The IBM PC Company BBS can be reached at (919)
517-0001.
IBM Online Addresses:
The HMM manuals online address is:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/cdt/hmm.html
The IBM PC Company Support Page is:
http://www.ibm.com/us/support/index.html
The IBM PC Company Home Page is:
http://www.pc.ibm.com
v
Contents
About This Supplement . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Publications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Support
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
iv
v
General Checkout/Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . .
General Checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics and Test Information
. . . . . . . . .
1
2
5
PC Server 330 - Type 8640 (Models 11Y, 21Y, PB0,
PM0, PT0)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Service Information . . . . . . . . . . .
Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Symptom-to-FRU Index . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parts Listing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parts Listing (PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Service Information . . . .
Safety Information
. . . . . . . . .
Lithium Battery Notice . . . . . . . .
Laser Compliance Statement
. . . .
Software/Hardware Mismatch Problems
Undetermined Problems . . . . . . .
Send Us Your Comments! . . . . . .
Problem Determination Tips . . . . .
Phone Numbers, U.S. and Canada . .
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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vii
General Checkout/Diagnostics
General Checkout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics and Test Information
. . . . . . . .
Power-On Self-Test (POST)
. . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Codes
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Error Messages
. . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Error Messages
. . . . . . . .
Software-Generated Error Messages . . . .
About the Test Programs . . . . . . . . . . .
Characteristics of the Diagnostics
. . . . .
Using the System Diagnostics . . . . . . .
Program Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Diagnostics
. . . . . . . . .
Viewing the Test Results
. . . . . . . . .
SCSI Tests (Adaptec) Diskette . . . . . . . .
Running the Tests
. . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Test Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a SCSI Device
. . . . . . . . .
Manually Selecting a SCSI Device . . . . .
Selecting a Test (Standard Mode) . . . . .
Test Descriptions (Standard Mode) . . .
Selecting a Test (Advanced Mode)
. . . .
Test Descriptions (Advanced Mode)
. .
Symptom-to-FRU Index (SCSI Test - Adaptec)
Error Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Codes
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Ethernet Diagnostics . . . . . . .
Starting the Ethernet Diagnostics
. . . . .
Option Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Error Message Table . . . . . . . .
SCSI Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet Controller Messages
. . . . . . . .
Novell NetWare Server ODI Driver Messages
Novell NetWare DOS ODI Driver Messages
Novell NetWare OS/2 ODI Driver Messages
NDIS 2.01 Driver Messages . . . . . . . .
NDIS 3.0 Driver Messages
. . . . . . . .
Packet Driver Messages
. . . . . . . . .
UNIX Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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1
General Checkout
The ROM based diagnostic program developed by IBM is
the primary method of testing the server. Option-specific
diagnostic files are supplied with some optional devices
and adapters. These files provide a more specialized test
of the option. Refer to the documentation supplied with
the option for information on installing and running
option-specific diagnostics.
Diagnostic error messages appear when a test program
finds a problem with a hardware option.
General error messages appear if a problem or conflict is
found by an application program, the operating system, or
both. For an explanation of these messages, refer to the
information supplied with that software package.
A failed system might be part of a shared DASD cluster
(two or more systems sharing the same external storage
device(s)). Prior to running diagnostics, verify that the
failing system is not part of a shared DASD cluster.
A system might be part of a cluster if:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The customer identifies the system as part of a
cluster.
One or more external storage units are attached to
the system and at least one of the attached storage
units is additionally attached to another system or
unidentifiable source.
One or more systems are located near the failing
system.
If the failing system is suspect to be part of a shared
DASD cluster, all diagnostic tests can be run except
diagnostic tests which tests the storage unit (DASD
residing in the storage unit) or the storage adapter
attached to the storage unit.
2
PC Server HMM
Notes
1. For systems that are part of a shared DASD
cluster, run looped one test at a time. Do not run
all tests in looped mode, as this could enable the
DASD diagnostic tests.
2. If you suspect a problem, run the ROM based
diagnostic program. Always start with step 001
below. For additional information about the test
programs see “About the Test Programs” on
page 7.
3. If multiple error codes are displayed, diagnose
the first error code displayed.
4. If the computer reports a POST error, go to the
“Symptom-to-FRU Index” on page 123.
5. If the computer hangs and no error is displayed,
go to “Undetermined Problems” on page 164.
6. If a device cannot be selected from the Module
Test menu, that device might be defective.
7. Power supply problems, see “Power Supply
Voltages” on page 87
8. Unknown Power-on Password, see “Removing an
Unknown Power-on Password” on page 63.
001
IS THE SYSTEM PART OF A CLUSTER?
Yes No
002
Go to Step 004.
003
Schedule maintenance with the customer. Shut down all
systems related to the cluster. Run storage test.
004
– Power-on the server and watch the screen. Or, if the
system is already powered-on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
– When the message Press F1 to enter
Configuration/Setup appears, press F1. If a power-on
or administrator password is set, the system prompts
you for it.
The Diagnostic/Setup Utility Menu appears.
– Select Diagnostic Utility; then, press Enter.
The Diagnostics Utility Menu appears.
– Select Run Diagnostic; then, press Enter.
The server displays the Diagnostic Mode Menu:
Ÿ
Stop on Error stops the test programs when the
Single or Loop diagnostic tests encounter an error.
The Endless Loop choice default setting is stop on
error. This setting can be changed.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
3
(CONTINUED)
Reset Run List clears previously defined diagnostic
test selections from memory.
Reset Result Buffer clears the results of the last
diagnostic tests.
Single runs the selected test runs one time.
Loop runs the selected test up to a maximum of 254
times, and saves the results.
Endless Loop runs the selected test until stopped
manually or until the tests encounter an error. The
default setting is stop on error. This setting can be
changed. Running the test over an extended time
can help to identify the cause of an intermittent
component failure.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
– Press Enter. The test selection menu displays.
– Press the arrow keys to move between the choices on
the menu.
– Press Enter to select or deselect the choice.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
All runs all tests on the menu. When you select
this choice, all of the other choices change to Y
(selected).
System Board tests the CMOS, RTC, and timers
CPU tests the microprocessor(s) on the processor
board.
DRAM Memory tests all system memory in all
DIMM slots.
Diskette A tests the diskette drive and controller.
Parallel port tests the parallel port.
Serial port tests the serial port.
Keyboard tests the keyboard.
Ethernet tests on-board Ethernet functions.
SCSI refers to the Diagnostic and Test section of
the HMM to test using the SCSI diagnostic diskette.
Mouse tests the device connected to the mouse
port.
Video to test the monitor.
– Select Run Diagnostics. The diagnostic program then
runs the tests for each of the selected devices or
modules.
– Press Esc twice to return to the Diagnostic Utility Menu.
– Select Diagnostic Log to view the results of the
diagnostic tests.
DID THE DIAGNOSTIC TESTS DETECT AN ERROR?
Yes No
005
The diagnostic tests completed successfully.
006
Go to the “Symptom-to-FRU Index” on page 123.
4
PC Server HMM
Diagnostics and Test Information
The following tools are available to help identify and
resolve hardware-related problems:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Power-on self-test (POST)
POST beep codes
Test programs
Error messages
Option Diskettes
Power-On Self-Test (POST)
When you power-on the system, it performs a series of
tests to check the operation of the system and some
options. This series of tests is called the power-on
self-test, or POST.
POST does the following:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Checks some basic system-board operations
Checks the memory operation
Compares the current system configuration with the
stored system configuration information
Starts the video operation
Verifies that drives (such as the diskette, CD-ROM,
and hard disk drives) are working
If a power-on password or administrator password set, you
must type the password and press Enter before POST will
continue.
The level of password protection determines the number of
choices that are available on the Configuration/Setup utility
program menu.
While the memory is being tested, the amount of available
memory appears on the screen. These numbers advance
as the system progresses through POST. If POST finishes
without detecting any problems, a single beep sounds and
the first screen of your operating system or application
program appears.
If POST detects a problem, an error message appears on
your screen. A single problem might cause several error
messages to appear. When you correct the cause of the
first error message, the other error messages probably will
not appear on the screen the next time you turn on the
system.
POST Beep Codes
POST generates beeping sounds to indicate successful
completion or the detection of an error.
One beep and the startup of the operating system or
application program indicates successful completion of
POST. More than one beep indicates that POST detected
an error.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
5
For a complete list of beep codes, see “Symptom-to-FRU
Index” on page 123.
Test Programs
The PC Server Diagnostics program includes the
diagnostic test programs, which are stored in nonvolatile
read-access memory (NVRAM) in the server. These
programs are the primary method of testing the system
board, memory, and many other options that you can
install in the PC Server 330.
You can use the programs to test the IBM components of
the system and some external devices. The more optional
adapters and devices you have attached to your system,
the longer the testing takes.
If you cannot determine whether a problem is caused by
the hardware or by the software, you can run the test
programs to confirm that the hardware is working correctly.
The PC Server Diagnostics programs include tests that
identify most problems associated with major components
of your system, such as the serial ports, the video
controller, the keyboard and the mouse.
Types of Error Messages
Error messages indicate that a problem exists.
Messages generated by the software generally are text
messages, but they also can be numeric. There are four
types of error messages: POST error messages, beep
codes, diagnostic error messages, and software-generated
messages.
POST Error Messages: POST error messages
appear when, during startup, POST finds problems with
the hardware or detects a change in the hardware
configuration. A list of these error messages is given in
“POST Error Message Table” on page 21.
Diagnostic Error Messages:
Diagnostic error
messages appear when a test program finds a problem
with a hardware option. Normally, these messages are
text, but they can include an alphanumeric identifier.
When the diagnostic tests automatically start following a
signal from NetFinity, the server saves the errors in the
error buffer. Otherwise, the error messages display on the
screen, and can be stored in nonvolatile read-access
memory.
Software-Generated Error Messages:
These
messages appear if a problem or conflict is found by an
application program, the operating system, or both. For an
explanation of these messages, refer to the information
that comes with your software package.
6
PC Server HMM
About the Test Programs
The following is useful information about navigating
through the test programs, as well as procedures for
starting and stopping them. These programs are designed
to test the PC Server 330 - Type 8640. Non-IBM products
tested with these programs might present misleading error
messages or unexpected system responses. If you want
to test a non-IBM product, refer to the information that
comes with that product.
You can start the diagnostics programs from the
Configuration/Setup utility program.
Characteristics of the Diagnostics
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Menu driven
Supports single runs or multiple runs of selected
diagnostic tests
Reports errors to screen
Saves errors to the Diagnostic Log
Using the System Diagnostics:
To start the
diagnostic program:
1. Power-on the server and watch the screen. Or, if the
system is turned on already, press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. When the Press F1 to enter Configuration/Setup
message appears, press F1. If a power-on or
administrator password is set, the system prompts
you for it.
The Diagnostic/Setup Utility Menu appears.
3. Select Diagnostic Utility; then, press Enter.
4. After a few moments, the Diagnostics Utility Menu
appears.
a. Select Run Diagnostic to choose which system
components to test, and the number of times the
server will run the tests.
b. Select Diagnostic Log to display the results of
the most recent diagnostic tests.
If the server stops during testing and you cannot continue,
replace the device that was being tested when the test
stopped.
Program Navigation: You can use the following
keys to maneuver within the test programs:
Enter
Selects an item, runs the test
module, or runs the test.
Down Arrow (↓)
Moves the cursor down.
Up Arrow (↑)
Moves the cursor up.
Page Down
Moves to the next error in the
Diagnostic Log.
Page Up
Moves to the previous error in
the Diagnostic Log.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
7
F1
Displays the appropriate Help
information. Use the Up Arrow
(↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to
scroll through the information.
Pressing F1 from within a Help
screen provides a help index
from which you can select
different categories. Pressing
Esc exits Help and returns to
where you left off.
Esc
Returns to the previous menu.
Tab
Moves the highlight bar (or
cursor) to the test group.
Diagnostics Mode
When you start the diagnostic test programs from the
Configuration/Setup menu, you can select the tests and
the number of times the tests run.
Some choices on the Diagnostic menu display a menu, so
that you can further customize the test program.
Notes
1. You can only run the diagnostic tests when you
start the server with the highest level password.
That is, if you enter the power-on password, and
an administrator password is set, you can
perform diagnostic tests. You can only view the
test results in the diagnostic log.
2. You might have to install a wrap connector on
your active parallel or serial port to obtain
accurate test results for these ports.
Running the Diagnostics:
To use the
Diagnostics:
1. Power-on the server and watch the screen. Or, if the
system is powered on already, press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. When the message Press F1 to enter
Configuration/Setup appears, press F1. If a
password is set, the system prompts you for it.
The Diagnostic/Setup Utility Menu appears.
3. Select Diagnostic Utility; then, press Enter. The
Diagnostic Utility Menu appears.
4. Select Run Diagnostic; then, press Enter. The
server displays the How Many? menu:
Ÿ Stop on Error stops the test programs when the
Single or Loop diagnostic tests encounter an
error. The Endless Loop choice default setting
is stop on error. This setting can be changed.
Ÿ Reset Run List clears previously defined
diagnostic test selections from memory.
8
PC Server HMM
Reset Result Buffer clears the results of the
last diagnostic tests.
Ÿ Single runs the selected tests one time.
Ÿ Loop Count runs the selected tests up to a
maximum of 254 times, and saves all tests
results. Running the test multiple times can be
useful to confirm that a hardware or software
change has corrected a component failure.
Ÿ Endless Loop runs the selected tests until
stopped manually or until the tests encounter an
error. The default setting is stop on error. This
setting can be changed. Running the test over
an extended time can help to identify the cause
of an intermittent component failure.
Press Enter. The test selection menu displays.
Press the arrow keys to move between the choices
on the menu. Press Enter to select or deselect the
choice.
Ÿ All runs all tests on the menu. When you select
this choice, all of the other choices change to Y
(selected).
Ÿ System Board tests the CMOS, RTC, and
timers
Ÿ CPU tests the microprocessor(s) on the
processor board.
Ÿ DRAM Memory tests all system memory in all
DIMM slots.
Ÿ Diskette A tests the diskette drive and controller.
Ÿ Parallel port tests the parallel port.
Ÿ Serial port tests the serial port.
Ÿ Keyboard tests the keyboard.
Ÿ Ethernet tests on-board Ethernet functions.
Ÿ SCSI refers to the Diagnostic and Test section of
the HMM to test using the SCSI diagnostic
diskette.
Ÿ Mouse tests the device connected to the mouse
port.
Ÿ Video to test the monitor.
Select Run Diagnostics. The diagnostic program
then runs the tests for each of the selected devices or
modules.
Press Esc twice to return to the Diagnostic Utility
Menu.
Select Diagnostic Log to view the results of the
diagnostic tests.
Press Esc to return to the Diagnostic Utility Menu.
Press Esc to exit from the Diagnostic/Setup Utility
Menu. The server restarts.
Ÿ
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Viewing the Test Results:
To view the results of
the system diagnostics:
1. Power-on the server and watch the screen. Or, if the
system is turned on already, press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
2. When the message Press F1 to enter
General Checkout/Diagnostics
9
Configuration/Setup appears, press F1. If a
password is set, the system prompts you for it.
The Diagnostic/Setup Utility Menu appears.
3. Select Diagnostic Utility; then, press Enter. The
Diagnostic Utility Menu appears.
4. Select Diagnostic Log. The server displays the test
results.
5. Press Page Down to view any additional test results.
6. Press Esc to return to the Diagnostic Utility Menu.
7. Press Esc to exit from the Diagnostic/Setup Utility
Menu. The server restarts.
SCSI Tests (Adaptec) Diskette
The following information supports the the diagnostic tests
on the SCSI Test (Adaptec) diskette (form number
S430-6816-00)
Notes
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Always boot the system from the SCSI Test
(Adaptec) diskette when running the SCSI tests.
To test a CD-ROM device you will need to install
a scratch-free data CD or scratch-free IBM test
CD in the drive. Scratches on the CD can cause
false errors.
To test a SCSI tape device you need to install a
formatted blank tape in the device.
If you receive an error, refer to “Symptom-to-FRU
Index (SCSI Test - Adaptec)” on page 18.
Running the Tests:
To start SCSI Test (Adaptec) Diskette, do the following.
1. Power-off the server.
2. Insert the SCSI Test (Adaptec) Diskette into diskette
drive A:
3. Power-on the server. The following menu is
displayed:
à
SCSI TEST MENU
ð
ð) EXIT
1) SCSI Tests (Standard mode)
2) SCSI Tests (Advanced mode)
á
ñ
Note
If you start the test in advanced mode, a warning
screen is displayed to warn you that due to the
nature of the test functions available in this
mode, data loss may occur.
4. Select the mode you want to run; then, press Enter.
See “SCSI Test Modes” on page 11.
10
PC Server HMM
5. Select the SCSI device you want to test. See
“Selecting a SCSI Device” on page 11.
Note
If the SCSI bus scan fails to find a device that
you know is installed in the server and you want
to test it, see “Manually Selecting a SCSI
Device.”
6. Select the test you want to run.
Ÿ If you selected Standard Mode, see “Selecting a
Test (Standard Mode)” on page 12.
Ÿ If you selected Advanced Mode, see “Selecting a
Test (Advanced Mode)” on page 14.
SCSI Test Modes:
Two modes for testing are available.
Modes
Description
Standard
Offers a set of basic non-destructive
test (with the exception of the
read/write test) which do not require
extensive SCSI subsystem knowledge.
Advanced
Offers a greater choice of test. To fully
utilize the functions available in
advanced mode you should be familiar
with SCSI subsystems and SCSI
command blocks.
Selecting a SCSI Device:
After you select the mode you want to run, a window
displays the following information about the SCSI devices.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
SCSI ID
LUN
Vendor name
Product name
Revision level
Capacity
SCSI device type
Use the Up/Down (↓/↑) arrow keys to select the device
you want to test; then, pressEnter. After you select a
device, the test menu for the test mode you selected is
displayed. See “Selecting a Test (Advanced Mode)” on
page 14 and “Selecting a Test (Standard Mode)” on
page 12.
Manually Selecting a SCSI Device:
If the test fails to find a installed device, the device might
be defective. To manually select the device, do the
following.
1. Press F5 to access the User Selection Menu.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
11
2. Highlight the correct device (option); then, press
Enter.
3. Enter the SCSI ID and LUN of the device. After you
select a device, the test menu for the test mode you
selected is displayed. See “Selecting a Test
(Advanced Mode)” on page 14 and “Selecting a Test
(Standard Mode).”
Selecting a Test (Standard Mode):
The following test are available in standard test mode for
the devices listed.
Device
Test
SCSI Hard Disk Drives
0
1
2
3
4
-
Device Diagnostics
Test Unit Ready
Get Device Status
Read Test
Read / Write Test
SCSI CD-ROM Drives
0
1
2
3
-
Device Diagnostics
Test Unit Ready
Get Device Status
Read Test
SCSI Tape Drive Drives
0 - Device Diagnostics
1 - Test Unit Ready
2 - Get Device Status
Test Descriptions (Standard Mode)
Test
Description
Device
Diagnostics
Sends a command requesting the SCSI
device to perform a self diagnostics.
The status indicator will display busy
during the test. When the test is
complete a message stating whether
the test were completed successfully or
unsuccessfully.
Test Unit Ready
Sends a SCSI Test Unit Ready
command to the device and will
indicate if the device is ready or not.
Get Device
Status
Displays the status of the last
command sent to the device and is
displayed as:
Device sense key status: 00
(NO SENSE ERROR)
A non zero value indicates an error,
see“Symptom-to-FRU Index (SCSI Test
- Adaptec)” on page 18 .
Read Test
Reads the entire media of the SCSI
device. A status bar showing the test
progress is displayed during the test.
A message is displayed when the test
completes successfully or an error
occurs.
12
PC Server HMM
Test
Read / Write
Test
Description
Attention
This test will destroy all data on
the device.
Issues a write command and then a
read command to verify the integrity on
the device.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
13
Selecting a Test (Advanced Mode)
Note
Selecting the advanced mode requires that you enter
parameters for the drive you want to test.
Parameters you enter are used in configuring the SCSI
Commands. In most cases, the default values are
sufficient. Just press Enter and continue.
Note
The Block Length is the sector size of the device. Do
not modify this unless you are familiar with the
behavior of the device under a different sector size.
If you need to modify the default values, put the cursor on
the field to be modified and change the value; then, press
Enter. A test list for the type of device selected is
displayed.
The following test are available in standard test mode for
the devices listed.
Device
Test
SCSI Hard Disk Drives
0 - Test Unit Ready
1 - Rezero Unit
2 - Custom SCSI Command
3 - Request Sense
4 - Format Unit
5 - Read Capacity
6 - Start / Stop Unit
7 - Read (10 Byte)
8 - Read (6 Byte)
9 - Write (10 Byte)
A - Write (6 Byte)
B - Seek (10 Byte)
C - Send Diagnostic
D - Inquiry
Miscellaneous Options
E - Re-Select a device
F - Re-Scan SCSI bus
G - Read buffer
14
PC Server HMM
Device
Test
CD-ROM Drive
0 - Test Unit Ready
1 - Rezero Unit
2 - Custom SCSI Command
3 - Request Sense
4 - Inquiry
5 - Read Capacity
6 - Start / Stop Unit
7 - Read (10 Byte)
8 - Read (6 Byte)
9 - Seek (10 Byte)
A - Send Diagnostic
Miscellaneous Options
B - Re-Select a device
C - Re-Scan SCSI bus
D - Read buffer
SCSI Tape Drive
0 - Test Unit Ready
1 - Rewind
2 - Custom SCSI Command
3 - Request Sense
4 - Inquiry
5 - Erase Tape
6 - Load / Unload Unit
7 - Lock / Unlock Media
8 - Read Tape
9 - Space
A - Write Tape
B - Write Filemark
Miscellaneous Options
C - Re-Select a device
D - Re-Scan SCSI bus
E - Read buffer
Test Descriptions (Advanced Mode): After
selecting one of these test, a window is displayed which
shows the following.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The SCSI command block that is going to carry out
the test
The SCSI command block bytes
The time-out value in seconds
The expected number of data bytes transferred (The 1 value in the Time-out means indefinite wait.)
Note
In most cases, the default values are sufficient. If you
desire to modify any of the values in these windows,
place the cursor on the field to be modified and
change the value; then, press Enter. To issue the
command, press F10.
Test
Description
Test Unit Ready
Checks and indicates if the drive is
ready.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
15
Test
Description
Rezero Unit
Reinitializes the device to a known
state. This is not part of the SCSI
specification and vendor specific.
Custom SCSI
Command
If a SCSI command is required but is
not listed in the menu, select the option
to create a user defined command
block.
Request Sense
Displays the status of the last
command sent to the device and is
displayed as:
Device sense key status: 00
(NO SENSE ERROR)
A non zero value indicates an error,
see“Symptom-to-FRU Index (SCSI Test
- Adaptec)” on page 18 .
Format Unit
Attention
This command will erase all data
on the disk.
This command requires two
parameters:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Defect List Format
Interleave value
Refer to the SCSI device's manual for
the correct values. Highlight the
appropriate option for each parameter;
then, press Enter.
Ready Capacity
When selected the following
information is requested.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Number of sectors
Block length
Drive capacity
Start / Stop
Start sets the device start field to 1
(spin up).
Stop sets the device start field to 0
(spin down).
Read
Two versions, read(6) and read(10)
Read(6) does not provide cache control
bits. When selected the following the
following information is requested.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
16
PC Server HMM
Transfer length
Number of times to issue the
command
Perform data compare Y/N
Enter a 2 - byte pattern
Starting sector
Test
Description
Write
Two versions, read(6) and read(10)
Read(6) does not provide cache control
bits. When selected the following the
following information is requested.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Starting sector
Transfer length
Number of times to issue the
command
Perform data compare Y/N
Enter a 2 - byte pattern
Seek
When selected, you are prompted to
enter the drive number you want to
seek to. Enter the number; then, press
Enter.
Send Diagnostic
Sends a command requesting the SCSI
device to perform a self diagnostics.
The status indicator will display busy
during the test. When the test is
complete a message stating whether
the test were completed successfully or
unsuccessfully.
Inquiry
Returns the following information.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Lock / Unlock
Vendor
Revision level
Device type
ANSI version
Type of media
Select the desired option; then, press
Enter
The Lock Medium options issues a
PREVENT/ALLOW SCSI command
with the Prevent field set to 1 (prevent
removal).
The Unlock Medium options issues a
PREVENT/ALLOW SCSI command
with the Prevent field set to 0 (allow).
Note
For some CD-ROM drives, this
option disables/enables the eject
button on the front of the drive.
Re-Select a
Device
Returns to the device selection to allow
you to select another device.
Re-Scan SCSI
bus
Re-scans the SCSI bus and returns to
the controller to select menu. When
the controller is selected and the Enter
key pressed, the SCSI bus is
re-scanned. All devices found are
displayed n the device select menu.
Read Buffer
Displays the data that was written or
read on the last command
General Checkout/Diagnostics
17
Test
Description
Read Tape
Tests the ability of the device to read
the tape. You will be prompted to
enter the following.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Write Tape
Transfer length
Number of times to issue the
command
Terminate if filemark not found
Y/N
Perform data compare Y/N
Enter a 2-byte pattern
Tests the ability of the device to write
data to a tape. You will be prompted
to enter the following.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Enter a 2-byte pattern
Transfer length
Number of times to issue the
command
Write filemark at the end of each
transfer Y/N
Tape Space
Used to test the positioning functions of
the SCSI tape device.When this
command is selected, you will be
prompted to enter the code and count
parameters of the command.
Write Filemarks
Requests that the specified number of
filemarks or setmarks are written to the
current position on the device.When
selected, you will be prompted for the
number filemarks to write.
Symptom-to-FRU Index (SCSI Test Adaptec)
This Symptom-to-FRU Index lists possible causes and
actions for error messages and sense errors you may
receive using the SCSI Tests (Adaptec) Diskette. If more
than one possible cause or action is listed, the most likely
cause is listed first.
Error Messages
Error Message
Action
Insufficient memory to
allocate data buffer.
Program Terminated
Not enough conventional
memory available.
Insufficient memory for help
file
Not enough conventional
memory.
Invalid command line
argument specified
Invalid command-line
parameter, type ASDA/H for
available parameters.
Insufficient memory to
allocate
Not enough conventional
memory available.
18
PC Server HMM
Error Message
Action
Unable to open ASPI
Manager!
Check to see if ASPI
Manager has been loaded
correctly.
Invalid command
Invalid SCSI command.
Device is not returning a
MEDIA CAPACITY.
If a removal device is
installed, make sure the
media is inserted.
Format unit
Check the defect list of the
drive and do a low level
format.
Test Unit Ready
Device not ready. Check
cabling and functionally the
drive.
Rezro / Rewind Unit
Unable to complete tape
rewind, check media or
drive.
Custom SCSI Command
Illegal command.
Request sense
Device is reporting an illegal
sense code.
Read Block
None
Write Block
None
Erase tape
Trouble erasing tape, check
media or tape heads.
Load / Unload Unit
Tape stuck or device does
not support this function.
Error Codes
Error Code
FRU/Action
0h
No Sense
1. None
1h
Recovery Error
1.
2.
3.
4.
Cable
Device
Adapter
System Board
2h
Not Ready
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Cable
Adapter
System Board
3h
Medium Error
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Cable
Adapter
System Board
4h
Hardware Error
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Cable
Adapter
System Board
General Checkout/Diagnostics
19
Error Code
FRU/Action
5h
Illegal Request
1.
2.
3.
4.
Adapter
Cable
Device
System Board
6h
Unit Attention
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
cable
System Board
7h
DATA Protect
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
Cable
System Board
8h
Blank Check
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
Cable
System Board
9h
Vendor Specific
1. None
Ah
Copy Aborted
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Cable
Adapter
System Board
Bh
Aborted Command
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
Cable
System Board
Ch
Equal
1. None
Dh
Volume Overflow
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
System Board
Cable
Eh
Miscompare
1.
2.
3.
4.
Device
Adapter
System Board
Cable.
Running the Ethernet Diagnostics
You must use the Ethernet diagnostics to perform
diagnostic tests on the integrated Ethernet controller.
Starting the Ethernet Diagnostics:
Follow the
instructions in “Running the Diagnostics” on page 8.
Option Diskettes
An optional device or adapter might come with a diskette
that contains option-specific test programs. If it does,
follow the instructions that come with the option. Different
instructions apply depending on whether the Option
Diskette is startable or not startable.
20
PC Server HMM
Error Messages
Error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not
intended to be used to identify a failing part. Refer to
“Symptom-to-FRU Index” on page 123.
Types of Messages: System problems can result
in two types of error messages:
Ÿ
POST error messages appear when, during startup,
POST finds problems with the hardware or detects a
change in the hardware configuration.
Ÿ
Diagnostic error messages appear when the
diagnostic program finds a problem with hardware.
Messages generated by your software generally are text
messages, but they also can be numeric. Information
about these messages is not included in this handbook.
For information about these error messages, refer to the
documentation that comes with your software.
Multiple Messages:
Sometimes the first error to
occur causes additional errors. In this case, the system
displays more than one error message. Always follow the
suggested action instructions for the first error message
that appears.
POST Error Message Table:
If a password
prompt appears with a POST message, type the
administrator or power-on password; then press Enter.
For a complete list of POST error codes see
“Symptom-to-FRU Index” on page 123.
SCSI Messages
The following table lists messages that reflect problems
with the SCSI controller or SCSI device.
Note
If the server does not have a hard disk drive, ignore
any message that indicates that the BIOS is not
installed.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
21
SCSI
Messages
Description
All
One or more of the following might be causing the
problem.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
A failing SCSI device (adapter, drive, controller)
An improper SCSI configuration or SCSI
termination jumper setting
Duplicate SCSI IDs in the same SCSI chain
A missing or improperly installed SCSI
terminator
A defective SCSI terminator
An improperly installed cable
A defective cable
Action: Verify that:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The external SCSI devices are turned
on. External SCSI devices must be
turned on before the system.
The cables for all external SCSI devices
are connected correctly.
If you have attached an external device
to the server's external SCSI connector,
the external SCSI termination jumper
(J29) is set to the proper position.
The last device in each SCSI chain is
terminated correctly.
The SCSI devices are configured
correctly.
If the above are correct, run the diagnostics for
additional information about the failing device. If the
error recurs, go to “Symptom-to-FRU Index” on
page 123.
22
PC Server HMM
Ethernet Controller Messages
Ethernet Controller Messages
The integrated Ethernet controller might display messages
from the following drivers:
Ÿ
Novell NetWare Server ODI
Ÿ
Novell NetWare Server DOS ODI
Ÿ
Novell NetWare Server OS/2 ODI
Ÿ
NDIS Adapter for level 2.01
Ÿ
NDIS Adapter for level 3.0
Ÿ
Packet Driver
Ÿ
SCO UNIX LLI, UnixWare DLPI, and SunSoft Solaris
General Checkout/Diagnostics
23
Novell NetWare Server ODI Driver
Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the Novell
NetWare server ODI driver. The explanation and
recommended action are included with each message.
PCNTNW-NW-026 The MSM is unable to parse a
required custom keyword.
Explanation: The user entered an incorrect parameter
keyword.
Action: Enter the keyword correctly. Then, reload the
driver.
PCNTNW-NW-054 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The board did not respond when the driver
tried to initialize it.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enabled position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTNW-NW-58 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The IRQ setting might be incorrect with the
hardware setting, or the EEPROM might be corrupted.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the IRQ settings in the NET.CFG file
match the configuration settings in the
Configuration/Setup utility programs.
2. Verify that the EEPROM on the system board is
programmed correctly.
PCNTNW-NW-66 The cable might be disconnected
from the board.
Explanation: The cable might be disconnected from the
server's Ethernet port.
Action: Verify that a cable is connected to the AUI port or
the 10BASE-T port.
24
PC Server HMM
PCNTNW-NW-071 The matching virtual adapter could
not be found.
Explanation: You tried to load another instance of the
driver with a different I/O address. This new board could
not be found.
Action: If you installed an IBM Ethernet adapter, make
sure the adapter is seated properly. Also, check the I/O
settings of the board with the settings supplied to the drive.
PCNTNW-NW-072 A resource tag is unavailable.
Explanation: The driver tried to allocate some resources
that were not available.
Action: Add or free some memory in the server. Then,
restart the server.
PCNTNW-NW-073 Unable to allocate memory.
Explanation: The driver failed to allocate the memory
needed for normal operation.
Action: Add more memory, or free some memory
resources in the server. Then, restart the server.
PCNTNW-NW-074 The hardware interrupt cannot be
set.
Explanation: An attempt was made to initialize a given
hardware interrupt. The attempt was not successful.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enabled position.
2. Make sure that the interrupt request numbers are set
correctly, and that no other devices are using the
interrupt.
PCNTNW-NW-075 The MLID cannot be registered with
the LSL.
Explanation: An error occurred while the driver was
trying to register with Link Support Layer.
Action: Check the version of Netware Operating System.
Make sure that this driver is correct for the version of
Netware that you are using. Restart the server.
PCNTNW-NW-076 The polling procedure cannot be
added.
Explanation: An error occurred while the driver was
adding a polling procedure to the Netware Operating
System polling routines.
Action: Check the version of Netware Operating System.
Make sure that this driver is correct for the version of
Netware that you are using. Restart the server.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
25
PCNTNW-NW-077 The event notification cannot be
registered.
Explanation: The driver failed to register its event
notification routines with the Netware Operating System.
Action: Check the version of Netware Operating System.
Make sure that this driver is correct for the version of
Netware that you are using. Restart the server.
PCNTNW-NW-078 The firmware file cannot be read.
Explanation: The driver to read a firmware file. The read
process failed.
Action: Make sure that the support files that accompany
the driver are present. Restart the server.
PCNTNW-NW-079 The MLID did not initialize MSMTx
Free Count.
Explanation: The MSMTx Free Count is not initialized
properly.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-084 Unable to allocate memory below the
16 megabyte boundary.
Explanation: A request was made to allocate memory
below 16 megabytes. The request did not complete
successfully.
Action: Free some memory below 16 megabytes, or add
more memory below the 16 megabyte boundary.
PCNTNW-NW-086 The driver parameter block is too
small.
Explanation: The driver parameter block is too small.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-087 The media parameter block is too
small.
Explanation: The driver media parameter block is too
small.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
26
PC Server HMM
PCNTNW-NW-091 The hardware configuration
conflicts.
Explanation: You tried to load a new frame type for the
existing adapter. The hardware assumptions made in
doing so are incorrect.
Action: Make sure that the hardware configuration
matches the software settings.
PCNTNW-NW-092 Cannot schedule AES without an
HSM routine.
Explanation: The NetWare Operating System needs a
Hardware Support Module routine before it schedules an
AES event.
Action: Restart the server. If the error is still present,
replace the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-093 Cannot schedule interrupt time call
back without an HSM routine.
Explanation: The driver needs a Hardware Support
Module routine before it can schedule an interrupt time call
back.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-094 Cannot set hardware interrupt
without an HSM routine.
Explanation: The driver needs a hardware interrupt call
back routine routine before it sets the interrupt.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-095 Cannot add polling without an HSM
routine.
Explanation: The driver needs an HSM polling routine
before it can start the polling process.
Action: Restart the server. If the error recurs, replace
the system board.
PCNTNW-NW-126 The group bit in the node address
override was cleared.
Explanation: The IEEE address has a group bit
indicating that an address belongs to a group of stations.
This bit is used only as a destination address; it cannot be
used as a source address. You tried to enter a source
address with this bit set. The driver cleared the group bit
of the source address.
Action: None.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
27
PCNTNW-NW-127 The local bit in the node address
override was set.
Explanation: The local bit in the IEEE address format
indicates that the addresses are being managed locally. If
you use the node address override capabilities of this
driver to enter a new address, the local bit should be set.
You entered an address without the local bit set. The
driver has set the local bit.
Action: None.
PCNTNW-NW-164 The device was not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller in the server.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTNW-NW-164 Device not found at IOADDRESS.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller cannot be found at
the IO address specified in the NET.CFG file.
Action: Verify that the IO Address in the NET.CFG file
matches with the board. Otherwise, remove the PORT
keyword from the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-NW-167 PCI scan specified, device not
found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enable position.
2. Edit the NET.CFG file to change the BUSTYPE
keyword to PCI1.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTNW-NW-180 The DMA parameter is not necessary
for PCI device.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller does not require a
DMA setting.
Action: Delete the DMA parameter from the NET.CFG
file.
28
PC Server HMM
Novell NetWare DOS ODI Driver Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the Novell
NetWare DOS ODI device driver. The explanation and
recommended action are included with each message.
PCNTW-DOS-1 The LSL is not loaded.
Explanation: The Link Support support module
(LSL.COM) is not loaded.
Action: Load LSL.COM; then, load the device driver.
PCNTW-DOS-2 The LSL has no more room for a board
using Frame <string>.
Explanation: The maximum number of adapters, whether
virtual or physical, has been registered with the Link
Support Layer. In the PC Server 330, the DOS ODI LSL
can support up to five PCI Ethernet adapters, plus the
Ethernet controller in the system board.
Action: Reduce the number of active adapters in the
systems by removing an adapter, or by decreasing the
number of frame types activated by Multiple Link Interface
Driver (MLID).
PCNTW-DOS-3 Could not find PCNTNW MLID to
unload.
Explanation: A request was made to unload PCNTNW
MLID, but the MLID is not loaded.
Action: None.
PCNTW-DOS-4 A TSR is loaded above the PCNTNW
MLID.
Explanation: You tried to unload the PCNTNW MLID
from memory, but the PCNTNW MLID detected another
Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) program loaded above
the MLID. For the PCNTNW MLID to unload safely, you
must first unload any TSR programs that were loaded after
you loaded the MLID.
Action: Either unload the other TSR program before
loading the PCNTNW MLID, or unload the TSR program
before attempting this operation.
PCNTW-DOS-5 PCNTNW MLID could not be unloaded;
the operation was aborted.
Explanation: The PCNTNW MLID attempted to remove
the resident PCNTNW MLID from memory, and failed. A
hardware error has probably occurred.
Action: Run the Ethernet diagnostic.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
29
PCNTW-DOS-6 The adapter did not initialize. PCNTNW
did not unload.
Explanation: The hardware did not initialize correctly.
The PCNTNW driver did not load.
Action: Check the hardware. Make sure that the board's
hardware setting matches its settings in the NET.CFG file.
PCNTW-DOS-7 You need another PCNTNW MLID
Section Heading in the NET.CFG file in
order to load the MLID again.
Explanation: You tried to load the PCNTNW MLID a
second time. Normally, you would do this so that you
could use two or more Ethernet controllers in the server.
When two or more of the same type of Ethernet controllers
are installed in the server, an associated PCNTNW MLID
section heading must be specified in the NET.CFG file.
Action: Create a NET.CFG file and add the commands
for both PCNTNW MLID boards to the file. Then, restart
the server.
PCNTNW-DOS-8 A NET.CFG is required to load the
MLID again.
Explanation: You tried to load the PCNTNW MLID a
second time. Normally, you would do this so that you
could use two or more Ethernet controllers in the server.
When two or more of the same type of Ethernet controllers
are installed in the server, an associated PCNTNW MLID
section heading must be specified in the NET.CFG file.
Action: Create a NET.CFG file and add the commands
for both PCNTNW MLID boards to the file. Then, restart
the server.
PCNTNW-DOS-9 The NET.CFG entry has been ignored.
Explanation: The PCNTNW ignored the NET.CFG entry.
Action: Verify that the entries in the NET.CFG file are
correct.
The PCNTNW MLID has been successfully removed.
Explanation: A request was made to unload a PCNTNW
MLID. The PCNTNW MLID has been removed from
memory.
Action: None.
30
PC Server HMM
PCNTNW-DOS-11 The MLID does not support frame
<string:>. The PROTOCOL keyword has
been ignored.
Explanation: The NET.CFG files specified the
PROTOCOL option for a PCNTNW MLID. The specified
frame type is not supported by the PCNTNW MLID.
Action: Check the PROTOCOL line in the NET.CFG file
for possible omissions of required dashes and underscores
or any misspellings.
PCNTNW-DOS-12 The protocol keyword must have a
frame type. Entry ignored.
Explanation: The PROTOCOL option was specified in
the NET.CFG file for a PCNTNW MLID. The entry failed
to specify the associated frame type for the protocol ID
addition. An entry in the NET.CFG file for the PROTOCOL
option should use the following format:
LINK DRIVER PCNTNW
PROTOCOL IPX 8137 ETHERNET_II
Action: Specify a frame with the PROTOCOL option.
PCNTNW-DOS-13 The MLID could not register Protocol
ID <string> for protocol stack <string> for
frame type.
Explanation: The PCNTNW MLID could not register the
specified Protocol ID.
Action: Verify the protocol information in the NET.CFG
file.
PCNTNW-DOS-14 This version of LSL is not
supported.
Explanation: The PCNTNW MLID cannot run
successfully using this version of the LSL.
Action: Update the LSL.COM to a newer version.
PCNTNW-DOS-15 The frame type is already activated
for frame <string>. The NET.CFG entry
has been ignored.
Explanation: Two FRAME keywords under the same
main section heading specified the same frame type. A
specified frame type can be specified only once per driver.
Action: Remove the duplicate FRAME keyword entry.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
31
PCNTNW-DOS-16 The node address was incorrectly
specified in NET.CFG.
Explanation: You used the NODE ADDRESS option in
the NET.CFG file to override the node address on the
network board. The number specified was not a valid
Ethernet address. An Ethernet address is six bytes in
length. This error occurs if Bit 0 of the first address byte is
a 1. This bit must always be 0. For example, if the first
byte has the following address, an invalid Ethernet address
is generated.
FIRST BYTE
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
This byte will produce node addresses in the 0100 0000
0000 to 01FF FFFF FFFF range (in hexadecimal), all of
which will be invalid.
Action: Specify a valid node address in the NET.CFG
file.
PCNTNW-DOS-17 An invalid keyword was specified in
NET.CFG on line xx.
Explanation: The keyword specified in the NET.CFG file
is incorrect.
Action: Check the keyword in question. Make sure that
the keyword is correctly spelled.
PCNTNW-DOS-18 The frame type specified in the
NET.CFG file is not supported.
Explanation: The NET.CFG file specified the
PROTOCOL option for a PCNTNW MLID. The specified
frame type is not supported by the PCNTNW MLID.
Action: Check the PROTOCOL line in the NET.CFG file
for possible omissions of required dashes and
underscores, or any misspellings. Check the PCNTNW
MLID documentation for supported frame types.
PCNTNW-DOS-19 An invalid Ethernet node address is
specified in NET.CFG. The MLID modified
the incorrect address bits.
Explanation: The NET.CFG file has an invalid node
address. The PCNTNW MLID modified and corrected the
address.
Action: Verify the node address entries in the NET.CFG
file.
32
PC Server HMM
PCNTNW-DOS-50 The board cannot be found.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller is either not
configured correctly or is disabled.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enabled position.
2. Check the settings for the Ethernet controller (for
example, the I/O and interrupt request settings)
against the settings in the NET.CFG.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTNW-DOS-54 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller initialization failed.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enabled position. Go to “General
Checkout/Diagnostics” on page 1 to run the
&diagute..
PCNTNW-DOS-58 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The IRQ setting might be incorrect with the
hardware setting, or the EEPROM might be corrupted.
Action: Verify that the IRQ settings in the NET.CFG file
match the configuration settings in the Configuration/Setup
utility programs. Verify that the EEPROM on the system
board is programmed correctly.
PCNTNW-DOS-61 PCI device IRQ number mismatch.
Explanation: The IRQ number specified in the NET.CFG
file does not match with the IRQ number assigned in the
Configuration/Setup utility programs.
Action: Remove the IRQ number in the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-DOS-64 The device was not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find any PCnet device in
the server.
Action: Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to
the default (enable) position. Go to “Ethernet Diagnostics”
on page 75 to run the diagnostic utility.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
33
PCNTNW-DOS-65 Device not found at IOADDRESS.
Explanation: The device was not found at the IO address
specified in the NET.CFG file. The driver cannot find an
Ethernet controller in the server.
Action: Verify that the IO address in the NET.CFG file
matches with the with the board. Otherwise, remove the
PORT keyword from the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-DOS-67 PCI scan specified, device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Use the BUSTYPE keyword to specify a value of
PCI1.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Ethernet Diagnostics”
on page 75 to run the Ethernet diagnostics.
PCNTNW-DOS-75 Unsupported bus ID specified.
Explanation: The bus ID number specified in the
NET.CFG file is not supported by Novell.
Action: Correct the bus ID number in the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-DOS-76 Wrong bus ID specified.
Explanation: The bus ID number specified in the
NET.CFG file is different from the bus type found in the
server.
Action: Correct the bus ID number in the NET.CFG.
PCNTNW-DOS-80 The DMA parameter is not necessary
for PCI device.
Explanation: The board does not require a DMA setting.
Action: Edit the NET.CFG file to delete the DMA
parameter.
34
PC Server HMM
Novell NetWare OS/2 ODI Driver Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the NetWare
OS/2 ODI driver. The explanation and recommended
action is included with each message.
PCNTNW-OS2-1 The LSL is not loaded.
Explanation: The Link Support Layer module (LSL.SYS)
is not loaded.
Action: Load LSL.SYS before loading the driver.
PCNTNW-OS2-21 Could not add the MLID Protocol ID.
Explanation: The PCNTNW MLID could not register the
specified Protocol ID.
Action: Edit the NET.CFG file and correct the protocol
information.
PCNTNW-OS2-22 Could not allocate memory. The
virtual board did not load.
Explanation: The driver could not allocate memory for
the virtual adapter.
Action: Check the system configuration.
PCNTNW-OS2-54 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The board initialization failed.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “General Checkout/Diagnostics” on page 1 to
run the &diagute..
PCNTNW-OS2-56 This interrupt is already used and
cannot be shared.
Explanation: The interrupt is already used by another
device and cannot be shared.
Action: Assign a different IRQ in the Configuration/Setup
utility programs.
PCNTNW-OS2-58 The board did not respond to the
initialization command.
Explanation: The IRQ setting might be incorrect with the
hardware setting, or the EEPROM might be corrupted.
Action: Verify that the IRQ settings in the NET.CFG file
match the configuration settings in the Configuration/Setup
utility programs. Verify that the EEPROM on the system
board is programmed correctly.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
35
PCNTNW-OS2-61 PCI device IRQ number mismatch.
Explanation: The IRQ number specified in the NET.CFG
file does not match with the IRQ number assigned in the
Configuration/Setup utility programs. The IRQ numbers
might be assigned automatically, or you might have
manually assigned the IRQ number.
Action: Remove the IRQ number in the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-OS2-64 The device was not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find the Ethernet
controller in the server.
Action: Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to
the default (enable) position. Go to “General
Checkout/Diagnostics” on page 1 to run the &diagute..
PCNTNW-OS2-65 Device not found at IOADDRESS.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller cannot be found at
the IO address specified in the NET.CFG file.
Action: Verify that the IO address in NET.CFG matches
with the board. Otherwise, remove the PORT keyword
from the NET.CFG file.
PCNTNW-OS2-67 PCI scan specified, device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet jumper on the system board
is set to the default, enable position.
2. Edit the NET.CFG file to change the BUSTYPE
keyword to PCI1.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTNW-OS2-73 Unable to allocate memory.
Explanation: The driver could not allocate memory for
the virtual board.
Action: Check the system configuration.
PCNTNW-OS2-80 The DMA parameter is not necessary
to PCI device.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller does not require a
DMA setting. This parameter is not a valid driver
parameter.
Action: Edit the NET.CFG file to delete the DMA
parameter.
36
PC Server HMM
NDIS 2.01 Driver Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the NDIS
2.01 drivers. The explanation and recommended action
are included with each message.
PCNTND-DOS-1 Unable to open the Protocol Manager.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured properly.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-6 Out of memory while allocating
buffers.
Explanation: The driver could not allocate the requested
buffers.
Action: Check the system configuration. Edit the
PROTOCOL.INI file to reduce the number of Txbuffers and
Rxbuffers specified for the driver.
PCNTND-DOS-7 Protocol Manager device error.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured properly.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-8 Bad status for Protocol Manager.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured correctly.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-9 Cannot find PROTOCOL.INI entry.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured properly
in the PROTOCOL.INI file.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-10 The Protocol Manager ioctl failed.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured properly
in the PROTOCOL.INI file.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-11 Protocol Manager registration failed.
Explanation: The NDIS stack is not configured properly.
Action: Check and correct the configuration.
PCNTND-DOS-15 Device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller in the server.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
37
3. Replace the system board.
PCNTND-DOS-16 PCI scan specified, device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
3. Replace the system board.
PCNTND-DOS-21 Board failed checksum test. Please
run configuration utility.
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTND-DOS-23 WARNING: PCNET IRQ found =
Explanation: The IRQ setting in PROTOCOL.INI does
not match the hardware IRQ setting.
Action: Remove the IRQ setting from PROTOCOL.INI (or
match the IRQ setting in PROTOCOL.INI with the
configuration settings in the Configuration/Setup utility
programs.
PCNTNW-DOS-24 WARNING: PCNET IRQ doesn't
match protocol.ini.
Explanation: The IRQ setting in PROTOCOL.INI does
not match the hardware IRQ setting.
Action: Remove the IRQ setting from PROTOCOL.INI or
match the IRQ setting in PROTOCOL.INI with the
hardware jumper setting.
PCNTNW-DOS-25 PCI scan specified, PCI bus not
found!
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
38
PC Server HMM
PCNTNW-DOS-29 WARNING: DMA number is not
necessary for PCI device.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller does not require a
DMA setting.
Action: Remove the DMA setting in PROTOCOL.INI.
PCNTNW-DOS-32 IRQ number is already in use by
another PCNET device.
Explanation: The specified IRQ number is already in use
by another Ethernet controller or device.
Action: Modify the IRQ setting in the PROTOCOL.INI file,
or modify the IRQ settings in the Configuration/Setup utility
programs.
PCNTNW-DOS-33 PCNET device with specified
IOBASE is already in use.
Explanation: The specified IO address number is already
in use by another Ethernet controller or device.
Action: Modify the IO address setting on the hardware,
or modify the IO address setting in the PROTOCOL.INI
file.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
39
NDIS 3.0 Driver Messages:
Windows NT error messages are logged into a log file.
You can view the file with the Event Viewer. Error
messages appear with the “PCNTN3” prefix followed by by
a “Missing Configuration Parameter” message and several
hex numbers. The hex numbers must be converted to
decimal values so that they correspond to the error
numbers used in this manual.
PCNTN3-9
IO base address is already in use by
another PCNET device.
Explanation: The specified IO address number is already
in use by another device.
Action: Modify the IO address setting on the hardware or
modify the IO Address setting in the setup dialog box.
PCNTN3-13 IRQ and/or DMA number is already in use
by another device.
Explanation: The specified IRQ is specified by another
device.
Action: Modify the IRQ setting in the setup dialog box.
PCNTN3-18 PCI scan specified, device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default Enable position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTN3-19 LanceOpenAdapter failed.
Explanation: The configuration is set up incorrectly.
Action: Rerun the setup program.
PCNTN3-20 Device at specified IO base address not
found.
Explanation: The Ethernet controller cannot be found at
the specified IO address.
Action: Verify that the IO address matches with the
board. Otherwise, remove the IO Address specification
from the setup.
40
PC Server HMM
PCNTN3-21 Device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find any PCnet device.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default Enable position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
41
Packet Driver Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the packet
driver. The explanation and recommended action are
included with each message.
PCNTPK-DOS-1 The command syntax is PCNTPK [-n]
[-d] [-w]
<INT=packet_int_no>
[IRQ=int_no] [IOADDR=io_addr]
[DMA=dma_no] [BUSTYPE=bus]
[DMAROTATE] [TP] [LED0=xx]
[BUSTYPE=bus] [LED0=xx]
[LED2=xx] [LED3=xx]
Explanation: The driver command was not entered
correctly.
Action: If you entered the command from the command
line, enter the command with the correct syntax. If the
command is in the AUTOEXEC.NET file, edit the file to
correct the syntax. The only parameters that should be
included are PCNTPK and BUSTYPE=PCI1.
PCNTPK-DOS-2 Unable to reset the PCnet device.
Explanation: The software could not reset the Ethernet
controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTPK-DOS-3 Unable to initialize the PCnet device.
Explanation: The software could not initialize the
Ethernet controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Check the interrupt settings in the Configuration/Setup
utility programs.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTPK-DOS-5 There is already a packet driver at
xxxx.
Explanation: The driver is already loaded at this memory
location. It cannot be loaded a second time at the same
location.
Action: Do not reload the driver. If you want to load the
driver at a different memory location, specify another
software interrupt address on the INT parameter.
42
PC Server HMM
PCNTPK-DOS-6 <IRQ=int_no> should be between 0
and 15 inclusive.
Explanation: The specified IRQ is out of range for the
Ethernet controller.
Action: Use valid IRQ values.
PCNTPK-DOS-7 Packet driver failed to initialize the
board.
Explanation: The board initialization failed.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTPK-DOS-8 <INT=packet_int_no> should be in the
range 0x60 to 0x80.
Explanation: The specified software interrupt number is
out of the allowable range.
Action: Specify a valid value for the INT parameter.
PCNTPK-DOS-12 PCI device IRQ number mismatch.
Explanation: The specified IRQ number does not match
with the IRQ number assigned by the PCI BIOS.
Action: Remove the IRQ setting.
PCNTPK-15 The device was not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
PCNTPK-DOS-18 PCI scan specified, device not found.
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
43
Packet driver is at segment xxxx.
Explanation: The memory address where the packet
driver is loaded is xxxx.
Action: None.
Packet interrupt number xxxx.
Explanation: The interrupt number used by the packet
driver is xxxx.
Action: None.
My Ethernet address is xxxxxxxxxxxx.
Explanation: The Ethernet address of this station is
xxxxxxxxxxxx.
Action: None.
My ARCnet address is xxxx.
Explanation: The ARCnet address of this station is xxxx.
Action: None.
44
PC Server HMM
UNIX Messages:
This section contains the error messages for the following
UNIX drivers.
Ÿ
SCO UNIX LLI
Ÿ
UnixWare DPLI
Ÿ
SunSoft Solaris
pnt0-2
PCI search specified, PCI device not
found!
Explanation: The driver cannot locate the Ethernet
controller on the PCI bus.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
2. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
3. If the problem persists, go to “Running the Ethernet
Diagnostics” on page 20 to run the diagnostic utility.
pnt0-6
Cannot allocate memory for the adapter
during an interrupt. Please check the
Streams parameters.
Explanation: The system is out of Streams memory
blocks.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Use the CRASH utility to increase the number of
Streams memory blocks for the failing size.
2. Modify the IRQ settings in the Configuration/Setup
utility programs, or run netconfig to match the
hardware settings.
pnt0-6
Cannot allocate memory for the adapter
during an interrupt! Please check the
Streams parameters.
Explanation: On a SunSoft Solaris system, this message
indicates that the system is out of Streams memory blocks.
Action: Use the CRASH utility to increase the number of
Streams memory blocks for the failing size.
pnt0-7
Cannot allocate memory for the adapter
during reset! Please check the Streams
parameters.
Explanation: The system is out of Streams memory
blocks.
Action: Use the CRASH utility to increase the number of
Streams memory blocks for the failing size.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
45
pnt0-11
device not found!
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
pnt0-12
device failed checksum test!
Explanation: The driver cannot find an Ethernet
controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
pnt0-13
add_intr_handler failed! Interrupts already
enabled.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to match the hardware settings.
pnt0-14
Cannot locate hardware.
Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver cannot find any
Ethernet controller.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that the Ethernet enable jumper is set to the
default (enable) position.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
pnt0-15
No more devices to open.
Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver cannot find any
more Ethernet controllers.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that additional IBM PCI Ethernet adapters are
present or replace the Ethernet adapter that fails to
respond.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
46
PC Server HMM
pnt0-17
Device fault... Reset initiated!
Explanation: The SunSoft Solaris driver has been reset
due to device fault.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Verify that additional IBM PCI Ethernet adapters are
present or replace the PCnet card that fails to
respond.
2. Go to “Running the Ethernet Diagnostics” on page 20
to run the diagnostic utility.
pnt0-19
IRQ found for PCnet hardware does not
match space.c!
Explanation: This is a warning message referring to the
IRQ found in the system.
Action: Ignore this message if you are sure that this is
what you want to do. Otherwise, run netconfig to match
the hardware settings.
pnt0-19
IRQ found for PCnet hardware does not
match pnt.conf!
Explanation: This is a warning message referring to the
IRQ that the SunSoft Solaris driver found in the system.
Action: Ignore this message if you are sure that this is
what you want to do. Otherwise, run netconfig to match
the hardware settings.
pnt0-20
add_intr_handler failed! Unknown
interrupt type.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
pnt0-21
add_intr_handler failed! Out of range
interrupt number.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
General Checkout/Diagnostics
47
pnt0-22
add_intr_handler failed! Out of range IPL.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
pnt0-23
add_intr_handler failed! Vector already
occupied.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
pnt0-24
add_intr_handler failed! Vector already
shared at different IPL.
Explanation: The IRQ specified or found conflicts with
other devices in the system.
Action: Perform the following steps:
1. Modify the hardware settings.
2. Run netconfig to search for another Ethernet
controller.
pnt0-26
The DMA number is not necessary for PCI
device.
Explanation: The IBM PCI Ethernet adapter does not
require a DMA setting.
Action: Edit the SPACE.C file to delete the DMA
parameter.
pnt0-29
The IRQ number is already in use by
another
Explanation: The IBM PCI Ethernet adapter
Explanation: The specified IO address is already in use
by
pnt0-31
IO address is not necessary for the PCI
device.
Explanation: The I/O address specified is not required.
Action: Remove the assigned IO address specified for
the Ethernet controller.
48
PC Server HMM
PC Server 330 - Type 8640 (Models
11Y, 21Y, PB0, PM0, PT0)
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Service Information . . . . . . . . .
Checkpoint Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration/Setup Utility . . . . . . . .
Starting the Configuration/Setup Utility
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu . .
System Summary . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Information . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Devices and I/O Ports
. . . . . . . . .
Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm/Wakeup Settings . . . . . . . . .
Wakeup Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wakeup on Ring . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Ethernet Controller . . . . .
Removing an Unknown Power-on Password .
Removing the Power-On Password When
Keylock is Installed
. . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Power-On Password When
Keylock Is Not Installed . . . . . . . .
Resolving Configuration Conflicts . . . . . .
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts
System Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrator Password Menu . . . . . .
Using the Power-on Password Menu . . .
System Owner's Name
. . . . . . .
Restricting Access to Diskette Drives .
Start Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Setup
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Cache Control . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Control . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ROM Shadowing
. . . . . . . . . .
Universal Serial Bus . . . . . . . . .
Memory Settings
. . . . . . . . . .
Plug and Play
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Log
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exiting From the Configuration/Setup Utility
Program
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring PCI Features and Options . .
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program . . . .
Starting the SCSISelect Utility Program
.
SCSISelect Utility Program Options
. . .
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings
SCSI Disk Utilities . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a Low-Level Disk Format .
When To Use the Format Disk Program
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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Starting the Low-Level Format . . . . .
Ethernet Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm/Wakeup Settings . . . . . . . . . .
PC Server Advanced Systems Management
Adapter (FRU No. 76H3240)
. . . . . . . .
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . .
Resetting the Adapter and Clearing the
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System and Adapter Configuration . . . . .
Configuration Considerations:
. . . . .
Configuration/Setup Utility ISA Legacy
Resources:
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual I/O Address and Interrupt
Assignment
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter Configuration:
. . . . . . . .
Device Driver Installation
. . . . . . . . .
OS/2 Device Driver Installation . . . . .
Windows NT Device Driver Installation
.
Novell NetWare Device Driver Installation
Adapter Cable to System Board Connections
PC Server 330 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Power Control Unit Operation and
Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Voltages
. . . . . . . . . . .
Connector P1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector P2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector P3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector P4, P5, P6, P7, P8 . . . . . . .
Specifications (PC Server 330 - Type 8640) . .
System/Processor Board Replacement
. . . .
Symmetric Multiprocessors/Multiprocessing
. .
Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapters
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CD-ROM Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drives (Hot-Swap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Light States
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expansion Bays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expansion Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Door
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Drive Bays
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bays 1 through 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bay 7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bays 8 through 10
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Input/Output Connectors . . . . . . . . . . .
Keylock Assembly Exploded View
. . . . . .
Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microprocessor Board Components - Pentium Pro
Microprocessor Board Components - Pentium II
Microprocessor Board - Pentium Pro . . . .
Jumper Settings - Pentium Pro
. . . . . .
50
PC Server HMM
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105
106
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Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium Pro
Microprocessor Board - Pentium II
. . . . . .
Jumper Settings - Pentium II
. . . . . . .
Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium II .
Microprocessor Removal - Pentium II . . . . .
Operator Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Panel Status Indicators . . . . . . .
Security Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Side Cover
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jumper Block J27
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Jumper Settings
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
U-Bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Video Memory Module . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voltage Regulator Module
. . . . . . . . . .
Symptom-to-FRU Index . . . . . . . . . . . . .
No Beep Symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beep Symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Error Codes
. . . . . . . . . . .
RAID POST Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Diagnostic Error Codes . . . . . . . . .
Error Code 7219h . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BCS/ECS Configuration Registers Codes . . .
Parts Listing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cables
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboards (101/102 Key)
. . . . . . . . . .
Power Cords
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parts Listing (PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cables
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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PC Server 330 - Type 8640
51
151
151
Features
Note
The PC Server 330 - Type 8640 has Selectable
Startup.
Microprocessor
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Intel Pentium Pro microprocessor or Intel Pentium II
microprocessor with MMX technology
16 KB of level-1 cache
512 KB of level-2 cache
Clock rate varies by model
Memory
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Standard: 64 MB, expandable to 512MB (1 GB for Model
21Y only)
60 ns, buffered extended data output (EDO), Error Correcting
Code (ECC)
Four dual inline memory-module (DIMM) sockets
Diskette Drives
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Up to two diskette drives supported
Standard: One 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
Optional (internal):
– 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
– 3.5-inch, 2.88 MB
Hard Disk Drives
Ÿ
Supports up to seven hard disk drives, six of them
hot-swappable. (The lower two 3.5-Inch DASD bays will
support either one half-high drive installed in the lower bay
and occupying part of bay 9, or one slim-high drive and one
floppy drive.)
CD-ROM Drive
Ÿ
Standard: SCSI
Keyboard and Auxiliary Device (some models)
(some models)
Ÿ
Ÿ
Keyboard
Mouse
Expansion Slots
Supports up to six adapters.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Four dedicated PCI slots
Two shared PCI/ISA slots
Expansion Bays
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
One 5.25-inch drive bays and six 3.5-inch hot-swap drive
bays.
Three 3.5-inch drive bays
The number of bays available for expansion varies by model.
Upgradable POST and BIOS
Ÿ
POST/BIOS upgrades (when available) can update EEPROM
on the system board
Security Features
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
52
Bolt-down capability
Door lock
LogicLock security enabled
Power-on and administrator passwords
Selectable drive-startup
PC Server HMM
Ÿ
Security-error indicator
Integrated Functions
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Two serial ports
Two universal serial bus (USB) ports
One parallel port
Mouse port
Keyboard port
16-bit UltraSCSI controller
– One external connector (16-bit)
RAIDport controller on the system board
– One internal connector to hot-swap bay
IBM 10/100 Mbps Ethernet Controller
– 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX port
Video controller port, compatible with:
– Super video graphics array (SVGA)
– Video graphics adapter (VGA)
– Color graphics adapter (CGA)
1 MB video memory, expandable (up to 2 MB)
Power Supply
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
350 W (100-220)
Built-in overload and surge protection
Automatic restart after a momentary loss of power
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
53
Additional Service Information
The following additional service information is for the PC
Server 330 Type 8640.
Checkpoint Codes
During POST, the computer displays the status of the
components being tested in the form of Checkpoint (CP)
codes in the lower right-hand corner of the screen. The
following is a list of the CP codes followed by the routine in
process and the boot mode.
CP
Code
Routine
Boot Mode
01
Test CPU Regs
Cold
02
Wait for RTC
Cold
04
Init Timer 0
Cold+Warm+SAD
05
Test DMA
Cold+Warm+SAD
06
Test Page Regs
Cold+Warm+SAD
07
Verify Refresh
Cold
08
Enable Parity
Cold+Warm+SAD
09
Clear first 64 K
Cold+Warm
0A
POST with Stack
Cold+Warm+SAD
0B
BIOS Shadow
Cold+Warm
0C
Phase 2 POST
Cold+Warm+SAD
0D
Init KBD Data
Cold+Warm+SAD
10
Test DMS
Locations
Cold+Warm+SAD
12
Test PICs
Cold+Warm+SAD
14
Init Vector Table
Cold+Warm+SAD
15
Init Keyboard
Cold+Warm+SAD
16
Std CMOS
Checksum_NS
Cold+Warm
17
Check
Configuration
Cold+Warm
20
Test Timer Tick
Cold
21
Test Timer 2
Cold+Warm+SAD
23
Test RTC
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
26
vpd_main
Cold+Warm
30
Shadow VPD
Cold+Warm
31
Save ID
Cold+Warm+SAD
32
Check P54C
Cold
33
Init Q Boot
Cold+Warm
34
Periph Config
Cold+Warm+SAD
35
Init Timeout Tables
Cold+Warm+SAD
36
Pos_Setup
Cold+Warm
37
TCPC
Cold+Warm
38
Find Serial Ports
Cold+Warm
39
Find Parallel Ports
Cold+Warm
3A
Enable Timer Init
Cold+Warm+SAD
54
PC Server HMM
CP
Code
Routine
Boot Mode
3B
Clear Mem Size
Error
Cold
3C
Mfg Boot Fork
Cold
3D
SignOn
Cold+Warm
3E
CPU Name
Cold+Warm
3F
CPU Speed
Cold+Warm
40
Enable Video
SAD
41
Size Memory
Above 64 K
Cold+Warm
42
Password Not
Entered
Cold
43
Test PS2 Mouse
Cold+Warm
44
Check for Mouse
Buttons
Cold
45
Init KBD Flags
Cold+Warm+SAD
46
Test KBD
Cold+Warm
47
TCPC_Error
Cold+Warm
48
Mem Test Prompt
Cold+Warm
49
Test Memory
Cold+SR
4A
Clear EBDA
Warm
4B
Allocate EBDA
Cold+Warm+SR
4C
xfer_EBDA_vars
Cold+Warm+SR
4D
Set Warm Boot
Flag
Warm
4E
Clear Speed Bits
Cold+Warm+SAD
4F
E_FLOB
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
50
Enable System
Interrupts
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
51
C2Sec_Chk
Cold
52
Init KBD
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
53
Check for NPX
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
54
reset_hdctl
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
55
FD_INIT
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
56
Set Floppy Config
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
57
Unlock Early
Cold
58
Init A20
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
59
HD Setup
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
5A
PnP_Assign Card
Select Numbers
Cold+Warm+SR
5B
Verify CMOS
Config
Cold+Warm+SR
5C
Clear Screen
Cold+Warm+SAD
5D
PnP_Assign
Resources
Cold+Warm+SR
5E
Init Time of Day
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
5F
Check for Locked
KBD
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
60
Init Enable NMI
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
61
Set Boot Speed
Cold+Warm+SR
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
55
CP
Code
Routine
Boot Mode
62
Set KBD LEDs
Cold+Warm+SAD
63
Check for Setup
Hot Key
Cold+Warm
64
CSET_AFT_MTEST
Cold+Warm
65
CSET_AFT_CMCFG
Cold+Warm+SR
66
CSET_BFR_OPROM
Cold+Warm+SR
67
Phase 2 Exit Big
Real
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
90
Disable Video
Cold+Warm+SAD
91
Phase 1 Enter Big
Real
Cold+Warm+SAD
93
Init Refresh
Cold+Warm
94
Init Chip_NS
Cold+Warm+SAD
95
CSET_Init
Cold+Warm+SAD
96
Disable Parity
Cold+Warm+SAD
97
Periph Init
Cold+Warm+SAD
98
Init RTC
Cold+Warm+SAD
99
Init Timer 2
Cold+Warm+SAD
9A
Setup GPIO Addr
Cold+Warm+SAD
9B
Post LED On_NS
Cold+Warm+SAD
9C
CPU1 LED On_NS
Cold+Warm+SAD
B0
Disable Appl 1
Local APIC
Cold+Warm
B3
Display SMP Sign
On
Cold+Warm
B4
AP Cache Init
Cold+Warm
D1
Cache Init
Cold+Warm+SAD
D3
Cache Configure
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
E0
Reclaim Onboard
Option ROM Space
Cold+Warm+SAD+SR
EA
PCI Reset
Cold+Warm
EB
PCI Video
Cold+Warm
EC
PCI Configure
Cold+Warm+SR
ED
PCI IDE
Cold+Warm
EE
PCI SCSI
Cold+Warm
56
PC Server HMM
Configuration
The process of allocating server resources to organize and
interconnect hardware devices and software programs is
referred to as configuration. The steps required to
configure the server depend on the number and types of
devices and programs installed.
The server supports the following type of adapters.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI)
Industry Standard Architecture (ISA)
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
In general, the greater the number and variety of hardware
devices and software programs installed in the server, the
more you will have to interact with the server and the
devices to correctly configure the system.
The server comes with the following hardware
configuration utility programs:
Ÿ
Ÿ
The built-in Configuration/Setup utility program
configures system board functions, such as serial and
parallel port assignments, change interrupt requests
settings, and the startup sequence for drives installed
in the system. You can also use this utility program
to set passwords for starting up the server and
accessing the Configuration/Setup utility program.
The SCSISelect utility program can be used to
configure the SCSI devices, changes default values,
resolve configuration conflicts, and perform a
low-level format on a SCSI hard disk drive.
The following actions are typically, but not always, required
to configure the server.
1. Run the Configuration/Setup utility program and
record the current configuration settings.
2. Set jumpers or switches on the server's system
board.
See “Jumper Settings” on page 117.
3. Set jumpers or switches on the device.
Refer to the device installation instructions.
4. Install the device in the server.
If you install an ISA adapter that is not a Plug and
Play device, use the Plug and Play choice on the
Configuration/Setup utility programs main menu to
set the ISA legacy resources. These include
memory, I/O ports, direct memory access (DMA), and
interrupt request levels (IRQs). See “Plug and Play”
on page 71 for more information.
5. Install software programs. Refer to the installation
instructions that come with the software.
6. Resolve configuration conflicts.
See “Resolving Configuration Conflicts” on page 65.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
57
Configuration/Setup Utility:
For most
configurations, the server will operate using the default
system settings. You need to change the settings only to
resolve configuration conflicts or to enable or change
device functions (for example, enabling the &infra. port).
After you run and exit the Configuration/Setup utility
program, configuration information is stored in nonvolatile
RAM (NVRAM). The configuration information remains
available for the next system startup while the server is
powered off.
Always run the Configuration/Setup utility program if you
added or removed any hardware option or receive an error
message instructing you to do so.
Starting the Configuration/Setup Utility
Program: To start the Configuration/Setup utility
program:
1. Power-on the server and watch the screen.
2. When the message Press F1 to enter
Configuration/Setup appears, press F1.
The Diagnostic/Setup Utility menu appears.
Note
If you entered a power-on password and an
administrator password has been set, the menu does
not display. Instead, the server displays the
Configuration/Setup Utility menu.
Ÿ
Ÿ
To configure the server, select Configuration/Setup
Menu.
The Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu appears.
For information about the menus, see
“Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu.”
To run the system diagnostics, select Diagnostics.
(For information on running the system diagnostics,
see “About the Test Programs” on page 7.)
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu:
The
Configuration/Setup utility program Main Menu lets you
select settings you want to change.
58
PC Server HMM
IBM SurePath Setup - © IBM Corporation
Configuration/Setup Utility
• System Summary
• System Information
• Devices and I/O Ports
• Date and Time
• System Security
• Start Options
• Advanced Setup
• Plug and Play
• Error Log
Save Settings
Restore Settings
Load Default Settings
Exit Setup
<↑> <↓> Move
<Enter> Select
<F1> Help
<Esc> Exit
Pressing F1 displays Help information for a selected menu
item.
Notes
1. If you enter only the power-on password and an
administrator (supervisor-level) password is also
set, a limited version of the menu appears.
2. The choices on some menus might differ slightly,
depending on the BIOS version that comes with
the server.
To change configuration settings:
1. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) keys to
select the menu item for the configuration setting you
want to change. Selected items are highlighted.
Then press Enter.
2. Select the configuration setting you want to change.
Use the Page Up (PgUp) and Page Down (PgDn)
keys to scroll through the menu, if needed.
3. Use the Right Arrow (→) or Left Arrow (←) keys to
select the appropriate setting for the selected item.
4. Repeat Steps 1 through 3 for each setting you want
to change. Press Esc to return to the
Configuration/Setup Main Menu.
5. After making changes, you can select
Ÿ Save Settings to save the selected changes.
Ÿ Restore Settings to delete the changes and
restore the previous settings.
Ÿ Load Default Settings to cancel the changes
and restore the factory settings.
6. To exit from the Main Menu, select Exit Setup. The
system prompts you to confirm your choice. You can
return to the Main Menu, or save your changes and
exit, or exit without saving your changes; the
Diagnostic/Setup utility menu displays.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
59
Note
If you entered a power-on password, and an
administrator password has been set, the menu
does not display. Instead, the server restarts.
7. Press Esc to exit from the Diagnostic/Setup utility
menu and restart the server.
System Summary: Select this choice to display
configuration information, such as the type and speed of
the microprocessor, and amount of memory.
Changes made to configuration settings appear on this
summary screen. You cannot edit the fields.
The System Summary choice appears on the full
Configuration/Setup menu and on the limited
Configuration/Setup user's menu.
Product Data: Select this choice to view system
information such as the machine type and model, the
system serial number, the system board identifier, and the
revision level or issue date of the flash electronically
erasable programmable ROM (EEPROM) and BIOS.
System Information:
Select this choice to display
information about the PC Server 330, and to view the
interrupt request (IRQ) settings for the SCSI and Ethernet
controllers on the system board, and other PCI adapters
installed in the server.
Changes that you make on other menus might appear on
this summary screen. You cannot edit any fields.
The System Information choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
PCI Routing: Select this choice to view the settings for
interrupt requests for PCI adapters. In addition, you can
view the interrupt requests for the Ethernet and SCSI
controllers on the system board.
Devices and I/O Ports: Software recognizes ports
from their port assignments. Each port must have a
unique port assignment. The Configuration/Setup utility
program normally handles this, but you might have special
hardware or software that requires you to change these
assignments.
Select the Devices and I/O Ports choice to view or
change the assignments for devices and input/output ports.
You can add serial ports by installing a serial adapter in an
expansion slot. See the documentation that comes with
the serial adapter for information about port assignments.
60
PC Server HMM
The parallel port can be configured as bidirectional, that is,
data can be both read from and written to a device. In
bidirectional mode, the server supports Extended
Capabilities Port (ECP) and Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP).
The server supports a wide assortment of monitors.
Because characteristics of monitor types vary, you should
review the documentation that came with the monitor to
determine the monitor type and refresh rate.
Notes
When you configure the parallel port as bidirectional,
use an IEEE 1284-compliant cable. The maximum
length of the cable must not exceed 3 meters (9.8
feet).
To display or change the assignments for devices, or the
infrared, serial, or parallel ports:
1. Select Devices and I/O Ports.
2. Select a device or port; then, use the Left Arrow (←)
and Right Arrow (→) keys to advance through the
settings available.
The Devices and I/O Ports choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
Date and Time:
Select this choice to set the system
date and time.
The system time is in a 24-hour format:
hour/minute/second. The system date is in standard
format for the country. For example, in the United States,
the format is MM/DD/YYYY (Month/Day/Year).
Select Date and Time, then use the Left Arrow (←) and
Right Arrow (→) keys to advance through each data field.
Type the new information; the system saves the
information as you type it.
The Date and Time choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
Alarm/Wakeup Settings: The server can be
started manually or at a predefined event. The server
enters one of the following states.
Standby mode
The server is powered down. The automatic restart
feature, which enables the server to restart following a
momentary power loss, means that the server is never
completely powered off.
The server must be in the Standby mode (off) for the
Alarm/Wakeup Settings features that you define to take
effect.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
61
Attended mode
This is the “on” state that occurs when you press the
power switch from the Standby or Unattended mode. The
Power-On light comes on whenever the server is on.
Unattended mode
The server starts at a specified date and time, or when it
receives a signal from either serial port. When the server
powers on in the Unattended mode, the Unattended
Power-On light and the Power-On light come on.
Note
To change from Unattended mode to Attended mode,
press the power switch. Press the power switch again
to change to Standby mode.
Select the Alarm/Wakeup Settings choice to enable and
disable the Unattended mode.
Notes
1. Set the Wakeup features immediately before you
plan to power-off the server. The server locks
and cannot be used after you exit, saving the
settings. When the server restarts, in either
Attended or Unattended mode, the Wakeup
features return to the default, disabled, setting.
2. When both Wakeup features are enabled, the
server starts when the first event (time or signal)
occurs.
The Alarm/Wakeup Settings choice appears only on the
full Configuration/Setup menu.
Wakeup Timer:
With this option, you can specify a
time and date when the server will power-on automatically.
To set the Unattended mode, select Alarm/Wakeup
Settings, then select Wakeup Timer. Then, set or
change the settings. Select Wakeup Date to specify a
date up to 31 days away. Select Wakeup Time to specify
the time, using a 24-hour clock format.
Wakeup on Ring:
When this option is enabled, the
server will power-on automatically when it receives a signal
from serial port A or B.
Configuring the Ethernet Controller
The 10/100 Mbps Ethernet controller on the system board
provides an efficient, high-speed interface to an Ethernet
network. The controller dynamically detects the
transmission speed of the network traffic, and automatically
adjusts conditions for full-duplex or half-duplex operation.
62
PC Server HMM
You can configure the Ethernet controller to remotely wake
up or power up computers in the network for administrative
and maintenance tasks. For example, you can install and
update software at night, minimizing the inconvenience to
users on the network.
If you need additional Ethernet connectors, you can install
an Ethernet adapter, such as the IBM PCI Ethernet
adapter. Refer to the documentation that comes with the
adapter for configuration information.
Note
If you are installing an IBM PCI Ethernet adapter, be
sure to run the Ethernet diagnostics and record the
server's Ethernet configuration information before you
install the adapter.
Removing an Unknown Power-on
Password
When a power-on password is set, the POST does not
complete until you enter the password. If you forget the
power-on password, you can regain access to the server in
the following ways:
Enter the administrator password at the power-on
prompt. Start the Configuration/Setup utility programs
and change the power-on password. See “Using the
Power-on Password Menu” on page 68.
Follow the instructions in “Removing the Power-On
Password When Keylock is Installed.”
Ÿ
Ÿ
Removing the Power-On Password When
Keylock is Installed
Before you begin
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Read “Safety Information” on page 154.
Power-off the server.
Disconnect all external cables and power cords,
and then remove the server cover.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
63
1. Locate the Clear CMOS jumper (J23, pin 7).
2. Verify that the keylock is connected to the system
board. If no keylock is installed, go to “Removing the
Power-On Password When Keylock Is Not Installed.”
3. Add a jumper to pins 2 and 3 (the pins furthest away
from the microprocessor board).
4. Replace the server cover and reconnect all external
cables and power cords.
5. power-on the server; then, close and lock the server
door.
6. Power-off the server, and remove the cables.
7. Remove the jumper from jumper J23-7; if you moved
the jumper earlier, replace it in its original position.
8. Replace the server cover and reconnect all external
cables and power cords.
9. Power-on the server and use the Configuration/Setup
utility programs to enter a new password and
reconfigure the server.
Note: The administrator password is not affected by
this jumper.
Removing the Power-On Password When
Keylock Is Not Installed
Before you begin
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Read “Safety Information” on page 154.
Power-off the server.
Disconnect all external cables and power cords,
and then remove the server cover.
1. Locate the battery on the system board.
2. Use one finger to lift the battery clip over the battery.
3. Use one finger to slightly slide the battery out from
under the battery clip. (The spring mechanism behind
the battery will push it out toward you as you slide it
forward.)
4. Use your thumb and index finger to pull the battery
from under the battery clip.
5. Ensure that the battery clip is touching the base of
the battery socket by pressing gently on the clip.
6. Reinstall the battery:
a. Lift the battery clip.
b. Tilt the battery and slide it under the battery clip.
c. As you slide the battery under the clip, press the
battery into the socket.
64
PC Server HMM
7. Reinstall the server cover and complete the
installation.
8. Start the Configuration/Setup utility program and reset
the configuration parameters as needed (see
“Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 58).
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
The resources used by the server consist of IRQs, DMA,
I/O port addresses, and memory. This information is
useful when a resource configuration conflict occurs.
Conflicts in the configuration occur if:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
A device is installed that requires the same resource
as another device. (For example, a conflict occurs
when two adapters try to write to the same address
space.)
A device resource is changed (for example, changing
jumper settings).
A device function is changed (for example, assigning
COM1 to two serial ports).
A software program is installed that requires the same
resource as a hardware device
The steps required to resolve a configuration error are
determined by the number and variety of hardware devices
and software programs installed. If a hardware
configuration error is detected, a configuration error
message appears after the server completes POST and
before the operating system is loaded. You can bypass
the error by pressing Esc while the error message is
displayed.
The Configuration/Setup utility program configures the
system hardware and PCI interrupt requests. The program
does not consider the requirements of the operating
system or the application programs. See “Resolving
Software Configuration Conflicts” on page 66 for additional
information.
Resolving Hardware Configuration
Conflicts: Use the following information to help
resolve hardware configuration conflicts:
1. Run the Configuration/Setup utility program to view
and change resources used by the system board
functions and the PCI interrupt requests (IRQs), if
necessary. Record the current settings before
making any changes. (See “Starting the
Configuration/Setup Utility Program” on page 58 for
instructions.)
2. Determine which adapter or device is causing the
error.
3. Change configuration resource allocations. Use the
Configuration/Setup utility program to view or change
system board resource allocations. Jumpers and
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
65
switches define the system resources a device uses.
If the settings are incorrect or set to use a resource
that cannot be shared, a conflict occurs and the
device will remain deactivated by the configuration
program.
4. Change system board jumpers or switches.
5. Remove the device or adapter. Some configurations
are not supported.
Resolving Software Configuration
Conflicts: The memory-address space and IRQs used
by some hardware options might conflict with addresses
defined for use through application programs or the EMS.
(EMS is used only with DOS.)
If a conflict exists, one or more of the following conditions
might exist:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The system cannot load the operating system.
The system does not work.
An application program does not operate, or it returns
an error.
Screen messages indicate a conflict exists.
To resolve conflicts, you can change the software or
hardware configuration.
Note
Start the Configuration/Setup utility program to view
the addresses used by the system board functions.
The best way to resolve memory-address conflicts is to
change the addresses used by the application program or
the device driver. You can use the Configuration/Setup
utility program to change addresses.
If a device driver is causing a memory-address conflict,
refer to the operating-system documentation or the
documentation supplied with the device drivers.
System Security
To control access to the server, security features, such as
adding passwords, securing diskette access, and defining
a system owner's name that displays during startup can be
implement
To set, change, or delete a password:
1. Select System Security.
2. Select the password that you want to change.
The System Security choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
After a power-on or administrator password is set, you
must enter the password when you power-on the server.
66
PC Server HMM
(The passwords do not appear on the screen as you type
them.)
Type of
Password
No password set
Results
Ÿ
Ÿ
Power-on
password only
Ÿ
Ÿ
Administrator
password
Ÿ
Ÿ
Administrator
and power-on
password
No password required to start
system.
User can access all choices on
the Configuration/Setup utility
program menu.
User must enter password to
complete the system startup.
Power-on password provides
access to all choices on the
Configuration/Setup utility program
menu.
User must enter password to
complete the system startup.
Administrator password provides
access to all choices on the
Configuration/Setup utility program
menu.
User can enter either password to
complete the system startup.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Administrator password provides
access to all choices on the
Configuration/Setup utility program
menu. You can set, change, or
delete both the administrator and
power-on passwords, and allow a
power-on password to be changed
by the user.
Power-on password provides
access to a limited set of choices
on the Configuration/Setup utility
program menu. This might
include changing or deleting the
power-on password.
Administrator Password Menu:
The
administrator password (sometimes called a
supervisor-level password) controls access to some
features of the server, including the Configuration/Setup
utility program.
Attention
If an administrator password is set and then forgotten,
it cannot be overridden or removed. You must replace
the system board.
To set an administrator password:
1. Select Administrator Password on the System
Security menu; then press Enter.
The Administrator Password menu appears.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
67
2. Type the password in the Enter Administrator
Password data field.
A password can contain any combination of up to
seven alphanumeric characters (A–Z, a–z, and 0–9).
Keep a record of the password in a secure place.
3. Move the cursor to the Enter Administrator
Password Again data field and type the password
again.
4. Select Set or Change Administrator Password to
save the new password; then press Enter. The
password becomes effective immediately.
Note
A message appears if the two passwords do not
match. If this happens, press Enter to cancel the
request and return to the System Security menu.
To delete an administrator password:
1. Select Administrator Password on the System
Security menu; then press Enter.
Following a warning, the Administrator Password
menu appears.
2. Select Delete Administrator Password; then press
Enter.
3. A confirmation window appears. Press Enter to
delete the administrator password. Press Esc to
return to the System Security menu.
To enable a user to change the power-on password:
1. Select Administrator Password on the System
Security menu; then press Enter.
The Administrator Password screen appears.
2. Select Power-on password changeable by user.
Press the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to
toggle the entry to Yes.
When this choice is enabled, System Security appears on
the limited Configuration/Setup menu. The System
Security menu contains the Power-on Password choice.
Using the Power-on Password Menu: When
a power-on password is set, you must enter a password
each time you start the system.
To set a power-on password:
1. Select Power-on Password on the System Security
menu; then press Enter.
The Power-on Password menu appears.
2. Type the password in the Enter Power-on Password
data field.
You can use any combination of up to seven
characters (A–Z, a–z, and 0–9) for the power-on
68
PC Server HMM
password. Keep a record of the password in a
secure place.
3. Move the cursor to the Enter Power-on Password
Again data field and type the password again.
4. Select Set or Change Power-on Password to save
the new password; then press Enter.
Note
A message appears if the two passwords do not
match. If this happens, press Esc to cancel the
request and return to the System Security menu.
If you forget the power-on password, and an administrator
password has been set, use the administrator password at
the power-on prompt; then start the Configuration/Setup
utility program and change the power-on password. If no
administrator password has been set, you must move the
Clear CMOS jumper to remove the power-on password,
see “Removing an Unknown Power-on Password” on
page 63.
To delete a power-on password:
1. Select Power-on Password on the System Security
menu; then press Enter.
The Power-on Password menu appears.
2. Select Delete Power-on Password; then press
Enter.
3. A confirmation window appears. Press Enter to
delete the power-on password. Press Esc to cancel
the request and return to the System Security menu.
To turn off the prompt for the power-on password:
1. Select Power-on Password on the System Security
menu; then press Enter.
The Power-On Password screen appears.
2. Select Password Prompt. Press the Left Arrow (←)
or Right Arrow (→) key to toggle the entry to Off.
System Owner's Name: You can specify a system
owner's name that displays during POST, each time the
server is started. The system owner's name can only be
removed or changed from the System Security menu; it is
not affected by moving the Clear CMOS jumper. If you set
an administrator password, only the administrator can set,
change, or delete the system owner's name.
1. Select System Owners Name on the System
Security screen, and press Enter.
The System Owners Name screen appears.
2. Type the name in the Enter System Owners Name
String data field. You can use any combination of up
to 15 characters and spaces for the system owner's
name.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
69
3. Press the Down Arrow (↓) key to select the Set or
Change System Owners Name data field.
4. Press Enter to set the name or change a previously
defined name.
To delete the system owner's name, select Delete Stored
System Owners Name and press Enter.
Restricting Access to Diskette Drives: The setting
for the Secure Diskette Drives option controls who has
access to the diskettes (user and administrator, or
administrator only). The server comes with this feature set
to Enable, so that both the user and administrator have
access to diskette drives.
To change this setting so that the access to the diskette
drives is disabled, select the System Security menu option
and then select Secure Diskette Drives. Press the Left
Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to toggle the entry to
Disable in the Diskette Drive Access data field. If the
administrator password is enabled, only the administrator
can change this setting.
Start Options:
Start options take effect when you
start the server.
You can select keyboard operating characteristics, such as
the keyboard speed. You can also specify whether the
keyboard number lock starts on or off. You can also
enable the server to run in disketteless and monitorless
operation.
The server uses a startup sequence to determine the
device from which the operating system loads. For
example, you can define a startup sequence that checks
for a startable diskette in the primary diskette drive, then
checks the hard disk drive in bay 7, and then checks a
network adapter.
You can enable a virus-detection test that checks for
changes in the master boot record at start up. You can
also choose to run POST in an enhanced mode or a quick
mode.
Select Start Options, then use the Left Arrow (←) and
Right Arrow (→) keys to advance through each data field.
The Start Options choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
Advanced Setup: Select Advanced Setup to
change values for advanced hardware features such as
cache control and ROM shadowing.
A warning message displays above the choices on this
menu, to alert you that the system may malfunction if
these options are configured incorrectly. Follow the
instructions on the screen carefully.
70
PC Server HMM
Use the Left Arrow (←) and Right Arrow (→) keys to
advance through the options for the selected menu item.
The Advanced Setup choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
Cache Control: Select this choice to define the
microprocessor cache state as enabled or disabled. In
addition, you can define the microprocessor cache type as
write-back or write-through.
You can also enable or disable video BIOS caching, and
define buffers for video and option ROM caching.
PCI Control: Select this choice to view the assigned
interrupt requests (IRQs) for PCI adapters installed in the
server, and for the SCSI and Ethernet controllers on the
system board.
ROM Shadowing: Select this choice to enable ROM
shadowing in specified areas. When these areas are
enabled, the contents can be cached, using the Cache
Control option.
Universal Serial Bus: Use this choice to enable the
Universal Serial Bus and to set the clock speed for the
USB devices. The documentation for the devices should
specify the proper clock speed. If you are installing two
USB devices, they should have the same clock speed.
Memory Settings: Use this choice to select the
memory speed and the type of error detection.
The server supports 60 ns DIMMs. You can specify the
type of error detection that the server uses as ECC or
parity, or you can specify that no error correction is
performed.
Plug and Play:
When you install an ISA legacy
adapter, you must allocate the system resources that the
adapter will use. Select Plug and Play to identify the
available system resources:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Memory
I/O ports
DMA
Interrupt
Note
The menus do not contain resources that are used by
the system or by previously installed Plug and Play
adapters.
Select Plug and Play; then, use the Up Arrow (↑) and
Down Arrow (↓) keys to highlight the system resource that
you want to change. Use the Left Arrow (←) and Right
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
71
Arrow (→) keys to toggle from Plug and Play to ISA
Legacy for the selected menu item for each menu choice.
The Plug and Play choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup menu.
Error Log:
Select Error Log to view the three most
recent errors the system has generated.
Exiting From the Configuration/Setup Utility
Program: Select Exit Setup to exit from the
Configuration/Setup utility programs Main Menu; then,
press Enter.
The system prompts you to confirm your choice. If you
want to make additional changes, you can return to the
Configuration/Setup Utility. If you made any changes and
did not save them with the Save Settings choice, the
system prompts you to save or discard the changes before
exiting the Configuration/Setup utility programs.
The server returns to the Diagnostic/Setup Utility menu.
Press Esc to exit from the menu and restart the server.
When you finish configuring the server, you can save the
CMOS and NVRAM configuration data to a diskette. This
is useful in case you have to clear CMOS or replace the
system board, and you want to restore the existing
configuration.
Refer to the README file on the PC Server Utilities
Diskette for specific procedures on backing up and
restoring CMOS and NVRAM configuration data.
Configuring PCI Features and Options:
PCI
devices automatically communicate with the server
configuration information. This usually results in automatic
configuration of a PCI device. If a conflict does occur, see
“Resolving Configuration Conflicts” on page 65.
Multiple-function PCI adapters use more than one interrupt.
When you install one of these adapters, review the IRQ
assignments in the Configuration/Setup utility programs
(see “PCI Control” on page 71). Verify that the IRQ
assignments are correct.
The PC Server 330 uses a rotational interrupt technique to
configure PCI adapters. This technique enables you to
install a variety of PCI adapters that currently do not
support sharing of PCI interrupts. For information on
manually overriding the interrupt, see “PCI Control” on
page 71.
72
PC Server HMM
Using the SCSISelect Utility Program
The server comes with a menu-driven configuration utility
program, called SCSISelect, that allows you to view and
change SCSI settings.
You can use the SCSISelect Utility program to:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
View and change the default SCSI ID values
Verify and change configuration conflicts
Perform a low-level format on a SCSI hard disk
Starting the SCSISelect Utility Program:
You can access this program when you start the server.
The SCSISelect prompt appears after the IBM PC Server
screen appears briefly and then disappears. A message
appears as each drive spins up. Press Ctrl+A immediately
after all drives have spun up.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) and Down Arrow (↓) key to move
the highlight bar to the various menu choices. Press Esc
to return to the previous menu. Also, you can press the
F5 key to switch between color and monochrome modes (if
the monitor permits). To change the settings of the
displayed items, follow the directions on the screen.
SCSISelect Utility Program Options: The
following options appear on the SCSISelect Utility program
menu:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings
SCSI Disk Utilities
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings: To view or
change the SCSI controller settings, select
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings and follow the
directions on the screen. This menu has the following
selections:
Ÿ
Host Adapter SCSI ID
Ÿ
Select this choice to change the SCSI ID of the SCSI
controller from its default value of 7.
SCSI Parity Checking
Ÿ
The default value is Enabled. This value should not
be changed.
Host Adapter SCSI Termination
Ÿ
Select this choice to configure SCSI controller
termination. The default value is Low On / High On.
SCSI Device Configuration
Ÿ
Select this choice to configure SCSI device
parameters. Before you can make updates, you must
know the ID of the device whose parameters you
want to configure.
Advanced Configuration Options
Select this choice to view or change the settings for
advanced configuration options. These options
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
73
include enabling support for large hard disk drives
and support for drives with &ultra. speed.
SCSI Disk Utilities: To see the IDs that are assigned
to each SCSI device or to format a SCSI device, select
SCSI Disk Utilities from the SCSISelect Utility program
menu.
To use the utility program, select a drive from the list.
Read the screens carefully before making a selection.
Note
If the following screen displays, you might have
pressed Ctrl+A before the selected drives spun up.
Restart the server, and watch the SCSISelect
messages as each drive spins up. After the drive that
you want to view or format spins up, press Ctrl+A.
à
Unexpected SCSI Command Failure
Target SCSI ID:
4
SCSI CDB Sent:
ð3 ðð ðð ðð ðE ðð ð7 ðð ð2 ðð
Host Adapter Status:
ððh - No host adapter error
Target Status:
ð2h - Check condition
Sense Key:
ð2h - Not ready
+Sense Code:
ð4h
+Sense Code Qualifier:
ð2h
ð
Press 'Esc' to continue.
á
ñ
Performing a Low-Level Disk Format: You can
perform a low-level format on hard disk drives using the
Format Disk feature of the SCSISelect Utility program.
Depending on the hard disk capacity, the low-level format
program could take up to two hours.
When To Use the Format Disk Program: Use the
Format Disk program:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
74
When installing software that requires a low-level
format
When you get recurring messages from the diagnostic
tests directing you to run the Low-Level Format
program on the hard disk
As a last resort before replacing a failing hard disk
drive
PC Server HMM
Note
For information about backing up all of the files, see
the operating-system documentation.
Starting the Low-Level Format
Attention
The low-level format erases all data and programs.
1. If the hard disk is working, make a backup copy of all
the files and programs on the hard disk.
2. Select Format disk from the SCSISelect Disk Utilities
menu; then follow the instructions on the screen.
Note
Hard disks normally contain more tracks than
their stated capacity (to allow for defective
tracks). A message appears on the screen if the
defect limit is reached. If this happens, replace
the drive.
3. To install an operating system after the hard disk
drive is formatted, refer to the README file in Start
Here on the ServerGuide Main CD.
Ethernet Diagnostics
You must use the IBM PC Server PCI Ethernet diagnostic
diskette to perform diagnostic tests on the integrated
Ethernet controller.
Ethernet Ports
The PC Server 330 Type 8640 has Ethernet connectors for
10Base-T or Attachment Unit Interface (AUI) devices. The
controller automatically detects which port is connected to
the network, and then uses that port for communication.
Notes
Ÿ
Ÿ
If the server is shipped with an Ethernet interface
cable, it must be installed to comply with FCC
requirements.
The cables used in a 10BASE-T link segment do
not require grounding. However, all of the
devices connected to the cables must be
grounded.
To connect the 10Base-T port to a 10Base-T port on a
repeater, use an unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable with
RJ-45 connectors at both ends. Use a straight-through
UTP cable when connecting to a crossover port (also
called MDI-X port), and use crossover cables to connect to
a repeater that is not a crossover port (also known as a
MDI port).
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
75
To connect the AUI port to a 10Base-5, 10Base-2, or
10Base-F segment, use an AUI cable.
Password
If a power-on password or administration password is set,
you must type the password and press Enter before POST
will continue.
Note
If an administration password is set and then
forgotten, it cannot be overridden or removed. You
must replace the system board.
If a power-on password is set and forgotten, you can
regain access to the server by using either of the following
methods:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Entering the administration password at the power-on
prompt. Start the Configuration/Setup Utility
programs and change the power-on password.
Changing the position of the power-on password
jumper (J27-7) When you restart the server, POST
proceeds without prompting for the password for this
startup only. Start the Configuration/Setup Utilities
programs and set a new power-on password. Leave
the power-on password jumper (J27-7) in its new
position, unless you need to perform this procedure
again.
Alarm/Wakeup Settings:
For proper operation of the Alarm/Wakeup Settings
options, set the Password Prompt choice to Off.
Set the Wakeup features immediately before you plan to
Power-off the server. The server locks and cannot be
used after you exit, saving settings. When the server
restarts, in either Attended or Unattended mode, the
Wakeup features return to the default, disabled settings.
When both Wakeup features are enabled, the server starts
when the first event (time or signal) occurs.
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PC Server HMM
PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter (FRU No.
76H3240)
Note
For a list of FRUs for this product see “Parts Listing
(PC Server Advanced Systems Management Adapter)”
on page 151.
The IBM PC Server Advanced Systems Management
Adapter provides monitoring and event recording functions
for ISA systems when used with TME 10 NetFinity Version
4.1.
Installation Requirements:
The Adapter can be installed only in ISA systems. The
Adapter is supported by TME 10 NetFinity Version 4.1.
Note
If the server has TME 10 NetFinity Version 4.0
installed, download the IBM PC Server Advanced
Systems Management Adapter files from:
Ÿ
Ÿ
IBM PC Server World Wide Web page at
http://www.pc.ibm.com/servers/
IBM PC Company Bulletin Board Service (BBS)
at (919) 517-0001
Read the README file for instructions.
Device drivers for OS/2, Microsoft Windows NT, and Novell
NetWare are provided with the Adapter.
Resetting the Adapter and Clearing the
Configuration:
If you removed an adapter from one system and are
reinstalling it in a different system, you must reset the
adapter. (clear the configuration) before you reinstall it to
avoid possible configuration conflicts. With the adapter
removed from the system:
1. Remove the battery from the adapter and set it aside.
2. With a metal paper clip or small metal screwdriver,
short the battery-socket contacts on the adapter
together. This resets the adapter and clears the
configuration.
3. Reinstall the battery on the adapter.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
77
System and Adapter Configuration:
The IBM PC Server Advanced Systems Management
Adapter must be configured after installation.
Configuration Considerations:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The adapter uses only adapter COM B for external
communication, therefore a modem or null-modem
cable must be connected to adapter COM B.
To share adapter COM B with the system, adapter
COM B must be assigned one of the following I/O
addresses:
3F8 (COM 1)
2F8 (COM 2)
3E8 (COM 3)
2E8 (COM 4)
To dedicate the adapter COM B to the adapter only,
adapter COM B must be disabled with the adapter
configuration program to prevent the system from
accessing it.
The adapter COM A is not used by the adapter. For
the system to use adapter COM A, it must be
configured with the adapter configuration program.
Each port I/O address covers eight contiguous
address bytes as shown in the table on page 78.
Make sure there are no conflicts between the adapter
port I/O addresses and interrupts you configure, and
previously assigned system I/O addresses and
interrupts.
The adapter can be configured to the following I/O address
ranges and interrupts:
I/O Address Ranges (hex)
Interrupts
100–107
120–127
140–147
168–16F
188–18F
200–207
220–227
240–247
268–26F
300–307
3
4
5
9
10
11
14
15
N/A
N/A
Note: Any listed I/O address range can be assigned with
any listed interrupt as long as there are no conflicts with
previously assigned system I/O addresses and interrupts.
Configuration/Setup Utility ISA Legacy
Resources:
1. Restart the system and run the Configuration/Setup
Utility.
2. Select the ISA Legacy Resources option.
3. Select I/O Port Resources.
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PC Server HMM
4. Refer to the list in the table on page 78 and
“Configuration Considerations:,” and reserve I/O
addresses for the adapter ports.
5. Enter the reserved I/O addresses on the
Configuration Data Worksheet on page 80.
6. Select Interrupt Resources.
7. Refer to the list in the table on page 78, and reserve
interrupts for the adapter service processor port and
the two adapter COM ports.
8. Enter the reserved interrupts on the Configuration
Data Worksheet on page 80.
9. Follow the on-screen prompts to exit the
Configuration/Setup Utility.
Go to “Adapter Configuration:” on page 80.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
79
Manual I/O Address and Interrupt Assignment:
If you do not have the Configuration/Setup Utility ISA
Legacy Resources option follow this procedure.
1. Refer to the lists in the table on page 78 and
“Configuration Considerations:” on page 78, and
select available I/O addresses and interrupts for the
adapter ports.
2. Enter these I/O addresses and interrupts on the
Configuration Data Worksheet below.
Configuration Data Worksheet
I/O
Address
Interrupt
Service Processor Port
Adapter COM A
Adapter COM B
Continue with “Adapter Configuration:.”
Adapter Configuration:
1. Power-off the system.
2. Make sure the adapter configuration diskette is not
write protected.
3. Insert the adapter configuration diskette into the
diskette drive.
4. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.
The adapter configuration Flash Utility menu is
displayed:
Flash Utility
Select one:
Configure Service Processor
View Service Processor Configuration
Update Service Processor
Set Up COM Ports
Configure OS Watchdog Timer
Exit
Enter
F1=Help
F3=Exit
5. Look at the two LED displays on the adapter and
check the dot on each LED for the indications listed in
the table on page 81.
80
PC Server HMM
Battery
CR2
CR1
CR1 Dot On
CR1 Dot Off
Problem indication. Check:
34-pin interface cable
connection
Replace:
Cable then, Adapter.
Note
Normal. Check CR2 Dot.
For Advanced Systems
Management External
Power Control Units,
replace the 10-pin
External Power Source
Cable then, the
External Power Control
Unit.
CR2 Dot Blinking
CR2 Dot Off
Normal; microcode is
loaded. Go to step 6.
Microcode is not loaded.
Select Update Service
Processor on the Flash
Utility menu and follow the
prompts. Then return to
step 5 on page 80. If CR2
continues to be off, replace
the adapter battery. (See
“Lithium Battery Notice” on
page 159)
Note: If you reset the adapter by following the procedure
“Resetting the Adapter and Clearing the Configuration” on
page 77, CR2 Dot will be off and you must select Update
Service Processor on the Flash Utility menu.
6. Refer to the configuration data worksheet on page 80
and complete the following steps.
a. Choose Configure Service Processor from the
Flash Utility menu and select the port and IRQ
you entered in the configuration data worksheet.
The utility program writes an SM.INI file to the
diskette. This file is used during the device
driver installation.
b. Follow the on-screen prompts and choose Setup
COM Ports from the Flash Utility menu. Select
the COM port I/O addresses and interrupts you
entered on the configuration worksheet.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
81
7. Follow the on-screen prompts to exit from the adapter
configuration utility program.
8. Replace the system cover.
Go to “Device Driver Installation” for device driver
installation instructions.
Device Driver Installation:
If the operating system is OS/2, go to “OS/2 Device Driver
Installation.”
If the operating system is Windows NT, go to “Windows
NT Device Driver Installation.”
If the operating system is Novell NetWare, go to “Novell
NetWare Device Driver Installation” on page 83.
OS/2 Device Driver Installation:
The OS/2 adapter device driver is stored in the C:\OS2
and C:\OS2\DLL directories unless otherwise specified by
you. The CONFIG.SYS file is also updated.
To install the adapter device driver and dynamic link library
(DLL):
1. Insert the adapter configuration diskette into the
diskette drive.
2. Open an OS/2 window.
3. At the OS/2 prompt type:
A:
and press Enter.
4. At the A: prompt type:
OS2\SETUP
and press Enter.
5. Follow the menu prompts to complete the installation.
6. Restart the system to activate the device driver.
Refer to the TME 10 NetFinity Version 4.1 documentation
for information on the operation and functions of the
adapter.
Windows NT Device Driver Installation:
The Windows NT adapter device drivers are stored in the
Windows NT system directories.
To install the adapter device drivers:
1. Insert the adapter configuration diskette into the
diskette drive.
2. Log on with administrator privileges.
3. Open a DOS window.
4. At the DOS prompt type:
A:
and press Enter.
5. Type CD\NT
and press Enter.
6. Type SETUP
82
PC Server HMM
and press Enter.
The adapter device drivers are loaded and started.
Refer to the TME 10 NetFinity Version 4.1 documentation
for information on the operation and functions of the
adapter.
Novell NetWare Device Driver Installation:
To install the Novell Netware adapter device driver:
1. Insert the adapter configuration diskette into the
diskette drive.
2. At the NetWare prompt type
LOAD A:\NETWARE\SETUP
and press Enter.
3. Follow the on-screen prompts. If you accept the
default choices, the adapter device driver is copied to
the hard disk as SYS:\SYSTEM\IBMSPN.NLM, and
the AUTOEXEC.NCF file is updated.
4. To load the adapter device driver:
a. Restart the system.
Or
b. At the NetWare prompt type
SEARCH ADD path (where path is the path
the driver was copied to in step 3)
and press Enter.
At the NetWare prompt type
LOAD IBMSPN port-adrs irq (where
port-adrs is the port address you selected
and irq is the interrupt you selected during
the adapter configuration procedure)
and press Enter.
The adapter device driver will load without
restarting the server.
Refer to the TME 10 NetFinity Version 4.1 documentation
for information on the IBM PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter operation and functions.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
83
Adapter Cable to System Board
Connections:
Note
It is easier to connect the cables to the system board
and Adapter before you install the Adapter in the
system.
I2C Reserved
Connector (J4)
C2/Monitor
Jumper (J7)
POST LEDs
(CR1) (CR2)
Battery
(J2)
Cable to 325/330
Power Switch (J6)
COM B
Connector
Cable to 325/330
System Board
Power Switch
Connector (J8)
External Power
Connector
Enhanced Security
Cable (J10)
2 x 17 System Board
Interface Connector (J16)
COM A
Connector
16 Bit ISA
Connector
PC Server 330:
Refer to “System Board” on page 117.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
84
34-pin cable from Adapter (J16) to System
Management Cable Connector (J28) on system
board.
16-pin cable from Adapter (J8) to Operator Panel
Connector (J37) on system board.
Cable from Operator Panel to Adapter (J6).
PC Server HMM
External Power Control Unit Operation and
Indicators:
The external power control unit provides power to the
system under control of the adapter.
OK
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The Power Status LED .2/ On indicates power is
enabled to the system. The Power Status LED Off
indicates power is disabled to the system.
The Cable Attached LED .3/ On indicates the power
unit control cable is connected to the adapter. The
Cable Attached LED Off indicates the external power
control unit control cable is not connected to the
adapter.
If system power from the external power control unit
is disabled by the adapter, press the external power
control unit power on button.1/ to enable system
power from the external power control unit.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
85
86
PC Server HMM
Power Status LED .2/
Cable Attached LED .3/
Indicates
Action/FRU
On
On
System power is enabled and the
external power control unit signal
cable is connected to adapter.
None
Off
On
The adapter has caused system
power to be removed and the
external power control unit signal
cable is connected to adapter.
1. Press the external power
control unit power on button .1/
to restore system power.
2. Check system power-on switch.
3. Bypass power module unit by
plugging the Server directly into
the AC wall socket.
4. Power module
5. A.C. power cord
Off
External power control unit signal
cable is not connected to adapter.
1. Connect the cable to the
adapter.
2. External power control unit
signal cable
3. External power control unit
4. Adapter
Power Supply Voltages
If the voltages are correct and the power supply fan runs,
the power supply is OK.
Connector P1
1
4
Key
−Lead
Pin
+Lead
Pin
3
4
1
2
V dc
Minimum
V dc
Maximum
+ 4.8
+ 4.8
+ 5.25
+ 5.25
Connector P2
1
4
Key
−Lead
Pin
+Lead
Pin
3
4
1
2
V dc
Minimum
V dc
Maximum
+ 3.3
+ 3.3
+ 3.46
+ 3.46
Connector P3
1
12
−Lead
Pin
+Lead
Pin
2
2
2
2
2
4
5
8
10
11
V dc
Minimum
V dc
Maximum
+ 11.52
+ 11.52
- 10.8
+ 4.8
- 4.5
+ 12.6
+ 12.6
- 13.2
+ 5.25
- 5.5
Connector P4, P5, P6, P7, P8
A
−Lead
Pin
+Lead
Pin
C
B
A
D
B
C
D
V dc
Minimum
V dc
Maximum
+ 4.8
+ 11.52
+ 5.25
+ 12.6
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
87
Specifications (PC Server 330 - Type
8640)
Size
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
88
With pedestal:
– Depth: 473 mm (18.6 in.)
– Height: 652 mm (25.6 in.)
– Width: 315 mm (12.4 in.)
Weight
– Typical server as shipped: 19 kg (42 lb)
Total Power Available for Drives
– Nominal Operating Current allowed:
- +5 V dc line: 5.3 A
- +12 V dc line: 5.0 A
Heat Output
– Approximate heat output in British Thermal Units (BTU)
per hour:
- Minimum configuration: 440 BTU (129 watts)
- Maximum configuration: 1000 BTU (293 watts)
Electrical Input
– Sine-wave input (50 to 60 Hz) is required
– Input voltage:
- Low range:
Ÿ Minimum: 90 V ac
Ÿ Maximum: 137 V ac
- High range:
Ÿ Minimum: 180 V ac
Ÿ Maximum: 265 V ac
- Input kilovolt-amperes (kVA) approximately:
Ÿ Minimum configuration as shipped: 0.08 kVA
Ÿ Maximum configuration: 0.52 kVA
Environment
– Air temperature:
- Server on: 10° to 35° C
(50° to 95° F)
Altitude: 0 to 914 m (3000 ft.)
- Server on: 10° to 32° C
(50° to 90° F)
Altitude: 914 m (3000 ft.) to 2133 m (7000 ft.)
- Server off: 10° to 43° C
(50° to 110° F)
Maximum Altitude: 2133 m (7000 ft.)
– Humidity:
- Server on: 8% to 80%
- Server off: 8% to 80%
– Maximum altitude: 2133 m (7000 ft)
PC Server HMM
System/Processor Board Replacement
When replacing the system board, make sure jumpers,
cables, adapter cards, and processor board are installed
and seated correctly on the new system board.
The PC Server 330 Type 8640 computer might have two
processors, and other components installed on the
processor board. When replacing the processor board,
remove all of the installed components from the old
processor board and install them on the new processor
board. If the problem remains, check the following:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The processor is installed and seated correctly in
socket (U5) on the processor board.
If installed, the optional processor is seated correctly
in socket (U6) on the processor board.
All other components removed from the old processor
board or system board are installed and seated
correctly on the new board.
Note
If the processor(s) are not seated correctly,
intermittent problems can occur.
Symmetric
Multiprocessors/Multiprocessing
The PC Server 330 Type 8640 has a second upgradable
processor socket on the processor board to support
Symmetric Multiprocessors/Multiprocessing (SMP). The
SMP capability extends processing performance by
allowing tasks to be dispatched to the next available
processor rather then being queued until the busy
processor has completed its task. The SMP capability also
provides a level of high availability in that some operating
systems run in a uni-processor mode if one of the
processors should experience a failure. This function will
allow the LAN to continue operation so that service can be
scheduled at a non-critical time.
Note
If the optional processor is installed, the optional
processor is the boot processor.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
89
Locations
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
90
“Adapters” on page 91
“Controls and Indicators” on page 92
“Drives (Hot-Swap)” on page 94
“Expansion Bays” on page 95
“Expansion Slots” on page 96
“External Connectors” on page 96
“Front Door” on page 97
“Internal Drive Bays” on page 98
“Input/Output Connectors” on page 101
“Keylock Assembly Exploded View” on page 103
“Memory-Module Kits” on page 103
“Microprocessor Board Components - Pentium Pro”
on page 104
“Microprocessor Board Components - Pentium II” on
page 105
“Microprocessor Board - Pentium Pro” on page 106
“Microprocessor Board - Pentium II” on page 109
“Microprocessor Removal - Pentium II” on page 112
“Operator Panel” on page 113
“Operator Panel Status Indicators” on page 114
“Security Cover” on page 116
“Side Cover” on page 116
“System Board” on page 117
“U-Bolt” on page 120
“Video Memory Module” on page 121
“Voltage” on page 122
“Voltage Regulator Module” on page 122
PC Server HMM
Adapters
CD-ROM Replacement
If you ordered a MKE CR-504 8X SCSI CD-ROM drive
(FRU number 73H2601), you may receive a 12X SCSI
CD-ROM drive (FRU number 93H8055). If you are
replacing the 8X CD-ROM drive with a 12X CD-ROM drive,
discard the CD-ROM 16/8 bit SCSI converter currently
connected to the 8X CD-ROM drive. The converter is not
needed to connect the 12X CD-ROM drive to the system.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
91
Controls and Indicators
The most commonly used controls are on the front of the
server.
CD-ROM Drive
In-Use Light
CD-ROM Eject Button
Diskette Eject
Button
Power-On Light
Diskette Drive
In-Use Light
Power Switch
92
PC Server HMM
CD-ROM Eject Button: Push this button to release
a CD from the CD-ROM drive.
Diskette Eject Button: Push this button to release a
diskette from the drive.
Power-On Light: This green LED lights when you
power-on the server by pressing the power switch,
and when the server powers on in the Unattended
mode.
Power Switch: Use this switch to power-on the
server manually, or return the server to Standby
mode. The automatic restart feature, which enables
the server to restart following a momentary power
loss, means that the server is never completely
turned off. Do not set the server to the Standby
mode if any of the drive In-Use lights are on. This
might damage the information stored on a hard disk
or diskette.
You can configure the server to start at a specified
date and time, or when it receives a signal from
either serial port. (For information on setting
Unattended startup, see “Alarm/Wakeup Settings” on
page 61.)
To toggle the server between Attended mode and
Standby mode, press and release the power switch.
Diskette-Drive In-Use Light: This light comes on
when the drive is accessing a diskette.
CD-ROM Drive In-Use Light: This light comes on
when the CD-ROM drive is accessed.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
93
Drives (Hot-Swap)
Amber Green
Light
Light
Locked
Position
Power-Off
Switch
Light States
Green
Amber
Description
On
Off
Drive tray is powered on; the hard
disk drive is inactive; and the drive
should not be removed.
Blinking
Off
The hard disk drive is inactive.
The hot-swap drive can be
removed safely.
On
On or
Blinking
The hard disk drive is in use, and
should not be removed.
Off
Off
The drive is defective, or no power
is being supplied to the drive. The
hot-swap drive can be removed
safely.
94
PC Server HMM
Expansion Bays
Open
Bays
Open
Bays
CD-ROM
Drive
3.5-Inch
Diskette Drive
Power
On/Off Switch
Open Bays: Your server's design accommodates
3.5-inch and 5.25-inch devices, such as hard disk,
tape, and rewritable optical disk drives. The number
and capacities of the hard disk drives vary by model.
For information on the supported types of drives and
their installation, see “Internal Drive Bays” on
page 98.
Diskette Drive: The 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB (MB is
approximately 1 000 000 bytes) diskette drive uses
1 MB (unformatted) or 2 MB (unformatted) diskettes.
CD-ROM Drive: Your server comes with a SCSI
CD-ROM drive.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
95
Expansion Slots
PCI
6
PCI
5
PCI
4
ISA
PCI
ISA
PCI
PCI
3
2
1
External Connectors
Power
Connector
Ethernet
Connector
SCSI Connector
Parallel Connector
Serial Connectors
Universal Serial
Bus (USB)
Connectors
Keyboard
Connector
Mouse
Connector
Monitor
Connector
96
PC Server HMM
Expansion Slots
Front Door
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
97
Internal Drive Bays
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
The server comes with a CD-ROM drive installed in bay 7
and a diskette drive installed in bay 8. Some models come
with a preinstalled hard disk drive.
Bay
Drive
Width
Drive Type
Drive Height
1-6
3.5-inch
Hard disk,
hot-swap
25.4 mm (1 in.)
7
5.25-inch1
CD-ROM
41.3 mm (1.6
in.)
8
3.5-inch
Diskette1
25.4 mm (1.0
in.)
9-10
3.5-inch
Hard disk3,
optical disc2,
diskette1
41.3 mm (1.6
in.)
98
PC Server HMM
Notes
1. The server does not support 5.25-in. drives in
Bay 7.
2. The server supports any compatible drive that
connects to the diskette cable. Be sure that the
holes in the drive align with the holes in the
housing.
3. This device is temperature-sensitive with
high-density DASD.
Bays 1 through 6
Bay 7
Thumbscrew
Hinge Pin
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
99
Bays 8 through 10
100
PC Server HMM
Input/Output Connectors
Power
Connector
Ethernet
Connector
SCSI Connector
Parallel Connector
Serial Connectors
Universal Serial
Bus (USB)
Connectors
Keyboard
Connector
Mouse
Connector
Expansion Slots
Monitor
Connector
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
101
Power Connector: The server power cable
connects here.
Ultra SCSI Connection: The SCSI cable is
connected to the internal SCSI controller. Default
state is inactive.
Parallel Connector: A signal cable for a parallel
device, such as a printer, connects here.
Serial Connectors: Signal cables for modems or
other serial devices connect here to the 9-pin serial
connectors, serial ports A and B. Devices connected
to serial port B and the &infra. port share a port
assignment. See “Devices and I/O Ports” on
page 60 for port assignment information.
Expansion Slots: Cables to the external connectors
on ISA and PCI adapters connect here.
Monitor Connector: The monitor signal cable
connects here.
Universal Serial Bus (USB) Connectors: You can
connect I/O devices to the universal serial bus (USB)
connectors, USB connector A and connector B. You
need a 4-pin cable to connect a device to these
ports.
Keyboard Connector: The keyboard cable
connects here.
Mouse Connector: The mouse cable connects
here. This connector is sometimes called the
auxiliary-device port.
Ethernet Connector: An unshielded twisted pair
cable with an RJ-45 connector attaches here to the
10/100 Ethernet controller on the system board.
102
PC Server HMM
Keylock Assembly Exploded View
Memory-Module Kits
J3
J4 J5
J2
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
103
Microprocessor Board Components Pentium Pro
.1/
.2/
.3/
.4/
.5/
.6/
.7/
.8/
.9/
.1ð/
.11/
104
Heat sink retention clip
Fan sink
Heater spreader
Pin 1 location
Microprocessor
Fan power cable connector (J21)
Secondary microprocessor socket, empty,
with lever in closed, locked position
Primary microprocessor board socket, with
latch in closed position
Secondary VRM connector
Voltage regulator module
Fan power cable
PC Server HMM
Microprocessor Board Components Pentium II
.1/ Primary VRM connector
.2/ Primary VRM
.3/ Secondary VRM connector
.4/ Air baffle
.5/ Terminator card in secondary microprocessor
connector
.6/ Secondary microprocessor bracket (goal-post)
.7/ Primary microprocessor bracket (goal-post)
.8/ Primary microprocessor
.9/ Dual-inline memory module (DIMM) in
memory-module connector 1
Note
If you are installing an additional microprocessor,
remove the terminator card (.5/) from the secondary
microprocessor connector.
The second microprocessor installed, becomes the
startup (boot) microprocessor.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
105
Microprocessor Board - Pentium Pro
Clock Frequency J1
Selection Jumpers J20
Clock Ratio Jumper
J30
J29
J28
J27
PMC Frequency J17
Selection Jumper J18
Reserved
J9
J10
PCI/ISA Bus Jumper (J12)
106
PC Server HMM
Jumper Settings - Pentium Pro
Note
Refer to “Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium
Pro” for the correct clock speed and frequency
selection jumper settings for the microprocessor.
Jumper
Description
J1/J20
Clock speed jumper block.
J30/J29
J28/J27
Frequency selection jumper block. The default
Core/Bus fraction is 3.
J17/J18
Microprocessor memory controller (PMC)
frequency selection jumper block. The default
setting is 66.66 MHz.
J9, J10
Reserved.
J12
PCI/ISA bus jumper. To ensure proper
operation of the PC Server 330, do not move
the jumper from its default position.
Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium Pro
Speed (in MHz)
Multiplier
Clock
speed
PMC
frequency
2001
J30
J1
J17
J29
J18
J20
J28
J27
180
J30
J1
J29
J17
J18
J20
J28
J27
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
107
Speed (in MHz)
Multiplier
Clock
speed
PMC
frequency
166
J30
J1
J17
J29
J18
J20
J28
J27
1
MHz measures only processor internal clock speed, not
application performance. Many factors affect application
performance.
108
PC Server HMM
Microprocessor Board - Pentium II
Secondary
Microprocessor
Fan Connector (J21)
Frequency Selection
Jumpers
(J9, J10, J11, J17, J18)
(J17)
(J12)
(J9)
(J10)
(J18)
(J2)
(J3)
(J4)
(J5)
Primary
Microprocessor
Connector (U5)
Memory
Connectors
(J8)
Primary Voltage
Regulator Module
Connector (U5)
Clock Frequency
Selection Jumpers
(J20)(J38)
Processor Core Frequency
Selection Jumpers
(J30, J29, J28, J27)
Secondary Microprocessor
Connector (U6)
Primary Microprocessor
Fan Connector (J22)
Secondary Voltage Regulator
Module Connector (U6)
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
109
Jumper Settings - Pentium II
Note
Refer to “Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium
Pro” on page 107 for the correct clock speed and
frequency selection jumper settings for the
microprocessor.
Jumper
Description
J20,
J38
Clock speed jumper block. The default setting
is 66.66 MHz. Use the appropriate
microprocessor clock speed for the
microprocessor that you have installed.
J27,
J28,
J29,
J30
Processor core frequency selection jumper
block. The default core/bus fraction is 3.5 (233
MHz). (Jumpers are installed on J27 and J30;
no jumper is installed on J28 or J29.)
For the core/bus fraction 4 (266 MHz), the
jumpers are installed on J27, J28, and J29; no
jumper is installed on J30.
For the core.bus fraction 4.5 (300 MHz), the
jumpers are installed on J27 and J29; no jumper
is installed on J28 or J30.
For the core.bus fraction 5 (333 MHz), the
jumpers are installed on J27 and J28; no jumper
is installed on J29 or J30.
J39,
J14,
J15,
J16,
J32,
J13
Voltage identification selection jumper block for
primary VRM. The default setting is J14. (A
jumper is installed on J14; no jumper is installed
on J39, J15, J16, J32, or J13.)
J40,
J33,
J35,
J36,
J34,
J37
Voltage identification selection jumper block for
secondary VRM. The default setting is J36. (A
jumper is installed on J36; no jumper is installed
on J40, J33, J35, J34, or J37.)
J17,
J18
Microprocessor memory controller (PMC)
frequency selection jumper block. The default
setting is 66.66 MHz.
J9, J10,
J12
Reserved.
J8
PCI/ISA bus jumper. To ensure that the server
operates properly, do not move this jumper from
its default position.
110
PC Server HMM
Bus/CPU Speed MHz Settings - Pentium II
Speed
(in MHz)
233
Multiplier
Clock
speed
J9
J30
J29
J28
PMC/
Frequency
J38
J18
J20
J27
J12
J17
J10
266
J9
J30
J29
J28
J38
J18
J20
J27
J12
J17
J10
300
J9
J30
J29
J28
J38
J18
J20
J27
J12
J17
J10
333
J9
J30
J29
J28
J27
J38
J18
J20
J12
J17
J10
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
111
Microprocessor Removal - Pentium II
To remove the Pentium II processor:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Push tabs inward.
Pull processor from socket.
To install the Pentium II processor:
Ÿ
Ÿ
112
Insert processor into socket.
Push down until tabs snap outward.
PC Server HMM
Operator Panel
Note
Loosen, do not remove screw.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
113
Operator Panel Status Indicators
Power-On Light
Unattended Power-On Light
POST Activity Light
SCSI Hard Disk Drive Light
T
Primary Microprocessor
ActivityLight
Ethernet Transmit Light
Ethernet Link Status Light
1
2
Secondary Microprocessor
Activity Light
Ethernet Receive Light
Security Light
Unattended Power-On Light: This green LED lights
when the server powers on in Unattended mode.
SCSI Hard Drive In-Use Light: This amber LED
lights when your server is accessing a SCSI device.
If this light remains illuminated, this might indicate
that either the SCSI bus or the system
microprocessor has stopped.
2
Secondary Microprocessor In-Use Light: This
amber LED blinks to show the activity of a
microprocessor installed in the secondary
microprocessor socket. The LED lights during POST
to indicate the presence of the microprocessor.
When you install a secondary microprocessor, it
becomes the startup microprocessor.
Ethernet Receive Light: This amber LED shows
receive activity on the network.
Security Light: When tamper-detection software is
installed and enabled, this amber LED shows that a
security hardware or software error occurred. This
amber LED shows that a security hardware error
occurred. To enable the security indicator, you must
purchase and install the IBM PC Server Advanced
Systems Management Adapter or another
tamper-detection software product.
Ethernet Link Status Light: This green LED shows
an active link connection on the 10BASE-T interface.
Ethernet Transmit Light: This amber LED shows
transmit activity on the network.
1
114
Primary Microprocessor In-Use Light: This amber
LED blinks to indicate the activity of a microprocessor
installed in the primary microprocessor socket. The
LED comes on during POST to indicate the presence
of the microprocessor.
PC Server HMM
T
POST Activity Light: This amber LED lights while
the power-on self-test (POST) and the configuration
utility programs are running. If this light remains on,
either a POST error has occurred, or the system
microprocessor has stopped.
Power-On Light: This green LED lights when you
turn on your server by pressing the power switch,
and when the server powers on in Unattended mode.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
115
Security Cover
Side Cover
Captive
Screws
116
PC Server HMM
System Board
Power Connectors
Parallel Connector
Ethernet Connector
USB Connectors
External SCSI Connector (J22)
Diskette Drive Connector
Keyboard Connector
Reserved
RAID Status
Connector
Mouse Connector
Battery
RAIDport
Connector (J23)
System
Management
Adapter (J28)
Serial Connector
RAID SCSI
Connector (J21)
System Reset
Jumper (J1)
ISA Slots
Memory DIMM
Socket
PCI Slots
Speaker Connector
Reserved
System Fan
Power Connector
Operator Panel
Connector (J37)
Jumper Block (J27)
Video Connector
Reserved
Processor Board
Connector
Video RAM Sockets
Jumper Block J27
Pentium II Processor
Pentium II Processor
Flash Write Enable
Recovery Boot
Boot Block Enable
VPD Write Enable
Clear CMOS
Pentium Pro Processor
Pentium Pro Processor
Flash Write Disable
Normal Boot
Boot Block Protected
VPD Write Disable
Tamper Detect
Jumper Settings
J47
On-Board
RAID Disable
J45
SCSI
Disable
J46
Ethernet
Disable
J44
HA Clustering
Disable
J27
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
117
Jumper
Default
Jumper
Position
Jumper Description
(from left to right)
J27-1
Primary microprocessor (default). If
you replace the microprocessor that
comes with the server, you might need
to move the jumper to the opposite
position.
J27-2
Secondary microprocessor (default).
The primary and secondary
microprocessors must have the same
cache size and cache speed; the
jumpers should be set to the same
position. If you add microprocessors
that differ from the one that comes with
the server, you might need to move the
jumpers to the opposite position.
J27-3
Flash update enable jumper: Disabled.
You must move the jumper from the
default jumper position to update the
flash BIOS on the system board.
J27-4
The flash memory contains a protected
area that cannot be damaged. The
code in this area enables the server to
start from a diskette when the BIOS
becomes damaged, for example, if a
power failure occurs during a flash
update. After starting, the Flash
Memory Update Utility automatically
recovers the system BIOS from the
BIOS recovery files on the diskette.
Default position is Normal Boot. When
the flash is complete, the jumper must
be moved to the default, disabled,
position.
J27-5
Boot block is protected from accidental
overwrite.
J27-6
VPD write is disabled. You must move
the jumper from the default jumper
position to update or overwrite the Vital
Product Data.
J27-7
Tamper detection/Clear CMOS. The
default is Tamper Detect.
When you install the System
Management adapter, you must install
a jumper on the two bottom pins.
When your server model supports the
Systems Management Adapter, the
door keylock is enabled.
Clear CMOS position: When the jumper
is moved to this setting, it clears
CMOS and all configuration
information, including the power-on
password. See “Removing an
Unknown Power-on Password” on
page 63 for more information.
118
PC Server HMM
Jumper
Default
Jumper
Position
Jumper Description
(from left to right)
J44
HA Clustering Enable jumper (Not
supported, do not move the jumper.)
J45
SCSI Disable jumper (normally
enabled).
Not present on early System Boards
J46
Ethernet Disable jumper (normally
enabled).
Not present on early System Boards
J47
On-Board RAID Disable jumper
(normally enabled).
Not present on early System Boards
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
119
U-Bolt
120
PC Server HMM
Video Memory Module
Video
Memory
Module
Bevel
Notch
Module
Connector
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
121
Voltage
Attention
The PC Server 330 Type 8640 Models 11Y, 21Y,
PB0, PM0, and PT0 have a auto sensing voltage
power supply. There is no voltage switch on these
models.
Voltage Regulator Module
122
PC Server HMM
Symptom-to-FRU Index
The Symptom-to-FRU Index lists beeps, errors, symptoms,
and the possible causes. The most likely cause is listed
first. Use this Symptom-to-FRU Index to help you decide
which FRUs to have available when servicing the
computer. This Index contains the following
Notes
1. In this Index POST error codes and Diagnostic
error codes are listed separately.
2. For IBM devices not supported by this
Symptom-to-FRU Index, refer to the manual for
that device.
No Beep Symptoms
No Beep/Symptom
FRU/Action
No Beeps occur after
successfully completing
POST
1. Disconnected
speaker
2. Speaker
3. System Board
Beep Symptoms
Beep symptoms are short tones or a series of short tones
separated by pauses (intervals without sound). See the
following examples.
Beeps
Description
1-2-X
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
One beep
A pause (or break)
Two beeps
A pause (or break)
Any number of beeps
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
One beep
A pause (or break)
Two beeps
A pause (or break)
Any number of beeps
Description
1-2-X
4
Four continuous beeps
Beep/Symptom
FRU/Action
1-1-2
(CPU register test failure)
1. Optional
Microprocessor
(if installed)
2. Microprocessor
1-1-3
(CMOS write/read test
failure)
1. Real-Time Clock with
Battery
2. System Board
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
123
Beep/Symptom
FRU/Action
1-2-1
(Programmable Interval
Timer test failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
1-2-2
(DMA initialization test in
progress or failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
1-2-3
(DMA page register
write/read test in progress
or failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
1-2-4
(RAM refresh verification
failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
1-3-1
(1st 64K RAM test failure)
1. Dual Inline Memory
Module (DIMM)
2. Microprocessor Card
1-3-2
(1st 64K RAM parity test
failure)
1. Dual Inline Memory
Module
2. Microprocessor Card
3. System Board
1-3-3
(Slave DMA register test in
progress or failure)
1. Microprocessor Card
2. System Board
1-3-4
(Master DMA register test in
progress or failure)
1. Microprocessor Card
2. System Board
1-4-1
(Master interrupt mask
register test failure)
1. Microprocessor Card
2. System Board
1-4-2
(Slave interrupt mask
register test failure)
1. Microprocessor Card
2. System Board
1-4-4
(Keyboard controller test
failure)
1. System Board
2. Keyboard
2-2-2
(Search for video read only
memory in progress)
1. System Board
2-2-4
(Timer tick interrupt test in
progress or failure)
1. Real-Time Clock with
Battery
2. System Board
2-3-1
(Interval timer channel 2 test
in progress failure)
1. System Board
2-3-3
(Time of day clock test
failure)
1. System Board
2-4-3
(Test comparing CMOS
memory size against actual
in progress)
1. Real-Time Clock
Battery
2. System Board
124
PC Server HMM
Beep/Symptom
FRU/Action
2-4-4
(Memory size mismatch
occurred)
1. Dual Inline Memory
Module
2. Microprocessor Card
3. System Board
Three Short Beeps
1. Dual Inline Memory
Module
2. Microprocessor Card
3. System Board
One Continuous Beep
1. Optional
Microprocessor
(if installed)
2. Microprocessor
3. Microprocessor Card
4. System Board
Repeating Short Beeps
1. Keyboard
2. System Board
One Long and One Short
Beep
1. Video adapter
(if present)
2. System Board
3.
One Long and Two Short
Beeps
1. Video adapter
(if present)
2. System Board
Two Long and Two Short
Beeps
1. Video adapter
POST Error Codes
POST Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
101
(Timer tick interrupt failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor
102
(Timer 2 test failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor
106
(Diskette controller failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor
112
(I 2C interface hardware
error)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
3. Microprocessor
114
(Option read only memory
checksum failure)
1. Failing Adapter
2. Run Diagnostics
115
(Boot block checksum error)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
116
(Application processor
failure)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
151
(Real time clock failure)
1. Run Diagnostics
2. Battery/CMOS Chip
3. System Board
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
125
POST Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
161
(Real time clock battery
failure)
1. Battery
162
(Invalid configuration
information or CMOS RAM
checksum failure)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Failing Device
3. Battery/CMOS Chip
4. System Board
163
(Time of day not set)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Battery/CMOS Chip
3. System Board
164
(Memory size does not
match CMOS)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Dual Inline Memory
Module
3. Microprocessor Card
173
(Bad EEPROM cyclic
redundancy check 1)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Battery/CMOS Chip
3. System Board
175
(Bad EEPROM cyclic
redundancy check 1)
1. System Board
2. Microprocessor Card
176
(Computer cover or cable
cover was removed without
a key being used)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
177
(Bad Administrator
Password checksum)
1. System Board
178
(EEPROM is not functional)
1. System Board
183
(PAP is required)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
184
(Power-on password
corrupted)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. System Board
185
(Corrupted Boot Sequence)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. System Board
186
(System Board or security
hardware problem)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. System Board
187
(Vital Product Data S/N not
set)
1. Set vital product data
2. System Board
188
(Bad EEPROM cyclic
redundancy check 2)
1. System Board
126
PC Server HMM
POST Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
189
(Excessive password
attempts)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
and enter the
administrator
password
201
(Base or extended memory
error)
1. Dual Inline Memory
Module
2. Microprocessor Card
3. System Board
301
(Keyboard failure)
1. Keyboard
2. System Board
303
(Keyboard controller failure)
1. System Board
2. Keyboard
604
(Diskette drive 0 or 1 failure)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Diskette Drive
3. Diskette Drive Cable
4. System Board
662
(Diskette drive configuration
error)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
and Diagnostics
2. Diskette Drive
3. Diskette Drive Cable
4. System Board
962
(Parallel port configuration
error)
1. Disconnect external
cable on serial port
2. Run
Configuration/Setup
3. System Board
11XX
(Serial port configuration
error)
1. Disconnect external
cable on serial port
2. Run
Configuration/Setup
3. System Board
1800
(No more interrupt request
available)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Failing Adapter
3. System Board
1801
(No more room for option
read only memory)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Failing Adapter
3. System Board
1802
(No more input/output space
available)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Failing Adapter
3. System Board
1803
(No more memory above 1
MB available)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Failing Adapter
3. System Board
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
127
POST Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
1804
(No more memory below 1
MB available)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Move failing adapter to
slot 1 or 2
3. Failing Adapter
4. System Board
1805
(Checksum error or 0 size
option read only memory)
1. Remove failing
peripheral
component
interconnect (PCI)
card
2. System Board
1806
(PCI-PCI bridge error)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Move failing adapter to
slot 1 or 2
3. Failing Adapter
4. System Board
1962
(No valid startup devices
were found.)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. System Board
2400
(Display adapter failed;
using alternate)
1. Video Adapter
(if installed)
2. System Board
2462
(Video configuration error)
1. Video Adapter
(if installed)
2. System Board
8601
(Pointing device failure)
1. Pointing Device
2. System Board
8602
(Pointing device failure)
1. Pointing Device
2. System Board
8603
(Pointing device has been
removed)
1. Pointing Device
2. System Board
000120P0
(Primary microprocessor
cache failure)
1. Microprocessor
Board
000120P1
(Secondary microprocessor
cache failure)
1. Microprocessor
Board
2. System Board
01298001
(No update data for boot
processor)
1. Update BIOS
01298002
(No update data for
application processor)
1. Update BIOS
01298003
(Bad update data for boot
processor)
1. Update BIOS
2. System Board
128
PC Server HMM
POST Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
01298004
(Bad update data for
application processor)
1. Update BIOS
2. System Board
I9990301
(Fixed disk failure)
1. Run
Configuration/Setup
2. Fixed disk drive
Diagnostic Error Codes
In the following error codes, X can be any number or letter.
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
01A0h
(Application Processor did
not complete in time
allotted)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A1h
(Failed 586 Instruction test)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A2h
(Failed 486 Instruction test)
1. Voltage regulator
2. Processor
3. Processor Card
01A3h
(Failed 386 Instruction test)
1. Voltage regulator
2. Processor
3. Processor Card
01A4h
(Failed 386 Register test)
1. Voltage regulator
2. Processor
3. Processor Card
01A5h
(Failed 386 ALU/Multiply
test)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A6h
(Failed 32bit Address test)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A7h
(Unknown error reported
from Application Processor)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A8h
(Invalid processor(s)
found/none found to test)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
01A9h
(Application Processor Test
error)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
129
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
01AAh
(No Application Processor
found)
1.
2.
3.
4.
0601h
(Format failed)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette drive
3. System board
0602h
(Verify failed)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette drive
3. System board
0603h
(Read failed)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette drive
3. System board
0604h
(Write failed)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette drive
3. System board
0606h
(General drive failure)
1. Diskette drive
0607h
(Write Protect test failed)
1. Diskette drive
2. System board
0608h
(Write Protect set on - it
should not be)
1. Diskette drive
2. System board
0610h
(DMA error on system
board)
1. System board
0613h
(Media not supported)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette Drive
0615h
(Drive was empty)
1. Diskette
2. Diskette Drive
0617h
(Program error)
1. Rerun Diagnostic
2. Processor Card
3. System Board
0647h
(Excess drives found with
BIOS or in CMOS)
1. Rerun Diagnostic
2. Run Setup
3. System Board
0648h
(Failed resetting controller)
1. Diskette drive
2. System Board
0649h
(Setup bad. Check system
configuration)
1. Run setup
0658h
(Change Line test failed)
1. Diskette Drive
7201h
(Invalid Vendor ID or Device
ID)
1. System Board
7202h
(Failed Test #1 - I/O Access
Test)
1. System Board
130
PC Server HMM
Voltage regulator
Processor
Processor Card
System Board
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
7217h
(Unable To Acquire Adapter
Base I/O)
1. System Board
7218h
(Unable To Acquire Adapter
IRQ)
1. System Board
7219h
(Failed Ethernet Data
Transceiver test, see“Error
Code 7219h” on page 136
.)
1. System Board
0301h
(Keyboard test failed)
1. Keyboard
2. Keyboard Cable
3. System Board
0303h
(Keyboard test failed)
1. Keyboard
2. Keyboard Cable
3. System Board
AA05h
(PROBLEM DETERMINING
DIMM PHYSICAL
ADDRESSES)
1. Processor Card
AA06h
(PCI BIOS call failed)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA07h
(DATA AREA FAILS TEST)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA08h
(ECC un-correctable
memory error detected!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA09h
(ECC correctable memory
error detected)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA0Ah
(Both single and multiple bit
errors detected!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA0Bh
(PCI BIOS call failed!
CONFIG ADDR NOT ON
BOUNDARY)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA0Ch
(UnExpected NMI occurred!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
3. System Board
AA0Dh
(ECC forced single bit error
was NOT detected)
1. Processor Card
AA0Eh
(The forced
ECC-single-bit-error was
NOT detected and an
UNEXPECTED
Un-Correctable error
occurred!)
1. Processor Card
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
131
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
AA0Fh
(The forced
ECC-single-bit-error was
detected but an
UNEXPECTED
Un-Correctable error
occurred!)
1. Processor Card
AA10h
(The data was NOT
corrected)
1. Processor Card
AA11h
(PCI BIOS call failed!)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA12h
(EXPECTED NMI did NOT
occur!)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA13h
(Forced Un-Correctable
error was NOT detected!)
1. Processor Card
AA14h
(The Forced Un-Correctable
error was NOT detected and
an UNEXPECTED ECC
Correctable error occurred!)
1. Processor Card
AA15h
(The ECC forced
un-correctable error
detected OK but an
UNEXPECTED ECC
correctable error occurred)
1. Processor Card
AA16h
(ECC un-correctable
memory error detected!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA17h
(ECC correctable memory
error detected!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
3.
AA18h
(Both single and multiple bit
errors)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA19h
(PCI BIOS is NOT
supported!)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA1Ah
(PCI BIOS did NOT find
Memory Controller)
1. Processor Card
2. System Board
AA1Bh
(ERROR READING Memory
Controller Config Register)
1. Processor Card
AA1Ch
(UNKNOWN Memory
Controller Release level)
1. Processor Card
132
PC Server HMM
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
AA1Dh
(DIMM IS SMALLER THAN
SYSTEM SUPPORTS)
1. DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA1Eh
(DIMM IS LARGER THAN
SYSTEM SUPPORTS!)
1. DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA23h
(Memory Controller Dram
row boundary Register data
error)
1. Processor Card
AA24h
(MTRRs exceed program
maximum!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA25h
(MTRRs NOT supported!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA26h
(CPUID NOT recognized!)
1. Processor
2. Processor Card
AA27h
(Invalid MTRR service
request!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA29h
(MEMORY CONTROLLER
HAS LOGGED AN
ERROR!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA2Ah
(DIMM in connector JX
FAILS FAST ACCESS
SPEED TEST (PATTERN
0)!)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA2Bh
(DIMM in connector JX
FAILS FAST ACCESS
SPEED TEST (PATTERN
1)!)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA2Ch
(MEMORY ADDRESS
TEST FAILED!)
1. DIMMs 1,2,3
2. Processor Card
AA2Dh
(DIMM in connector JX IS
STUCK-AT-0)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA2Eh
(DIMM in connector JX IS
STUCK-AT-1)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA2Fh
(DIMM in connector JX
FAILS ASCII R/W TEST!)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
AA30h
(DIMM in connector JX
PROBLEM DETERMINING
DIMM 16KB ALIGNMENT!)
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
133
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
AA31h
(DIMM in connector JX NMI
HANDLER FAILED TO
INSTALL OK!)
1. Specified DIMM
2. Processor Card
0901h, 0902h, 0904h,
0906h, 0908h, 090Ah
(Parallel Test Failed)
1. System Board
8601h
(Bad pointing device)
1. Pointing Device
8602h
(User detected pointing
device error)
1. Pointing Device
8603h
(No pointing device was
found)
1. Attach Mouse
2. Rerun Diagnostic
11XXh
(Serial Test Failed)
1. System Board
0104h, 0105h, 0106h,
0109h
(Planar Test Failed)
1. System Board
0501h
(Video register test error)
1. System Board
0503h
(Video frequency test error)
1. System Board
0506h
(Video get VESA mode
error)
1. System Board
0511h
(Video VGA memory test
error)
1. System Board
0513h
(Video frequency test time
out error)
1. System Board
0521h
(Video DAC test error)
1. System Board
0522h
(Video attribute test error)
1. System Board
0523h
(Video visual test error)
1. System board
0524h
(Video monitor test error)
1. Video Monitor
2. System Board
0530h
(Video Memory module #1
error )
1. System Board
0531h
(Video Memory module #2
error)
1. System Board
0532h
(Video Memory module #3
error)
1. Video Memory
Module
2. System Board
134
PC Server HMM
Diagnostic Error
Code/Symptom
FRU/Action
0533h
(Video Memory module #4
error)
1. Video Memory
Module
2. System board
0540h
(Video Test error)
1. Rerun Diagnostic
2. System Board
RAID POST Error Codes
Once the RAID test has completed the following register
information is displayed on the screen before returning to
the Diagnostic Control program:
Hdwr: ISPR= aaaa
BCS= bb
ECS= cc
The number aaaa is the controller POST, it should
normally read EF10 which indicates NO ERROR. BCS and
ECS are configuration registers.
Note
For a full list of the BCS ECS configuration error
messages, refer to the manual for the RAID adapter.
Error Code
FRU/Action
1XXX
ServeRAID POST - Flash
Checksum error
1. System Board
2XXX
ServeRAID POST - Code
DRAM error
1. System Board
3XXX
ServeRAID POST - NVRAM
error
1. System Board
4XXX
ServeRAID POST Timer/Cache Mem Ctl error
1. System Board
5XXX
ServeRAID POST - Cache
Mem Ctl error
1. System Board
6XXX
ServeRAID POST - Cache
DRAM error
1. System Board
7XXX
ServeRAID POST Host/Local PCI Bus
Interface error
1. System Board
8XXX
ServeRAID POST - SCSI
IOP error
1. System Board
9XXX
ServeRAID POST - SCSI
Termination error
1. System Board
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
135
Error Code
FRU/Action
AXXX
ServeRAID POST - SCSI
IOP error
1. System Board
BXXX
ServeRAID POST - SCSI
Bus Interface error
1. Cable
2. System Board
RAID Diagnostic Error Codes
Error Code
FRU/Action
2601h
Adapter never came back
from res
1. System Board
2602h
CBSP OP bit = 0
1. System Board
2603h
ISPR not = 0EF10h
1. System Board
2604h
Unable to get 2'nd ISPR
byte
1. System Board
2605h
Timeout of clr HISR
1. System Board
2606h
Timeout of 2'nd read of
HISR
1. System Board
2607h
BCS bit VBC not = 1
1. System Board
2608h
CBSP OP bit not = 0
1. System Board
2609h
PCI BIOS Error
1. System Board
260Ah
No PCI BIOS found
1. System Board
260Bh
Adapter never came back
from res
1. System Board
2610h
ServeRAID POST Error RAID Controller Hardware
problem
1. System Board
2620h
RAID Configuration Error Disk Configuration or Hard
Disk problem
1. System Board
Error Code 7219h
Error code 7219h returns the following additional
information in the failing data field.
136
PC Server HMM
Failing Data
Description
19010101
Error setting DMA channel
19010102
Error setting IRQ
19020201
Ethernet chip did not respond to
initialization
19020202
Ethernet chip status error
19020203
Ethernet chip initialization did not
complete
1903xxyy
Error in Ethernet loop-back test (xxyy =
number of completed transmit and
received data packets)
BCS/ECS Configuration Registers
Codes
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
BCS not in table
ECS not in table
Explanation: The
adapter is not
functioning
properly.
Action: Run
ServeRAID
diagnostics and
display message
M4.
0000 0000
(X'00')
0000 0001
(X'01')
Explanation:
Invalid Flash
configuration.
Action: Run
ServeRAID
configuration and
display message
M2.
0000 0000
(X'00')
0000 0010
(X'02')
Explanation:
Invalid NVRAM
configuration.
Action: Run
ServeRAID
configuration and
display message
M2.
0000 0000
(X'00')
0000 0011
(X'03')
Explanation:
Invalid Flash and
NVRAM
configuration.
Action: Run
ServeRAID
configuration and
display message
M3.
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
137
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0001
(X'01')
0000 1000
(X'08')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL
drive(s) are not
responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0001 1000
(X'18')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0010 1000
(X'28')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0011 1000
(X'38')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL,
HSP/SHS, and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0100 1000
(X'48')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL
drive(s) are not
responding and
unidentified drive(s)
were found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
138
PC Server HMM
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0001
(X'01')
0101 1000
(X'58')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0110 1000
(X'68')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0001
(X'01')
0111 1000
(X'78')
Explanation: No
configuration was
found in drive(s)
and ONL/RBL,
HSP/SHS, and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1000 1000
(X'88')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL
drive(s) are not
responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1001 1000
(X'98')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
139
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0011
(X'03')
1010 1000
(X'A8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1011 1000
(X'B8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL,
HSP/SHS, and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1100 1000
(X'C8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL
drive(s) are not
responding and
unidentified drive(s)
were found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1101 1000
(X'D8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
140
PC Server HMM
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0011
(X'03')
1110 1000
(X'E8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0011
(X'03')
1111 1000
(X'F8')
Explanation: A
drive was imported
from another
system and it has
valid configuration
and ONL/RBL,
HSP/SHS, and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F4, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0000 1000
(X'08')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0000 1100
(X'0C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL drive(s)
are not responding
and drive in wrong
ID.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0001 1000
(X'18')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0001 1100
(X'1C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and drive in wrong
ID.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
141
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0111
(X'07')
0010 1000
(X'28')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0010 1100
(X'2C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and drive in wrong
ID.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0011 1000
(X'38')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL,
RDY/SBY, and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0011 1100
(X'3C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL,
RDY/SBY, and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and drive in wrong
ID.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0100 1000
(X'48')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0100 1100
(X'4C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL drive(s)
are not responding,
drive in wrong ID,
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
142
PC Server HMM
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0111
(X'07')
0101 1000
(X'58')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0101 1100
(X'5C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding,
drive in wrong ID,
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0110 1000
(X'68')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0110 1100
(X'6C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding,
drive in wrong ID,
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 0111
(X'07')
0111 1000
(X'78')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL,
RDY/SBY, and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
143
BCS
ECS
Explanation and
Possible
Recovery Action
0000 0111
(X'07')
0111 1100
(X'7C')
Explanation:
ONL/RBL,
RDY/SBY, and
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding,
drive in wrong ID,
and unidentified
drive(s) were
found.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F3, F10
0000 1001
(X'09')
0000 0000
(X'00')
0000 1001
(X'09')
0001 0000
(X'10')
Explanation: No
error occurred.
Action: None
Explanation:
HSP/SHS drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 1001
(X'09')
0010 0000
(X'20')
Explanation:
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 1001
(X'09')
0011 0000
(X'30')
Explanation:
HSP/SHS and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 1111
(X'0F')
0000 0000
(X'00')
Explanation: No
error occurred.
Action: None
0000 1111
(X'0F')
0001 0000
(X'10')
Explanation:
HSP/SHS drives
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 1111
(X'0F')
0010 0000
(X'20')
Explanation:
RDY/SBY drives
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
0000 1111
(X'0F')
0011 0000
(X'30')
Explanation:
HSP/SHS and
RDY/SBY drive(s)
are not responding.
Action: Press F1,
F2, F10
144
PC Server HMM
Parts Listing
23
1
3
2
4
5
6
22
21
7
20
8
9
10
11
19
12
13
18
14
17
16
15
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
145
System
Index
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
146
System (PC Server 330 - Type 8640)
Models 11Y, 21Y, PB0, PM0, PT0
DASD Hot Swap Backplane
DASD Hot Swap Shell
DASD Hot Swap Door
Fan Assembly 80 MM with Connector
Front Bezel/Door Assembly
Front Bezel/Door Assembly (Models
11Y, 21Y)
PC Server 330 Label
Keylock with Key
CD-ROM 16/8 Bit SCSI Converter
MKE CR-504 8X SCSI CD-ROM Drive
See“CD-ROM Replacement” on
page 91 .
12X SCSI CD-ROM Drive (Models 11Y,
21Y)
8 MM White Blank Bezel
LED/On/Off Switch Cable Assembly
3.5-Inch Blank Vented Bezel
1.44MB Diskette Drive
Pedestal
Speaker
Fan Assembly 120 MM with Connector
Fan Assembly 120 MM with Connector
(Models 11Y, 21Y)
Card Guide
DASD 3-Drive Cage Assembly
Microprocessor Card without Processor
(Models PT0, PBO, 11Y, 21Y)
System Board without Memory and
Microprocessor
350W Power Supply Assembly
Base Frame Assembly
Access Cover
Air Baffle
C2 Cable Cover (Optional, when
available)
C2 Security Cable (Optional, when
available)
DASD Tray
Door Hinge
32 MB ECC 3.3v Buffered DIMM
(Model PM0)
64 MB ECC 3.3v Buffered DIMM
(Models 11Y, 21Y, PB0, PT0)
128MB ECC 3.3V Buffered DIMM
(Models 8S0, PS0, PSW, PM0, and
PMW) (Optional)
256MB ECC 3.3V Buffered DIMM
(Models 8S0, PS0, PSW, PM0, and
PMW) (Optional)
Heat Sink with Chip and Grease (Model
PM0)
Keyboard with Cable
See“Keyboards (101/102 Key)” on
page 149 .
Lithium Coin Cell Battery
See“Lithium Battery Notice” on
page 159 before replacing this FRU,
PC Server HMM
FRU
No.
06H8576
61H0030
76H5035
60H9673
60H7061
11L2347
75H8324
33F8433
92F0324
73H2601
93H8055
72H2668
55H8168
71G0770
93F2361
96G2412
06H2649
76H3447
11L2341
60H5742
60H9344
12J2681
60H8109
75H8479
61H0087
60H9349
01K7067
55H8188
76H0206
06H8631
55H8186
12J4121
12J4122
76H0656
12J4123
76H1814
33F8354
Index
System (PC Server 330 - Type 8640)
Models 11Y, 21Y, PB0, PM0, PT0
Microprocessor Card (Model PM0)
Logo Gray
Miscellaneous Parts Kit (Models PB0,
PT0, PTW)
Ÿ 32X5/16-Inch Screws (6 each)
Ÿ EMC Contact
Ÿ EMC Ground Contacts (4 each)
Ÿ I/O Blank
Ÿ FEM-Nut 4-40 Screws (2 each)
Ÿ Floppy M3 Screws (2 each)
Ÿ HF 6-32 Screws (2 each)
Ÿ PL M3X8 HEX Screws (3 each)
Ÿ System Board Edge Support
Ÿ Power Switch Bracket
8 MM EMC Shield
Mouse
200 MHz Microprocessor Chip with
512K Cache and Heat Sink (Model
PM0)
233 MHz Microprocessor Chip with
512K Cache and Heat Sink (Model
PT0)
266 MHz Microprocessor Chip with
512K Cache and Heat Sink (Model
PB0)
300 MHz Microprocessor Chip with
512K Cache and Heat Sink (Model
11Y)
333 MHz Microprocessor Chip with
512K Cache and Heat Sink (Model
21Y)
Power Cord
See“Power Cords” on page 150 .
Processor Card Tray (Models 11Y,
21Y, PB0, PT0)
Processor Card Tray(Model PM0)
PC Service Label (Models 11Y, 21Y)
PC Service Label (Models PT0, PB0)
PC Service Label (Model PM0)
Rear Bezel (Optional)
Service Processor Adapter (Model 21Y)
Shadow Box
Terminator Card (Models 11Y, 21Y,
PB0, PT0)
Voltage Regulator Card (Models 11Y,
21Y, PB0, PT0)
Voltage Regulator Card (Model PM0)
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
FRU
No.
75H7419
12J5687
55H8179
72H2666
06H4595
12J3501
12J2700
12J2703
11L1808
01K4327
60H9816
60H9691
11L2355
60H7180
60H9824
60H9819
12J4743
60H8258
12J2701
12J2699
76H1815
147
Cables
Cables (Server 330 - Type 8640)
148
DASD Status Cable
FRU
No.
60H9326
Diskette Drive Signal Cable
06H6344
Parallel Data Cable
61H0036
SCSI Cable (1X)
61H0075
SCSI Internal/External Cable
61H0084
SCSI Hard Disk Drive Fast/Wide Cable
(3X)(Terminated)
76H3455
SCSI Short Cable to I/O Casting
55H8190
Serial Cable
61H0034
PC Server HMM
Keyboards (101/102 Key)
Keyboards (101/102 key)
FRU No.
Arabic
Belgium-Dutch
Belgium-French
Bulgarian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
Finnish
French
German
Greek
Hebrew
Hungarian
Iceland
Italy
Latvia
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Romanian
Russian-Cyrillic
Serbian-Cyrillic
Slovak
Slovenia/Croatia/Bosnia
South Africa
Spanish
Swedish
Swiss-French
Swiss-German
Turkish 179
Turkish 440
U.K. English
U.S. English
U.S. English (E/ME/A use only)
1391490
1391414
1391526
1399583
1399570
1391407
1391511
1391411
1391402
1391403
1399046
1391408
1399581
1391495
1393395
1391406
1391409
1399580
1391410
1399582
1399579
1399578
1399571
1393669
1396790
1391405
1391411
1391412
1391412
8125409
1393286
1391406
75H9505
1396790
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
149
Power Cords
Power Cords
FRU No.
Arabic
Belgium
Bulgaria
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Israel
Italy
Latvia
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Serbia
Slovakia
South Africa
Spain
Switzerland
Switzerland (French/German)
U.S. English
U.K./Ireland
Yugoslavia
14F0033
1339520
1339520
1339520
13F9997
1339520
1339520
1339520
1339520
14F0087
14F0069
1339520
1339520
1339520
1339520
1339520
1339520
1339520
14F0015
1339520
1339520
14F0051
62X1045
14F0033
1339520
150
PC Server HMM
Parts Listing (PC Server Advanced
Systems Management Adapter)
Index
PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter
FRU No.
PC Server Advanced Systems
Management Adapter
(Service Processor Adapter)
Lithium battery
(See “Lithium Battery Notice” on
page 159)
External Power Control Unit
76H3240
33F8354
71G6222
Cables
1
2
3
4
Index
1
2
3
4
Cables (PC Server Advanced
Systems Management Adapter)
FRU
No.
16-pin Interface Cable
34-pin Interface Cable
34/26-pin Interface Cable
Processor Adapter External Power
Connector Cable
76H6827
76H3257
76H6828
76H4054
PC Server 330 - Type 8640
151
Related Service Information
Important
The service procedures are designed to help you
isolate problems. They are written with the
assumption that you have model-specific training on
all computers, or that are familiar with the computers,
functions, terminology, and service information
provided in this supplement and the PS/2 Hardware
Maintenance Manual (part number 83G8990, form
number S52G-9971-02).
Safety Information
. . . . . . . . . . . .
General Safety
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Safety . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Inspection Guide
. . . . . . . .
Handling Electrostatic Discharge-Sensitive
Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grounding Requirements . . . . . . . .
Lithium Battery Notice . . . . . . . . . . .
Laser Compliance Statement
. . . . . . .
Software/Hardware Mismatch Problems
. .
Undetermined Problems . . . . . . . . . .
Send Us Your Comments! . . . . . . . . .
Problem Determination Tips . . . . . . . .
Phone Numbers, U.S. and Canada . . . . .
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1997
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158
158
159
160
162
164
165
166
167
169
169
153
Safety Information
The following section contains the safety information that
you need to be familiar with before servicing an IBM
mobile computer.
General Safety
Follow these rules to ensure general safety:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
154
Observe good housekeeping in the area of the
machines during and after maintenance.
When lifting any heavy object:
1. Ensure you can stand safely without slipping.
2. Distribute the weight of the object equally
between your feet.
3. Use a slow lifting force. Never move suddenly
or twist when you attempt to lift.
4. Lift by standing or by pushing up with your leg
muscles; this action removes the strain from the
muscles in your back. Do not attempt to lift any
objects that weigh more than 16 kg (35 lb) or
objects that you think are too heavy for you.
Do not perform any action that causes hazards to the
customer, or that makes the equipment unsafe.
Before you start the machine, ensure that other
service representatives and the customer's personnel
are not in a hazardous position.
Place removed covers and other parts in a safe
place, away from all personnel, while you are
servicing the machine.
Keep your tool case away from walk areas so that
other people will not trip over it.
Do not wear loose clothing that can be trapped in the
moving parts of a machine. Ensure that your sleeves
are fastened or rolled up above your elbows. If your
hair is long, fasten it.
Insert the ends of your necktie or scarf inside clothing
or fasten it with a nonconductive clip, approximately 8
centimeters (3 inches) from the end.
Do not wear jewelry, chains, metal-frame eyeglasses,
or metal fasteners for your clothing.
Remember: Metal objects are good electrical
conductors.
Wear safety glasses when you are: hammering,
drilling soldering, cutting wire, attaching springs, using
solvents, or working in any other conditions that might
be hazardous to your eyes.
After service, reinstall all safety shields, guards,
labels, and ground wires. Replace any safety device
that is worn or defective.
Reinstall all covers correctly before returning the
machine to the customer.
PC Server HMM
Electrical Safety
Observe the following rules when working on electrical
equipment.
Important
Use only approved tools and test equipment. Some
hand tools have handles covered with a soft material
that does not insulate you when working with live
electrical currents.
Many customers have, near their equipment, rubber
floor mats that contain small conductive fibers to
decrease electrostatic discharges. Do not use this
type of mat to protect yourself from electrical shock.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Find the room emergency power-off (EPO) switch,
disconnecting switch, or electrical outlet. If an
electrical accident occurs, you can then operate the
switch or unplug the power cord quickly.
Do not work alone under hazardous conditions or
near equipment that has hazardous voltages.
Disconnect all power before:
– Performing a mechanical inspection
– Working near power supplies
– Removing or installing main units
Before you start to work on the machine, unplug the
power cord. If you cannot unplug it, ask the customer
to power-off the wall box that supplies power to the
machine and to lock the wall box in the off position.
If you need to work on a machine that has exposed
electrical circuits, observe the following precautions:
– Ensure that another person, familiar with the
power-off controls, is near you.
–
–
–
Remember: Another person must be there to
switch off the power, if necessary.
Use only one hand when working with
powered-on electrical equipment; keep the other
hand in your pocket or behind your back.
Remember: There must be a complete circuit to
cause electrical shock. By observing the above
rule, you may prevent a current from passing
through your body.
When using testers, set the controls correctly
and use the approved probe leads and
accessories for that tester.
Stand on suitable rubber mats (obtained locally,
if necessary) to insulate you from grounds such
as metal floor strips and machine frames.
Observe the special safety precautions when you
work with very high voltages; these instructions are in
the safety sections of maintenance information. Use
extreme care when measuring high voltages.
Related Service Information
155
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Regularly inspect and maintain your electrical hand
tools for safe operational condition.
Do not use worn or broken tools and testers.
Never assume that power has been disconnected
from a circuit. First, check that it has been
powered-off.
Always look carefully for possible hazards in your
work area. Examples of these hazards are moist
floors, nongrounded power extension cables, power
surges, and missing safety grounds.
Do not touch live electrical circuits with the reflective
surface of a plastic dental mirror. The surface is
conductive; such touching can cause personal injury
and machine damage.
Do not service the following parts with the power on
when they are removed from their normal operating
places in a machine:
– Power supply units
– Pumps
– Blowers and fans
– Motor generators
and similar units. (This practice ensures correct
grounding of the units.)
If an electrical accident occurs:
– Use caution; do not become a victim
yourself.
– Switch off power.
– Send another person to get medical aid.
Safety Inspection Guide
The intent of this inspection guide is to assist you in
identifying potentially unsafe conditions on these products.
Each machine, as it was designed and built, had required
safety items installed to protect users and service
personnel from injury. This guide addresses only those
items. However, good judgment should be used to identify
potential safety hazards due to attachment of non-IBM
features or options not covered by this inspection guide.
If any unsafe conditions are present, you must determine
how serious the apparent hazard could be and whether
you can continue without first correcting the problem.
Consider these conditions and the safety hazards they
present:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
156
Electrical hazards, especially primary power (primary
voltage on the frame can cause serious or fatal
electrical shock).
Explosive hazards, such as a damaged CRT face or
bulging capacitor
Mechanical hazards, such as loose or missing
hardware
PC Server HMM
The guide consists of a series of steps presented in a
checklist. Begin the checks with the power off, and the
power cord disconnected.
Checklist:
1. Check exterior covers for damage (loose, broken, or
sharp edges).
2. Power-off the computer. Disconnect the power cord.
3. Check the power cord for:
a. A third-wire ground connector in good condition.
Use a meter to measure third-wire ground
continuity for 0.1 ohm or less between the
external ground pin and frame ground.
b. The power cord should be the appropriate type
as specified in the parts listings.
c. Insulation must not be frayed or worn.
4. Remove the cover.
5. Check for any obvious non-IBM alterations. Use
good judgment as to the safety of any non-IBM
alterations.
6. Check inside the unit for any obvious unsafe
conditions, such as metal filings, contamination, water
or other liquids, or signs of fire or smoke damage.
7. Check for worn, frayed, or pinched cables.
8. Check that the power-supply cover fasteners (screws
or rivets) have not been removed or tampered with.
Related Service Information
157
Handling Electrostatic
Discharge-Sensitive Devices
Any computer part containing transistors or integrated
circuits (ICs) should be considered sensitive to electrostatic
discharge (ESD). ESD damage can occur when there is a
difference in charge between objects. Protect against ESD
damage by equalizing the charge so that the machine, the
part, the work mat, and the person handling the part are all
at the same charge.
Notes:
1. Use product-specific ESD procedures when they
exceed the requirements noted here.
2. Make sure that the ESD protective devices you use
have been certified (ISO 9000) as fully effective.
When handling ESD-sensitive parts:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Keep the parts in protective packages until they are
inserted into the product.
Avoid contact with other people.
Wear a grounded wrist strap against your skin to
eliminate static on your body.
Prevent the part from touching your clothing. Most
clothing is insulative and retains a charge even when
you are wearing a wrist strap.
Use the black side of a grounded work mat to provide
a static-free work surface. The mat is especially
useful when handling ESD-sensitive devices.
Select a grounding system, such as those listed
below, to provide protection that meets the specific
service requirement.
Note: The use of a grounding system is desirable
but not required to protect against ESD
damage.
–
–
–
Attach the ESD ground clip to any frame ground,
ground braid, or green-wire ground.
Use an ESD common ground or reference point
when working on a double-insulated or
battery-operated system. You can use coax or
connector-outside shells on these systems.
Use the round ground-prong of the AC plug on
AC-operated computers.
Grounding Requirements
Electrical grounding of the computer is required for
operator safety and correct system function. Proper
grounding of the electrical outlet can be verified by a
certified electrician.
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Lithium Battery Notice
CAUTION
Pour éviter tout risque d'explosion, remplacez la pile
selon les instructions du fabricant qui en définit les
équivalences. Ne cherchez pas à la démonter ou à la
recharger. Ne l'exposez ni au feu, ni à l'eau. Ne la
mettez pas en court-circuit. Pour le reyclage ou la
mise au rebut des piles usagées, conformez-vous à la
réglementation en vigueur.
Die Batterie kann bei unsachgemäßem Austauschen
explodieren. Eine verbrauchte Batterie nur durch eine
gleichwertige, vom Hersteller empfohlene Batterie
ersetzen. Die Batterie nicht zerlegen, wiederaufladen
oder kurzschließen. Die Batterie vor Feuer und Nässe
schützen. Bei der Entsorgung der aufladbaren
Batterie die örtlichen Richtlinien für Sondermüll sowie
die allgemeinen Sicherheitsbestimmungen beachten.
Se la batteria è sostituita in modo non corretto
potrebbe esserci pericolo di esplosione. Si
raccomanda di sostituirla con una batteria dello stesso
tipo o equivalente. Non smontarla, ricaricarla, gettarla
nell'acqua o nel fuoco, o cortocircuitarla. Smaltire la
batteria secondo la normativa in vigore (DPR 915/82,
successive disposizioni e disposizioni locali).
Hay peligro de explosión si la batería se sustituye
incorrectamente. No la desmonte, recargue, eche al
fuego o al agua, ni la cortocircuite. Deseche la batería
tal y como disponga la normativa local.
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced.
Replace only with the same or equivalent type
recommended by the manufacturer's instructions. Do
not disassemble it, recharge it, throw it into fire or
water, or short-circuit it. Dispose of the battery as
required by local ordinances or regulations.
Related Service Information
159
Laser Compliance Statement
Some IBM Personal Computer models are equipped from
the factory with a CD-ROM drive. CD-ROM drives are
also sold separately as options. The CD-ROM drive is a
laser product. The CD-ROM drive is certified in the U.S. to
conform to the requirements of the Department of Health
and Human Services 21 Code of Federal Regulations
(DHHS 21 CFR) Subchapter J for Class 1 laser products.
Elsewhere, the drive is certified to conform to the
requirements of the International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) 825 and CENELEC EN 60 825 for
Class 1 laser products.
When a CD-ROM drive is installed, note the following.
CAUTION:
Use of controls or adjustments or performance of
procedures other than those specified herein might
result in hazardous radiation exposure.
O uso de controles, ajustes ou desempenho de
procedimentos diferentes daqueles aqui especificados
pode resultar em perigosa exposição à radiação.
Pour éviter tout risque d'exposition au rayon laser,
respectez les consignes de réglage et d'utilisation des
commandes, ainsi que les procédures décrites.
Werden Steuer- und Einstellelemente anders als hier
festgesetzt verwendet, kann gefährliche
Laserstrahlung auftreten.
L'utilizzo di controlli, regolazioni o l'esecuzione di
procedure diverse da quelle specificate possono
provocare l'esposizione a
160
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El uso de controles o ajustes o la ejecución de
procedimientos distintos de los aquí especificados
puede provocar la exposición a radiaciones
peligrosas.
Opening the CD-ROM drive could result in exposure to
hazardous laser radiation. There are no serviceable parts
inside the CD-ROM drive. Do not open.
Some CD-ROM drives contain an embedded Class 3A or
Class 3B laser diode. Note the following.
DANGER:
Laser radiation when open. Do not stare into the
beam, do not view directly with optical instruments,
and avoid direct exposure to the beam.
Radiação por raio laser ao abrir. Não olhe fixo no feixe
de luz, não olhe diretamente por meio de instrumentos
óticos e evite exposição direta com o feixe de luz.
Rayonnement laser si carter ouvert. Évitez de fixer le
faisceau, de le regarder directement avec des
instruments optiques, ou de vous exposer au rayon.
Laserstrahlung bei geöffnetem Gerät. Nicht direkt oder
über optische Instrumente in den Laserstrahl sehen
und den Strahlungsbereich meiden.
Kinyitáskor lézersugár ! Ne nézzen bele se szabad
szemmel, se optikai eszközökkel. Kerülje a
sugárnyalábbal való érintkezést !
Aprendo l'unità vengono emesse radiazioni laser. Non
fissare il fascio, non guardarlo direttamente con
strumenti ottici e evitare l'esposizione diretta al fascio.
Radiación láser al abrir. No mire fijamente ni examine
con instrumental óptico el haz de luz. Evite la
exposición directa al haz.
Related Service Information
161
Software/Hardware Mismatch Problems
If a failure appears to be the result of a defective FRU, but
the diagnostic tests run error-free, there might be a
software and hardware mismatch. These problems might
be intermittent, and they are usually difficult to diagnose.
If you are experiencing this type of problem, and the
operating system is of the “direct driver” variety, which
bypasses the BIOS interface, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
AIX
Netware
SCO UNIX
Some “windowing” interfaces
Other Unix-based software
the most-likely cause of the problem is a mismatch
between the software and the hardware.
The following information is provided to help you resolve
these problems:
Software Can Be Sensitive to the Hardware
Direct-driver software is sensitive to variations in hardware
design. The resulting incompatibilities are usually
addressed with a revision (sometimes referred to as a
patch), to the direct-driver software. Make certain the
software is current and that all known revisions are
installed. The IBM on-line bulletin board (sometimes
referred to as PCPROD), and other software tools sources,
such as Novell Netware, should be referenced by the
software support personnel for any revisions provided by
the appropriate software vendor.
The most-likely cause of these types of problems, when
direct-driver software is involved, is the failure to obtain the
latest revisions from the software vendor.
Software Installation
It is very important to follow the vendor's installation
procedures. The software should not be migrated from
another system, unless the installation instructions indicate
that migration is supported (especially from a different
model in the product line).
Important
Migrating adapters from slower systems to faster
systems might cause problems. This is due to
device-specific, system-specific, or time-dependent
software code, that controls these devices.
162
PC Server HMM
Adapter and Software Compatibility
Hardware adapters for some operating systems must be
approved by the software vendor to be compatible with
that software. The approval is specific to the system,
adapter E.C. level, and the software version. Contact the
software vendor to confirm that system and adapter
configuration is supported by their software level. The
compatibility support is especially important for, (but not
limited to), all LAN adapters and RIPL applications.
Software Failures After a Hardware Change
After the initial installation, any changes in the hardware
configuration (addition or changes of adapters or features),
might result in computer failures and require the
reinstallation of the operating system or the software
revisions.
Specific hardware configuration changes (such as memory
address, interrupt level, or programmable option select),
might result in a computer failure if the software has
unique operating requirements.
Related Service Information
163
Undetermined Problems
You are here because the diagnostic tests did not identify
the failure, there is no Devices List, or the system is
inoperative.
Note: If you suspect a software mismatch is causing
failures (solid or intermittent), be sure to see
“Software/Hardware Mismatch Problems” on
page 162.
Check the power supply voltages. See “Power Supply
Voltages” on page 87. If the voltages are not correct,
replace the power supply. If the voltages are correct,
return here and do the following:
1. Power-off the computer.
2. Remove or disconnect the following (one at a time)
until you find the failure (power-on the computer and
reconfigure each time).
Ÿ Any external devices
Ÿ Surge suppressor device (on the computer)
Ÿ Modem, printer, mouse, or non-IBM devices
Ÿ Each adapter
Ÿ Drives
Ÿ Memory-Module Kits
Note
Minimum operating requirements for the PC
Server 330, Type 8640 are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
System board
Processor board with:
– Processor
– 1 memory DIMM
Cooling fan
3. Power-on the computer. If the problem remains,
suspect the system board, then the processor board
in that order.
Note
If the problem goes away when you remove an
adapter, and replacing that adapter does not correct
the problem, suspect the system board or processor
board.
164
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Send Us Your Comments!
We want to know your opinion about this manual (part
number 10L9158). Your input will help us to improve our
publications.
Please photocopy this survey, complete it, and then fax it
to IBM HMM Survey at 919-543-8167 (USA).
Name
Phone Number
1. Do you like this manual?
Ø Yes
Ø No
2. What would you like to see added, changed, or
deleted in this manual?
3. What is your service experience level?
Ø Less than five years
Ø More than five years
4. Which Servers do you service most?
Thanks in advance for your response!
Related Service Information
165
Problem Determination Tips
Due to the variety of hardware and software combinations
that can be encountered, use the following information to
assist you in problem determination. If possible, have this
information available when requesting assistance from
Service Support and Engineering functions.
Machine type and model
Processor or hard disk upgrades
Failure symptom
– Do diagnostics fail?
– What, when, where, single, or multiple systems?
– Is the failure repeatable?
– Has this configuration ever worked?
– If it has been working, what changes were made
prior to it failing?
– Is this the original reported failure?
Reference/Diagnostics Diskette Version
– Type and version level
Hardware configuration
– Print (print screen) configuration currently in use
– BIOS level
Operating system software
– Type and version level
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Important
To eliminate confusion, identical systems are
considered identical only if they:
1. Are the exact machine type and models
2. Have the same BIOS level
3. Have the same adapters/attachments in the
same locations
4. Have the same address
jumpers/terminators/cabling
5. Have the same software versions and levels
6. Have the same Reference/Diagnostics Diskette
(version)
7. Have the same configuration options set in the
system
8. Have the same setup for the operation system
control files
Comparing the configuration and software set-up
between “working and non-working” systems will often
lead to problem resolution.
166
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Phone Numbers, U.S. and Canada
Note
EMEA customers should contact their Dealer or IBM
Service organization.
Before you place a call to the Support Center, refer to
“Problem Determination Tips” on page 166.
Authorized Dealers or Servicers
Number
Information
919-517-0001
800-528-7705
800-937-3737
800-426-2472
Bulletin Board Service - PC Company
Bulletin Board Service - TSS Only
IBM Business Partner Education
IBM Customer Engineer Technical
Support
IBM Dealer Support Center
IBM Direct Desktop Software Sales
IBM Part Number ID and Look Up
IBM PC HelpCenter
IBM Software Defect Support (CSDs)
IBM Software Ordering (Publications)
IBM Supplies Technical Hotline
IBM Warranty Parts Claims Center
800-IBM-DEAL
800-342-6672
303-924-4015
800-426-7763
800-237-5511
800-327-5711
800-426-1484
800-388-7080
U.S. Customers and Helpware Subscribers
Number
Information
919-517-0001
800-426-8322
800-999-0052
800-237-4824
800-964-8523
800-742-2493
800-447-4700
800-426-2468
800-426-3333
800-IBM-SERV
800-772-2227
800-426-7282
800-426-9402
(Ext. 150)
800-241-1620
800-342-6672
800-237-5511
800-284-5933
914-962-0310
800-547-1283
Bulletin Board Service - PC Company
Customer Education Business Unit
Customized Operational Services
EduQuest (Educational Computers)
End User HelpDesk Support
IBM Anti-Virus Services
IBM Authorized Dealer Referrals
IBM Dealer Referral
IBM Information Referral Service
IBM Service
IBM PC HelpCenter and HelpDesk
IBM Technical Manuals
Multimedia Information Center
800-551-2832
Multimedia HelpCenter
OS/2 Information Line
OS/2 Support Services
Prodigy
Prodigy User Questions
Technical Coordinator Program
SystemXtra for Personal Systems
LAN Automated Distribution/2
OS/2 Bulletin Board
OS/2 Application Assistance Center
Technical Solutions Magazine
Related Service Information
167
IBM Canada Customer and Servicer Support
Number
Information
800-661-PSMT
905-316-5556
Business Partner Marketing Support
Business Partner Marketing Support Toronto
Business Partner Marketing Support French
Customer Relations
Customer Service Dispatch
Customer Service Parts
Customer Support Center (ISC)
Customer Service Repair Center
Dealer Support Group (DSG)
HelpClub Registration / IBM Direct
HelpFax
HelpFax - Toronto
HelpPC
IBM Certification Administrator
Mail to: 50 Acadia Drive
Markham, Ontario L3R 0B3
IBM Education (A+ Course)
IBM Information Network Support
IBM PC Service Partners
International Warranty Registration
Lexmark Product Information
PartnerLine
Parts Orders, Exchange or Emergency
Parts Regular Orders, Exchange
514-938-6048
800-465-4YOU
800-IBM-SERV
800-263-2769
800-465-2222
416-443-5701
800-505-1855
800-465-7999
800-465-3299
905-316-3299
800-565-3344
905-513-3355
800-661-2131
800-268-3100
800-387-8343
800-487-7426
800-663-7662
800-IBM-9990
800-263-2769
416-443-5808
(Fax)
416-443-5755
514-938-3022
905-316-4255
604-664-6464
204-934-2735
800-661-7768
800-565-3344
800-387-8483
800-465-1234
905-316-4148
905-316-4100
(Fax)
905-316-4150
905-316-4100
(Fax)
905-316-4872
905-316-4100
(Fax)
800-661-2131
800-565-3344
416-443-5835
(Fax)
905-316-2445
905-316-3515
(Fax)
416-443-5778
800-505-1855
800-267-7472
168
Parts Orders, Inquiries
PC Co Bulletin Board - Montreal
PC Co Bulletin Board - Markham
PC Co Bulletin Board - Vancouver
PC Co Bulletin Board - Winnepeg
PS Marketing Support (PSMT)
PS/1 Warranty Customer Helpline
PS/1 Warranty Service (DOAs)
Publications Ordering
Service Management Support
Service Management Support
Service (Warranty) Manager
Service (Warranty) Manager
Service Quality Programs
Service Quality Programs
Skill Dynamics (Education)
ThinkPad EasyServe
Warranty Claim Fulfillment
Warranty Claim Reimbursement
Warranty Claim Reimbursement
Warranty Claim Parts Inquiry
Warranty Provider Support Hotline
Warranty Service, ThinkPad
PC Server HMM
Notices
References in this publication to IBM products, programs,
or services do not imply that IBM intends to make these
available in all countries in which IBM operates. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not
intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,
program, or service may be used. Subject to IBM’s valid
intellectual property or other legally protectable rights, any
functionally equivalent product, program, or service may be
used instead of the IBM product, program, or service. The
evaluation and verification of operation in conjunction with
other products, except those expressly designated by IBM,
are the responsibility of the user.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the IBM Corporation
in the United States or other countries or both:
HelpWare
NetFinity
PowerPC
PS/2
ThinkPad
ValuePoint
IBM
OS/2
Predictive Failure Analysis
PS/ServerGuide
The following terms are trademarks of other countries:
Intel, MMX, and Pentium are trademarks or registered
trademarks of Intel Corporation.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks or
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and
other countries licensed exclusively through X/Open
Company Limited.
Other company, product, and service names may be
trademarks or service marks of others.
Related Service Information
169
IBM

Part Number: 10L9158
Printed in U.S.A.
S84H-8ð35-ð1
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