2014 Annual Report Full Version PDF File,

2014 Annual Report Full Version PDF File,

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY 

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 

 

 

 

Edith Cowan University  

Edith Cowan University acknowledges and respects its continuing association with the Nyoongar  people, the traditional custodians of the land upon which its campuses stand. 

This report is available in Word and PDF formats from the ECU website:  www.ecu.edu.au/about‐ ecu/reports‐and‐plans/annual‐reports . To minimise download times and reduce printing, the  report can be viewed in sections, as well as a single document.  

ECU encourages you to use recycled paper and to print the report and/ or its sections in double‐ sided formats. 

The Annual Report references other documents obtainable from the ECU website. If you have  difficulties accessing any of these documents, or you require the Annual Report in an alternative  format, then please contact  [email protected]

Official correspondence relating to the Annual Report should be addressed to: 

 

 

 

Council Secretary 

Edith Cowan University  

 

270 Joondalup Drive 

JOONDALUP  WA  6027 

 

 

JOONDALUP CAMPUS 

270 Joondalup Drive 

JOONDALUP  WA  6027 

Phone: 13 43 28 

Fax: (08) 9300 1257 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECU EMAIL and WEB ADDRESS 

[email protected]

 

  www.ecu.edu.au

 

 

 

 

MOUNT LAWLEY CAMPUS  

2 Bradford Street 

MOUNT LAWLEY  WA  6050 

Phone: 13 43 28 

Fax: (08) 9370 2910 

 

 

 

SOUTH WEST CAMPUS 

Robertson Drive 

BUNBURY  WA  6230 

Phone: 13 43 28 

Fax: (08) 9780 7800 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

CONTENTS 

 

SECTION 1: OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................ 6 

STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE ....................................................................................................................... 6

 

CHANCELLOR’S FOREWORD .......................................................................................................................... 7

 

VICE‐CHANCELLOR’S EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................ 8

 

ABOUT ECU ................................................................................................................................................... 9

 

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................................................... 10

 

COMMITTEE STRUCTURE ............................................................................................................................ 11

 

GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE ......................................................................................................................... 12

 

WORK OF THE GOVERNING COUNCIL ......................................................................................................... 14

 

SECTION 2A: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON OPERATIONS ........................................................... 17 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 1: 

TO CREATE POSITIVE OUTCOMES IN OUR COMMUNITIES THROUGH MUTUALLY 

BENEFICIAL ENGAGEMENT

 ............................................................................................................................. 17

 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 2: 

TO DELIVER ACCESSIBLE WORLD‐CLASS EDUCATION AND AN ENRICHING STUDENT 

EXPERIENCE

 ................................................................................................................................................... 20

 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 3: 

TO ENHANCE THE PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL OUTCOMES OF GRADUATES

 ........... 27

 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 4: 

TO STRENGTHEN RESEARCH CAPABILITY, CAPACITY, TRANSLATION AND IMPACT

 ......... 30

 

STRATEGIC PRIORITY 5: 

TO ENHANCE ORGANISATIONAL RESILIENCE, SUSTAINABILITY AND REPUTATION

 ......... 36

 

SECTION 2B: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS ............................ 44 

REPORT CERTIFICATION .............................................................................................................................. 44

 

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS ................................................................................................................ 45

 

 

SECTION 3: SIGNIFICANT ISSUES ................................................................................................. 53 

SECTION 4: DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE ................................................................... 55 

AUDITOR GENERAL’S STATEMENT .............................................................................................................. 55

 

CERTIFICATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS .............................................................................................. 58

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ............................................................................................................................. 59

 

ADDITIONAL FACTS AND STATISTICS ........................................................................................................ 124

 

OTHER FINANCIAL, GOVERNANCE AND LEGAL DISCLOSURES .................................................................. 127

 

PRICING POLICIES .................................................................................................................................. 127

 

MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS ................................................................................................................... 127

 

EMPLOYEES AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS ............................................................................................. 127

 

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, HEALTH AND INJURY MANAGEMENT .......................................................... 128

 

INSURANCE OF OFFICERS...................................................................................................................... 130

 

CORPORATE STANDARDS AND RISK MANAGEMENT ........................................................................... 130

 

ADVERTISING ........................................................................................................................................ 133

 

RECORDKEEPING ................................................................................................................................... 134

 

DISABILITY ACCESS AND INCLUSION PLAN OUTCOMES ....................................................................... 135 

 

 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

List of Tables 

Table 1: Student Load (EFTSL) by Course Award Level, 2010‐2014 ................................................................ 23 

Table 2: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2010‐2014 .................................................................... 24 

Table 3: Research Funding by Category, 2009‐2014 ($M) .............................................................................. 33 

Table 4: Research Block Funding by Category, 2009‐2014 ($M) ..................................................................... 33 

Table 5: Higher Degree by Research Student Load, 2011‐2014 ...................................................................... 34 

Table 6: Financial Ratios, 2014 ........................................................................................................................ 40 

Table 7: Backlog Maintenance (%), 2009‐2013 ............................................................................................... 41 

Table 8: Utilisation Rates (% time used), 2009‐2013 ...................................................................................... 41 

Table 9: Water Consumption (kL/ EFTSL), 2009‐2013 ..................................................................................... 41 

Table 10: Waste to Landfill (kg/EFTSL), 2011‐2013 ......................................................................................... 42 

Table 11: Energy Consumption (GJ/m

2

), 2009‐2013 ....................................................................................... 42 

Table 12: Bachelor Course Level Graduates’ CEQ Course Satisfaction ........................................................... 47 

Table 13: Bachelor Course Level Graduates’ CEQ Quality of Teaching Scale .................................................. 48 

Table 14: Domestic Bachelor Course Level Graduates in Full‐time Employment ........................................... 49 

Table 15: Retention Commencing Students .................................................................................................... 50 

Table 16: Research and Development Publications per 10 Academic FTE ..................................................... 50 

Table 17: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE ............... 51 

Table 18: ECU Operating Margin ..................................................................................................................... 52 

Table 19: Enrolments by Type of Attendance, 2010‐2014 ............................................................................ 124 

Table 20: Enrolments by Campus, 2010‐2014 ............................................................................................... 124 

Table 21: Enrolments by Gender, 2010‐2014 ................................................................................................ 124 

Table 22: Enrolments by Course Level, 2010‐2014 ....................................................................................... 125 

Table 23: Onshore and Offshore International Enrolments by Home Country Region, 2010‐2014 ............. 125 

Table 24: Enrolment Proportions by Equity Group, 2010‐2014 .................................................................... 125 

Table 25: Completions by Course Level, 2009‐2013 ..................................................................................... 126 

Table 26: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2014 ....................................................................................... 127 

Table 27: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2014 ....................................................................................... 127 

 

Table 28: Academic Staff by Contract Type, 2010‐2014 ............................................................................... 127 

Table 29: Professional Staff by Contract Type, 2010‐2014 ........................................................................... 128 

Table 30: Performance against 2014 Injury Management Targets ............................................................... 130 

Table 31: Advertising Expenditure, 2014 ...................................................................................................... 133 

 

 

List of Figures 

Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2014 .......................................................................... 10 

Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2014 ............................................................................................. 11 

Figure 3: Council Membership 2014...................................................................................................................... 12 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

Figure 4: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2010‐2014 ............................................................................................ 25 

Figure 5: Graduate Satisfaction, 2009‐2013 .......................................................................................................... 26 

Figure 6: ECU Full‐time Graduate Employment, 2010‐2013 .................................................................................. 29 

Figure 7: Higher Degree by Research Graduate Satisfaction, 2008‐2013 .............................................................. 35 

 

 

 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

SECTION 1: OVERVIEW 

Statement of Compliance  

 

Hon Peter Collier MLC 

Minister for Education; Aboriginal Affairs; Electoral Affairs 

10 th

 Floor, Dumas House 

2 Havelock Street  

 

WEST PERTH WA 6005 

 

16 March 2015 

 

 

Dear Minister 

In accordance with section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006 (WA), we hereby submit for  your information and presentation to Parliament, the Annual Report of Edith Cowan University for  the year ending 31 December 2014. 

 

The Annual Report was prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management 

Act 2006 (WA) and is made in accordance with a resolution of the University’s Council. 

Yours sincerely 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan 

Chancellor 

On behalf of the University Council  

 

Edith Cowan University 

270 Joondalup Drive    

 

JOONDALUP  WA  6027 

  

 

Section 1 ‐ Overview 

 

Chancellor’s Foreword 

In 2014 the University, its students and staff achieved success in a number of areas.  Many of  these achievements are highlighted within this Annual Report and it has been a pleasure to hear of  these successes at Council meetings throughout the year. 

A number of key initiatives were progressed during the year, including  

 completion of the ECU Health Centre incorporating the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic –  officially opened on 10 December 2014; 

 construction of Building 34, for which Council approved the name Ngoolark; 

 progress against the University’s Reconciliation Action Plan; 

 the Vision for Growth strategy; 

 recruitment of the next Vice‐Chancellor; and 

 a strategic retreat, which afforded Council the opportunity to work with the senior  leadership team to examine opportunities for the University in 2015 and beyond. 

Importantly, the University achieved its 2014 financial targets. The budget for 2015 was approved  at the December 2014 meeting of Council, and will provide a sound financial basis to support the  strategic goals of the University for 2015.  

Council noted that the higher education sector continued to be a topic for debate at a national  level.  Whilst at this time the outcomes are still not known, the debate underscores that the 

University operates in an environment where there are high expectations that the sector will  deliver skills and benefits for Australia, whilst being competitive, efficient and responsive to local  community needs.   

Our University is well placed to meet these expectations as it continues to undertake meaningful  and useful research, provide a five star student experience, and to remain relevant to the  communities that we serve. 

Council was delighted to welcome Mr Simon Butterworth as a new member during the year. Mr 

Butterworth brings extensive commercial experience to ECU and served on the University’s 

Quality, Audit and Risk Committee before joining Council.  Council recorded its great appreciation  for the work of two long‐standing and valued members: Ms Leslie Chalmers and Dr Norman 

Ashton.  Both have completed three terms and made significant contributions to Council and to its  committees and boards. 

Professor Kerry Cox AO retired as Vice‐Chancellor in September 2014.  His eight‐and‐a‐half years  as Vice‐Chancellor saw many advances across the University in teaching, research and above all,  engagement.  His leadership saw increased participation in higher education, particularly for those  traditionally denied the opportunity.  This is one of his greatest legacies.  It was pleasing to see  him appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia in the 2015 Australia Day Honours.  

Members of Council and senior management continue to work together to support the University  in achieving its objectives. I am grateful for the work of my fellow Council members in providing a  cohesive and effective governing body that interacts well with the senior management of the 

University. 

 

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan 

Chancellor, March 2015

 

 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Vice‐Chancellor’s Executive Summary 

In recent years, ECU has settled on a distinctive point of difference: being “One University – 

Students First”.  The feedback from our graduates continues to reflect the success of this  approach, and for the sixth consecutive year, ECU has been rated as five‐stars in the categories of 

Teaching Quality, Generic Skills and Graduate Satisfaction.  In alignment with this, our 2014  biennial staff survey again reported higher levels of engagement and commitment to ECU by our  staff than peers in other Australian universities. 

A 2014 highlight, was the opening of the ECU Health Centre in Wanneroo. Encompassing the 

Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, the facility will take pressure off emergency departments and help  prevent hospital admissions.  Once fully operational, it will provide wide‐ranging health and  wellness services to the local community, seven days a week.  This exemplifies ECU’s approach  that effective engagement should result in mutual benefits. 

Engagement with ECU Alumni has also increased this year with the introduction of an alumni  mentoring program, a series of exclusive events, and continued career support for life. We are now in  touch with more than 52,500 ECU Alumni in all parts of the world. 

Amongst our graduates, and one who epitomises excellence, is Hugh Jackman.  It was a pleasure  to welcome him back to ECU this year, when he launched the Jackman Furness Foundation for the 

Performing Arts, together with Australian veteran actor, friend of ECU and WAAPA, and Patron of  the Foundation, Mr Jack Thompson AM.  I acknowledge their tremendous efforts and generosity,  and that of Deborra‐Lee Furness, and thank them on behalf of students and staff. 

ECU also received its largest ever philanthropic gift to support internationally‐recognised  education research.  A seven‐figure bequest from the estate of the late Mr Denis Holland was left  in memory of his late wife and former ECU staff member Dr Susan Holland.  This generous gift will  be used to establish the Dr Susan Holland Scholarship that will support experienced teachers to  complete research degrees directed towards enhancing the quality of teaching. 

The University took pride in the recognition our Chancellor received with his appointment as an 

Officer of the Order of Australia in the Queen’s Birthday Honours, for his services to the community. 

2014 was a significant year for ECU with the retirement of Professor Kerry Cox, after more than  eight years as Vice‐Chancellor.  At a graduation ceremony in September, the University conferred  upon him the degree of Doctor of the University (honoris causa) and the title of Emeritus 

Professor. I acknowledge his enormous contributions to ECU and to higher education more  broadly, during a period of significant change. 

It has been a privilege to lead the University since September and I thank our Chancellor, the Hon 

Dr Hendy Cowan AO, for the opportunity to do so until the arrival in April 2015, of our next Vice‐

Chancellor, Professor Stephen Chapman. 

I thank all members of the University community who have contributed to ECU’s many successes  in 2014. These include our hard working Council and Committee members, current and past  students and staff, and guest speakers and visiting scholars.  Through their efforts, ECU continues  to provide an exceptional student experience that adds value for our graduates and communities. 

 

Professor Arshad Omari 

Acting Vice‐Chancellor, March 2015

 

Section 1: Overview 

About ECU 

Edith Cowan University is a large, multi‐campus institution serving communities in Western 

Australia and internationally. The University has two metropolitan campuses at Mount Lawley and 

Joondalup, and also serves Western Australia's South West Region from a campus at Bunbury, 200  km south of Perth. 

Granted university status in 1991, ECU offers innovative and practical courses across a wide range  of disciplines and has a vibrant research culture with high quality researchers and research  partners.   

 

ECU has more than 22,900 students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Approximately 

3,300 of these are international students originating from 95 countries.  More than 300 courses  are offered through four faculties: 

 Business and Law; 

 Health, Engineering and Science; 

 Education and Arts, which includes the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts 

(WAAPA); and 

 Regional Professional Studies. 

Strategic Direction 

ECU’s strategic direction (

Engaging Minds, Engaging Communities: Towards 2020

) includes a 

‘Purpose’, ‘Vision’, ‘Values’, and five ‘Strategic Priorities’ as follows: 

 

Purpose 

 

To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and beyond, through  teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships. 

Vision 

 

For our students, staff and graduates to be highly regarded internationally as ethical and engaged  contributors to more inclusive, sustainable and prosperous communities. 

Values  

 Integrity – behaving ethically and pursuing rigorous intellectual positions 

 Respect – valuing individual differences and diversity 

 Rational Inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning  

 Personal Excellence – striving to realise potential 

 

Strategic Priorities  

1.  To create positive outcomes in our communities through mutually beneficial engagement. 

2.  To deliver accessible world‐class education and an enriching student experience. 

3.  To enhance the personal and professional outcomes of graduates. 

4.  To strengthen research capability, capacity, translation and impact. 

5.  To enhance organisational resilience, sustainability and reputation. 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

Organisational Structure 

Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2014 

10 

Committee Structure 

Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2014 

Section 1: Overview 

 

11 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Governance Structure 

Figure 3: Council Membership 2014 

Member  Term 

Date term  commenced/ ended 

Council 

Meetings 

Attended* 

Chancellor (ECU Act, section 12(1)) 

Hon Dr Hendy Cowan AO  1 Jan 2014 – 31 Dec 2016 

1 Jan 2011 – 31 Dec 2013 

1 Jan 2008 – 31 Dec 2010 

1 Jan 2005 – 31 Dec 2007 

Members appointed by the Governor (ECU Act, section 9(1)(a)) 

Mr Eddie Bartnik 

Mr Simon Butterworth 

12 Jun 2012 – 11 Jun 2015 

27 Apr 2014 – 26 Apr 2017 

Current  5 

Current 

Term commenced 27 

April 2014 

Current 

3(5) 

Mr John Cahill 

Ms Leslie Chalmers 

Mr Kempton Cowan 

Dr Pamela Garnett 

Term ended 

26 April 2014 

Ms Denise Goldsworthy 

Chief Executive Officer – ex‐officio (ECU Act, section 9(1)(b)) 

Professor Kerry O. Cox  Ex‐officio 

Current  6 

Member nominated by Minister charged with administration of the School Education Act 1999 (WA) 

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(aa)) 

Dr Norman Ashton  30 Aug 2011 – 29 Aug 2014 

30 Aug 2008 – 29 Aug 2011 

30 Aug 2005 – 29 Aug 2008 

Term ended 

29 August 2014 

4(4) 

4(4) 

Professor Arshad Omari 

9 Aug 2011 – 8 Aug 2014 

9 Aug 2014 – 8 Aug 2017 

27 Apr 2011 – 26 Apr 2014 

27 Apr 2008 – 26 Apr 2011 

12 Apr 2005 – 26 Apr 2008 

19 Dec 2012 – 18 Dec 2015 

19 Dec 2009 – 18 Dec 2012 

19 Dec 2006 – 18 Dec 2009 

20 Sept 2012 – 19 Sept 2015 

20 Sept 2009 – 19 Sept 2012 

30 Apr 2013 – 29 Apr 2016 

7 Sept 2014 – 31 Mar 2015 

Current 

Current 

Term ended 

6 September 2014 

Term commenced 

7 September 2014 

5(5) 

1(1) 

0(1) 

2(2) 

Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(c)) 

 

Associate Professor Ute Mueller  1 Oct 2012 – 30 Sept 2015 

16 May 2011 – 31 Sept 2012 

Current  5 

12 

Section 1: Overview 

Member 

Professor Mark Stoney 

Term 

1 Oct 2012 – 30 Sept 2015 

Date term  commenced/ ended 

Current 

Salaried Staff, Other than Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(d)) 

Council 

Meetings 

Attended* 

Current  3(4)  Ms Valentina Bailey  1 Oct 2012 – 30 Sept 2015 

1 Oct 2009 – 30 Sept 2012 

1 Apr 2009 – 30 Sept 2009 

Enrolled Students – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(e)) 

Ms Jacynth Cox  10 Oct 2014 – 9 Oct 2015  2(2) 

Mr Harinderjit Gill 

Mr Matthan Kipps 

Mr Timothy Newhouse 

10 Oct 2013 – 9 Oct 2014 

10 Oct 2013 – 9 Oct 2014 

10 Oct 2014 – 9 Oct 2015 

Term commenced 10 

October 2014 

Term ended 

9 October 2014 

Term ended 

9 October 2014 

Term commenced 10 

October 2014 

2(4) 

2(4) 

2(2) 

Alumni – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(f)) 

Mr Brad McManus 

Ms Julien Proud 

22 Dec 2014 – 21 Dec 2017 

22 Dec 2011 – 21 Dec 2014 

20 Sept 2013 – 19 Sept 2016 

20 Sept 2010 – 19 Sept 2013 

1 Apr 2009 – 19 Sept 2010 

Members co‐opted by Council (ECU Act, section 9(1)(i)) 

Current 

Current 

Ms Janet Curran 

Ms Kelly Hick 

Mr Simon Holthouse 

20 Sept 2012 – 19 Sept 2015 

20 Sept 2009 – 19 Sept 2012 

Current 

18 Mar 2012 – 17 Mar 2015  Current 

12 Sept 2013 – 11 Sept 2016 

12 Sept 2010 – 11 Sept 2013 

12 Sept 2007 – 11 Sept 2010 

Current 

Ms Denise McComish 

(Pro‐Chancellor since 25.08.2011) 

22 Mar 2013 – 21 Mar 2016 

22 Mar 2010 – 21 Mar 2013 

22 Mar 2007 – 21 Mar 2010 

Current  3 

Dr Saliba Sassine  17 Nov 2012 – 16 Nov 2015 

25 Aug 2011 – 16 Nov 2012 

Current 

* Council held six regular meeting during the year.  The bracketed figures indicate the potential number of attendances for  members whose term of office did not cover the full year, or who had leave of absence during the year. 

Additional Council membership information can be viewed at  Members of Council. 

 

  

13 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Work of the Governing Council 

ECU’s enabling Act provides that the Council is the governing authority of the University. The  fundamental responsibilities of the Council are to determine the strategic direction and  governance framework of the University. The Council is chaired by the Chancellor, the Hon Dr 

Hendy Cowan AO, and consists of the Vice‐Chancellor (ex‐officio) and members drawn from the  community and the University’s alumni, students and staff. Council members fulfil an important  duty for the University and the community and do so on an honorary basis. 

The major activities of Council fall into five categories: 

 determining the strategic direction of the University; 

 management/oversight of the Vice‐Chancellor; 

 self‐governance of the Council and its various sub‐committees; 

 providing governance of the University; and 

 ensuring compliance with the ECU Act and all other relevant legislation and statutes. 

The Council met on six occasions during 2014.  In addition to its regular meetings, Council: 

 held a special meeting (May 2014) to complete the appointment of the next  

Vice‐Chancellor; 

 attended a workshop on Council responsibilities in relation to workplace health and safety;  

 held a Council Strategic Retreat in October 2014; and 

 undertook a number of site visits, including a visit to the ECU Health Simulation Centre and  to the ECU Health Centre. 

Council is well supported by a number of committees.  The committees comprise predominantly 

Council members ‐ assisted in many cases by co‐opted members of the external community.  Each  year Council reviews the Terms of Reference and composition of each of its committees.  The  committees are an essential part of the University’s governance framework. 

 

Strategic Direction of the University 

Major strategic issues considered by Council in 2014 included: 

 a Vision for Growth strategy; 

 briefings on Workplace Health and Safety; 

 an annual report against the Reconciliation Action Plan, 2012‐2015; 

 the 2014 Audit Operational Plan; 

 ECU’s Performance Indicator Framework – themed reports on Resources Supporting Core 

Functions, Teaching and Learning; Capacity and Community Responsiveness, and Research; 

 a report on the role and function of the Academic Board; 

 briefings on the proposed changes to higher education; 

 the success of students entering university via non‐traditional pathways; 

 the ECU Health Centre; 

 the work of the ECU Student Guild; and 

 ECU’s Key Actions for 2015. 

At its December 2014 meeting, Council considered and approved the Budget for 2015.  

14 

Section 1: Overview 

 

Oversight of the Vice‐Chancellor 

Council received a report from the Vice‐Chancellor at each Council meeting. These reports  included strategic advice and matters for information. In addition, the Vice‐Chancellor reported to 

Council on the University’s performance against its Key Performance Indicators and its targets, as  well as on the University’s progress against the Key Actions that Council had set for the year. 

Professor Kerry Cox retired from his position in September 2014 and Council appointed Professor 

Stephen Chapman as the University’s next Vice‐Chancellor.  Professor Chapman will not  commence his position with the University until April 2015 and Professor Arshad Omari was  therefore appointed Acting Vice‐Chancellor, for the period from September 2014 to April 2015. 

 

Self‐governance of the Council 

ECU’s  Corporate Governance Statement  assists current and commencing members of Council,  executive management and senior staff of the University in carrying out their roles.  It also helps to  inform students and staff of the broader University community about governance processes at the 

University, and serves a similar purpose for the external community, including stakeholders such  as governments.   

In addition, ECU’s governing Council has affirmed a commitment to monitor its performance  against the Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian Universities and the 

Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency Threshold Provider Standards.   

Each year Council undertakes a self‐evaluation and in 2014 an online questionnaire asked  members to assess their own performance and that of Council as a whole.  An independent  reviewer received the responses and prepared a report for the Chancellor.   The report confirmed  that governance remains robust at ECU, with the skills and expertise of Council members, the  leadership of the Chancellor, the monitoring of delegated responsibilities, and Council’s working  relationship with the Vice‐Chancellor, highlighted as particular strengths. The work of Council  committees was also considered to be highly effective, as was the logistical and practical support  offered to Council. 

 

Governance of the University 

Key Council activities in 2014 relating to the governance of the University included: 

 reports from regular meetings of Council committees, provided to Council to keep it  informed of activities across ECU’s academic and operational areas; 

 mid‐year and end‐of‐year reports on progress against Key Actions for 2014, as previously  approved by Council, and on the performance against the University’s performance  measures;  

 amendments, as requested, to University Rules; and 

 ongoing professional development opportunities, offered to all members of Council. 

 

15 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Compliance  

The 2013 Annual Report was approved by Council and submitted to the Western Australian 

Minister for Education in accordance with the required timelines.   

The Council’s monitoring of the University, particularly through the Resources Committee and the 

Quality, Audit and Risk Committee, provided assurance to Council that the University has in place  appropriate risk management, financial and quality controls. 

At its August 2014 meeting, Council reviewed TEQSA’s Provider Threshold Standards as they  pertained to governance and noted that the University complied with the Standards. 

The Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian Universities (Item 14)  requires that a university should disclose in its annual report its compliance with the Voluntary 

Code of Best Practice and provide reasons for any areas of non‐compliance.  At its August 2014  meeting, Council confirmed that it continued to comply with the Voluntary Code of Best Practice.   

Council is satisfied that the University is compliant with the new Code of Best Practice.   

16 

Section 2A: Performance – Report on Operations 

 

SECTION 2A: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON OPERATIONS 

Strategic Priority 1: To create positive outcomes in our  communities through mutually beneficial engagement 

HIGHLIGHTS 

 

ECU Health Centre  

The ECU Health Centre, incorporating the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, opened for business on‐ schedule and on‐budget in September 2014. The state‐of‐the‐art, $22 million facility has more  than 3,000 m

2

 of clinic space spread over three floors. This ‘one‐stop shop’ will bring together a  range of primary health services to provide high‐quality care for patients, their families and carers.  

 

Uniting science and Aboriginal knowledge 

The ‘Old Ways New Ways’ project developed by ECU is inspiring Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait 

Islander students in WA high schools to study science at a tertiary level. The project brings  together Western and Aboriginal knowledge perspectives to science and encourages students to  explore science, in particular chemistry, through a range of hands‐on activities that show students 

  how chemistry is used in the forensics area. 

Campus Dash 

Hundreds of people ran, jogged and walked through the streets of central Joondalup for the ECU 

Community Campus Dash on Sunday 12 October. The event, in its second year, attracted ECU  students, staff, alumni and members of the community. The event raised funds for ECU’s 

 

Melanoma Research Group to continue its work developing an early‐warning blood test to detect  skin cancer melanomas. 

Technology scholarship 

Westpac Group and ECU are teaming up to offer new scholarships to support the brightest young  minds in technology. Recipients will receive $5,000 per year for up to five years to support their  undergraduate studies. The Westpac Bicentennial Foundation Young Technologists scholarships 

 

are open to all Year 12 students.  

Science Academy 

ECU’s School of Engineering collaborated with Ellenbrook Christian College to deliver a six‐week  science program for primary and high school students. The Science Academy allowed school  students to learn from the expertise and facilities of the School of Engineering. 

 

Public lectures 

Several public lectures were held at ECU in 2014. In delivering the 2014 Edith Cowan Memorial 

Lecture, Ms Diane Smith‐Gander delivered a strong call to action for change to improve the  position of women in Western Australia.  In July, Dr Ira Harkavy, Associate Vice‐President and  founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships at the 

University of Pennsylvania, delivered the 2014 Vice‐Chancellor’s Distinguished Oration, 

 

  highlighting the growing role of universities in their communities. 

 

17 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

ECU approach to Engagement in 2014 included: 

 A wide range of outreach activities and projects with community stakeholders and  partners, supported and co‐ordinated by ECU’s Engagement Unit, in collaboration with 

ECU’s faculties.  

 Strategies, policies and procedures to support fundraising and alumni relationships,  developed and implemented by ECU’s Office of Advancement. 

 School engagement, including activities, projects and sporting events, and articulation  agreements with registered training organisations to build transition pathways between  the vocational education and training and higher education sectors. 

 Continued development of over 100 mutually‐beneficial partnerships, including those  through the Bunbury Education Precinct, the Joondalup Learning Precinct, the ECU Health 

Centre, and the Smith Family. 

ECU’s Key Engagement Outcomes in 2014 

The University’s governing Council approved one key action relating to this Strategic Priority for 

2014.  

Launch the ECU Health Centre to enhance ECU’s engagement with the health professions and  position ECU as a major health innovator in Western Australia. 

The ECU Health Centre, incorporating the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, opened in 2014.  The 

Independent Practitioner Network has been appointed to operate the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic,  which commenced operations on 30 September 2014. 

In addition to the GP Super Clinic, the ECU Health Centre will operate a pharmacy, pathology  collection, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, exercise physiology,  community midwifery and dietetics services.  ECU has also relocated its Psychological Services 

Centre to the facility and is currently developing further services to offer to the community. 

The Centre offers ECU health students, researchers and health professionals exciting new  opportunities for learning, investigation and collaboration, while helping to support improved  health outcomes for the community. 

ECU has invested $12 million in the Health Centre, with the Commonwealth and Western 

Australian governments providing $5 million each. The Commonwealth funding was provided  through the GP Super Clinics Program.   

 

The Centre was officially opened by the Hon. Dr Kim Hames MLA, Deputy Premier; Minister for 

Health; Tourism on 10 December 2014. 

ECU’s Strategic Focus on Engagement 

ECU’s engagement activities are embedded across all core functions of the University, via  functional plans for teaching and learning, research and research training, and the operational  plans of faculties and service centres. 

The University’s engagement activities continued to be overseen by five Pro‐Vice‐Chancellors with  engagement responsibilities: 

 Professor Lynne Cohen, Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor Engagement (Communities); 

18 

Section 2A: Performance – Report on Operations 

 

 

 Professor Ken Greenwood, Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor Engagement (Science, Technology and 

Engineering); 

 Professor Colleen Hayward AM, Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor (Equity and Indigenous);  

 Professor Atique Islam, Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor Engagement (Business, Law and Government);  and 

 Professor Cobie Rudd, Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor (Health Advancement). 

 

During 2014, Professor Nara Srinivasan also continued to fill the part‐time position of Pro‐Vice 

Chancellor Engagement (Emirates) to encourage the development of programs in Dubai in  conjunction with ECU’s partner, the Emirates Airlines Group. 

19 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Strategic Priority 2: To deliver accessible world‐class education  and an enriching student experience 

HIGHLIGHTS 

Five star rating 

For the sixth consecutive year ECU received five star ratings, the highest level, for its teaching  quality, generic skills and overall satisfaction, based on graduate ratings from the Australian 

Graduate Survey. ECU graduates have also enjoyed a steady improvement in graduate starting 

  salaries, achieving five stars in the 2015 edition of the Good Universities Guide. 

Engineering accreditation 

ECU is the first university in WA, and one of only six in Australia, to offer a fully accredited Master  of Engineering course after receiving accreditation from Engineers Australia in 2014. The course 

  had been offered at ECU under provisional accreditation since 2010.  

Motion capture raises the bar 

Dance students at WAAPA now have access to a state‐of‐the‐art motion capture facility, which  aims to improve teaching and prevent injuries. The facility is the first to use motion capture  technology and the expertise of a specialised bio‐mechanist to support an elite dance program. 

 

The facility uses tiny markers on dancers’ bodies to map their movements in 3D to assist dancers  in refining their technique and prevent injuries. 

New library study space 

The award‐winning library on the Joondalup Campus now features a new study area, dubbed LL1 

Common. It provides additional computers, new seating areas and collaborative learning spaces 

  and whiteboards to facilitate working in groups. Two sleeping pods are also available for students  to enjoy a 20‐minute ‘power nap’ before an automated gentle wakening. 

New piano hitting right notes 

Dr Malcolm McCusker AC CVO QC and Mrs Tonya McCusker through the McCusker Charitable 

Foundation generously provided a Fazioli grand piano to WAAPA music students. The world‐class, 

 

Italian piano will allow students to practice and perform in a range of musical genres, from  classical to jazz.  

Office for Learning and Teaching citation 

ECU’s Dr Anne Harris was named as a recipient of an Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) 

Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning by the Minister for Education the Hon. 

 

 

 

Christopher Pyne MP in September 2014. 

International student of the year 

ECU student, Shufaa Athman has received the prestigious Council of International Students 

Western Australia award for International Student of the Year for 2014.  Shufaa was recognised for  her volunteering work and her outstanding academic results. 

 

20 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 

 

Health simulation rises to the challenge 

ECU has taken delivery of an inflatable simulation tent that erects in just two minutes to help train  health students and professionals for health emergency scenarios such as oil‐rig explosions, train  derailments and toxic chemical fires.  The fully portable structure, the size of a lounge room, will  also allow ECU to extend its health simulation programs to regional and rural communities in WA. 

ECU’s Key Teaching and Learning Outcomes in 2014 

The University’s governing Council approved two key actions relating to this Strategic Priority for 

2014.  

Maintain and enhance the quality of ECU’s program offerings and outcomes through the 

implementation of strong and integrated quality assurance processes and procedures. 

ECU’s course accreditation guidelines were applied in securing a number of professional  accreditations in 2014 including: Social Work, Occupational Therapy, Nutrition and Dietetics, IT, 

Accounting, Engineering, Advertising, Nursing, Occupational Health and Safety, Human Resources  and Project Management. 

A number of school reviews were conducted in 2014, including the School of Computer and 

Security Science, School of Education, School of Law and Justice, and Kurongkurl Katitjin, ECU’s 

Centre for Indigenous Australian Education and Research. Processes for the review of research  centres and institutes were piloted in the review of the Health and Wellness Institute.  

The second round of unit and course reviews commenced in September 2014 with the review of  units offered in Semester 1, while ECU’s Excellence Framework was further embedded into  processes such as change management and professional development for unit co‐ordinators. 

The Curriculum Approval and Publications System (CAPS), which replaced the Course Management 

System, went live on 1 October. CAPS will provide greater functionality and the ability to map and  monitor the course learning outcomes of each course. 

 

Implement a new business development capability through the Marketing and Communications 

Services Centre to deliver growth in domestic and international student enrolments. 

The Strategic Business Development Unit has been working to enhance ECU’s capacity to identify  opportunities, assess potential return on investment and lead the implementation of plans to  achieve the ECU Vision for Growth, approved by Council at its March 2014 meeting. 

A ‘Market Creation to Customer Acquisition’ project was completed in February 2014 and led to  establishment of: 

 a Market Creation to Customer Acquisition framework and roadmap to implementation,  based on an iterative process of funding and development; 

 an eight stage Business Development framework;  

 a Proposition Pipeline Management mechanism (for capture and development of new  ideas); 

 a process handbook describing 38 processes for implementation as resources/funding  becomes available; and 

 a future state technology architecture vision.  

Growth vision revenue has been translated into student commencement targets and a sales  growth plan for 2015 is in development. 

21 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

ECU’s Strategic Focus on Teaching and Learning  

ECU has two functional plans that outline initiatives, actions, timeframes, responsibilities and  performance measures for the achievement of the University’s goals in teaching and learning. The 

Enrolment Functional Plan, 2012‐2014 includes activities relating to marketing, teaching, student  support and partnership building.  ECU has made continued progress in growing enrolments and  increasing access and participation by under‐represented groups. The Teaching and Learning 

Functional Plan, 2014‐2016 promotes a number of elements that will keep learning and teaching  strategies and directions strongly aligned with ECU’s Purpose and Vision. This includes strategies 

  to further develop internationalisation within the curriculum and develop the capacity and  capability to use technology to provide flexible and enhanced learning opportunities for students.  

Student Recruitment and Admissions 

In 2014, ECU continued the “That’s How University Should Be” campaign across a variety of media  including television, radio, print and digital advertising.  Digital marketing continued to grow as a  proportion of total marketing activity. Growth continued across the social media channels:  ECU’s 

Future Students’ Facebook page grew to over 54,000 likes by November 2014, an 85 per cent  increase on 2013, future student Twitter followers grew to 3,442 (a 28 per cent increase), YouTube  video views grew to 565,688 (a 134 per cent increase) and LinkedIn Company Page members grew  to 5,421 members (a 46 per cent increase).  

Overall, there were over 61,000 prospective student enquiries from within Australia (a growth of 1  per cent on 2013) and over 1.3 million visitors to the future students website (a growth of 19 per  cent on 2013). Both were achieved despite lower numbers of WA Year 12 students in “the half‐ cohort”. 

A number of school engagement activities were undertaken in 2014, supported by funding  through the Australian Government’s Higher Education Participation and Partnership Program. 

These included a wide variety of initiatives in partnership with primary and secondary schools, and  with young people from disadvantaged communities. The initiatives are intended to support  learning and foster aspirations for higher education for all those with the ability and motivation to  study. 

In terms of international recruitment, a number of processes were implemented to improve the  effectiveness of ECU’s sales capability and agent management in 2014. South East Asia, South Asia  and North Asia continued to be key focus areas for the University’s international recruitment  efforts, with a 9% increase in fee paying onshore student applications recorded for 2014. 

The University’s new strategic business development capability also aims to improve the return on  investment of student recruitment activities and to grow the number of onshore students  participating in undergraduate and postgraduate programs.  Examples of outcomes achieved in 

2014 included: 

 articulation agreements with all State Government VET providers in WA and a simplified  approach to the assessment of VET qualifications; 

 a Bachelor of Sustainability product review;  

 streamlining of School of Communications and Arts domestic application processes  through modification of application requirements; and 

 development of a strategic position on recruiting Australia Awards students. 

22 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 

 

Consistent with the “One University: Students First” philosophy, international student admissions  and domestic student admissions are both now administered by the Student Services Centre and  average application turnaround times have reduced by 87% (22.7 days to 2.7 days) since 2013. 

 

Enrolments 

Full‐year total student load for 2014 was estimated to be 17,678 Equivalent Full Time Student 

Load (EFTSL), which is a slight increase from 2013 (17,648 EFTSL).  

ECU experienced stable Commonwealth‐supported student load in 2014.  The uncapping of 

Bachelor level Commonwealth‐supported places in 2012 has had minimal impact in Western 

Australia, where limited growth in domestic student numbers is evident. This reflects the  historically lower levels of unmet demand for higher education in Western Australia. 

Despite the continuing strength of the Australian dollar, the relatively high cost of living in Perth  and increasing competition from other international education provider countries, ECU  experienced a slight increase in International onshore fee‐paying student load. 

The following tables show ECU’s student load for the period 2010‐2014 by course award level and  by funding categories. 

 

Table 1: Student Load (EFTSL) by Course Award Level, 2010‐2014 

 

Doctorate by Research 

Doctorate by Coursework 

Masters by Research 

Masters by Coursework 

Postgraduate/Graduate Diploma 

Postgraduate/Graduate Certificate 

Bachelor 

Sub‐Bachelor 

Enabling and Other  

Vocational Education and Training  

2010 

336 

20 

99 

2,181 

842 

277 

108 

687 

488 

2011 

347 

14 

108 

1,583 

833 

275 

2012  2013  2014 

13,725  14,116  13,951  13,600  13,337 

85 

562 

477 

351 

11 

106 

1,415 

855 

284 

69 

606 

483 

330 

97 

1,426 

806 

276 

41 

622 

446 

328 

86 

1,634 

763 

356 

27 

744 

400 

 

Total  18,763  18,400  18,131  17,648  17,678 

Notes: 2014 data is as at 12/02/2015. Data for 2013 is finalised and differs from provisional figures  reported in the Annual Report for 2013. 

23 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Table 2: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2010‐2014 

 

Commonwealth Grant 

Domestic Tuition Fee 

Fee‐paying International on‐shore 

Fee‐paying International off‐shore 

Research Training Scheme / ECU Funded 

Vocational Education and Training 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

12,657  12,995  13,002  12,866  13,066 

792  963  1,049  1,093  1,066 

2,732 

1,767 

2,594 

1,034 

2,379 

878 

2,304 

632 

2,372 

478 

325 

490 

337 

477 

340 

483 

307 

446 

296 

400 

 

Total  18,763  18,400  18,131  17,648  17,678 

Notes: 2014 data is as at 12/02/2015.  Data for 2013 is finalised and differs from provisional figures reported in the 

Annual Report for 2013. 

Retention 

The 2014 retention rate (for ECU students who commenced in 2013) decreased compared with  the previous year’s results (see Report on Key Performance Indicators beginning on page 45).   

A working party was established with representation from key staff from faculties and service  centres to examine retention issues and to promote greater accountability for retention at the  school and course level.  

ECU continued the effective work of the Connect for Success program, a proactive, University‐ wide student retention and success initiative that systematically identifies and supports  commencing students who may require additional assistance to complete their studies. 

Peer mentoring has also been used as a retention strategy, to positively influence a student’s  experience and to build academic and social networks, particularly during the crucial first year of  study. The ECU Retention and Persistence Transition Support initiative is one such example, and a  number of successful ECU school‐based peer mentoring programs were also in place in 2014.  

During 2014, orientation modules such as Balancing Life and UniEssential study skills and Basic 

computing skills were available online and video information was embedded in the ECU website  and on YouTube. The ECU Student Guide, which provides orientation and transition information,  was also available electronically. 

An ECU Buddy Program was established in Semester 2 to provide students who have relocated to 

Australia with support and guidance in adapting to life in a new country.  Forty‐one international  onshore students received support from a range of ‘buddies’ consisting of student volunteers and  mentors.  

 

 

Peer support continued to be provided to postgraduate research students through the Graduate 

Research School’s Support–Opportunities–Advice–Resources Centre. Since 2009, over 3,500 client  interactions have been recorded, providing cultural, academic and campus transition support to 

Higher Degree by Research and Bachelor Honours students and high levels of satisfaction with the  service have been recorded. 

 

24 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 

New Course Offerings in 2014 

ECU regularly renews its course offerings to maintain an academic profile that is contemporary  and continues to reflect the needs of the communities it serves. New courses offered for the first  time in 2014 were: 

 Bachelor of Sustainability 

 Bachelor of Engineering (Civil and Environmental) 

 Master of Healthcare Studies 

 Diploma of Live Production and Technical Services 

Student and Graduate Satisfaction 

ECU continued to perform well on the key indicators of teaching excellence, as measured by the  national Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) of graduates and through ECU’s own online Unit  and Teaching Evaluation Instrument (UTEI) and mid‐course CEQ survey, that gauge the satisfaction  of current ECU students.   

As shown in Figure 4 below, student satisfaction with teaching quality and with unit content (as  measured by the UTEI) remained steady in 2014, and continued the trend of high results over the  time‐series.  

 

Figure 4: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2010‐2014 

65

60

55

50

45

40

Teaching Quality

Unit Content

35

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

 

Year

 

Notes: Mean overall satisfaction is measured on a scale of ‐100 to +100.  The measure includes all ECU  student cohorts and all coursework units. 

In the latest CEQ survey results, ECU was ranked 5 th

 nationally for Overall Course satisfaction.  On 

Good Teaching satisfaction ECU was ranked 5 th

 nationally.  On Generic Skills satisfaction ECU was  ranked 7 th

 nationally. ECU was also above the State and national averages for each of these  indicators.  Figure 5 below illustrates ECU’s performance for each of the graduate satisfaction  indicators over the period 2009‐2013.  

 

 

25 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Figure 5: Graduate Satisfaction, 2009‐2013 

100.0

95.0

90.0

85.0

80.0

75.0

70.0

65.0

60.0

55.0

Overall Satisfaction

Generic Skills

Good Teaching

50.0

2009 2010 2011

Year of Survey

2012 2013

 

Notes: The three measures record the percentage of ECU Bachelor level graduates who, in responding to the relevant 

Course Experience Questionnaire survey items ‘agree’ with those statements.  The percentage agreement is the  percentage of responses that are 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five‐point Likert scale. This is a departure  from previous years, which reported ‘broad agreement’ for these measures. This change is in keeping with the usual  method of measurement across the Higher Education sector. 

The annual University Experience Survey was conducted at all Australian universities in 2014. The  satisfaction of undergraduate students is measured across five focus areas and in four of these 

(Skills Development, Teaching Quality, Student Support, and Learning Resources). ECU’s results  were in the top 10 of Australian universities. 

ECU’s learning environment and support for student learning is also evaluated through the ECU 

Student Services and Facilities Feedback Evaluation (SSAFE) survey, which is conducted biennially. 

The latest SSAFE survey was conducted in late 2013 and an internal summary report including  specific improvement plans was finalised in 2014 in consultation with all relevant service centre  stakeholders and faculties and reported to the University’s Senior Leadership Team and the 

Quality, Audit and Risk Committee.  Results from the survey illustrated that overall satisfaction  with ECU’s services and facilities increased slightly, while 87% of survey respondents agreed that  they would recommend ECU, or their current course, to others.   

 

Additional data on course satisfaction and quality of teaching, including comparison with State and  national benchmarks, can be found in the Report on Key Performance Indicators beginning on  page 45. 

 

 

26 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

Strategic Priority 3: To enhance the personal and professional  outcomes of graduates 

 

HIGHLIGHTS  

Paid internships 

Students from ECU’s Graduate Diploma of Broadcasting received paid internships with major  media organisations around Australia in 2014. Upon completion of the one‐year course, the  graduates began working alongside journalists at the Seven Network, ABC News 24, Fox Sports 

News, 6PR and WAtoday.com.au. The first paid internship was established for this course in 2007  with 6PR with available opportunities now expanded to seven, giving students in the course a one‐ in‐three chance of securing a paid placement. 

 

Bound for Oxford 

Aboriginal graduate Tamara Murdock was one of just three recipients of the national Charlie 

Perkins Scholarship in 2014. It follows her completion of a Bachelor of Science (Environmental 

Management) with First Class Honours and work with the Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation  in Geraldton, her hometown. The scholarship assisted her in commencing a Master of Science in 

 

Biodiversity, Conservation and Management at the University of Oxford.  

Social work wins 

The outstanding quality of ECU’s social work program was again recognised with graduate and 

(now) lecturer in the program, Pippa Blackburn, winning WA’s prestigious Social Worker of the 

Year Award. In the 2014 WA Youth Awards, the Minister for Youth’s Outstanding Youth Worker 

Award was also awarded to ECU Social Work Graduate, Matthew Bartlett. 

 

Study and internship in Bali 

Paramedical Science student Brienna Forster secured a prestigious New Colombo Plan Scholarship  giving her the chance to study for six‐months in Bali, Indonesia. Brienna will complete six months  study at Udayana University and will undertake an internship at Sanglah Hospital. 

 

Mentoring with our alumni 

A new ECU Alumni Mentoring program was piloted in Semester 2, 2014 to provide mentoring from  some of ECU’s brightest past and present students.  Fourteen mentoring partnerships were 

  established in this initial phase of the program, which seeks to provide students and graduates  with career advice regarding their chosen field of employment.  

ECU’s Key Graduate Employment Outcomes in 2014 

 

The University’s governing Council approved two key actions for this Strategic Priority for 2014.  

Improve graduate learning outcomes through an employability focus to the curriculum  supporting the development of generic skills and English language outcomes. 

ECU has an extensive English Language Proficiency framework, as part of the Course and Unit 

Planning and Development policy, last amended in October 2014. 

In 2014 a Post‐Entry Language Assessment (PELA) was implemented within first year core units in  all undergraduate courses and an increasing number of postgraduate courses. The PELA provides a 

27 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

post‐enrolment test of commencing students’ English language proficiency and was completed by  over 6,000 students in 2014. ECU staff use the PELA results to tailor English language support for  commencing students to enhance the employment prospects of ECU graduates.   

ECU has implemented an English Language Proficiency (ELP) measure to provide comprehensive  and timely feedback to students on their English language skills.   Monitoring of the PELA process  and the ELP strategy was undertaken by the Deputy Vice‐Chancellor (Teaching, Learning and 

International), the ELP Committee and the Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Committee. 

Learning Advisors in faculty‐based Academic Skills Centres continued to provide a range of student  support measures tailored to faculty, school and/or courses. These assist students with the  development of their academic skills, as well as presentation and team working skills.  Faculty‐ based Careers Advisors provide an employability focus within the curriculum in designated first  year units and a number of courses now include a first year foundation, or generic skills unit, to be  completed in a student’s first semester of study. 

 

Support and evaluate improvements in graduate outcomes in our various pathways resulting  from enhanced retention strategies and inclusive practice in workplace integrated learning,  career development, volunteering and student leadership. 

Connect for Success (C4S) is a program that seeks to identify students who may require extra  support in their transition to university studies.  An analysis of the program indicates its success in  improving the retention rates for those students accessing the C4S service compared with others. 

In March 2014, Employability Week events and activities were held across all ECU campuses to  help students prepare for employment after graduation. Activities included a Volunteer Fair, 

Business and Law Fair, Engineering Fair and twenty‐five career specific workshops. 

The University’s 'one‐stop shop' for career planning and job search resources and information, 

CareerHub, continued to grow in 2014.  The CareerHub received 3,389 student registrations, 351  organisation registrations, and advertised 1,523 job opportunities. 

ECU’s VolunteerHub, which received over 1,100 student registrations in 2014, also provided  specific access to volunteering opportunities and resources for students.  In 2014, 111  organisations registered on VolunteerHub with a total of 511 volunteering opportunities having  been available. 

Faculty‐based Career Advisers continued to support students, with in excess of 740 appointments  and a range of workshops and career seminars/presentations held in 2014. 

In 2014, an internal review of workplace integrated learning (WIL) recommended development of  a stand‐alone WIL Policy to improve risk management practices, engagement with host  organisations, process of agreements and appropriate University‐wide software to manage WIL  placements. WIL resources were developed to support Academic staff in designing and/or revising 

WIL opportunities. An Australian Qualifications Framework compliance project was completed and  course‐level learning outcomes for WIL have been embedded in relevant courses. ECU’s e‐ portfolio system, PebblePad, was used to help direct, document and assess WIL activities. 

Improving the employment outcomes for ECU’s graduates will continue to be a strategic focus for  the foreseeable future, as the initiatives described above expand in scope over time to support a  greater proportion of the ECU student cohort. 

28 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

Graduate full‐time employment outcomes, as measured by the Australian Graduate Survey, four  months post‐graduation, have persistently tracked below national averages as shown in Figure 5  below. 

 

Figure 6: ECU Full‐time Graduate Employment, 2010‐2013 

85

80

75

70

65

60

55

50

100

95

90

Sector Average

Full‐time Employment

2010 2011

Year of Survey

2012 2013

 

Notes: The measure reported is the Bachelor‐level domestic graduates who are working full‐time, as a  proportion of those in, or available for, full‐time work. ‘Available’ includes, in addition to those already in  full‐time work, those seeking full‐time work who are either not working or are working part‐time. 

‘Bachelor‐level’ includes Pass Bachelor, Honours, and Graduate Entry degrees.

 

 

 

29 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Strategic Priority 4: To strengthen research capability, capacity,  translation and impact 

HIGHLIGHTS 

New habitats for birds 

Mine sites in WA’s Pilbara region are inadvertently providing new habitats for migratory  shorebirds. A study by ECU School of Natural Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dr Sora 

Marin‐Estrella found these man‐made wetlands are being utilised by shorebirds in preference to  traditional intertidal mudflats, which are increasingly under threat from coastal development and  climate change. The research was made possible through a collaboration with Rio Tinto subsidiary 

Dampier Salt. 

 

Bushfire information at click of a button 

A new website that allows the public to access bushfire information previously only available to  authorities won a National iAward in 2014. ECU School of Communications and Arts PhD student 

Paul Haimes created the MyFireWatch website as part of a collaborative ARC Linkage project  between Landgate and ECU. ECU has now won National iAwards in each of the last three years. 

 

Literacy on the move 

The ‘Moving on with Literacy’ program, developed by ECU School of Education researchers, is  designed to help children develop the specific physical skills needed to read and write, such as  holding a pen and tracking eyes across a page. The program involves students singing and dancing  along to action songs as modelled by their teacher. A year‐long study in eight Perth schools has  shown the movement program to be effective in improving students’ literacy skills. 

 

Cyber security awareness in small business  

Researchers from ECU’s Security Research Institute surveyed businesses in Perth’s northern  suburbs on their knowledge around cyber security. The research found lax security measures were  commonplace among small businesses, which are the target for more than 31 per cent of all  cyber‐attacks. The researchers then conducted a series of workshops to educate small business 

  owners on minimising the risks of cyber‐attacks. 

Sensor gets to heart of the matter 

An innovative new heart rate monitor that operates under the same principles as noise cancelling  headphones is under development at the ECU Electron Science Research Institute.  The monitor  works by isolating the magnetic field generated by a heart, and provides more detailed 

  information than a standard electrocardiogram. 

Research Week 

The Joondalup, Mount Lawley and South West (Bunbury) campuses again hosted the annual 

Research Week

 in September, which celebrated the research activities and outcomes of ECU  researchers of all levels, and shared their knowledge, insights and inspiration with students, staff  and the wider community.  ECU offered a series of events, including a lecture about the  importance of science education to regional and rural Australia and another about Alzheimer’s 

 

disease by WA’s new Chief Scientist, Professor Peter Klinken and Associate Professor Simon Laws. 

 

30 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

ECU’s Key Research and Research Training Outcomes in 2014 

The University’s governing Council approved two key actions for this Strategic Priority for 2014.  

Increase engaged research funding and activity and attain the milestone targets for 2014 in 

Collaborative Research Networks funding for ECU. 

Engaged research funding and activity is monitored through grants forming part of the Higher 

Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) submission. Refer to Table 3 for more details. 

Research networks within the Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) sub‐projects have expanded  both internally and externally and this has created new opportunities for the development of  greater understanding and knowledge depth of the CRN teams’ research areas.  All sub‐projects  progressed well towards their objectives/outcomes in 2014 and highlights included: 

 three successful CRN workshops on Child Mental Health and Wellbeing, Nano‐electronics  and Nano‐photonics, and Protection of Coastal Ecosystems; and 

 as a result of the CRN funding:  o

117 journal articles and 14 book chapters have been published;  o

52 Visiting Fellows visited ECU to discuss research projects and collaborations; and  o

149 joint grant applications were submitted, of which 45 grants have been funded. 

Initial discussions have taken place with project teams about the long‐term sustainability of  projects, and an outline summary has been prepared to transition each of the six sub‐projects  following the end of CRN funding. 

 

Increase the proportion of timely research higher degree completions and effectiveness of  research supervision through enhanced supervisor training and the continued application of  threshold requirements for supervisor research outputs. 

The proportion of timely completions in 2014 decreased to 55% (from 67% in 2013) due to the  transition of ‘overtime’ students through ECU’s new candidature management procedures,  implemented in late 2013.  There were 116 completions in 2014, compared to 103 completions in 

2013.   

Training to support higher degree by research candidates in 2014 included: “Managing your  research project for timely completions”, “Completion master classes”, and the “Retreat to 

Complete”. Ten higher degree supervisor‐training workshops were delivered to 136 staff (face‐to‐ face and online).  

 

 

A research supervisors’ stream was introduced at the 2014 InSPIRE Research Training Conference,  and several supervisor workshops (not related to compliance training) were delivered, including 

“Improving Supervisor Practice”. 

 

31 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

ECU’s Strategic Focus on Research and Research Training 

Research Profile 

 

ECU seeks to be recognised for high impact research providing social, economic, environmental  and cultural benefits, with eleven identified areas of research priority:  

Medical and Health Sciences, including Nursing, Neurosciences, and Human Movement and 

Sports Science 

Ecology, Environmental Science and Management 

Communication and Media Studies; Cultural Studies 

Performing Arts and Creative Writing 

Education  

Engineering 

Law  

Innovation, Management, and Services 

Visual Arts and Crafts, and Design 

 

Cyber Security 

Aboriginal Culture, Education and Health 

Research Leadership 

ECU continued to build a rich research culture in 2014 by implementing new, and consolidating  existing, initiatives designed to engage and support researchers, whilst expanding engagement  activities with industry and government. A broad range of activities included the following  highlights. 

 Research translation workshops were available along with a Research Impact Award to  encourage, recognise and reward outcomes‐focused research that benefits our  communities.   

 A program of Master Classes was available for researchers, including a series of five 

Excellence in Academe workshops facilitated by Dr Shelda Debowski; and a grant writing  workshop led by Dr Gil Stokes. 

 Two Research Orientation (You, your research and ECU) sessions were delivered to inform  researchers about the many support services available at ECU.   

 An ‘Early Start’ grants review process, supported by internal and external peer reviews of  research proposals, was developed.   

 Eight ‘Enterprise Tuesday’ sessions were implemented, designed to introduce researchers  to potential industry and government partners, as well as to encourage and inspire  individuals to pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions. 

 ECU students, staff, and members of the community listened to, and engaged with, 

Professor Margaret Seares, at the 2014 Inspirational Leaders Seminar.  

 eResearch has expanded greatly in 2014, with a motion capture facility and a desktop eye  tracking capability established at the ECU Mount Lawley Campus.  

 The Centre for Innovative Practice was reclassified to a University‐designated Research 

Centre; and the Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Services was established  following an amalgamation of the WA Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care and the Clinical 

Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre.  

32 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 ECU worked towards the establishment of a new Australian Cyber Security Research 

Institute to represent a co‐ordinated strategic research and education effort between  national cyber security agencies, industry and researchers. 

 

Research Funding  

Total research income in 2014 is likely to be above that achieved in 2013 ($16.5 million), based on  unaudited figures as at 31 December 2014 ($17.1 million).  The Australian Government’s total  research block grant allocation for 2014 was $8.5 million.  

Table 3: Research Funding by Category, 2009‐2014 ($M)  

 

National Competitive Research Grants 

Other Public Sector Research Funding 

Industry and Other Funding 

Co‐operative Research Centre Funding 

2010 

2.75 

8.30 

4.21 

0.05 

2011 

2.80 

8.40 

4.55 

2012 

2.99 

6.32 

4.92 

1.19 

2013 

3.37 

5.82 

5.37 

1.96 

2014 

3.60 

6.93 

4.71 

1.84 

Total  15.31  15.75  15.43  16.51  17.09 

Notes: The 2014 income figures are as at 31 December 2014 and unaudited.  Further analysis will be done based on  the latest HERDC guidelines, which might alter research income by HERDC category for 2014. The 2013 income  figures are final (audited and submitted) and differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 

2013. 

 

Table 4: Research Block Funding by Category, 2009‐2014 ($M) 

 

Joint Research Engagement Program 

Research Training Scheme 

Research Infrastructure Block Grant 

Sustainable Research Excellence 

2010 

2.03 

4.41 

0.37 

0.45 

2011 

2.19 

4.41 

0.47 

0.52 

2012 

2.42 

4.48 

0.51 

0.71 

2013 

2.58 

4.58 

0.44 

0.71 

2014 

2.81 

4.56 

0.44 

0.72 

 

Total 

 

Notes: The 2014 income figures are for the full year. 

7.27  7.59  8.12  8.31  8.53 

ECU maintained its position in the top Tier Two funding group for Sustainable Research Excellence,  based on Category 1 Australian Competitive Research Grant income.   

 

33 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

National Grants announced in 2014 

Professor Lelia Green and Dr Donell Holloway from ECU’s School of Communications and Arts  were awarded a $365,211 Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project grant. They will  work with colleagues including Professor Sonia Livingstone, OBE, from the London School of 

Economics to examine family practices and attitudes around very young children’s internet use in 

Australia and the United Kingdom. 

Two ECU projects, one to investigate how to break the cycle of welfare dependency and a second,  to develop weed‐zapping lasers, secured prestigious ARC Linkage Project Scheme grants worth a  combined $420,000 in 2014. The University received $270,000 supporting a Photonic Weed 

Detection System, developed by Professor Kamal Alameh, that will change the way farmers target  and eliminate weeds, reducing herbicide use by up to 75 per cent while also eliminating the need  to ‘blanket spray’ crops.  Professor Lelia Green and Associate Professor Panizza Allmark received 

$150,000 for a project partnering with the St Vincent de Paul Society aimed at breaking the multi‐ generational cycle of poverty. 

Professor Alfred Allan from ECU's School of Psychology and Social Science is also a Chief 

Investigator in a national team of researchers awarded $636,590 to look at ways to reduce the risk  of convicted sex offenders re‐offending. 

 

In 2014, ECU increased its strategic research investment by 2 per cent to $10.3 million, with a  focus on increasing external research collaborations and building research capacity. These funds  were applied to key state, national and international initiatives, fellowships, scholarships and  infrastructure, in order to foster industry linkages and commercialisation in areas of research  priority.  

 

Research Training 

Higher Degree by Research student numbers declined between 2010 and 2013, and provisional  figures for 2014 indicate a further decrease.  

Table 5: Higher Degree by Research Student Load, 2011‐2014 

 

Doctorate by Research 

Masters by Research 

2010 

336 

99 

2011 

347 

108 

2012 

351 

106 

2013 

330 

97 

2014 

328 

86 

Total (EFTSL)  435  455  457  420  414 

Notes: 2014 data is as at 12/02/2015. 2013 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures  reported in the Annual Report for 2013. 

 

Instruments such as the International Student Barometer show that ECU’s research and higher  degree students and graduates continue to rate highly the support received from their supervisors  and ECU’s Graduate Research School.  

 

Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire (for both domestic and  international students) as shown in Figure 7 below also show high levels of student satisfaction  with ECU.  In each of the last three years, ECU was rated higher than the national average.   

34 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

Figure 7: Higher Degree by Research Graduate Satisfaction, 2008‐2013 

100.0

95.0

90.0

85.0

80.0

ECU Sector Average

75.0

2009 2010 2011

Year of Survey

2012 2013

Notes: This measures the percentage of ECU Higher Degree by Research graduates who, in responding to the overall  satisfaction item from the national Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire “agree” with the statement 

“Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of my higher degree research experience”.  The percentage agreement is  the percentage of responses that are 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five‐point Likert scale. 

 

 

ECU has expanded its scholarships programs to include a new category of ‘Industry Engagement 

Scholarships’, which provide PhD scholarships for specific projects in industry, community and  government. The industry partner contributes support and direction to the research project, and  the higher degree by research candidate has the opportunity to develop their career in research,  or one in the broader economy, where their high levels of technical and analytical skills and  creativity would be valuable.  

The doctoral training program is also driving engagement through the  Industry and Postgraduate 

Research Engagement Program ( iPREP). This is an ECU initiative with all five universities in WA  linking industry partners with interdisciplinary teams of PhD candidates to work on authentic  industry and community issues and problems. The aim of iPREP is to familiarise industry with  university research, improve employment prospects for doctoral graduates, and develop  professional skills needed in industry settings.  

 

 

The number of international scholarship opportunities also increased through partnerships with  international institutions and foreign governments. Recruitment activity for international research  students also increased through attendance at international scholarship fairs.  

A project commenced in 2014 to develop a four‐year research degree, which integrates research  preparation (one year) and research (three years), comprising generic and discipline specific skills,  into a single degree. The aim of this new degree is to provide an alternative pathway to the PhD,  with the first year designed to help higher degree by research candidates build required research  training skills, and scaffold their research journey for a successful PhD. 

 

35 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Strategic Priority 5: To enhance organisational resilience,  sustainability and reputation 

 

HIGHLIGHTS  

New leader for ECU 

Following a global recruitment campaign, Professor Stephen Chapman was appointed as ECU’s  next Vice‐Chancellor, replacing Professor Kerry Cox, who retired in September 2014. Professor 

Chapman is currently the Principal and Vice‐Chancellor of Heriot‐Watt University, Scotland and has  led significant improvements to the student experience, with Heriot‐Watt University being named  by The Sunday Times newspaper as the Best Scottish University for an unprecedented two  consecutive years, 2011‐12 and 2012‐13.  

 

Star support 

Hollywood actor Hugh Jackman returned to ECU in May 2014 to launch the Jackman Furness 

Foundation for the Performing Arts. The WAAPA graduate established the Foundation with a $1  million donation, matched by Andrew and Nicola Forrest’s Minderoo Foundation. The Foundation  aims to raise $10 million over four years to support performing arts in Australia and WAAPA’s 

  performing arts projects will be funded in perpetuity through interest raised. 

Smart travel 

ECU was named the winner of the ‘Achieve’ category at the WA Department of Transport’s 

TravelSmart awards. The award recognises ECU’s Transport Management Group and the 

University’s Active Transport Plan. These initiatives have resulted in more than half of all travel by  students to and from the University’s campuses considered “active transport”. 

 

Gold Medal workplace 

The University was one of only three organisations to receive ‘gold’ recognition from the WA 

Department of Health’s Healthier Workplaces WA program. The award recognises ECU’s successful  staff health and wellness program: Live Life Longer, a network of over 600 ‘legends’ who are 

  provided with incentives to promote the program and encourage staff involvement. 

Welcome spaces 

The first of ECU’s five cultural reflection spaces opened in May 2014. Welcome to Place, the first 

 

reflection space, is located at the entrance to the Joondalup campus near Building 1 and welcomes  students, staff and visitors onto campus, with the bilingual greetings “Wandjoo” and “Welcome”. 

The reflection spaces support ECU’s Reconciliation Action Plan and will provide a unique  opportunity to learn about traditional Whadjuk Nyoongar knowledge. 

ECU’s Key Organisational Sustainability Outcomes in 2014 

The University’s governing Council approved three key actions for this Strategic Priority for 2014.  

Continue the implementation of the [email protected] for the Future outcomes, to improve delivery of IT  services and return on the University’s technology investment. 

The [email protected] for the Future program moved into an implementation phase during 2014 and work  to provide a ‘virtual computing environment’ for staff and students continued. Specific activities  included: 

36 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 development of a business case for provision of a data centre and cloud services; 

 procurement for the upgrade of the University’s wired and wireless network; 

 development of a strategy and detailed roadmaps for several enterprise systems; and 

 progress of a business case to move the University to a ‘desktop as a service’ model. 

The University‐wide approach to investment in technology capability is now embedded in 

University processes. For example, development of the 2015 Asset Management Plan was  informed by planning and prioritisation processes conducted under the enterprise technology  governance framework. 

 

Continue to implement strategies necessary to ameliorate the financial impact of the 2015 half‐ cohort of WA school‐leavers. 

The financial impact of the anticipated reduction in commencing student load arising from the 

2015 half‐cohort has been addressed within the ECU Budget for 2015, which was approved by 

Council at its December 2014 meeting. 

The University continues to proactively manage the challenges of the half‐cohort with strategies  for cost containment, resource re‐alignment and enrolment growth, including: 

 a Staffing Strategies Committee chaired by the Deputy Vice‐Chancellor (Academic), which  continues to review and approve all staff appointments; 

 workforce management initiatives such as monitoring staffing profiles, leave, flexible  working hours, by the Deputy Vice‐Chancellor (Academic) and the Director, Human 

Resources; 

 cessation, prior to 2015, of the Academic Initiatives Fund (4% of faculty revenue);  

 a real reduction of 2% in service centre funding for 2014, requiring centres to identify  productivity efficiencies and prioritise activities; 

 further refinement of the Enterprise Resource Allocation Model to facilitate improved  strategic budget allocation and decision‐making across the University; and 

 strategic sourcing initiatives to contain contract expenditure and improved cost  management across the University. 

 

 

Improve Alumni engagement and deliver the outcomes of the integrated fundraising program  through partnerships, fundraising and Alumni relations. 

A series of 16 alumni events were held in 2014, including careers workshops, speaker events and  social events such as movie nights, comedy nights, and the flagship outdoor concert ‘Music under  the Stars’.

 

The number of alumni in contact with the University increased from 44,500 to more than 52,500 in 

2014, and almost 80 per cent of respondents to an alumni survey indicated that they felt proud to  be a graduate of ECU. 

The first Finding Solutions Panel Debate was held at Kurongkurl Katitjin, ECU’s Centre for 

Indigenous Australian Education and Research, to showcase ECU’s ability to engage with key  stakeholders in solving real‐world issues. 

 

37 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

 

ECU’s Strategic Focus on Organisational Sustainability 

This Strategic Priority comprises staffing, financial positioning, infrastructure and facilities services,  and sustainability. 

Staffing 

The ECU Staffing Plan 2012‐15 addresses key workforce planning and staffing strategies to 2015. 

This plan details the University’s equity and diversity commitments in relation to its workforce,  addressing the legislative requirements of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA), reported to the 

Workplace Gender Equity Agency. 

ECU continued to streamline organisational structures to improve staffing efficiency and  effectiveness in anticipation of reduced Commonwealth support for universities and the direct  impact on WA universities of the half‐cohort. These adjustments included change management  and staff reductions across most areas of the University. 

ECU implemented new arrangements from the 2013 Collective Agreement including a review of  staff profiles within ECU schools to identify options for alternative academic roles and streamlined  academic leadership structures. ECU also continued its focus in recruitment and promotion to  grow research capability and the proportion of the academic workforce with PhD qualifications. 

There were 12 academic promotions to Senior Lecturer and above in 2014. As anticipated, in the  period following the introduction of ECU’s Academic Standards framework there have been lower  applicant numbers and applicant ratios.  However, success rates have recovered to 60%.  

In 2014, ECU increased the representation of women at senior levels amongst both academic and  professional staff, and was confirmed as being compliant with Workplace Gender Equality Act 

2012 (Cwlth). 

The biennial staff survey was conducted in 2014. The ‘Voice’ survey is run at most Australian  universities. ECU staff responses to the survey totalled 1303, giving a response rate of 73%, which  is well above sector averages. In 2014 staff reported higher levels of engagement and  commitment to ECU (77%) than their peers in other Australian universities. Satisfaction scores  were highest for: organisation direction, and mission and values, and were lowest for: recruitment  and selection, organisational change and involvement, and support for research. 

The survey included questions relating to organisational risk factors such as equal employment  opportunity culture and psycho‐social workplace factors such as harassment and bullying.  For the 

University as a whole most results were positive, although some areas were identified as requiring  specific support in 2015.  

A strategy to reduce excess leave accruals was implemented successfully, together with a process  to monitor and prevent excessive leave balances accruing in the future.  

 

38 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 

Strengthening ECU’s Leadership Capacity 

A number of significant appointments were made in 2014. These included:  

Professor Stephen Chapman, appointed as Vice‐Chancellor, effective April 2015; 

Professor Lynne Cohen, reappointed as Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor: Engagement (Communities)  and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Education and Arts; 

Ms Jenny Robertson, appointed Director, Human Resources Services Centre; 

Professor Neil Drew, appointed Professor and Director of the Australian Indigenous 

HealthInfonet, Faculty of Education and Arts;  

Professor Joe Luca, reappointed as Dean, Graduate Research School; 

Ms Joanne Quinn, reappointed as General Counsel, Office of Legal Services; 

Professor Clive Barstow, reappointed as Head of School of Communications and Arts, 

Faculty of Education and Arts; 

Professor Di Twigg, reappointed as Head of School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of 

Health, Engineering and Science; 

Associate Professor Annette Raynor, reappointed as Head of School of Exercise and Health 

Sciences, Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science; 

Professor David McKinnon, appointed Professor and Director, Edith Cowan Institute for 

Education Research, School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts; 

Professor Kathy Boxall, appointed Professor of Social Work and Disability Studies, Faculty  of Regional Professional Studies; and 

Professor Mark Hackling, appointed as Emeritus Professor. 

 

 

Financial Positioning  

The University’s five strategic priorities are reflected in University‐wide strategic budget  allocations and in the expenditure plans of each faculty and service centre. ECU has implemented  budget strategies to enable it to respond quickly to change, while progressing its Purpose, Vision  and Strategic Priorities. 

 

Budget strategies work in parallel with complementary initiatives designed to: 

 continue to focus ECU’s academic activities and staff profile in areas of strength; 

 improve the quality of activities, services and outcomes in teaching and research; and 

 support the financial viability of ECU through a combination of cost‐savings and improved  efficiencies, and through the achievement of revenue growth targets. 

ECU overall financial position remained sound and the University received a “clean bill of health”  from the Australian Government’s Department of Education in its annual review of the financial  position of Australian universities.  In addition, the University once again received an unqualified  external audit opinion for 2014.  

Throughout 2014, ECU operated within the key budget parameters approved by Council. 

Performance against the 2014 financial targets set by Council was once again strong. The 

University posted a 2014 operating surplus of $27.5 million for the year, which exceeded the  original budget ($17.8 million) by $9.7 million. Total revenue for the University in 2014 was $388  million, which exceeded the original budget ($371 million) by $17 million. 

 

39 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Table 6: Financial Ratios, 2014 

  Actual   Target  Variance/ Comment 

 

Total Revenue 

Operating Margin  

$388 million  $371 million  Revenue is higher than original  budget. 

Interest cover (Debt 

Service Coverage Ratio) 

Current Ratio 

7% 

7.9 times 

2.5 

>4% 

>3 times 

>1.0 

Operating margin is above 4%  minimum target and achieved  original budget. 

Interest cover is above target of at  least 3 times and exceeds original  budget. 

Current ratio exceeds minimum  target of 1 and achieved original  budget. 

Number of weeks’ revenue in cash  is higher than the minimum 4 and  exceeds original budget. 

 

Number of Weeks 

Revenue ‐ Cash Assets 

Reserves 

37 weeks  >4 weeks 

 

Debt to equity ratio 

11.1%  <30%  The debt to equity ratio is well  within target of less than 30% 

 

The Financial Statements begin on page 60 of this Annual Report. 

 

40 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

Infrastructure and Facilities Services 

ECU measures its infrastructure and facilities services performance on five measures (as follow)  that are benchmarked against other Australian universities through the Tertiary Education 

Facilities Management Association. The latest available benchmark data is for 2013. 

 

Backlog Maintenance   

This measure provides the ratio of backlog maintenance cost to asset replacement value and  indicates that ECU continues to maintain low liability in backlog maintenance when compared to 

WA university averages and sector averages.  

Table 7: Backlog Maintenance (%), 2009‐2013 

 

ECU 

WA 

2009 

0.7%

 

2.6%

 

2010 

0.8%

 

2.8%

 

2011 

0.4%

 

2.2%

 

2012 

0.5%

 

3.5%

 

2013 

1.2% 

3.3% 

Sector 

 

Utilisation Rates 

5.5%

 

4.4%

 

4.3%

 

3.4%

 

4.0% 

This measure provides the daytime utilisation of teaching spaces (% time used) as measured by  audits. Results indicate that ECU has capacity to grow teaching and learning activities through  improved utilisation of existing space. 

Table 8: Utilisation Rates (% time used), 2009‐2013 

 

 

ECU 

WA 

2009 

15.3%

 

‐ 

2010 

21.5%

 

‐ 

2011 

21.1%

 

40.2%

 

2012 

21.4%

 

42.2%

 

2013 

18.3% 

28.9% 

Sector  31.3%

 

 

Water Consumption  

31.4%

 

35.7%

 

33.4%

 

30.3% 

This measures the use of water (kL) against student load (EFTSL). Benchmarking rules were  changed in 2011 and earlier figures are not comparable with those for 2011 and later. ECU  performs well when compared to WA and sector averages. 

Table 9: Water Consumption (kL/ EFTSL), 2009‐2013 

 

ECU 

WA 

Sector 

2009 

6.1

 

10.4 

10.3

 

2010 

4.8

 

12.5 

9.9

 

2011 

14.4

 

32.6 

12.4

 

2012 

12.0

 

33.0 

12.0

 

2013 

13.7 

30.1 

13.6 

41 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Waste to Landfill  

This measures waste to landfill in (kg) against student load (EFTSL). In 2014, ECU completed the  rollout of recycling bins within buildings that should impact positively on future results. 

 

Table 10: Waste to Landfill (kg/EFTSL), 2011‐2013 

 

ECU 

WA 

2011 

25.9

 

44.5

 

2012 

29.7

 

30.2

 

2013 

31.9 

30.0 

Sector  52.3

 

47.5

 

44.6 

 

Energy Consumption  

This measures energy consumption (gigajoules) against gross floor area (m

2

). All new buildings at 

ECU have been designed to use less energy.  ECU performs very well compared with WA and  sector averages. 

Table 11: Energy Consumption (GJ/m

2

), 2009‐2013 

 

ECU 

WA 

2009 

0.6

 

0.7

 

2010 

0.5

 

0.7

 

2011 

0.5

 

0.7

 

2012 

0.5

 

0.8

 

2013 

0.5 

0.8 

Sector  0.7

 

 

Environmental Sustainability  

0.7

 

0.7

 

0.7

 

0.7 

ECU operates under an environmental management system accredited to ISO 14001, 

Environmental Management Systems. This system includes programs around energy, water, waste  and travel to drive improved environmental outcomes.  In 2014, ECU received a TravelSmart 

Award from the WA Department of Transport for the University’s Transport Management Group  and Active Transport Plan.  

 

Building Infrastructure 

ECU’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and Buildings Asset Management Plan deliver a  structured and consistent approach to the management of the University’s assets.  The framework  and plan supports the University’s Purpose, Vision and Strategic Priorities by delivering building  infrastructure that enables ECU’s core functions of teaching, learning and research. 

Major building projects completed in 2014 included: 

 The Joondalup Engineering Pavilion, completed to budget. The School of Engineering has ‐ moved into the facility allowing the lease of an off‐campus facility to cease.  

 The construction of an additional 127 student housing beds at the Joondalup Campus  under a Public Private Partnership with Campus Living Villages. This will be ready for  occupation in Semester 1, 2015. The project is partly funded through the National Rental 

Affordability Scheme.  

Other major projects were at varying stages of development at the end of 2014: 

42 

Section 2A – Performance – Report on Operations 

 Construction of Ngoolark (Building 34 at the Joondalup Campus) remains on schedule to be  completed in January 2015 and will be delivered significantly under budget.  

 The ECU Health Centre (incorporating the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic) began operations in 

September 2014 and tenants are being sought for the unoccupied third floor, which will  require fit‐out. The project is currently significantly under budget.  

 

IT Infrastructure 

Major IT infrastructure initiatives in 2014, that will provide a foundation for teaching and learning  and research activities in the future, included the following. 

 Finalisation of the procurement activity and business case relating to the provisioning of  data centre and cloud services.  The option of moving to an externally managed solution  has been adopted and negotiations with the preferred supplier are underway. 

 Evaluation of the procurement for the network replacement program commenced and the  replacement of both wired and wireless networks is expected to be completed before the  beginning of Semester 2, 2015. 

 Implementation of new Call Centre technology was successfully completed. 

 Continuation of the information security work to improve the protection of the University’s  network and information from the increasing number of cyber security attacks.  

 

43 

Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

SECTION 2B: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON KEY PERFORMANCE 

INDICATORS 

Report Certification 

 

 

 

We hereby certify that the key performance indicators are based on proper records, are relevant  and appropriate for assisting users to assess ECU’s performance, and fairly represent the  performance of ECU for the financial year ended 31 December 2014. 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan    

Chancellor   

7 March 2015   

 

   

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

  

 

 

 

Professor Arshad Omari 

Acting Vice‐Chancellor 

7 March 2015 

44 

Section 2B: Performance – Report on Key Performance Indicators 

Key Performance Indicators  

Introduction 

ECU’s Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) focus on the University’s core business (teaching, learning  and research) and key stakeholders (students).  The KPIs are informed by the functions of the 

University as set out in Section 7 of the Edith Cowan University Act 1984 (WA) (ECU Act),  particularly: 

 S7(a) “to provide…courses of study appropriate to a university to meet the needs of the  community in this State.” 

 S7(c) “to support and pursue research and scholarship and aid the advancement,  development, and practical applications to education, industry, commerce and the  community, of knowledge or any techniques.” 

A revised version of the University’s strategic directions document: Edith Cowan University: 

Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards 2020 was approved by Council in December 

2012. The revised document specifies ECU’s Purpose and five Strategic Priorities that articulate the 

University’s commitment to the communities it serves.  

ECU’s Purpose is: To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and 

beyond, through teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships. 

ECU’s five Strategic Priorities are:  

1. To create positive outcomes in our communities through mutually beneficial engagement; 

2. To deliver accessible world‐class education and an enriching student experience; 

3. To enhance the personal and professional outcomes of graduates; 

4. To strengthen research capability, capacity, translation and impact; and 

5. To enhance organisational resilience, sustainability and reputation. 

 

The Annual Report’s Report on Operations is structured around these Strategic Priorities,  reflecting their importance in setting direction for the University’s operations.    

In this Key Performance Indicator Report, the functions specified in the ECU Act and reflected in 

ECU’s current Strategic Priorities, provide the basis for the following outcomes, against which the 

University’s performance is measured: 

 

Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are  provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.  

Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce  and the community, through the practical application of knowledge. 

For each KPI, the Key Performance Indicator Report provides, where possible: 

 ECU’s performance over the last five years; 

 a comparison to Target for the most recent year;  and  

 comparisons to the overall performance of universities in Australia (“National Average”)  and to public universities in Western Australia (“State Average”).   

 

A summary of KPIs to be audited by the Auditor General is provided in the diagram on the next page. 

45 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

 

 

Summary of KPIs to be audited by the Office of the Auditor General 

Outcome 1:  

ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the 

Western Australian community and are provided  in a supportive and stimulating learning  environment 

Course Satisfaction  

 

(effectiveness indicator) 

Quality of Teaching 

 

(effectiveness indicator) 

Graduate Employment 

(effectiveness indicator) 

Retention 

(effectiveness indicator) 

 

Outcome 2:  

ECU’s research and scholarship advance and  develop education, industry, commerce and the  community, through the practical application of  knowledge. 

Research Publications (per 10 Academic Staff FTE) 

(effectiveness and efficiency indicator) 

Higher Degree Research Completions (per 10 

Academic Staff FTE) 

(effectiveness and efficiency indicator) 

Operating Margin 

 (effectiveness and efficiency indicator) 

 

46 

Section 2B: Performance – Report on Key Performance Indicators 

Course Satisfaction 

Graduates are more likely to rate their course highly, in terms of overall satisfaction, if the course  was relevant to their needs, provided in a supportive learning environment and has proven useful  and relevant in an employment context following graduation.  Graduate satisfaction with the  quality of their course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet  the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating  learning environment.  

Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of their courses is available from  responses to the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of graduates  conducted four to six months after course completion.  

Course Satisfaction is defined as the percentage of all domestic and international Bachelor level 

(Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates who ‘agree’ with the  statement: “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this course” from the Course Experience 

Questionnaire. The percentage agreement is the percentage of responses that are 4 (agree) or 5 

(strongly agree) on the five‐point Likert scale. 

 

Table 12: Bachelor Course Level Graduates’ CEQ Course Satisfaction 

 

 

ECU 

Target 

Year of Survey 

2010  2011 

86.9% 

‐ 

86.9% 

‐ 

2012 

85.1% 

‐ 

2013 

86.9% 

‐ 

2014

1

 

 

86.0% 

National Average  81.1%  82.2%  83.2%  83.0%   

State Average  82.5%  83.4%  84.1%  83.0%   

Notes: 1. National data sets for 2014 were not made available in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this 

Report. 2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey” as is common practice across the  sector.  3. For the 2013 survey 3,314 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1,898 responded to the 

CEQ, equating to a response rate of 57.3%. 4. ECU adopted an amended KPI definition for the 2014 survey  year meaning that targets set in previous years are not applicable. 

 

ECU graduates’ Course Satisfaction level in the 2013 survey increased (by 1.8 percentage points),  compared with the 2012 survey.  The results over the time series (between 2010 and 2013) have  been stable.  

 

ECU’s Course Satisfaction results are consistently above both the National and State averages. 

Quality of Teaching 

Graduates are more likely to rate highly the quality of the teaching in their course, if the content  and teaching style was relevant to their needs and the course was provided in a supportive  learning environment. Graduate satisfaction with the teaching they experienced during their  course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of  the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning  environment.  

47 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of the teaching they experienced is  available from responses to the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of  graduates conducted four to six months after course completion. Six items in the CEQ make up the 

Quality of Teaching Scale which is used to indicate how satisfied graduates were with the teaching  experience during their course. 

The Quality of Teaching Scale is defined as the proportion of domestic and international Bachelor  level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates who ‘agree’ on  average with the six items comprising this scale.  The percentage agreement is the proportion of a  respondent’s scores on the six items which are 4 (agree) or 5 (strongly agree) on the five‐point 

Likert scale. 

 

Table 13: Bachelor Course Level Graduates’ CEQ Quality of Teaching Scale 

 

 

ECU 

Target 

National Average 

Year of Survey 

2010  2011 

73.6% 

‐ 

62.2% 

73.4% 

‐ 

64.6% 

2012 

74.2% 

‐ 

66.3% 

2013 

73.2% 

‐ 

66.9%   

2014

1

 

 

74.0% 

State Average  65.5%  66.1%  67.1%  66.2%   

Notes: 1. National data sets for 2014 were not available in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.  2. 

The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector.  3. For  the 2013 survey 3,314 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1,898 responded to the CEQ,  equating to a response rate of 57.3%.  4. ECU adopted an amended KPI definition for the 2014 survey year  meaning that targets set in previous years are not applicable. 

 

ECU graduates’ level of satisfaction with the quality of teaching for the 2013 survey decreased (by 

1.0 percentage point), compared with the 2012 survey.  The results over the time series (between 

2010 and 2013) have been stable. 

 

ECU’s Good Teaching Scale results are consistently above both the National Average and the State 

Average. 

Graduate Employment 

There is strong evidence that many students undertake higher education for employment‐related  reasons (i.e.to gain employment, or to advance their career). The employers, on whom the job  prospects of graduates largely depend, seek employees who have the skills and attributes needed  in their professions and occupations. Graduate employment is therefore an indicator of the extent  to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are  provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.  

 

Comparative data on employment outcomes for ECU graduates is available from the Graduate 

Destination Survey (GDS), a national survey of graduates, conducted four to six months after  course completion.   

48 

Section 2B: Performance – Report on Key Performance Indicators 

The Graduate Employment measure is defined as domestic Bachelor‐level graduates who are  working full‐time, as a percentage of those available for full‐time work. ‘Available’ includes, in  addition to those already in full‐time work, those seeking full‐time work who are either not  working or are working part‐time. ‘Bachelor‐level’ includes Pass Bachelor, Honours, and Graduate 

Entry degrees. 

 

Table 14: Domestic Bachelor Course Level Graduates in Full‐time Employment 

 

 

ECU 

Target 

Year of Survey 

2010  2011 

72.7% 

‐ 

68.6% 

‐ 

2012 

71.3% 

‐ 

2013 

67.1% 

‐ 

2014

1

 

 

75.0% 

 

National Average  76.6%  76.7%  76.1%  71.3%   

State Average  75.1%  76.6%  79.2%  72.9%   

Notes: 1. National data sets for 2014 were not available in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this 

Report.  2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice  across the sector.  3. For the 2013 survey 2,669 ECU Domestic Bachelor graduates were surveyed,  of whom 1,550 responded to the GDS, equating to a response rate of 58.1%.  4. ECU adopted an  amended KPI definition for the 2014 survey year meaning that targets set in previous years are  not applicable.   

 

The proportion of ECU graduates in full‐time employment at the time of the 2013 survey  decreased by 4.2 percentage points, compared with those surveyed in 2012.  The 2013 survey  result is below both the National and State averages.   

An additional Strategic Priority (SP3), added in December 2012, reinforces ECU’s commitment to  improved graduate employment outcomes. This continues to be progressed through a range of  strategies embedded in the curriculum and provided through support and services structures that  are responding to this strategic priority. 

Retention 

Many factors influence whether students decide to remain in their studies (retention), including  the relevance of those studies to their needs, and the learning environment in which that study  takes place.  Student retention is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses meet  the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating  learning environment.  

 

Retention is here defined as the percentage of all domestic and international onshore students  who commence a course in a given year (Year of Commencement) and remain enrolled, including  deferrals, in the same course or another ECU course in the following year. 

49 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Table 15: Retention Commencing Students 

 

  Year of Commencement 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014

1

 

ECU  75.4%  75.4%  74.7%  72.3%   

Target  ‐  ‐  ‐  80.0%  78.0% 

Notes: 1. Retention data for students commencing in 2014 will not be available until mid‐2015. 2. ECU  adopted an amended KPI definition in 2013 meaning that targets set for 2010 to 2012 are not applicable. 

 

 

The retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2013 decreased (by 2.4 percentage points)  compared with the retention rate for those who commenced in 2012.  

Research Publications 

The number of recognised research and development publications produced in a year, as reported  to the Department of Industry, is a direct measure of research output.  

The number of weighted research and development publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE is a  measure of the efficiency of research output and an indicator of how efficiently ECU’s research  and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community. 

Research and Development “Weighted Publications” is defined as the number of publications in  the Department of Industry‐defined categories A1, B, C1 and E1 in a year.  The number of  publications is assessed annually in a rigorous, externally audited system prior to submission to  the Department of Industry. Weighted publications are expressed per 10 full‐time equivalent (FTE)  academic staff, where academic staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and  research’ or ‘research only’.  

   

Table 16: Research and Development Publications per 10 Academic FTE 

  

A1 – Authored Research Books 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014

20.0  11.5  8.0  9.3 

B1 ‐ Book Chapter 

C1 ‐ Articles in Scholarly Refereed Journal 

46.6  40.6 

268.4  296.0 

38.5 

309.1 

35.6 

343.4 

E1 ‐ Full Written Paper ‐ Refereed Proceedings  187.2  201.3  154.2  128.3   

 

 

 

1

 

Total Unweighted Publications 

Total Weighted Publications 

Academic Staff FTE 

522.1  549.4  509.7  516.6   

602.1  595.4  541.7  553.8   

531  517  528  512   

Weighted Publications per 10 FTE  11.3  11.6  10.3  10.8   

Target  12.8  12.8  12.0  12.0  11.0 

Note: 1. Research publications figures for 2014 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2015. 

 

Total Unweighted Publications increased by 6.9 publications between 2012 and 2013. Total 

Weighted Publications also increased between 2012 and 2013, by 12.1 publications. Weighted 

50 

Section 2B: Performance – Report on Key Performance Indicators 

 

Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE increased between 2012 and 2013, from 10.3 to 10.8, and  was below the 2013 target of 12 publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE.   

Higher Degree Research Completions 

Doctorate and Masters by Research completions is a measure of ECU’s success in training new  researchers who will undertake research activity and scholarship, to advance and develop  education, industry, commerce and the community. 

Higher Degree Research Completions per 10 Academic FTE is a measure of the efficiency of ECU’s  higher degree research programs in providing new researchers to education, industry, commerce  and the community.  

 

Higher Degree by Research Completions is defined here as the number of Research Doctorates  and Masters by Research theses passed in a year.  Completions are also expressed per 10 full‐time  equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic staff are those at Level B and above, classified as 

‘teaching and research’ or ‘research only’. 

 

Table 17: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE 

 

Doctorate by Research 

Masters by Research 

Total Completions 

Total State Completions

2

 

Total National Completions

2

 

Academic Staff FTE 

2010  2011 

51 

19 

70 

56 

22 

78 

2012 

61 

29 

90 

2013 

84 

27 

111 

647  696  797  830 

7,403  7,961  8,230  9,209   

 

531  517  528  512   

 

 

 

2014

1

 

Completions per 10 FTE  1.3  1.5  1.7  2.2   

Target  2.2  2.2  2.0  2.0  1.9 

Notes: 1. Research completions for 2014 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2015. 2. State and 

National Higher Degree by Research completions for 2013 are from Table 8 of the 2013 Award Course 

Completions listings on the Department of Education website at:  http://education.gov.au/selected‐higher‐ education‐statistics‐2013‐student‐data . 

 

Total completions for research doctorates increased between 2012 and 2013 while total  completions for research masters decreased slightly between 2012 and 2013.  Completions per 10 

Academic Staff FTE increased (from 1.7 to 2.2) and exceeded target by 0.2 completions per 10 

Academic Staff FTE.  

 

51 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Operating Margin 

Operating Margin is a direct measure of the underlying financial efficiency of the University.  It  also provides an indication of ECU’s capacity to effectively provide research, together with courses  of study that meet the needs of the Western Australian community in a supportive and stimulating  learning environment, in support of Outcome 1 and Outcome 2. 

Operating Margin is the net operating result calculated as a percentage of total revenue.  The  target for this indicator is approved through ECU’s budget processes. 

Table 18: ECU Operating Margin 

 

ECU 

2010 

6% 

2011 

9% 

2012 

7% 

2013 

8% 

2014 

7% 

Target  3%  4%  4%  4%  4% 

 

ECU’s Operating Margin has been above the minimum target throughout the time series. 

52 

Section 3 – Significant Issues and Trends 

SECTION 3: SIGNIFICANT ISSUES  

Higher Education Reforms  

The Federal Coalition Government came to power in September 2013 and subsequently  announced its intention to undertake reviews of higher education funding, participation targets,  quality assurance and regulatory burden. 

The 2014‐15 Commonwealth Budget handed down in May 2014, proposed significant structural  and funding changes to higher education including: an average 20 per cent reduction in funding  for Commonwealth supported places; fee deregulation to allow providers to set their own student  fees for domestic students; extending the provisions of the demand driven system of uncapped  places to non‐university providers and to sub‐Bachelor level qualifications, including the provision  of government funding; and the introduction of student fees for research higher degrees. 

These arrangements, intended to deliver budget savings of $3.9 billion over three years, were  articulated in a bill that was voted down by the Senate on 2 December 2014.  A revised Higher 

Education and Research Reform Bill 2014 was introduced into the House of Representatives on 3 

December. The amended bill retracts the proposal to change the interest rates charged on student  debts. The bill also makes provision for a $100 million structural adjustment fund and a more  targeted equity funding program to support regional universities, outer metropolitan universities  and others with limited capacity to generate significant additional revenues under a deregulated  student fee model. In February 2015, the Senate referred to its Education and 

Employment Legislation Committee and its Education and Employment References Committee  inquiries into the provisions of the Higher Education and Research Reform Bill 2014, with both  reports due by mid‐March 2015. 

In the event that, and the extent to which, the reforms are enacted; ECU will need to continue to  develop and implement strategies to respond to the legislative changes that result.  

 

The 2015 “Half‐Cohort”  

In 2001, the Western Australian Government increased the pre‐school and school entry age by six  months to align with other Australian states and territories. This change reduced the number of  students commencing in kindergarten of that year by approximately 40 per cent. This has resulted in  a reduced cohort of Year 12 school‐leaver students of approximately 16,000 students in 2014,  compared to 24,000 students in the previous year.  This change will impact on ECU’s commencing  student numbers in 2015 and 2016, and a range of strategies including cost containment, resource 

  re‐alignment and enrolment growth were implemented in 2014 in preparation for reduced revenues. 

Course Accreditation 

In 2014 ECU further embedded improved processes for achieving professional accreditation of its  courses.  As a result of revised and more rigorous course accreditation guidelines, the University  secured a number of accreditations for courses in a range of disciplines including Social Work, 

Occupational Therapy, Nutrition and Dietetics, Speech Pathology, Information Technology, 

Accounting, Engineering, Advertising, Nursing, Occupational Health and Safety, Human Resources  and Project Management. 

ECU’s Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor (Health Advancement) continued to oversee a proactive approach to  the accreditation of health courses, and ECU met all completion and compliance reporting  requirements of the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency and Health Workforce 

Australia. Throughout the year, ECU maintained contact with the Tertiary Education Quality and 

53 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Standards Agency (TEQSA) to keep it informed of developments and actions taken by ECU in order  to maintain the high quality and good reputation of its programs, including its over 150  professionally accredited courses.  

Autonomous Sanctions and UNSC Sanctions 

Sanctions imposed through the Autonomous Sanctions Act 2011 (Cwlth) and the United Nations 

Security Council (UNSC) requires the University to implement compliance processes to ensure that  the University does not: 1. provide sanctioned services to sanctioned individuals; and/or 2. deal  with designated entities/individuals.  The University has implemented relevant compliance  processes and is monitoring the compliance obligations to verify that its processes and procedures  continue to maintain compliance. 

 

Harmonised Work Safety and Health Legislation 

Harmonisation of the safety and health legislation across Australia will result in uniform work  safety and health legislation across jurisdictions.  Legislation in Western Australia was delayed and  the new laws are now expected to be enacted in 2015. ECU has reviewed the proposed laws and is  well prepared to meet the requirements of the new legislation. 

 

Australian Charities and Not‐for‐profits Commission (ACNC) Act 2012 

 

The ACNC Act requires all universities to register as a charity with the ACNC Commissioner,  conditional upon meeting the required governance and external conduct standards. The  registration includes the names of all Council members as responsible officers and therefore ECU  is obliged to notify changes to the register records as these arise. In addition, ECU is required to  provide the ACNC Commissioner with an annual information statement in the approved form. 

Legal Deposits Act 2012 (WA) 

The Legal Deposits Act 2012 (WA) requires that Western Australia publications (including 

University publications) be deposited with the State Library, to ensure the ongoing collection and  preservation of the State’s cultural heritage for future generations. The compliance aspects of the 

Legal Deposits Act are being co‐ordinated by the Library Services Centre. 

 

Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 

The Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 (Cwlth) (ESOS Act) and related legislation is  designed to protect the interests of students coming to Australia on student visas. The Australian 

Government undertook a review of the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS)  framework in 2014, to consider ways to better align the ESOS Act, the National Code of Practice  for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students, and 

Streamlined Visa Processing.  

ECU is supportive of the proposed amendments to reduce regulatory burdens on education  institutions offering courses to international students, streamline standards and quality assurance  processes, improved information sharing by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection  and improve flexibility to meet the changing needs of international students. Changes to the ESOS 

Act, ESOS framework and associated legislation are expected in 2015.      

54 

Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance 

SECTION 4: DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE 

Auditor General’s Statement 

 

55

 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

56 

 

Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance 

57

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Certification of Financial Statements 

 

The accompanying financial statements of ECU and the accompanying consolidated financial  statements have been prepared in compliance with the provisions of the Financial Management 

Act 2006 (WA) from proper accounts and records to present fairly the financial transactions for the  financial year ended 31 December 2014 and the financial position as at 31 December 2014. 

At the date of signing we are not aware of any circumstances which would render the particulars  included in the financial statements misleading or inaccurate. 

 

 

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan 

Chancellor 

7 March 2015 

 

Professor Arshad Omari 

Acting Vice‐Chancellor 

 

7 March 2015 

 

Mr Brad Francis 

Chief Financial Officer 

 

6 March 2015 

 

Certification of financial statements required by Commonwealth Department of Education 

I declare that: 

 at the time of this certification there are reasonable grounds to believe that ECU will be  able to pay its debts as and when they fall due; and 

 the amount of Commonwealth financial assistance expended during the financial year  ended 31 December 2014 was for the purpose(s) for which it was provided.  

 

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan  

Chancellor   

7 March 2015   

58 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Arshad Omari 

Acting Vice‐Chancellor  

7 March 2015

Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance 

Financial Statements  

 

 

Financial Statements 

 

Income Statement 

Statement of Comprehensive Income 

Statement of Financial Position   

Statement of Changes in Equity 

Statement of Cash Flows 

Notes to Financial Statements 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This financial report covers Edith Cowan University as an individual entity. The financial report is presented in the 

Australian currency. 

The financial report was authorised for issue by the University Council on the 7th day of March 2015. The University  has the power to amend and reissue the financial statements. 

Page 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 ‐ 123 

59 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Income Statement 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

Note

 

Income from continuing operations 

Australian Government financial assistance 

Australian Government grants 

HELP ‐ Australian Government payments 

State and local Government financial assistance 

HECS‐HELP ‐ Student Payments 

Fees and charges 

Investment revenue 

Royalties 

Consultancy and contracts 

Other Revenue 

 

Total revenue from continuing operations 

Gains on disposal of assets 

Other investment income 

Other Income 

Total income from continuing operations 

 

 

Expenses from continuing operations 

Employee related expenses 

Depreciation and amortisation 

Repairs and maintenance 

Borrowing costs 

Impairment of assets 

Investment losses 

Other expenses 

 

Total expenses from continuing operations 

 

Net result for the period 

 

The above income statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 

10   

11   

12   

13   

14   

 

15   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

162,839   

92,408   

13,318   

10,098   

70,683   

11,860   

6,336   

5,549   

11,834   

 

384,925   

138   

1,930   

4,576   

391,569   

 

221,678   

20,581   

10,035   

1,488   

‐ 

156   

  

110,136   

364,074   

27,495   

 

2013 

$000's 

162,731 

87,823 

13,580 

11,677 

69,768 

11,657 

4,588 

5,528 

14,376 

381,728 

1,921 

3,993 

1,955 

389,597 

 

216,965 

23,600 

9,146 

4,068 

‐ 

7,547 

95,448 

356,774 

32,823 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60 

Edith Cowan University  

Statement of Comprehensive Income 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014  

  Note 

Net result for the period 

 

 

 

 

Items that may be reclassified to profit or loss 

Gain/(loss) on value of available‐for‐sale financial assets, net of tax 

Cash flow hedges, net of tax 

Net change in fair value of available‐for‐sale financial assets reclassified to profit or loss 

 

29   

29   

29   

 

Items that will not be reclassified to profit or loss 

Loss on revaluation of property, plant and equipment, net of tax  29   

 

Total comprehensive income   

 

Total comprehensive income attributable to the University   

 

The above statement of comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 

2014 

$000's 

27,495   

 

‐ 

(361)   

(2)   

  

(3,637)   

(4,000)   

23,495   

 

2013 

$000's 

32,823 

3,995 

21 

(2,717) 

(23,695) 

(22,396) 

10,427 

61 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Statement of Financial Position 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

Note

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

     

Assets 

     

Current assets 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables 

Derivative financial instruments 

Other financial assets 

Non‐current assets classified as held for sale 

Other non‐financial assets 

16   

17   

18   

19   

20   

21   

54,530   

11,831   

19   

137,307   

‐ 

  

15,344   

66,452 

12,158 

21 

114,768 

1,305 

8,183 

Total current assets 

 

   

 

219,031   

 

202,887 

Non‐current assets 

Receivables 

Other financial assets 

Property, plant and equipment 

Investment properties 

Intangible assets 

Other non‐financial assets 

17   

19   

23   

22   

24   

21   

22,833   

84,320   

806,807   

21,354   

6,465   

1,758   

22,986 

71,380 

782,941 

13,610 

6,103 

‐ 

 

Total non‐current assets   

943,537    897,020 

Total assets 

 

   

 

1,162,568    1,099,907 

   

Liabilities 

   

Current liabilities 

Trade and other payables 

Borrowings 

Provisions 

Other liabilities 

25   

26   

27   

28   

7,319   

125   

42,140   

39,509   

 

Total current liabilities 

   

 

89,093   

 

Non‐current liabilities 

Borrowings 

Provisions 

26   

27   

99,520   

76,000   

 

Total non‐current liabilities   

175,520   

 

Total liabilities   

264,613   

 

Net Assets 

 

 

 

897,955   

 

Equity 

Reserves 

Retained earnings 

29   

29   

350,046   

547,909   

 

Parent entity interest 

 

897,955   

 

Total equity   

897,955   

 

The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 

 

6,495 

172 

38,964 

29,827 

75,458 

90,145 

59,844 

149,989 

225,447 

874,460 

354,845 

519,615 

874,460 

874,460 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

62 

Edith Cowan University 

Statement of Changes in Equity 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

2014 

Balance at 1 January 

Net operating result 

Loss on revaluation of property, plant and equipment, net of tax 

Loss on available‐for‐sale financial assets 

Cash flow hedges 

Transfer from revaluation reserves to retained surplus for asset sales 

     

Retained 

Earnings 

$000's 

Reserves 

$000's 

Total 

$000's 

 

 

 

 

 

  519,615    354,845    874,460 

27,495    ‐     27,495 

‐ 

‐   

  (3,637)   

(361)   

(3,637) 

(361) 

‐ 

799   

  (2)   

(799)    ‐ 

(2) 

 

Total comprehensive income    28,294    (4,799)    23,495 

Balance at 31 December 2014    547,909    350,046    897,955 

 

2013 

     

 

Retained 

Earnings 

$000's 

Reserves 

$000's 

Total 

$000's 

Balance at 1 January 

Net operating result 

Loss on revaluation of property, plant and equipment, net of tax 

Gain on available‐for‐sale financial assets 

Cash flow hedges 

Transfer from revaluation reserves to retained surplus for asset sales 

Net change in fair value of available‐for‐sale financial assets reclassified to profit or  loss   

 

 

 

 

 

  483,514    380,519    864,033 

32,823    ‐     32,823 

‐    (23,695)    (23,695) 

‐ 

‐ 

3,278   

 

  3,995   

21   

(3,278)    ‐ 

3,995 

21 

‐    (2,717)    (2,717) 

 

Total comprehensive income 

  36,101    (25,674)    10,427 

Balance at 31 December 2013 

  519,615    354,845    874,460 

 

 

The above statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

63 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Statement of Cash Flows 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

 

Note 

 

Cash flows from operating activities 

Australian Government grants received 

OS‐HELP (net) 

Superannuation Supplementation 

State and local Government Grants received 

HECS‐HELP ‐ Student Payments 

Receipts from student fees and other customers 

Dividends and distributions received 

Interest received 

Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST) 

Interest and other cost of finance 

Net cash provided by operating activities 

Cash flows from investing activities 

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non‐current assets held  for sale 

Payments for property, plant and equipment and investment properties 

Proceeds from redemption of financial assets 

Payments for financial assets 

Net cash used in investing activities 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities 

Proceeds from borrowings 

Repayment of borrowings 

Net cash provided by / (used in) financing activities 

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of financial year 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16   

 

 

Financing arrangements     

Non‐cash financing and investing activities 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       26 

     37 

The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 

 

 

2(g)   

2(g)   

2(g)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36   

 

(46,175)   

10   

(35,840)   

(79,908)   

 

9,500   

(172)   

9,328   

(11,922)   

66,452   

54,530   

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

249,395   

1,723   

3,252   

13,318   

10,098   

102,290   

1,520   

248,461 

60 

2,704 

13,580 

11,677 

98,018 

813 

8,692    11,238 

(327,826)    (331,660) 

(3,804)    (4,959) 

 

58,658   

 

2,097   

49,932 

25,330 

 

(38,566) 

3,290 

(22,893) 

(32,839) 

 

250 

(2,320) 

(2,070) 

15,023 

51,429 

66,452 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

64 

Note 

10 

11 

12 

13 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

14 

15 

16 

17 

23 

24 

25 

26 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

Page No.  Contents of the notes to the financial statements 

Summary of significant accounting policies 

 

Australian Government financial assistance including Australian Government loan programs 

(HELP)

State and Local Government financial assistance 

Fees and charges 

Investment revenue and income 

Royalties 

66 

79 

81 

82 

82 

83 

Consultancy and contracts 

Other revenue and income 

Gains on disposal of assets 

Employee related expenses 

Depreciation and amortisation 

Repairs and maintenance 

Borrowing costs 

Impairment of assets 

Other expenses 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables 

Derivative financial instruments 

Other financial assets 

Non‐current assets classified as held for sale 

Other non‐financial assets 

Investment properties 

Property, plant and equipment 

Intangible assets 

Trade and other payables 

Borrowings 

Provisions 

Other liabilities 

Reserves and retained earnings 

Restricted funds 

Key management personnel disclosures 

Remuneration of auditors 

Contingencies 

Commitments 

Events occurring after the reporting date 

Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities 

Non‐cash investing and financing activities 

Financial risk management 

Fair value measurement 

Write‐offs 

Deferred government benefit for superannuation 

Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance 

89 

90 

90 

90 

91 

86 

86 

87 

88 

92 

94 

95 

96 

83 

83 

84 

84 

85 

85 

85 

103 

104 

104 

105 

105 

105 

106 

98 

100 

100 

102 

102 

109 

112 

113 

118 

65 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

1  Summary of significant accounting policies 

The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the annual financial statements are set out below. These policies  have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. The annual financial statements are for Edith 

Cowan University as an individual entity. 

The principal address of Edith Cowan University is: 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia, 6027.  

(a)  Basis of preparation 

The annual financial statements represent the audited general purpose financial statements of the University. They have  been prepared on an accrual basis and comply with the Australian Accounting Standards.  

Additionally the statements have been prepared in accordance with the following statutory requirements: 

Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Financial Statement Guidelines) 

Financial Management Act 2006 

Edith Cowan University is a not‐for‐profit entity and these statements have been prepared on that basis. Some of the  requirements for not‐for‐profit entities are inconsistent with the IFRS requirements. 

Date of authorisation for issue 

The financial statements were authorised for issue by the University Council on 7 March 2015. 

Historical cost convention  

These financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation of  available‐for‐sale financial assets, financial assets and liabilities (including derivative instruments) at fair value through  profit or loss, certain classes of property, plant and equipment and investment property.    

Critical accounting estimates and judgments 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain  critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in the process of applying the 

University’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgment or complexity, or areas where  assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements are disclosed below:  

Estimating the useful life of key assets; 

Impairment of assets; 

Classification of financial assets; 

Discount rates and payback periods used in estimating provisions; 

Estimating liabilities for defined benefit superannuation plans 

66 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

(b)  Revenue recognition 

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Amounts disclosed as revenue are net  of returns, trade allowances rebates and amounts collected on behalf of third parties.  

The University recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is probable that future  economic benefits will flow to the University and specific criteria have been met for each of the University’s activities as  described below. In some cases this may not be probable until consideration is received or an uncertainty is removed. The 

University bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction  and the specifics of each arrangement.  

Revenue is recognised for the major business activities as follows: 

(i) Government Grants 

Grants from the government are recognised at their fair value where the University obtains control of the right to receive  a grant, it is probable that economic benefits will flow to the University and it can be reliably measured. 

(ii) HELP payments 

Revenue from HELP is categorised into those received from the Australian Government and those received directly from  students. Revenue is recognised and measured in accordance with the above disclosure. 

(iii) Student fees and charges 

Fees and charges are recognised as income in the year of receipt, except to the extent that fees and charges relate to  courses to be held in future periods. Such income is treated as income in advance in liabilities. Conversely, fees and  charges relating to debtors are recognised as revenue in the year to which the prescribed course relates. 

(iv) Royalties 

Royalty income is recognised as income when earned. 

(v) Consultancy and contracts/ Fee for service  

Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction. 

(vi) Interest revenue 

Revenue is accrued on a time‐proportion basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate  applicable. 

(vii) Land development and resale 

Land is not sold until the development work is completed, and income is recognised when the significant risks and rewards  of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably. 

(viii) Gains 

Gains may be realised or unrealised. Realised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the sale  proceeds received or receivable and the carrying amount of the non‐current asset. Unrealised gains are determined on a  net basis as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of an asset. 

67 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(b)        Revenue recognition continued  

The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of gains are as follows: 

Realised gains on disposal of non‐current assets 

Gains arising on the disposal or retirement of a non‐current asset are recognised when control of the asset and the  significant risks and rewards of ownership transfer to the purchaser. Net gains are included in income for the period in  which they arise. 

Unrealised gains associated with investment property at fair value 

Gains arising from changes in the fair value of an investment property are included in income for the period in which they  arise. 

Gains associated with financial assets 

Gains arising on the retirement of financial assets are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and  rewards of ownership transfer from the Entity. Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise. 

(ix) Lease income 

Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight line basis over the lease term. 

(x) Service concession income 

Service concession income generated from the consumption of access rights by the operator is recognised on a straight  line basis over the life of the service concession arrangement. This represents the amortisation of the service concession  provision. Refer to note 1(r) for further details regarding this provision. 

(c)  Income tax 

The University is exempt from income tax in Australia under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. 

(d)  Borrowing costs 

Borrowing costs incurred for the construction of any qualifying asset are capitalised during the period of time that is  required to complete and prepare the asset for its intended use or sale. Other borrowing costs are expensed when  incurred. 

(e)  Impairment of assets 

University assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying  amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount  exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs of disposal and  value in use. For the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are  separately identifiable cash flows which are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets 

(cash generating units). Non‐financial assets that suffered impairment are reviewed for possible reversal of the  impairment at each reporting date. 

68 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

(f)  Cash and cash equivalents 

For cash flow statement presentation purposes, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and short‐term deposits  with financial institutions with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of  cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. 

(g)  Restricted funds 

Endowment and bequest funds are classified as restricted funds. Endowment and bequest funds have been received from  benefactors who, by the terms of their conveying instruments, have stipulated that the use of funds is limited in future  years to the purposes designated by the benefactors. 

(h)  Trade receivables 

Trade receivables are recognised initially at fair value less provision for impairment. 

Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis. Debts which are known to be uncollectible are written  off. A provision for impairment of receivables is established when there is objective evidence that the University will not  be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of receivables. Significant financial difficulties of the  debtor, probability that the debtor will enter bankruptcy or financial reorganisation, and default or delinquency in  payments (more than 90 days overdue) are considered indicators that the trade receivable is impaired. The amount of the  provision is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows,  discounted at the effective interest rate cash flows relating to short‐term receivable are not discounted if the effect of  discounting is immaterial. The amount of the provision is recognised in the income statement. 

(i)  Investments and other financial assets 

Classification 

The University classifies its investments in the following categories: loans and receivables, held‐to‐maturity investments  and available‐for‐sale financial assets. The classification depends on the purpose for which the investments were acquired. 

Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition and, in the case of assets classified as  held‐to‐maturity, re‐evaluates this designation at each reporting date. 

(i) Loans and receivables 

Loans and receivables are non‐derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an  active market. They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after the end  of the reporting period which are classified as non‐current assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables in the  statement of financial position. 

(ii) Held‐to‐maturity investments 

Held‐to‐maturity investments are non‐derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities  that the University's management has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity.  

(iii) Available‐for‐sale financial assets 

Available‐for‐sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non‐derivatives that are either  designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non‐current assets unless  management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the end of the reporting period. 

69 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(i)        Investments and other financial assets continued  

Regular purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on trade date ‐ the date on which the University commits to  purchase or sell the asset. Investments are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction costs. Financial assets are  derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired or have been transferred and  the University has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership. 

When securities classified as available‐for‐sale are sold, the accumulated fair value adjustments recognised in other  comprehensive income are included in the income statement as gains and losses from investment securities. 

Subsequent measurement 

Available‐for‐sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Loans, receivables and held‐to‐maturity  investments are carried at amortised cost using an effective interest method. 

Changes in the fair value of securities classified as available‐for‐sale are recognised in equity. 

Fair Value  

(j) 

The fair values of investments and other financial assets are based on quoted prices in an active market. If the market for  a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the University establishes fair value by using valuation  techniques that maximise the use of relevant data. These include reference to the estimated price in an orderly  transaction that would take place between market participants at the measurement date. Other valuation techniques  used are the cost approach and the income approach based on characteristics of the asset and the assumptions made by  market participants. 

Impairment 

The University assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of  financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity securities classified as available‐for‐sale, a significant or prolonged  decline in the fair value of a security below its cost is considered in determining whether the security is impaired. If any  such evidence exists for available‐for‐sale financial assets, the cumulative loss measured as the difference between the  acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously recognised in profit  and loss is removed from equity and recognised in the income statement. Impairment losses recognised in the income  statement on equity instruments are not reversed through the income statement.  

Fair value measurement 

The fair value of assets and liabilities must be measured for recognition and disclosure purposes. 

The University classifies fair value measurements using a fair value hierarchy that reflects the significance of the inputs  used in making the measurements. 

The fair value of assets or liabilities traded in active markets (such as trading and available‐for‐sale securities) is based on  quoted market prices for identical assets or liabilities at the reporting date (Level 1). The quoted market price used for  assets held by the University is the most representative of fair value in the circumstances within the bid‐ask spread. 

70 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

(j) Fair value measurement continued

The fair value of assets or liabilities that are not traded in an active market (for example, land and buildings) is determined  using valuation techniques. The University uses a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are based on market  conditions existing at each balance date. Techniques used to determine fair value for the remaining assets and liabilities  are outlined in note 39.  

The fair value of forward exchange contracts is determined using forward exchange market rates at the reporting date. 

The level in the fair value hierarchy shall be determined on the basis of the lowest level input that is significant to the fair  value measurement in its entirety. 

Fair value measurement of non‐financial assets is based on the highest and best use of the asset. The University considers  market participants use of, or purchase price of the asset, to use it in a manner that would be highest and best use. 

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables are assumed to approximate their fair  values due to their short‐term nature. 

(k)  Property, plant and equipment 

Land, buildings, leasehold improvements and works of art are shown at fair value, based on periodic, but at least triennial,  valuations by external independent valuers, less subsequent depreciation for buildings and leasehold improvements. Any  accumulated depreciation at the date of revaluation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the  net amount is restated to the revalued amount of the asset. All other property, plant and equipment are stated at  historical cost less depreciation. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the  items. Cost may also include gains or losses that were recognised in other comprehensive income on qualifying cash flow  hedges of foreign currency purchases of property, plant and equipment. For items of property, plant and equipment  acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition. Items of property, plant and  equipment (excluding works of art) costing less than $5,000 are expensed to the income statement.  

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when  it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the University and the cost of the item  can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the income statement during the financial  period in which they are incurred.  

Increases in the carrying amounts arising on revaluation of assets are recognised, net of tax, in other comprehensive  income and accumulated in equity under the heading of revaluation surplus. To the extent that the increase reverses a  decrease previously recognised in the income statement, the increase is first recognised in the income statement. 

Decreases that reverse previous increases of the same asset class are also recognised in other comprehensive income to  the extent of the remaining reserve attributable to the asset class. All other decreases are charged to the income  statement.  

Leasehold improvement 

Leasehold improvements are capitalised at amounts directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and  condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended for the University.  

71 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(k)        Property, plant and equipment continued  

Service concession assets 

The University has entered into arrangements with respect to the development and refurbishment of student  accommodation. Such arrangements provide for the appointment of an operator responsible for construction, asset  upgrades and subsequent operation and management of the assets for an extended period. It is deemed that the 

University continues to control such assets primarily due to the University, as grantor: ‐ 

(i) Ultimately controlling or regulating the services that may be provided by the operator with respect to the student  accommodation assets, the pricing of such services, and to whom such services may be provided; and 

(ii) Controlling the significant residual interest in the infrastructure at the end of the term of the arrangement 

Existing university buildings that form part of the arrangement with the external operator have been transferred from 

Land and Buildings into the Service Concession Assets class of assets. Capital improvements to such assets are capitalised  at cost which is equivalent to their fair value. 

Service concession assets under construction at reporting date are recognised at cost, which will be an amount equivalent  to fair value based on depreciated replacement cost. Subsequent to initial recognition, service concession assets are  measured at cost and depreciated over their useful life. 

Works of Art 

All works of art are initially recognised at fair value and continue to be measured at fair value, such value being based on  current market values determined by a qualified independent valuer. Works of art are not subject to depreciation having  regard to their indefinite life and the expectation of increasing value over time. Such assets controlled by the University  are classified as heritage assets and are protected and preserved for public exhibition, education, research and the  furtherance of public service. They are neither disposed for financial gain nor encumbered in any manner. 

Depreciation 

Land and works of art are not depreciated. 

Leasehold improvement assets are depreciated over the shorter of the lease term or the assets useful life. Where lease  arrangements contain options for renewal and extension of the lease term, such extensions are only taken into account  for the purposes of determining an appropriate depreciation period when, at inception of the lease, it is reasonably  certain that the University will exercise the option. 

72 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

(k) Property, plant and equipment continued

 

Depreciation on other assets is calculated using the straight line method to allocate their cost or revalued amounts, net of  their residual values, over their estimated useful lives, as follows:  

Asset Category  Estimated Useful Life 

Buildings 

Service concession assets ‐ buildings 

25‐50 years 

36.5 ‐ 50 years 

Computing equipment 

Other equipment and furniture 

Motor Vehicles 

Works of art 

Leasehold improvements 

Library collections 

3 ‐ 4 years 

6 years 

4 ‐ 6 years 

Not depreciated 

Refer to policy above 

10 years 

(l) 

The asset's residual value and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each reporting date. 

An asset’s carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is  greater than its estimated recoverable amount. 

Investment properties 

Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of the University.  

Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when  it is probable that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the 

University. Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its cost shall be deemed to  be its fair value, as at the date of acquisition.  

Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment property is carried at fair value, which is based on active market  prices, adjusted, if necessary, for any difference in the nature, location or condition of the specific asset.  If this  information is not available, the University uses alternative valuation methods such as recent prices in less active markets  or discounted cash flow projections. These valuations are reviewed annually by a member of the Australian Property 

Institute. Changes in fair values are recorded in the income statement. 

Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the income statement in the periods in which it  is receivable, as this represents the pattern of service rendered though the provision of the properties.  

(m)  Leases 

Leases of property plant and equipment, where the University, as lessee, have substantially all the risks and rewards of  ownership are classified as finance leases.  Finance leases are capitalised at the lease’s inception at the lower of the fair  value of the leased property and the present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding rental obligations,  net of finance charges, are included in other short‐term and long‐term payables. Each lease payment is allocated between  the liability and finance cost.  The finance cost is charged to the income statement over the lease period so as to produce  a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability for each period. The property, plant and  equipment acquired under finance leases are depreciated over the shorter of the asset’s useful life and the lease term. 

73 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014  m)        Leases continued  

Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as  operating leases (note 34(b)). The University leases certain property and equipment by way of operating leases. Payments  made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) are charged to the income statement on a  straight‐line basis over the period of the lease. 

(n)  Intangible assets 

All intangible assets are initially measured at cost. For assets acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value  at the date of acquisition. 

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, where appropriate, only  when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Entity and the cost of the item  can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the income statement during the financial  period in which they are incurred. 

Amortisation is calculated on a straight line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset. The estimated useful lives for  each class of intangible assets are: 

Intangible asset class 

Library collection   

Life 

10 years  

Expenditure on research activities is recognised in the income statement as an expense when it is incurred. 

(o)  Non‐current assets held for sale 

Non‐current assets are classified as held for sale and stated at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs  of disposal, if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing  use.  

An impairment loss is recognised for any initial or subsequent write down of the asset to fair value less cost of disposal. A  gain is recognised for any subsequent increases in fair value less costs to sell of an asset, but not in excess of any  cumulative impairment loss previously recognised. A gain or loss not previously recognised by the date of the sale of the  non‐current asset is recognised at the date of derecognition. 

Non‐current assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised and are presented separately from other  assets in the statement of financial position. 

(p)  Trade and other payables 

These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the University prior to the end of the financial year,  which are unpaid. Accounts payable are not interest bearing and are stated at their nominal value. The amounts are  unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition. 

(q)  Borrowings 

Borrowings are initially recognised at fair value, net of transaction costs incurred. Borrowings are subsequently measured  at amortised cost. Any difference between the proceeds (net of transaction costs) and the redemption amount is  recognised in the income statement over the period of the borrowings using the effective interest method.   

74 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

(r) 

Borrowings are removed from the statement of financial position when the obligation specified in the contract is  discharged, cancelled or expired. The difference between the carrying amount of a financial liability that has been  extinguished or transferred to another party and the consideration paid, including any non‐cash assets transferred or  liabilities assumed, is recognised in other income or other expenses. 

Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the University has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the  liability for at least 12 months after the balance sheet date and does not expect to settle the liability for at least 12 months  after the balance sheet date. 

Provisions 

Provisions for legal claims and service warranties are recognised when: the University has a present legal or constructive  obligation as a result of past events; it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation;  and the amount can be reliably estimated. 

Provisions are not recognised for future operating losses. 

Where there are a number of similar obligations, the likelihood that an outflow will be required in settlement is  determined by considering the class of obligations as a whole. A provision is recognised even if the likelihood of an  outflow with respect to any one item included in the same class of obligations may be small.  

Provisions are measured at the present value of management’s best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the  present obligation at the balance sheet date. The discount rate used to determine the present value reflects current  market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The increase in the provision due to  the passage of time is recognised as a finance cost 

Employee benefits 

(i) Short‐term obligations 

Liabilities for short‐term employee benefits including wages and salaries, non‐monetary benefits and bonuses are  measured at the amount expected to be paid when the liability is settled, if it is expected to be settled wholly before 12  months after the end of the reporting period, and is recognised in other payables. Liabilities for non‐accumulating sick  leave are recognised when the leave is taken and measured at the rates payable. 

(ii) Other long‐term obligations 

The liability for other long‐term benefits are those that are not expected to be settled wholly before 12 months after the  end of the annual reporting period. Other long‐term employee benefits include such things as annual leave, accumulating  sick leave and long service leave liabilities. 

It is measured at the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees  up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary  levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market  yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as  possible, the estimated future cash outflows. 

Regardless of the expected timing of settlements, provisions made in respect of employee benefits are classified as a  current liability, unless there is an unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after  the reporting date, in which case it would be classified as a non‐current liability. 

75 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(r)         Provisions continued  

(iii) Retirement benefit obligations 

All employees of the University are entitled to benefits on retirement, disability or death from the University's  superannuation plans. The University has a defined benefit section and a defined contribution section within its plans. The  defined benefit section provides defined lump sum benefits based on years of service and final average salary. The  employees of the University are all members of the defined contribution section of the University’s plans 

A liability or asset in respect of defined benefit superannuation plans is recognised in the balance sheet, and is measured  as the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the reporting date less the fair value of the superannuation fund’s  assets at that date and any unrecognised past service cost. The present value of the defined benefit obligation is based on  expected future payments which arise from membership of the fund to the reporting date, calculated annually by  independent actuaries using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary  levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. 

Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with  terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. 

Contributions to the defined contribution section of University's superannuation fund and other independent defined  contribution superannuation funds are recognised as an expense as they become payable. 

(iv) Deferred government benefit for superannuation 

In accordance with the 1998 instructions issued by the Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs (DETYA), now  known as the Department of Education, the effects of the unfunded superannuation liabilities of the University were  recorded in the Income Statement and the Statement of Financial Position for the first time in 1998. The prior years’  practice had been to disclose liabilities by way of a note to the financial statements. 

The unfunded liabilities recorded in the statement of financial position under Provisions have been determined by an  independent actuary, Mercer, and relate to liabilities for existing employees who are members of the pension scheme  have been calculated based on each member’s salary and the completed proportion of their expected total service. 

Members are assumed to earn entitlements to the maximum state pension at retirement. 

Liabilities for existing pensioners have been calculated allowing for the level of the existing pension, the level of assumed  pension indexation and expected mortality rates. Some former pension scheme members have transferred to the Gold 

State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the members receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or  invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed during any deferral period after leaving  public sector employment. Liabilities for member of Gold State Super have been calculated based on their projected  unfunded transferred service amounts and rates of exit. 

The calculated defined benefit obligation is the sum of the accrued liabilities for all relevant employees.  

Deferred government benefits for superannuation are the amounts recognised as reimbursement rights as they are the  amounts expected to be received from the Australian Government for the emerging costs of the superannuation funds for  the life of the liability, refer to note 17. 

For details relating to the individual schemes, refer to note 41. 

(v) Termination benefits 

Termination benefits are payable when employment is terminated before the normal retirement date, or when an  employee accepts an offer of benefits in exchange for the termination of employment. The University recognises the  expense and liability for termination benefits either when it can no longer withdraw the offer of those benefits or when it  has recognised costs for restructuring within the scope of AASB137 that involves the 

76 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

1 Summary of significant accounting policies continued

payment of termination benefits. The expense and liability are recognised when the University is demonstrably committed  to either terminating the employment of current employees according to a detailed formal plan without possibility of  withdrawal or providing termination benefits as a result of an offer made to encourage voluntary redundancy. 

Termination benefits are measured on initial recognition and subsequent changes are measured and recognised in  accordance with the nature of the employee benefit. Benefits expected to be settled wholly within 12 months are  measured at the undiscounted amount expected to be paid. Benefits not expected to be settled before 12 months after  the end of the reporting period are discounted to present value. 

Service concession provision 

The University has recognised a service concession provision in the statement of financial position. The liability reflects the  performance obligation the University has incurred to allow the operator access to, and the right to generate revenue  from, service concession assets. The liability incurred is initially recognised at an amount equivalent to the value of service  concession assets delivered to the University and is amortised to the statement of comprehensive income over the  duration of the service concession arrangement. As a provision, it is subsequently measured at the best estimate of the  amount that the University would rationally pay to settle the obligation at the reporting date or to transfer it to a third  party. This will generally equate to the unamortised balance at each reporting date. 

(s)  Foreign currency translation and hedge accounting 

(i) Functional and presentation currency 

Items included in the financial statements of the University are measured using the currency of the primary economic  environment in which the University operates. The financial statements are presented in Australian Dollars, which is the 

University’s functional and presentation currency. 

(ii) Transactions and balances 

Foreign currency transactions are translated into the functional currency using the exchange rates prevailing at the dates  of the transactions. Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the  translation at year‐end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognised  in the income statement. Qualifying cash flow hedges shall be accounted for by recognising the portion of the gain or loss  determined to be an effective hedge in other comprehensive income and the ineffective portion in the income statement.  

(t) 

If gains or losses on non‐monetary items are recognised in other comprehensive income, translation gains or losses are  also recognised in other comprehensive income. Similarly, if gains or losses on non‐monetary items are recognised in  profit and loss, translation gains or losses are also recognised in the income statement. 

Goods and Services Tax (GST) 

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not  recoverable from the taxation authority. In this case, it is recognised as part of the cost acquisition of the asset or as part  of the expense. 

Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST  recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included with other receivables or payables in the statement of  financial position. 

Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities  which are recoverable from, or payable to the taxation authority, are presented as operating 

77 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(t)        Goods and Services Tax (GST) continued  

cash flows. 

(u)  Comparative amounts 

Where necessary, comparative information has been reclassified to enhance comparability in respect of changes in  presentation adopted in the current year. 

(v)  New Accounting Standards and interpretations 

The Australian Accounting Standard Board ("AASB") has issued new and amended Accounting Standards and 

Interpretations that have mandatory application dates for future reporting periods. The University has decided against  early adoption of these standards. The following table summarises those future requirements, and their impact on the 

University: 

Standard  Application date  Implications 

AASB 9     1 January 2018 

AASB 2010‐7    1 January 2018 

 

ECU will consider the provisions of this standard when  applicable.

ECU will consider the provisions of these standards when 

  applicable.

AASB 2014‐1 

AASB 2014‐3 

  1 January 2015 

1 January 2016 

 

1 January 

2018

  1 January 2016 

 

ECU will consider the provisions of these standards when  applicable.

AASB2014‐4    1 January 2016 

ECU will consider the provisions of these standards when 

  applicable.

 

ECU will consider the provisions of these standards when  applicable.

(w)  Rounding of amounts 

Amounts in the financial statements have been rounded off in accordance with Class Order 98/100 as amended by Class 

Order 04/667 issued by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC), relating to the ‘rounding off’ of  amounts in the financial statements. Amounts have been rounded off to the nearest thousand dollars. 

78 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

2  Australian Government financial assistance including Australian Government loan programs (HELP) 

(a)  Commonwealth Grants Scheme and Other Grants  

 

 

Commonwealth Grants Scheme  #1  

Indigenous Support Program 

Partnership and Participation Program #2  

Disability Support Program 

Promotion of Excellence in Learning and Teaching 

Reward Funding 

Other  

Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants 

 

Note 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42(a)   

2014 

$000's 

136,132   

617   

3,236   

‐ 

‐ 

110   

12   

  

  

 

140,107   

2013 

$000's 

132,168 

619 

2,770 

84 

42 

330 

2,781 

138,794 

(b)  Higher Education Loan Programs  

HECS ‐ HELP 

FEE ‐ HELP

#3

 

VET FEE ‐ HELP 

SA ‐ HELP 

Total Higher Education Loan Programs 

(c)  Scholarships  

Australian Postgraduate Awards 

International Postgraduate Research Scholarships 

Commonwealth Education Cost Scholarship

#4

 

Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships #4  

Indigenous Access Scholarships 

Total Scholarships 

(d)  Education Research  

Joint Research Engagement Program #5  

Research Training Scheme 

Research Infrastructure Block Grants 

Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities 

Other  

Total Education Research Grants 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42(h)  

42(b)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42(c)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42(d)  

77,294   

11,877   

904   

2,333   

92,408   

1,882   

148   

62   

11   

52   

2,155   

2,808   

4,558   

439   

716   

1,559   

10,080   

73,851 

‐ 

13,019 

953 

87,823 

2,579 

4,583 

441 

709 

452 

8,764 

1,641 

162 

86 

40 

61 

1,990 

79 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

2  Australian Government financial assistance including Australian Government loan programs (HELP) continued 

(e)  Australian Research Council  

 

(i) Discovery 

Projects  

(ii) Linkages 

Projects 

Total Australian Research Council 

 

Note 

 

42(e)(i)  

 

42(e)(ii)  

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

196   

 

341   

 

537   

2013 

$000's 

208 

367 

575 

(f)  Other Australian Government financial assistance  

Non‐capital 

National competitive 

Other research grants 

Other non‐research grants 

Total 

Capital 

Other non‐research grants 

Total other Australian Government financial assistance 

Total Australian Government financial assistance 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,035   

2,525   

4,287   

9,847   

 

 

113   

9,960   

255,247   

2,414 

1,852 

3,442 

7,708 

4,900 

12,608 

250,554 

#1  Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS ‐ Regional Loading, CGS ‐ Enabling Loading, Maths and Science Transition Loading, Allocated Places 

Advance and Non‐designated Courses Advance.   

#2  Includes Equity Support Program. 

#3  Program in respect of FEE‐HELP for Higher Education only and excludes funds received in respect of VET FEE HELP. 

 

#4  Includes Grandfather Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships. 

#5  Includes Institutional Grants Scheme. 

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

Reconciliation 

Australian Government grants (a + c + d + e + f ) 

HECS ‐ HELP payments 

FEE ‐ HELP payments 

VET FEE ‐ HELP 

SA ‐ HELP payments 

 

 

 

 

 

162,839   

77,294   

11,877   

904   

2,333   

162,731 

‐ 

73,851 

13,019 

953 

Total Australian Government financial assistance   

255,247    250,554 

80 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

2 Australian Government financial assistance including Australian Government loan programs (HELP) continued

(g)  Australian Government Grants received ‐ cash basis (Ref note 42)  

 

 

 

CGS and Other Education grants 

Higher Education Loan Programs 

Scholarships 

Education research 

ARC grants ‐ Discovery 

ARC grants ‐ Linkages 

Other Australian Government grants 

Total Australian Government grants received ‐ cash basis 

OS‐Help (Net) 

Superannuation Supplementation 

Total Australian Government funding received ‐ cash basis 

 

 

42(a)   

42(b)  

42(c)   

42(d)  

42(e)  

42(e)  

 

 

 

 

42(f)   

 

42(g)   

 

2014 

$000's 

 

139,825   

88,368   

2,460   

9,335   

196   

341   

8,870   

249,395   

1,723   

3,252   

254,370   

2013 

$000's 

 

139,360 

86,804 

881 

9,659 

208 

367 

11,182 

248,461 

60 

2,704 

251,225 

3  State and Local Government financial assistance 

 

Government grants were received during the reporting period for the following purposes: 

 

Non‐capital 

Department of Training and Workforce Development* 

WA State and local Government research grants 

Total State and Local Government financial assistance 

*The funding relates to Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

8,234   

5,084   

13,318   

 

2013 

$000's 

8,467 

5,113 

13,580 

81 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

4  Fees and charges 

 

Course fees and charges 

Fee‐paying onshore overseas students 

Fee‐paying offshore overseas students 

Continuing education 

Fee‐paying domestic postgraduate students 

Fee‐paying domestic undergraduate students 

Fee‐paying domestic non‐award students 

Total course fees and charges 

Other non‐course fees and charges 

Student services and amenities fees  

Examination, registration and photocopying fees 

Other fees and charges 

Parking fees  

Rental charges 

Other 

Total Other Fees and Charges 

Total fees and charges 

5  Investment revenue and income 

 

 

Investment revenue 

Interest revenue from operating account 

Interest from bank bills 

Rental income from investment properties 

Total investment revenue 

Other investment income 

Dividends received 

Distributions from managed funds 

Net gain on disposal of available‐for‐sale financial assets transferred from equity 

Net gain on revaluation of investment properties 

Total other investment income 

Other investment losses 

Net loss on revaluation of investment properties 

Net investment income 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

54,762   

2,898   

520   

‐ 

5,279   

11   

  

63,470   

 

 

1,561   

441   

578   

1,660   

2,688   

285   

7,213   

70,683   

2013 

$000's 

51,845 

3,508 

446 

5,751 

86 

85 

61,721 

1,734 

490 

1,277 

1,462 

2,553 

531 

8,047 

69,768 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$'000 

229   

10,583   

1,048   

11,860   

 

 

112   

1,408   

10   

400   

‐ 

1,930   

 

  

13,790   

2013 

$'000 

‐ 

349 

10,552 

756 

11,657 

111 

702 

3,180 

3,993 

(7,547) 

8,103 

82 

6  Royalties 

 

 

Royalties 

7  Consultancy and contracts 

 

 

Consultancy 

Contract research 

Total consultancy and contracts 

8  Other revenue and income 

 

Other revenue 

Donations and bequests 

Scholarships and prizes 

Proceed from sale of non‐capitalised equipment 

Commissions, recoveries and rebates received 

Expense recoups 

Sale of goods 

Box office sales 

Sundry income 

Medical practitioners' fees 

Other revenue  

Total other revenue 

Other income 

Service concession income 

Other income 

Total other income 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

6,336    

 

2013 

$000's 

4,588 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

270   

5,279   

5,549   

 

2013 

$000's 

379 

5,149 

5,528 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

889   

1,407   

113   

5,452   

41   

1,982   

660   

758   

142   

390   

 

11,834   

 

948   

3,628   

4,576   

2013 

$000's 

1,896 

1,403 

162 

5,061 

53 

3,817 

473 

892 

133 

486 

14,376 

948 

1,007 

1,955 

83 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

9  Gains on disposal of assets 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non‐current assets held for sale 

Carrying amount of property, plant and equipment and non‐current assets held for sale ‐ sold 

Net gain on disposal 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

1,447   

(1,309)   

138   

2013 

$000's 

 

19,215 

(17,294) 

1,921 

10  Employee related expenses 

 

Academic 

Salaries 

Contributions to superannuation and pension schemes ‐ funded 

Payroll tax 

Worker's compensation 

Long service leave expense 

Annual leave 

Other 

Total academic 

Non‐academic 

Salaries 

Contributions to superannuation and pension schemes ‐ funded 

Payroll tax 

Worker's compensation 

Long service leave expense 

Annual leave 

Other 

Total non‐academic 

Total employee related expenses 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

94,080   

12,370   

6,027   

494   

694   

915   

455   

115,035   

221,678   

86,133   

11,209   

5,566   

444   

1,616   

974   

701   

106,643   

 

 

2013 

$000's 

79,929 

11,837 

5,494 

181 

2,782 

249 

549 

101,021 

93,572 

13,101 

5,926 

240 

2,433 

243 

429 

115,944 

216,965 

84 

11  Depreciation and amortisation 

 

Depreciation 

Buildings 

Service concession assets 

Leasehold improvements 

Other equipment and furniture 

Computing equipment 

Motor vehicles 

Library collections 

Total depreciation 

Amortisation 

Intangible assets 

Total depreciation and amortisation 

12  Repairs and maintenance 

 

 

Buildings maintenance 

Grounds maintenance 

Other equipment maintenance 

Total repairs and maintenance 

13  Borrowing costs 

 

 

Interest expense 

Less: Amount capitalised 

Total borrowing costs expensed 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

13,016   

1,209   

581   

3,317   

309   

121   

1,003   

19,556   

 

1,025   

20,581   

 

2013 

$000's 

963 

23,600 

13,325 

1,209 

968 

3,321 

2,690 

95 

1,029 

22,637 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

7,816   

802   

1,417   

10,035   

 

2013 

$000's 

7,366 

904 

876 

9,146 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

3,964   

(2,476)   

1,488   

 

2013 

$000's 

4,949 

(881) 

4,068 

85 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

14  Impairment of assets 

 

 

Bad and doubtful debts 

Total impairment of assets 

* Additional details on impairments of receivables are included at note 17. 

15  Other expenses 

 

 

Scholarships, grants and prizes 

Advertising and marketing 

Promotions and sponsorships 

Audit fees, bank charges, legal costs and insurance 

Computer software and maintenance 

General consumables 

Hire and lease costs 

Library subscriptions  

Non‐capitalised equipment 

Operating lease rental expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Professional and consulting fees 

Student related expenditure 

Telecommunications 

Travel, staff development and entertainment 

Utilities and rates 

Net loss on asset write‐offs #1  

Cost of goods sold 

Student Practicum and related expenses 

Miscellaneous 

Total other expenses 

#1 Additional detail on write‐offs during the year is included at note 40. 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

156   

 

156   

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

9,941   

5,672   

3,567   

13,683   

15,009   

4,100   

1,586   

1,544   

3,761   

258   

2,580   

12,297   

9,777   

1,493   

6,337   

6,567   

68   

51   

2,862   

8,983   

110,136   

 

2013 

$000's 

8,246 

5,794 

2,388 

1,984 

11,438 

4,815 

1,604 

1,355 

3,744 

253 

2,754 

14,237 

8,960 

1,184 

5,969 

7,043 

36 

1,882 

3,107 

8,655 

95,448 

86 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

16  Cash and cash equivalents 

 

 

Cash at bank 

Bank Bills 

Cash held in imprests 

Total cash and cash equivalent 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

9,330    

45,190    

10    

54,530    

 

2013 

$000's 

10,916 

55,526 

10 

66,452 

(a)  Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year  

 

The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the year as shown in the statement of cash flows as follows: 

2014  2013 

Note  $000's  $000's 

     

 

Unrestricted cash 

Restricted funds 

 

30   

 

45,246   

9,284   

57,722 

8,730 

 

Balance as per cash flow statement 

 

54,530    66,452 

(b)  Cash at bank and held in imprests  

Cash in operating accounts earns interest at the rate of 2.40% (2013: 2.45%). 

(c)  Bank Bills  

The bank bills are bearing fixed interest rates between 3.18% and 3.50% (2013: 3.29% and 3.75%). These deposits have an  average maturity of 91 days. 

87 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

17  Receivables 

 

Current 

Trade receivables and student fees 

Less: Provision for impaired receivables 

 

Deferred Government benefit for superannuation 

GST and withholding tax receivable 

Total current receivables 

Non‐current 

Deferred Government benefit for superannuation 

Total non‐current receivables 

Total trade and other receivables 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

6,454   

(1,411)   

 

5,043   

2,741   

4,047   

11,831   

 

22,833   

22,833   

34,664   

2013 

$000's 

8,474 

(1,292) 

7,182 

2,856 

2,120 

12,158 

22,986 

22,986 

35,144 

Impaired receivables 

As at 31 December 2014 current receivables of the University with a nominal value of $1.4m (2013: $1.3m) were impaired. It was  assessed that a portion of these receivables are expected to be recovered. 

The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows: 

 

 

 

3 to 6 months 

Over 6 months 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

1,287    

124    

1,411    

2013 

$000's 

 

585 

707 

1,292 

 

 

As at 31 December 2014, trade receivables of $0.5m (2013: $1.5m) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of  independent clients and students for whom there is no recent history of default. 

The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows: 

3 months or less 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

494   

2013 

$000's 

 

1,553 

88 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

Movements in the provision for impaired receivables are as follows: 

 

 

At 1 January 

Provision for impairment 

Provision for impairment recognised during the year 

Receivables written off during the year as uncollectible 

Unused amount reversed 

At 31 December 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

1,292    

 

156    

(40)    

3    

1,411    

2013 

$000's 

 

1,956 

(595) 

(68) 

(1) 

1,292 

The creation and release of the provision for impaired receivables has been included in 'impairment of assets' in the income  statement. Amounts charged to the provision account are generally written off when there is no expectation of recovering  additional cash. 

The other amounts within receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history, it is expected  that these amounts will be received when due. 

18  Derivative financial instruments 

 

Current assets 

Derivative financial instruments 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

19   

 

2013 

$000's 

21 

(a)  Instruments used by the University 

The University is party to derivative financial instruments in the normal course of business in order to hedge exposure to  fluctuations in foreign exchange rates in accordance with the University’s financial risk management policies (refer to note 

38). 

In order to protect against exchange rate movements, the University had entered into a forward exchange contract to  purchase foreign currency. 

These contracts are hedging obligations for payments for the ensuing financial year. The contracts are timed to mature  when payments for major shipments of component parts are scheduled to be made. 

The portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument that is determined to be an effective hedge is recognised  directly in equity. When the cash flows occur, the University adjusts the initial measurement of the component recognised  in the balance sheets by the related amount deferred in equity. 

(b)  Interest rate and foreign exchange risk 

For an analysis of the sensitivity of derivatives to interest rate and foreign exchange risk refer to note 38. 

89 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

19  Other financial assets 

 

Current 

Held‐to‐maturity 

Term deposits 

Total current other financial assets 

Non‐Current 

Available‐for‐sale investments 

Investment in shares 

Investment in managed funds 

Held‐to‐maturity 

Term deposits 

Total non‐current other financial assets 

Total other financial assets 

20  Non‐current assets classified as held for sale 

 

Non‐current assets held for sale 

Land 

Total non‐current assets held for sale 

21  Other non‐financial assets 

 

Current 

Accrued income 

Advances and prepayments 

Total current other non‐financial assets 

Non‐current 

Non‐current other non‐financial assets 

Total other non‐financial assets 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

137,307   

 

137,307   

 

 

2,032   

24,288   

 

 

58,000   

84,320   

221,627   

2013 

$000's 

114,768 

114,768 

2,572 

18,808 

50,000 

71,380 

186,148 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

  

  

 

2013 

$000's 

1,305 

1,305 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

5,503   

9,841   

 

15,344   

 

1,758   

17,102   

2013 

$000's 

4,627 

3,556 

8,183 

‐ 

8,183 

90 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

22  Investment properties 

 

At fair value 

Opening balance at 1 January  

Additions  

Transfers from property, plant and equipment 

Gain/(loss) on revaluation 

Closing balance as at 31 December  

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

‐ 

13,610   

7,344   

  

400   

21,354   

 

2013 

$000's 

9,820 

9,287 

2,050 

(7,547) 

13,610 

For fair value hierarchy categorisation of investment properties see note 39. 

(a)  Amounts recognised in income statement for investment properties 

  

 

 

Rental income 

Gain/(loss) on revaluation 

Total recognised in income statement 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

1,048   

400   

1,448   

2013 

$000's 

 

756 

(7,547) 

(6,791) 

(b)  Valuation basis  

The fair value of all investment properties has been determined by reference to recent market transactions. The  investment properties have been valued as at 31 December 2014 by independent professional valuers. 

91 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

23  Property, plant and equipment 

 

 

Year ended 31 December 2013 

Opening net book amount 

Additions 

Accumulated depreciation on write‐offs 

Write offs during the year 

Disposals 

Accumulated Depreciation on disposals 

Revaluation increments/ (decrements) 

Reclassifications in/(out) 

Transferred to investment properties 

Depreciation charge 

Transfers 

Closing net book amount 

At 31 December 2013 

‐ Cost 

‐ Valuation 

Accumulated depreciation 

 

 

 

 

Net book amount 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work in  progress 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

16,370    

25,154    

   

   

   

   

   

   

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

(6,958)    

34,566    

 

‐ 

34,566    

   

‐     

34,566    

 

 

 

 

Land 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

122,977   

1,230   

 

 

‐ 

(1,230)   

 

3,610   

(468)   

‐ 

(2,050)   

 

‐   

Buildings 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

561,798   

‐   

 

 

(408)   

16   

(25,540)   

‐   

‐ 

(13,325)   

 

3,197   

 

Service  concession  assets ‐ land 

$000's 

 

Service concession  assets ‐ building 

$000's 

 

Leasehold  improvements 

$000's 

 

Works of Art 

$000's 

 

Library 

Collections 

$000's 

 

Motor Vehicles

$000's 

 

Other  equipment and  furniture 

$000's 

 

Computer 

Equipment 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

11,149 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

468   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

50,293   

 

‐ 

‐ 

(1,209) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

9,849    

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(1,766)    

   

   

   

   

   

   

(968)    

2,000    

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

12,868   

63   

(10)   

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

6,056   

 

‐ 

(1,028)   

558   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

342   

138   

 

 

(39)   

35   

 

 

(95)   

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

9,665   

2,200   

29   

(33)   

(1,094)   

965   

(3,321)   

667   

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

2,333   

607   

 

 

(350)   

350   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(2,690)   

 

536   

 

 

124,069   

 

‐ 

124,069   

 

‐   

525,738   

 

‐ 

525,738   

 

‐   

‐ 

11,617 

‐ 

11,617 

 

 

 

 

 

  49,084   

 

‐ 

53,488   

 

(4,404)   

9,115    

 

‐ 

‐ 

   

9,115    

   

12,921   

 

‐ 

12,921   

 

‐   

5,586   

 

‐ 

12,029   

 

(6,443)   

381   

 

‐ 

762   

 

(381)   

9,078   

 

‐ 

38,471   

 

(29,393)   

786   

 

‐ 

11,472   

 

(10,686)   

124,069   

 

 

 

 

525,738   

 

 

 

 

11,617 

 

 

 

 

49,084   

 

 

 

 

9,115    

 

 

 

 

12,921   

 

 

 

 

5,586   

 

 

 

 

381   

 

 

 

 

9,078   

 

 

 

 

786   

 

 

 

 

Total 

$000's 

803,700  

29,392  

29  

(43)  

(3,121)  

1,366  

(23,696)  

‐   

(2,050)  

(22,636)  

‐   

782,941  

162,405  

671,843  

(51,307)  

782,941  

92 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

23 Property, plant and equipment continued

 

 

 

Year ended 31 December 2014 

 

Work in  progress 

$000's 

 

Opening net book amount 

Additions 

Disposals  

Accumulated depreciation on disposals 

Write‐offs during the year 

Accumulated depreciation on write‐offs 

Revaluation increments/(decrements) 

Reclassifications in/(out) 

Depreciation charge 

Transfers 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

34,566  

 

47,090  

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(9,305)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land 

$000's 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

124,06

 

7,66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buildings 

$000's 

525,738   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(11,122)   

‐ 

(13,016)   

7,649   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service  concession  assets ‐ land 

$000's 

 

Service concession  assets ‐ building 

$000's 

 

Leasehold  improvements 

$000's 

 

Works of Art 

$000's 

 

Library 

Collections 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

11,617 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

49,084   

(1,209)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

9,115    

   

   

   

   

   

(181)    

(1,958)    

(581)    

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

12,921   

70   

(68)   

(4)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

5,586   

(1,003)   

371   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motor Vehicles

$000's 

 

Other  equipment and  furniture 

$000's 

 

Computer 

Equipment 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

381   

99   

(44)   

44   

(121)   

 

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

9,078   

1,833   

(993)   

990   

(3,317)   

1,153   

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

786   

(998)   

998   

(309)   

132   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closing net book amount 

At 31 December 2014 

‐ Cost 

‐ Valuation 

Accumulated depreciation 

 

 

 

 

 

72,351  

 

 

‐ 

72,351  

 

 

 

‐   

 

131,73

 

 

 

131,73

 

 

 

 

509,249   

 

‐ 

509,249   

‐   

 

‐ 

‐ 

11,617 

 

11,617 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

47,875   

 

53,488   

(5,613)   

 

‐ 

‐ 

6,395    

 

   

6,395    

   

‐ 

‐ 

12,919   

 

12,919   

 

 

‐ 

4,954   

 

12,400   

(7,446)   

  ‐ 

359   

 

817   

(458)   

  ‐ 

8,744   

 

40,464   

(31,720)   

  ‐ 

609   

 

10,605   

(9,996)   

 

Net book amount   

 

72,351   5 

131,73

  509,249    11,617    47,875    6,395     12,919    4,954    359    8,744    609   

Total 

$000's 

782,941  

‐ 

49,092  

(2,035)  

2,032  

(68)  

(3,637)  

(1,962)  

(19,556)  

‐ 

806,807  

201,742  

660,298  

(55,233)  

806,807  

 

 

93 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

23  Property, plant and equipment continued 

(a)  Valuations of land, buildings and Works of art  

Land, buildings and leasehold improvements were revalued as at 31 December 2014 by independent professional valuers. 

The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings  and leasehold improvements have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic  benefits, refer to note 1(k). 

Works of art are heritage assets and have been valued as at 31 December 2012 by independent professional valuers, the  fair value of works of art has been determined by reference to recent market transactions. 

(b)  Service concession assets  

The University entered into a Service Concession Arrangement with Campus Living Villages (‘CLV’), an entity that  specialises in the construction, operation and maintenance of long‐term student accommodation services. As part of this  arrangement, CLV has constructed a 355 bed student village at the Mt Lawley Campus; commenced construction of a 127  bed student accommodation in Joondalup and continue to undertake refurbishment of existing accommodation at Mt 

Lawley, Joondalup and Bunbury campuses. CLV has assumed management of all such accommodation. CLV is  compensated for the provision of capital works to the University through the granting of rights by the University to CLV  allowing CLV to operate and enjoy full access to such assets, including the retention of all rental income. 

The term of the arrangement is for 38 years in total, at which time CLV management and operational rights will cease, and  the full operation and management will return to the University. The financial statements reflect the control of all such  assets by the University pursuant to the principles of service concession accounting. 

 

A breakdown of service concession assets at reporting date is: 

 

 

Land 

Buildings 

Work in progress 

Net book amount 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

11,617    

47,875    

11,119    

70,611    

 

2013 

$000's 

11,617 

49,084 

1,433 

62,134 

24  Intangible assets 

 

Year ended 31 December 2013 

Opening net book value 

Additions 

Amortisation charge 

Closing net book amount 

At 31 December 2013 

‐ Cost 

‐ Accumulated amortisation and impairment 

Net book amount 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library  collections 

$000's 

5,667    

1,399    

(963)    

 

6,103    

12,168    

(6,065)    

6,103    

 

Total 

$000's 

5,667 

1,399 

(963) 

6,103 

12,168 

(6,065) 

6,103 

94 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

24 Intangible assets continued

25  Trade and other payables 

 

 

Year ended 31 December 2014 

Opening net book amount 

Additions 

Amortisation charge 

Closing net book amount 

At 31 December 2014 

‐ Cost 

‐ Accumulated amortisation and impairment 

Net book amount 

Current 

Trade payables 

CGS and other liabilities to Australian Government 

OS HELP liabilities to Australian Government 

GST payable 

Total current trade and other payables 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library  collections 

$000's 

 

6,103    

1,387    

(1,025)    

6,465    

 

13,554    

(7,089)    

6,465    

Total 

$000's 

 

6,103 

1,387 

(1,025) 

6,465 

13,554 

(7,089) 

6,465 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

4,725   

300   

1,816   

478   

7,319   

 

2013 

$000's 

5,728 

405 

93 

269 

6,495 

The fair value of trade and other payables is equal to their carrying value. 

(a)  Foreign currency risk  

 

 

 

The carrying amounts of the University's trade and other payables are denominated in the following currencies. 

 

Australian Dollar 

US Dollar 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

7,300   

19   

7,319   

2013 

$000's 

 

6,495 

‐ 

6,495 

For an analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other payables to foreign currency risk refer to note 38. 

95 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

26  Borrowings 

 

Current ‐ Unsecured interest bearing 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

Non‐current ‐ Unsecured interest bearing 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

Total borrowings 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

125   

 

99,520   

 

99,645   

2013 

$000's 

172 

90,145 

90,317 

(a)  Financing arrangements  

 

Unrestricted access was available at reporting date to the following lines of credit:  

 

Credit standby arrangements 

Total facilities 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

Bank facilities 

Total facilities 

Used at balance date 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

Bank facilities 

Total used at balance date 

Unused at balance date                                                                                                                          

 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

 

Bank facilities 

 

 

Total unused at balance date 

Bank loan facilities  

Total facilities 

Used at balance date 

 

 

 

 

Unused at balance date   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

100,000   

6,050   

 

106,050   

 

99,645   

228   

99,873   

 

355   

5,822   

6,177   

 

106,050   

(99,873)   

6,177   

 

2013 

$000's 

100,417 

6,050 

106,467 

90,317 

211 

90,528 

10,100 

5,839 

15,939 

106,467 

(90,528) 

15,939 

The current interest rates on loans from Western Australian Treasury Corporation range between 3.47% and 5.41%, depending on  the type of borrowing (2013: 3.57% and 5.35%). 

A majority of the used bank facilities of $0.2m (2013: $0.2m) represent credit card balances outstanding as at year end which are  included as part of trade and other payables in note 25. 

96 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(b)  Fair value  

 

The carrying amounts and fair values of borrowings at reporting date are: 

  2014 

 

Carrying 

Amount 

$000's 

Fair Value 

$000's 

   

On‐statement of financial position* 

   

Borrowings 

Western Australian Treasury Corporation 

  99,645   

99,645   

 

 

    99,645   

99,645   

Carrying 

Amount 

$000's 

2013 

Fair Value 

$000's 

 

90,317    

 

90,317    

90,317 

90,317 

(c) 

* The fair value of borrowings equals their carrying amount, as the impact of discounting is not significant. 

Risk exposures  

 

The exposure of the University’s borrowings to interest rate changes and the contractual repricing dates at the reporting  dates are as follows: 

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

 

Within one year 

Between one and five years 

Later than five years 

 

 

 

125   

59,520   

40,000   

172 

35,145 

55,000 

 

These borrowings are classified as follows: 

Current borrowings 

Non‐current borrowings 

 

 

 

 

99,645   

125   

99,520   

 

90,317 

172 

90,145 

   

99,645    90,317 

The carrying amounts of the University’s borrowings are denominated in Australian Dollars. 

For an analysis of the sensitivity of borrowings to interest rate risk refer to note 38. 

97 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

27  Provisions 

 

Current provisions expected to be settled within 12 months 

Employee benefits 

Annual leave and other compensated absences 

Long service leave 

Defined benefit obligation 

Staff bonuses 

Superannuation and other post‐employment benefits 

Employee on‐costs 

Provision for service concession liabilities 

Other provisions 

 

Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months 

Employee benefits 

Annual leave and other compensated absences 

Long Service Leave 

Superannuation and other post‐employment benefits 

Employee On‐costs 

 

Total current provisions 

Non‐current provisions 

Employee benefits 

Long service leave 

Defined benefit obligation 

Provision for deferred salary 

Superannuation and other post‐employment benefits 

Employee on‐costs 

Provision for service concession liabilities 

Other provisions 

Total non‐current provisions 

Total provisions 

709    

12,806    

1,770    

1,056    

 

16,341    

42,140    

 

 

4,395   

22,833   

221   

1,703   

343   

39,273   

7,232   

76,000   

118,140    

2014 

$000's 

6,810    

7,294    

2,741    

1,150    

2,073    

1,102    

1,238    

3,391    

25,799    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 

$000's 

4,187 

22,986 

100 

1,419 

327 

‐ 

30,825 

59,844 

98,808 

6,754 

7,185 

2,856 

1,038 

2,038 

1,088 

948 

2,607 

24,514 

496 

11,460 

1,560 

934 

14,450 

38,964 

Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months represents a current obligation of the Entity, however, it is  the view of the management that they are expected to be settled after more than 12 months. 

Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months  after reporting date. 

Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 

12 months after the reporting date. 

98 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on‐costs including workers’  compensation premiums and payroll tax. The provision is measured at the present value of expected future payments. The  associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is included at note 10. 

Other provisions include a provision for present obligations arising from an onerous contract under which the unavoidable costs  of meeting the contract obligations exceed the economic benefits expected to be received. 

(a)  Movements in provision  

 

2014 

Current 

Carrying amount at start of year 

Additional provisions recognised 

Amounts incurred and charged 

Carrying amount at end of year 

Non‐current 

Carrying amount at start of year 

Additional provisions recognised 

Amounts incurred and charged 

Carrying amount at end of year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employment  on‐costs 

$000's 

 

Service  concession  liabilities 

$000's 

 

2,022   

985   

(849)   

2,158   

 

327   

145   

(129)   

343   

 

948    

1,238    

(948)    

1,238    

 

 

30,825    

9,686    

(1,238)    

39,273    

Other 

$000's 

2,607 

1,746 

(962) 

3,391 

‐ 

7,232 

‐ 

7,232 

 

 

2013 

Current 

Carrying amount at start of year 

Additional provisions recognised 

Amounts incurred and charged 

Carrying amount at end of year 

Non‐current 

Carrying amount at start of year 

Additional provisions recognised 

Amounts incurred and charged 

Carrying amount at end of year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employment  on‐costs 

$000's 

 

Service  concession  liabilities 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

1,505   

517   

  

2,022   

513   

(186)   

  

327   

 

 

948   

948   

(948)   

 

948   

 

30,340   

1,433   

(948)   

30,825   

Other 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

8,874 

‐ 

(6,267) 

2,607 

99 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

28  Other liabilities 

 

Current 

Fees and grants received in advance 

Financial assistance received in advance 

Accrued expenses 

Total other liabilities 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

17,352    

1,468    

20,689    

 

39,509    

2013 

$000's 

15,159 

3,845 

10,823 

29,827 

29  Reserves and retained earnings 

(a)  Reserves  

 

Reserves 

Property, plant and equipment revaluation surplus 

Investments revaluation surplus 

Hedging reserve ‐ cash flow hedges 

Total Reserves 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

344,283    

5,744    

19    

 

350,046    

2013 

$000's 

348,719 

6,105 

21 

354,845 

  Movements  

 

Property, plant and equipment revaluation surplus 

Balance 1 January 

Revaluation ‐ gross 

Transfer to retained earnings 

Balance 31 December 

Investments revaluation surplus 

Balance 1 January 

Revaluation ‐ gross 

Reclassification of net change in fair value of available‐for‐sale financial assets to profit  and loss 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance 31 December   

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

348,719   

(3,637)   

(799)   

 

344,283   

 

6,105   

(361)   

2013 

$000's 

375,692 

(23,695) 

(3,278) 

348,719 

4,827 

3,995 

‐ 

  

5,744   

(2,717) 

6,105 

100 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

29 Reserves and retained earnings continued

Movements continued

 

Hedging reserve ‐ cash flow hedges 

Balance 1 January 

Revaluation ‐ gross 

Balance 31 December 

Total reserves 

(b)  Retained earnings  

Movement in retained earnings were as follows: 

 

 

Retained earnings at the beginning of the year 

Net result for the period 

Transfer from property, plant and equipment reserve* 

Retained earnings at end of the year 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

21   

(2)   

19   

350,046   

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

21 

21 

354,845 

2014 

$000's 

 

 

 

 

519,615   

27,495   

799   

 

547,909   

 

2013 

$000's 

483,514 

32,823 

3,278 

519,615 

* Transfer from revaluation reserve of $0.8m (2013: $3.3m) represents realisation of revaluation surplus on assets  disposed.  

(c)  Nature and purpose of reserves  

(i)  Property, plant and equipment revaluation surplus 

The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of  non‐current assets, as described in note 1(k). 

(ii) Investments revaluation surplus 

Changes in the fair value and exchange differences arising on revaluation of investments, such as equities, classified as  available‐for‐sale financial assets, are taken to the investments revaluation reserve, as described in note 1(l). Amounts are  recognised in the income statement when the associated assets were sold or impaired. 

(iii) Hedging reserve ‐ cash flow hedges 

The hedging reserve is used to record gains or losses on a hedging instrument in a cash flow hedge that are recognised  directly in equity, as described in note 1(s). Amounts are recognised in the income statement when the associated hedged  transaction affects profit and loss. 

101 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

30  Restricted funds 

 

Restricted funds 

ECU Foundation 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

9,284   

 

2013 

$000's 

8,730 

 

The purpose of the ECU Foundation is to hold funds received from external sources. These funds are appropriated for a variety of  educational and research purposes ranging from scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs. The Foundation was  established to aid and promote excellence in educational and research activities by seeking, receiving and administering private  gifts for the benefit of the University and its community. 

31  Key management personnel disclosures 

(a)  Remuneration of members of the University Council  

 

The number of council members, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non‐monetary benefits and other benefits 

  for the financial year, fall within the following bands are: 

2014 

Number 

2013 

Number 

Nil to $10,000 

 

‐ 

20     19 

1  $120,001 to 130,000 

$130,001 to $140,000 

$160,001 to $170,000 

 

 

  ‐ 

   

1    

   

‐ 

‐  $170,001 to $180,000 

$260,001 to $270,000 

$360,001 to $370,000 

$510,001 to $520,000 

$530,001 to $540,000 

$740,001 to $750,000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

1    

   

1    

1    

1    

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

Base remuneration and superannuation 

Annual leave and long service leave accruals 

Other benefits 

The total aggregate remuneration of members of the accountable authority 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

1,526    

139    

67    

 

1,732    

2013 

$000's 

1,232 

40 

28 

1,300 

The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of council members. 

No council members are members of the pension scheme. 

102 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

31 Key management personnel disclosures continued

(b)  Remuneration of senior officers  

 

The number of senior officers, other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority, whose total  fees, salaries, superannuation, non‐monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following  bands are: 

2014 

Number 

2013 

Number 

$60,001 to $70,000 

$230,001 to $240,000 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

$240,001 to $250,000 

$310,001 to $320,000 

$320,001 to $330,000 

$340,001 to $350,000 

$350,000 to $360,000 

 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

1    

2    

1    

   

1    

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

$370,001 to $380,000 

$410,001 to $420,000 

$470,001 to $480,000 

$490,001 to $500,000 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

1    

1    

1    

   

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

Base remuneration and superannuation 

Annual leave and long service leave accruals 

Other benefits 

The total aggregate remuneration of senior officers 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

2,668   

6   

157   

2,831   

2013 

$000's 

 

2,982 

202 

203 

3,387 

The remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of senior officers other than senior  officers reported as members of the University Council. 

No senior officer is a member of the pension scheme. 

32  Remuneration of auditors 

 

Remuneration to the Office of the Auditor General ("OAG") and non‐related audit firms for the financial year are as follows: 

2014  2013 

  $000's  $000's 

   

Audit the Financial Statements 

Audit fees ‐ OAG 

Other audit and assurance services 

Audit fees ‐ OAG 

Audit fees ‐ Non‐OAG firms 

 

 

 

 

242   

14   

5   

 

‐ 

252 

Total  

 

261    257 

103 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

 

33  Contingencies 

Contingent liabilities  

In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, the University has the following contingent liabilities: 

Native title claims 

University land is subject to Federal Court proceedings concerning native title rights and to settlement negotiations between the 

State Government and the South West Aboriginal Land and Sea Council. 

Outstanding litigation 

The University and a number of its staff members are defendants in various actions commenced by a former employee. The  claims are not material and sufficient insurance is in place to cover the potential liabilities. 

34  Commitments 

(a)  Capital expenditure commitments  

Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the 

  financial statements, including amounts for infrastructure, are payable as follows: 

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

Property, plant and equipment 

   

Within one year 

 

11,103    39,441 

 

 

11,103    39,441 

(b)  Lease commitments: The Entity as lessee  

(i) Operating leases 

Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised in the financial statements as  liabilities, are payable as follows: 

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

 

Within one year 

Between one year and five years 

 

 

276   

270   

230 

353 

Cancellable operating lease  

 

546    583 

104 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(c)  Other expenditure commitments  

 

Commitments in relation to purchase orders in existence at the reporting date, but not recognised as liabilities, are  payable as follows: 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

 

Within one year 

 

13,005    6,589 

35  Events occurring after the reporting date 

No events have occurred since the reporting date that is likely to have a material impact on the financial statements or notes of  the University. 

36  Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities 

 

 

 

Net result for the period 

Non‐cash items 

Depreciation and amortisation expense 

Revaluation of investment properties 

Provision for impairment of receivables 

Service concession income 

Gain on sale of asset 

Net loss on asset write‐offs 

Gain on sale of investment 

 

(Increase)/decrease in receivables and non‐financial assets 

Decrease in inventories 

Increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables 

Increase/(decrease) in provisions 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

27,495   

 

 

20,581   

(400)   

156   

(948)   

(138)   

68   

(10)   

46,804   

(9,245)   

‐ 

  

10,504   

10,595   

11,854   

58,658   

2013 

$000's 

32,823 

23,600 

7,547 

(664) 

(948) 

(1,921) 

36 

(3,180) 

57,293 

1,620 

1,783 

(2,560) 

(8,204) 

(7,361) 

49,932 

37  Non‐cash investing and financing activities 

 

Proceeds accrued from sale of property, plant and equipment and non‐current assets held for sale  

2014 

$000's 

‐ 

  

2013 

$000's 

650 

105 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

38  Financial risk management 

The Entity is exposed to the following financial risks as a result of its activities: 

(a)  Market risk  

(i) Foreign exchange and interest risk 

The University does not trade in foreign currency and is not materially exposed to other price risks (for example, equity  securities or commodity price changes). The University’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates  primarily to the long‐term debt obligations. The University’s borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian 

Treasury Corporation (WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through  portfolio diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than as detailed in the interest rate sensitivity analysis table  below, the University has limited exposure to interest rate risk because it has no borrowings other than the WATC  borrowings. 

(ii) Price risk 

The University investment portfolios' are exposed to fluctuations in the prices of equity securities. The University's  investment policy provides strategies for minimisation of price risk with the diversification of that risk through a number  of investment managers and regular independent expert monitoring to ensure that there is no concentration of risk in any  one area. 

106 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

38 Financial risk management continued

 

(iii) Summarised sensitivity analysis 

 

The following table summarises the sensitivity of the University's financial assets and financial liabilities to interest rate  risk, foreign exchange risk and other price risk. 

 

 

Interest rate risk  Foreign exchange risk  Other price risk 

 

 

‐1%  +1%  ‐10%  +10%  ‐10%  +10% 

 

Carrying  amount 

$'000 

Profit 

$000's

Equity

$000's

Profit 

$000's

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's 

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's

Equity

$000's

                         

31 December 2014 

Financial assets 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Trade receivable 

Financial assets ‐ Available for  sale 

  26,320     ‐ 

Financial assets ‐ Held to  maturity 

Derivatives ‐ cash flow hedges   

  195,307     ‐ 

19     ‐ 

Sub‐total 

 

 

 

  54,530     (545)    (545)    545   

5,043     ‐    ‐    ‐    ‐ 

545    ‐ 

  14   

  ‐    ‐ 

14    (11)   

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐   

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

  (545)    (545)    545   

     

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

  ‐ 

  ‐ 

  182   

545    196   

   

  ‐ 

  ‐   

  ‐ 

‐   

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

   

(11)    

   (2,632)    (2,632)    2,632    2,632 

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

182    (113)    (113)     ‐      ‐   

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

196    (124)    (124)    (2,632)    (2,632)    2,632    2,632 

           

Financial liabilities 

Trade payables 

Borrowings 

 

 

   

6,841    

99,645    

‐ 

‐   

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐   

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

  ‐ 

(2)   

 

  ‐ 

(2)   

 

 

‐ 

2   

 

 

‐ 

2    

 

   

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

 

‐ 

‐   

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

 

Sub‐total    ‐    ‐    ‐    ‐    (2)    (2)    2    2     ‐      ‐    ‐    ‐ 

 

Total increase/(decrease) 

  (545)    (545)    545    545    194    194    (122)    (122)    (2,632)    (2,632)    2,632    2,632 

 

 

Interest rate risk  Foreign exchange risk  Other price risk 

 

 

‐1%  +1%  ‐10%  +10%  ‐10%  +10% 

 

Carrying  amount 

$'000 

               

31 December 2013 

Financial assets 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Trade receivables 

     

 

  66,452     (665)    (665)    665   

7,182     ‐    ‐    ‐    ‐ 

665    ‐ 

  13   

  ‐    ‐ 

13    (11)   

 

Financial assets ‐ available for  sale 

Financial assets ‐ held to  maturity 

Derivatives ‐ cash flow hedges   

  21,380     ‐ 

  164,768     ‐ 

21     ‐ 

Sub‐total 

Financial liabilities 

Trade payables 

Borrowings 

 

 

 

  (665)    (665)    665   

     

  6,226     ‐ 

  90,317     (4)   

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

  ‐ 

 

(4)   

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

4   

 

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

665   

 

4   

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

64   

 

 

 

  ‐ 

 

  ‐ 

51   

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

51    (11)   

64    (22)   

   

 

  ‐ 

‐   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profit 

$000's

Equity

$000's

Profit 

$000's

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's

Equity 

$000's 

Profit 

$000's

Sub‐total    (4) (4) 4 4 ‐ ‐ ‐

 

Total increase/(decrease) 

  (669)    (669)    669    669    64    64    (22)   

Equity 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(11)    

 

 

   

Profit 

$000's 

Equity 

$000's 

   (2,138)    (2,138)    2,138    2,138 

   

(11)    

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

‐ 

‐   

  ‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

(22)    (2,138)    (2,138)    2,138    2,138 

 

   

   

   

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profit 

$000's

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

$000's

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

(22)    (2,138)    (2,138)    2,138    2,138 

107 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

38  Financial risk management continued 

(b)  Credit risk  

Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the University’s receivables defaulting on their contractual obligations  resulting in financial loss to the University. The Entity measures credit risk on a fair value basis and monitors risk on a  regular basis. 

The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the  gross carrying amount of those assets inclusive of any provisions for impairment. 

(c) 

The University trades only with recognised, credit worthy third parties. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on  an ongoing basis with the result that the Entity’s exposure to bad debts is minimal. There are no significant concentrations  of credit risk. 

Provision for impairment of financial assets is calculated based on past experience, and current and expected changes in  client credit ratings. For financial assets that are either past due or impaired, refer to note 19. 

Liquidity risk  

The University is exposed to liquidity risk through its trading in the normal course of business. Liquidity risk arises when  the University is unable to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. 

The University’s objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility through the use of bank  loans and finance leases. The Entity has appropriate procedures to manage cash flows by monitoring forecast cash flows  to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments. 

The tables below analyse the Entity's financial assets and liabilities based on the remaining period at the reporting date to  the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows. Balances  due within 12 months equal their carrying balances, as the impact of discounting is not significant.  

 

 

 

Financial Assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Trade and other receivables 

Other financial assets 

Derivative financial instruments 

Total Financial Assets 

Financial Liabilities: 

Trade and other payables 

Borrowings 

Total Financial Liabilities 

 

Within 1 year 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

1 ‐ 2 years 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

2 ‐ 5 years 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

5+ years 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

   

2014 

$000's 

Total 

2013 

$000's 

 

  54,530   66,452   

 

5,043   7,182   

  ‐ 

  ‐ 

 

  137,307  114,768    8,000   ‐ 

19   21   

  ‐ 

 

 

  ‐ 

  ‐ 

 

  10,000   ‐ 

  ‐ 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

  ‐     

  ‐     

 

  66,320    71,380    

‐ 

  ‐     

54,530    66,452 

5,043    7,182 

221,627    186,148 

19    21 

 

  196,899  188,423    8,000   ‐ 

       

  10,000   ‐ 

   

  66,320    71,380    

   

 

 

6,841   6,226   

125  

172    14,581  

  ‐ 

  ‐

  ‐ 

  ‐ 

  ‐     

125    44,939   35,020    40,000    55,000    

  6,966

6,398

14,581

125

44,939

35,020 40,000    55,000    

281,219    259,803 

 

6,841    6,226 

99,645    90,317 

106,486

96,543

108 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

38 Financial risk management continued

(c) Liquidity risk continued

The following are the average interest rates for the above financial assets and liabilities as at 31 December 2014 

Financial assets 

1.  Cash and cash equivalents ‐ 3.2% p.a (2013: 3.32% p.a). 

2.  Trade and other receivables ‐ Non‐interest bearing financial asset. 

3.  Available‐for‐sale financial assets ‐ Non‐interest bearing financial asset. 

4.  Held to maturity investments ‐ 4.06% p.a (2013: 4.43% p.a). 

Financial liability 

1.  Trade and other payable ‐ Non‐interest bearing financial liability. 

2.  Borrowings ‐ 4.06% p.a (2013: 4.04% p.a). 

The University’s derivative financial instruments will be settled on a gross basis within the next 12 months. 

39  Fair value measurement 

(a)  Fair value measurements  

The fair value financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement or for disclosure  purposes. 

Due to the short‐term nature of the current receivables their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value and  based on credit history it is expected that the receivables that are neither past due nor impaired will be received when  due.  

 

The carrying amounts and aggregate net fair values of financial assets and liabilities at balance date are: 

 

Carrying Amount  Fair Value 

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

       

Financial assets 

Cash and cash equivalents 

Trade receivables 

Available‐for‐sale financial assets 

Held‐to‐maturity financial assets 

Derivative financial instruments 

 

 

 

 

 

54,530   

5,043   

26,320   

195,307   

19   

66,452   

7,182   

21,380   

164,768   

21   

54,530   

5,043   

26,320   

195,307   

19   

66,452 

7,182 

21,380 

164,768 

21 

Total financial assets 

 

 

281,219   

 

259,803   

 

281,219   

 

259,803 

 

Financial liabilities 

Trade payables 

Borrowings 

 

 

 

6,841   

99,645   

 

6,226   

90,317   

 

6,841   

99,645   

 

6,226 

90,317 

Total financial liabilities   

106,486    96,543    106,486    96,543 

109 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

39  Fair value measurement continued 

(a)  Fair value measurements continued  

110 

The University measures and recognises the following assets and liabilities at fair value on a recurring basis: 

Derivative financial instruments 

Available‐for‐sale financial assets 

Land and buildings 

Leasehold improvements 

Investments properties 

Works of art 

The University has also measured assets and liabilities at fair value on a non‐recurring basis as a result of the  reclassification of assets as held for sale. 

(b)  Fair value hierarchy  

The University categorises the assets and liabilities measured at fair value into a hierarchy based on the level of inputs 

  used in measurement. 

Level 1  quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. 

Level 2 

Level 3 

  inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or  liability, either directly or  indirectly.

inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable 

  inputs)

(i) Recognised fair value measurements 

Fair value measurements recognised in the statement of financial position are categorised into the following levels  

 

Fair value measurements at 31 December 2014 

 

Recurring fair value measurements 

Financial assets 

Investment in shares 

Investment in managed funds 

Derivative financial instruments 

Total financial assets 

Non‐financial assets 

Investment properties 

Land 

Buildings 

Leasehold improvements 

Works of art 

Total non‐financial assets 

 

 

 

 

Note 

 

 

19   

19   

18   

 

 

22   

23   

23   

23   

23   

 

 

2014 

$000's 

2,032   

24,288   

19   

 

26,339   

 

21,354   

131,735   

509,249   

6,395   

12,919   

681,652   

 

Level 1 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

2,032   

  

19   

 

2,051   

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

Level 2 

$000's 

‐ 

24,288 

‐ 

24,288 

21,354 

131,735 

509,249 

6,395 

12,919 

681,652 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

(b) Fair value hierarchy continued

Fair value measurements at 31 December 2013 

 

Recurring fair value measurements 

Financial assets 

Investment in shares 

Investment in managed funds 

Derivative financial instruments 

Total financial assets 

Non‐financial assets 

Investment properties 

Land 

Buildings 

Leasehold improvements 

Works of art 

Total non‐financial assets 

Non‐recurring fair value measurements 

Land held for sale 

Total non‐recurring fair value measurements 

 

 

 

Note 

 

 

 

 

19   

19   

   

 

 

 

 

22   

23   

23   

23   

23   

 

 

   

 

2013 

$000's 

2,572   

18,808   

21   

 

21,401   

 

13,610   

124,069   

525,738   

9,115   

12,921   

685,453   

 

1,305   

1,305   

 

Level 1 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

2,572   

  

21   

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

2,593   

 

  

  

  

  

  

‐    

 

  

  

 

Level 2 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

18,808 

18,808 

13,610 

124,069 

525,738 

9,115 

12,921 

685,453 

1,305 

1,305 

There were no transfers between levels 1 and 2 for recurring fair value measurements during the year.  All reported fair  value measurements were recurring. 

(ii) Disclosed fair values 

The University has a number of assets and liabilities which are not measured at fair value, but for which the fair values are  disclosed in the notes. 

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of their fair  values due to the short‐term nature of trade receivables.  

Non‐current borrowings are measure at amortised cost with interest recognised in the income statement when incurred. 

The fair value of borrowings disclosed in note 26 represents the contractual undiscounted cash flows at balance date.  

(c)  Valuation techniques used to derive level 2 fair values  

(i) Recurring fair value measurements 

Available‐for‐sale financial assets 

The fair values of investments in managed funds were based on the redemption prices at balance date, provided by the  fund managers. These prices represent the fair value of these investments.  

111 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

39  Fair value measurement continued 

(c)  Valuation techniques used to derive level 2 fair values continued  

Land 

The fair values of land were determined by independent valuer, McGees Property, effective 31 December 2014. Land has  been valued at the highest and best use basis. The most significant inputs into the land valuation were the prices per  hectare, derived from transactions that were considered to be relevant. Adjustments for differences in key attributes,  such as size and redevelopment costs based on recent transactions, have been made where necessary.  

Buildings and Leasehold Improvements 

The fair values of buildings and leasehold improvements were determined by independent valuer, Davson & Ward,  effective 31 December 2014. The fair values have been derived based on the cost approach. The most significant input  into this valuation approach was rates per square metre, sourced from in‐house library of cost analysis for similar projects  and trade publications. 

The University buildings are of a specialised nature and there is no active market for the assets, fair values have been  determined on the basis of replacement with a new asset having similar service potential including an allowance for  professional fees. The net current value of a building is the gross current value less accumulated depreciation to reflect  the consumed or expired service potential of the asset.   

Investment properties 

The fair values of investment properties have been valued by an independent valuer, McGees Property, effective 31 

December 2014. Valuations are based on the income approach with current rentals derived from market data. 

Works of art 

The fair values of works of art were determined by independent valuer, Seva Frangos Art and Lister Gallery in 2012.  

(ii) Non‐recurring fair value measurement 

Land classified as held for sale were valued at lower of fair value less costs to sell or carrying amount. The fair values of the  land were determined using the prices per hectare from relevant transactions.  

40  Write‐offs 

 

Total write‐offs as approved by the accountable authority during the financial year 

Receivables written‐off against provision 

Property, plant and equipment 

Inventory 

Total write‐offs 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

‐ 

40   

68   

  

108   

 

2013 

$000's 

69 

14 

22 

105 

112 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

41  Deferred government benefit for superannuation 

Unfunded Pension and Unfunded Gold State (Lump sum) Schemes 

The University has in its staffing profile a number of employees who are members of the Government Employees Superannuation 

Board (GESB) Scheme. As the Employer, the University is required to contribute to the scheme as employees are paid a pension or  lump sum pay out. Consequently, an unfunded liability has been created. An arrangement exists between the Australian 

Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the Edith Cowan University’s beneficiaries of the State 

Superannuation Scheme on an emerging cost basis. Accordingly a corresponding asset is recognised under receivables for the  reimbursement rights (refer to note 17).  

Nature of the benefits provided by the Schemes 

Pension Scheme 

The employer‐financed benefit is a pension benefit payable on retirement, death or invalidity, or a lump sum benefit on  resignation. 

Gold State Super (transferred benefits) 

Some former pension scheme members have transferred to Gold State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the members  receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed  during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment. 

The regulatory framework 

The Pension Scheme and Gold State Super (transferred benefits) operate under the State Superannuation Act 2000 (Western 

Australia) and the State Superannuation Regulations 2001 (Western Australia). 

Although the schemes are not formally subject to the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) (SIS) legislation, the Western 

Australian government has undertaken, in a Heads of Government Agreement, to operate the schemes in accordance with the  spirit of the SIS legislation. 

As an exempt public sector superannuation scheme (as defined in the SISI legislation), the schemes are not subject to any  minimum funding requirements. 

As a constitutionally protected scheme, the schemes are not required to pay tax. 

113 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

41  Deferred government benefit for superannuation continued  

Other entities responsibilities for the governance of the Schemes 

The Government Employees Superannuation Board (GESB) is the Scheme's Trustee and is responsible for the governance of the 

Scheme. As Trustee, GESB has a legal obligation to act solely in the best interests of Scheme beneficiaries. GESB has the following  roles: 

Administration of the Scheme and payment to the beneficiaries when required in accordance with the Scheme rules; 

Management and investment of the Scheme assets (although the liabilities in this report are not supported by assets), and 

Compliance with the Heads of Government Agreement referred to above. 

Scheme risks 

Pension Scheme 

There are a number of risks to which the Scheme exposes the University. The more significant risks relating to the defined benefits  are: 

Legislative risk ‐ the risk is that legislative changes could be made which increase the cost of providing the defined benefits. 

Pensioner mortality risk ‐ the risk is that pensioner mortality will be lighter than expected, resulting in pensions being paid  for a longer period. 

Inflation risk ‐ the risk that inflation is higher than anticipated, increasing pension payments, and the associated employer  contributions. 

Gold State Super (transferred benefits) 

There are a number of risks to which the Scheme exposes the University. The more significant risks relating to the defined benefits  are: 

Salary growth risk ‐ the risk that wages or salaries (on which future benefit amounts will be based) will rise more rapidly  than assumed, increasing defined amounts and the associated employer contributions. 

Legislative risk ‐ the risk is that legislative changes could be made which increase the cost of providing the defined benefits. 

Significant events 

There were no plan amendments, curtailments or settlements during the year. 

114 

 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

41 Deferred government benefit for superannuation continued

Sensitivity analysis 

Pension Scheme 

 

 

 

The sensitivity of the defined benefit obligation to changes in the significant assumptions is: 

 

Change in  assumption 

   

Impact on defined benefit obligation 

 

Increase in  assumption 

Decrease in  assumption 

     

 

Discount rate 

Pension increase rate 

 

 

0.5% p.a              ‐3.59% 

0.5% p.a               3.87%  

   

   

3.85% 

‐3.64% 

The above sensitivity analyses are based on a change in an assumption while holding all the other assumptions constant. In  practice this is unlikely to occur, and changes in some of the assumptions may be correlated. When calculating the sensitivity of  the defined benefit obligation to significant actuarial assumptions the same method has been applied as when calculating the  defined benefit liability recognised in the statement of financial position. 

The methods and types of assumptions used in the preparation of the sensitivity analysis did not change compared to the prior  period. 

Gold State Super (transferred benefits) 

 

The sensitivity of the defined benefit obligation to changes in the significant assumptions is: 

 

 

 

Discount rate 

Salary increase rate   

 

 

Change in  assumption 

 

0.05% p.a   

0.05% p.a   

 

Impact on defined benefit obligation 

Increase in  assumption 

Decrease in  assumption 

 

‐2.48%               2.69%  

2.07%               ‐2.07% 

The above sensitivity analyses are based on a change in an assumption while holding all the other assumptions constant. In  practice this is unlikely to occur, and changes in some of the assumptions may be correlated. When calculating the sensitivity of  the defined benefit obligation to significant actuarial assumptions the same method has been applied as when calculating the  defined benefit liability recognised in the statement of financial position. 

The methods and types of assumptions used in the preparation of the sensitivity analysis did not change compared to the prior  period. 

Funding arrangements 

The employer contributes, as required, to meet the benefits paid. 

115 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

41  Deferred government benefit for superannuation continued  

 

Reconciliation of the Net Defined Benefit liability (asset) 

 

 

 

 

Defined benefit obligation 

Fair value of plan assets 

Deficit 

Adjustment for effect of asset ceiling 

Net deferred benefit liability/(asset) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension Scheme 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

25,090   

 

‐ 

25,090   

 

‐ 

‐ 

25,400   

25,400   

 

 

25,090    25,400   

   

 

Gold Slate Super 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

484    

   

484    

   

‐ 

‐ 

442 

442 

484     442 

 

 

Reconciliation of the Defined Benefit obligation 

 

Present value of defined benefit obligations at the  beginning of the year 

Interest cost 

Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from changes in financial  assumptions 

Actuarial (gains)/losses arising from liability experience 

Benefits paid 

Balance at the end of the year 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension Scheme 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

25,400   

1,001   

28,782   

852   

   

Gold State Super 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

442    

17    

921 

27 

1,829   

(407)   

(2,733)   

25,090   

(2,069)   

639   

(2,804)   

25,400   

‐ 

24    

1    

   

484    

(25) 

(8) 

(473) 

442 

These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no assets. The employer contributes, as required, to  meet the benefits paid. 

Reconciliation of the Fair Value of Scheme Assets 

 

 

Fair value of Scheme assets at beginning of the year 

Employer contributions 

Benefits paid 

Balance at the end of the year   

 

 

 

Pension Scheme 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

2,733   

(2,733)   

  ‐ 

2,804   

(2,804)   

 

 

Gold State Super 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

   

   

    ‐ 

474 

(474) 

These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no assets. 

116 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

41 Deferred government benefit for superannuation continued

Reconciliation of the effect of the asset ceiling 

The asset ceiling has no impact on the net defined benefit liability/asset). 

Fair value of Scheme assets 

There are no assets in the Pension Scheme to support the State Share of the Benefit. Hence, there is: 

No fair value of Scheme assets; 

No asset allocation of Scheme assets; 

No financial instruments issued by the employer; 

No assets used by the employer; 

No asset‐liability matching strategies. 

 

 

 

Significant Actuarial assumptions at the reporting date 

 

 

 

Discount rate (active members) 

Discount rate (pensioners) 

Expected salary increase rates 

Expected pension increase rates 

 

 

 

 

Pension Scheme 

2014 

% p.a 

2013 

% p.a 

   

3.12   

3.12   

5.00   

2.50   

4.17   

4.17   

5.00   

2.50   

 

Gold State Super 

2014 

% p.a 

2013 

% p.a 

   

‐ 

3.12    

3.12    

5.00    

   

4.17 

4.17 

5.00 

2.50 

 

The discount rate is based on the Government bond maturing in April 2023. The decrement rates used (e.g. mortality and  retirement rates) are based on those used at the last actuarial valuation for the Schemes. 

Expected Contributions 

Expected contributions 

Expected employer contributions 

 

 

Pension Scheme 

2015 

$000's 

2,683   

 

Gold State Super 

2015 

$000's 

58 

Maturity profile of defined benefit obligation 

Pension Scheme 

The weighted average duration of the defined benefit obligation for the whole of the Pension Scheme is 7.7 years.  

Gold State Super (transferred benefits) 

The weighted average duration of the defined benefit obligation for the whole of the Gold State Super Scheme is 5.3 years. 

117 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

42  Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance 

(a) 

 

CGS and other Education grants  

 

 

Commonwealth Grants 

Scheme #1

 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting  period (total cash received from Australian Government for  the program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

Note 

2(g) 

 

 

2(a) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

136,224  

(92)  

136,132  

 

132,116   

‐ 

52   

132,168   

 

136,132   132,168   

 

(136,132)   (132,168)   

 

  ‐

  ‐ 

 

Indigenous Support 

Program 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

617  

 

617  

 

617  

(617)  

 

566   

53   

‐ 

619   

 

619   

(619)   

‐ 

 

Partnership & Participation 

Program #2

 

Disability Support Program

Promotion of Excellence in 

Learning and Training 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2,885   

351   

‐ 

3,236   

 

3,236   

(3,236)   

‐ 

 

3,419   

(649)   

‐ 

2,770   

 

2,770   

(2,770)   

‐ 

  ‐

89  

21  

110  

 

110  

(110)  

 

 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from Australian Government for the program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

 

 

Note 

2(g) 

 

 

 

2(a) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reward Funding 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

105   

(21)   

84   

 

84   

(84)   

‐ 

 

10  

2  

12  

70  

82  

(82)  

44   

(2)   

42   

49   

91   

(21)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

329  

1  

‐ 

330  

 

330  

(330)  

  70   

  ‐ 

2014 

$000's 

 

 

Other #3

 

 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

2,781   

 

 

 

 

 

2,781   

807   

2014 

$000's 

Total 

2013 

$000's 

139,825   139,360  

282   (566)  

140,107   138,794  

70   856  

3,588    140,177   139,650  

(3,588)    (140,177)   (139,580)  

 

  ‐ 

  ‐

  70  

#1 

#2 

 

#3 

Basic CGS grant amount, CGS – Regional Loading, CGS ‐ Enabling Loading, Maths and Science, Transition Loading, Allocated Places Advance and Non‐designate Courses Advance. 

Includes Equity Support Program. 

Includes Structural Adjustment Fund and Facilitation funding. 

118 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

42 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance continued

(b)  Higher education loan programs (excl OS‐HELP)  

 

 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received  from the Australian Government for the programs) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total Revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period 

 

 

 

Note 

2(g) 

 

2(b)   

 

 

 

 

HECS‐HELP (Aust. 

Government payments  only) 

2014 

$000's 

 

 

2013 

$000's 

 

73,108   

4,186   

77,294   

‐ 

 

74,484   

(633)   

73,851   

‐ 

 

 

 

 

77,294   

(77,294)   

73,851   

(73,851)   

  ‐ 

  ‐ 

 

FEE‐HELP #4

2014 

$000's 

 

2013 

$000's 

 

12,031    

(154)    

11,877    

‐ 

   

11,877    

(11,877)    

‐ 

   

11,230   

1,789   

13,019   

‐ 

 

13,019   

(13,019)   

‐ 

 

VET FEE‐HELP 

2014 

$000's 

 

2013 

$000's 

 

886  

18  

904  

 

904  

(904)  

 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  SA‐HELP 

2014 

$000's 

 

2013 

$000's 

 

 

2,343   

(10)   

‐ 

2,333   

 

2,333   

(2,333)   

‐ 

 

1,090   

(137)   

‐ 

953   

 

‐ 

953   

(953)   

 

2014 

$000's 

 

Total 

2013 

$000's 

 

88,368   

4,040   

92,408   

‐ 

 

92,408   

(92,408)   

‐ 

 

86,804  

1,019  

87,823  

‐   

87,823  

(87,823)  

‐   

#4  Program is in respect of FEE‐HELP for Higher Education only and excludes funds received in respect of VET FEE‐HELP. 

119 

 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

42 

(c)   Scholarships

 

 

 

Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance continued

 

 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash  received from Australian Government for the program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

Note 

2(g) 

 

2(c) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

       

Australian Postgraduate 

Awards 

International 

Postgraduate Research 

Scholarships 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2,072   

(190)   

1,882   

226   

2,108   

(2,108)   

1,991   

(350)   

1,641   

283   

1,924   

(1,698)   

148   

148   

148   

(148)   

 

 

‐ 

‐ 

162    

   

162    

   

162    

(162)    

 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

  ‐

  226   

  ‐     

   

 

   

Commonwealth 

Education Cost 

Scholarships #5  

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

116    (1,203)   

(54)    1,289   

62   

  ‐ 

86   

 

69   

(62)   

86   

(79)   

  7   

 

72   

(61)   

11   

 

16   

(11)   

 

 

 

   

Commonwealth 

Accommodation 

Scholarships #5  

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

(71)   

111   

40   

 

40   

(35)   

 

 

 

 

52   

 

52   

 

52   

(52)   

  ‐ 

 

 

Indigenous Access 

Scholarship 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

 

59   

61   

 

61   

(61)   

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

Total 

2013 

$000's 

2,460   

(305)   

2,155   

238   

881  

1,109  

1,990  

283  

2,393    2,273  

(2,381)    (2,035)  

12   

 

 

238  

#5  Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively. 

120 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

42 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance continued

(d)  Education Research  

 

 

Joint Research 

Engagement 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

Research Training 

Scheme 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

  

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting  period (total cash received from Australian Government for the  program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

 

Note 

2(g) 

 

 

 

2,808  

 

2,579   

‐ 

  ‐

4,558  

 

4,583   

‐ 

 

2(d)   

 

 

 

 

2,808  

 

2,579   

‐ 

  ‐

4,558  

 

4,583   

‐ 

 

2,808   2,579    4,558   4,583   

 

(2,808)   (2,579)    (4,558)   (4,583)   

 

  ‐

  ‐ 

  ‐

  ‐ 

 

Research 

Infrastructure Block 

Grants 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

439   

 

‐ 

439   

 

439   

(439)   

‐ 

  ‐ 

‐ 

441    

   

‐ 

441    

   

441    

(441)    

   

Commercialisation 

Training Scheme 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

33   

 

33   

(33)   

 

 

 

Sustainable Research 

Excellence in 

Universities 

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

716   

 

‐ 

716   

 

716   

(716)   

‐ 

  ‐ 

Other #6  

2014 

$000's 

2013 

$000's 

2014 

$000's 

Total 

2013 

$000's 

‐ 

709   

 

814  

745  

1,347   

(895)   

9,335   

745   

9,659  

(895)  

‐ 

709   

 

1,559  

86  

452    10,080   

1,308    86   

8,764  

1,341  

709    1,645   1,760    10,166    10,105  

(709)    (1,377)   (1,674)    (9,898)    (10,019)  

 

268   86    268    86  

#6  The reported surplus for collaborative research network is $0.26m (2013: $0.86m) and is expected to be rolled over for future use. 

121 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

42 

(e) 

Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance continued 

 

Australian Research Council Grants  

 

(i) Discovery 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from Australian Government for the program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

 

 

(ii) Linkages 

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from Australian Government for the program) 

Net accrual adjustments 

Revenue for the period 

Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year 

Total revenue including accrued revenue 

Less expenses including accrued expenses 

Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

122 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014 

 

Note 

2(g)   

 

 

2(e)(i)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note 

2(g)   

 

 

2(e)(ii)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

Projects 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

196   

  ‐ 

208   

 

196   

131   

208   

164   

327   

(206)   

372   

(241)   

121    131   

 

 

Projects 

2014 

$000's 

 

‐ 

341   

 

341   

273   

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

367   

 

367   

179   

614   

(339)   

546   

(273)   

275    273   

Total 

2014 

$000's 

 

‐ 

196   

 

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

208  

 

196   

131   

208  

164  

327   

(206)   

372  

(241)  

121    131  

Total 

2014 

$000's 

 

‐ 

341   

 

341   

273   

2013 

$000's 

 

‐ 

367  

 

367  

179  

614   

(339)   

546  

(273)  

275    273  

 

 

 

42 

(f) 

Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance continued 

 

OS‐HELP  

 

 

Cash received during the reporting period 

Cash spent during the reporting period 

Net cash received 

Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous period 

Cash surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period 

(g) 

 

Superannuation supplementation  

 

Cash received during the reporting period 

University contribution in respect of current employees 

Cash available 

Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous period 

Cash available for current period 

Contributions to specified defined benefit funds 

Cash surplus/(deficit) for this period 

 

(h)  Student Services and Amenities Fee  

 

Edith Cowan University 

Notes to the Financial Statements 

For the Year Ended 31 December 2014

 

 

 

Note 

 

   

   

2(g)   

   

25   

2014 

$000's 

 

2,625   

(902)   

1,723   

93   

1,816   

2013 

$000's 

 

490 

(430) 

60 

33 

93 

 

 

Note 

2(g)   

   

   

 

   

 

   

2014 

$000's 

 

3,252   

199   

3,451   

(380)   

3,071   

(2,981)   

90   

2013 

$000's 

 

2,704 

242 

2,946 

206 

3,152 

(3,532) 

(380) 

 

SA‐HELP revenue earned 

Student services and amenities fees  

Total revenue expendable in period 

Student services expenses during period 

Unspent/(overspent) student services revenue 

 

Note 

2(b)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 

$000's 

 

2,333   

1,561   

3,894   

(3,894)   

‐ 

 

2013 

$000's 

 

953 

1,734 

2,687 

(2,687) 

‐ 

 

123 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Additional Facts and Statistics 

STUDENT ENROLMENTS (PERSONS) 

Table 19: Enrolments by Type of Attendance, 2010‐2014 

   

Full‐time 

Part‐time 

Total 

 

Table 20: Enrolments by Campus, 2010‐2014 

 

Joondalup 

Mount Lawley 

Bunbury 

Study Centres (overseas) 

Study Centres (in Australia) 

Total 

 

Table 21: Enrolments by Gender, 2010‐2014 

 

Female 

Male 

Total 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

17,708  17,836  17,661  17,652  17,280 

6,533  6,053  5,871  5,653  5,704 

24,241  23,889  23,532  23,305  22,984 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

10,959  11,769  11,834  11,854  11,846 

7,938 

1,004 

2,386 

1,954 

7,450 

1,015 

1,568 

2,087 

6,929 

974 

1,248 

2,547 

6,599 

1,037 

942 

2,873 

6,510 

996 

600 

3,032 

24,241  23,889  23,532  23,305  22,984 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

14,676  14,734  14,549  14,321  14,105 

9,565  9,155  8,983  8,984  8,879 

24,241  23,889  23,532  23,305  22,984 

124 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

 

Table 22: Enrolments by Course Level, 2010‐2014 

 

Doctorate by Research 

Doctorate by Coursework 

Masters by Research 

Masters by Coursework 

Graduate/ Postgraduate Diploma 

Graduate Certificate 

Bachelor Honours 

Bachelor Pass 

Associate Degree 

Advanced Diploma/ Diploma 

Other Award/ VET 

Enabling Course 

Cross‐Institutional/ Non Award 

Total 

2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

438 

39 

154 

3,216 

1,306 

794 

187 

441 

28 

162 

2,552 

1,291 

685 

143 

441 

21 

165 

2,234 

1,332 

771 

140 

471 

164 

2,303 

1,189 

695 

149 

458 

158 

2,318 

1,106 

859 

139 

16,285  17,071  16,797  16,871  16,553 

120  113  93  58  39 

47 

567 

16 

577 

27 

591 

22 

488 

18 

440 

902 

186 

689 

121 

789 

131 

798 

88 

791 

100 

24,241  23,889  23,532  23,305  22,984 

 

Table 23: Onshore and Offshore International Enrolments by Home Country Region, 2010‐2014 

 

Americas 

Asia 

Africa 

Europe 

Middle East 

Other 

Total International Enrolments 

2010 

105 

4,098 

969 

312 

101 

18 

5,603 

2011 

109 

3,300 

814 

329 

137 

4,693 

 

Table 24: Enrolment Proportions by Equity Group, 2010‐2014 

2012 

106 

2,831 

614 

236 

164 

3,988 

2013 

105 

2,524 

545 

230 

217 

10 

3,631 

2014 

83 

2,292 

448 

204 

283 

13 

3,323 

 

Low SES Students (%) 

Regional Students (%) 

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander 

Students (%) 

Students with a Disability (%) 

2010 

11.3 

15.3 

1.1 

4.7 

2011 

11.6 

15.9 

1.0 

5.0 

2012 

12.0 

16.2 

1.1 

5.2 

2013 

11.8 

16.8 

1.2 

5.3 

2014 

12.6 

17.3 

1.3 

5.6 

125 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

 

Table 25: Completions by Course Level, 2009‐2013 

 

Doctorate by Research 

Doctorate by Coursework 

Masters by Research 

Masters by Coursework 

Graduate/ Postgraduate Diploma 

Graduate Certificate 

Bachelor Honours 

Bachelor Pass 

Associate Degree 

Advanced Diploma/ Diploma 

VET 

Total 

2009 

408 

55 

73 

41 

10 

23 

1,424 

648 

412 

92 

6,192 

 

2010 

48 

22 

1,423 

703 

467 

113 

3,342 

42 

182 

6,358 

2011 

54 

21 

1,191 

649 

386 

130 

3,549 

16 

16 

188 

6,206 

2012 

61 

28 

989 

691 

511 

88 

3,660 

14 

‐ 

213 

6,259 

2013 

85 

22 

837 

701 

406 

122 

3,617 

19 

15 

259 

6,091 

126 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

Other Financial, Governance and Legal Disclosures  

Pricing Policies 

 

ECU sets the level of the student contribution for Commonwealth supported places at the  maximum allowed under the  Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Cwlth), as is the case for most 

Australian universities.  Fees for fee‐paying courses are determined on the basis of cost and  market conditions and take into account Australian Government requirements regarding fees set  for non‐Commonwealth supported places. 

 

Changes to legislation affecting fee setting by universities were proposed in the Commonwealth 

Budget 2014‐15, and in May 2014 ECU announced that its existing course fee structure for 

Commonwealth supported domestic students would remain in place for all of 2014. This decision  provided fairness and certainty for those commencing in Semester 2 2014 and meant that these  students have until the end of 2020 to complete their course under the current fee structure.

 

 

Major Capital Projects 

Table 26: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2014    

Project 

Joondalup Engineering Pavilion 

Joondalup Student Housing (Public Private Partnership) 

 

Table 27: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2014  

Estimated  total cost 

($M) 

5.5

 

0.2 

Project 

Joondalup Ngoolark (Building 34) 

ECU Health Centre 

Estimated  total cost 

($M) 

69.0

 

22.0

 

Actual total  cost ($M) 

5.4

 

0.1

 

Project spend  to date ($M) 

Expected year  of completion 

57.4

 

18.8

 

2015

 

2015

 

Employees and Employee Relations 

Table 28: Academic Staff by Contract Type, 2010‐2014 

Staff 

Ongoing 

2010 

397 

2011 

396 

2012 

394 

2013 

386 

2014 

383 

 

 

Fixed term 

Casual 

196 

103 

189 

103 

189 

110 

184 

122 

155 

134 

Total  696  688  693  692 

Notes: Figures are based on full‐time equivalency, rather than headcount.  Figures are average full‐time  equivalents for the 12 calendar months as at 17 February 2015. 

672 

 

127 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Table 29: Professional Staff by Contract Type, 2010‐2014 

Staff  2010  2011  2012  2013  2014 

Ongoing 

Fixed term 

Casual 

738 

234 

88 

757 

263 

113 

737 

327 

116 

736 

329 

121 

761 

258 

155 

 

Total  1060  1133  1180  1186 

Notes: Figures are based on full‐time equivalency, rather than headcount.  Figures are average full‐time  equivalents for the 12 calendar months as at 17 February 2015. 

1174 

Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management 

Executive Commitment to Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management  

ECU is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff, visitors and  contractors, and is proactive in preventing and minimising the potential for injury, illness and  harm.  The University has a range of safety and health policies, guidelines, procedures and  protocols that exceed legislative obligations.  

Executive commitment is demonstrated by the University’s due diligence compliance framework  that requires Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) operational plans to be developed and  implemented by all faculties and service centres, the maintenance of Hazard Risk Registers and  reporting against a suite of performance indicators.  OSH compliance is certified biannually by 

Executive Deans /Faculty Executives and Service Centre Directors, and this is reported to the 

University Health and Safety Committee, Quality, Audit and Risk Committee (QARC), and Vice‐

Chancellor’s Planning and Management Group. 

 

To help University staff understand their safety and health responsibilities and due diligence  requirements, safety and health training programs have been developed.  These programs are  included in the Role Based Development Framework for managers and supervisors, and separate  briefings have been provided to the Senior Leadership Team and Council. In addition to statutory  requirements, the University expects all managers and supervisors to provide information,  instruction, training and supervision on safety and health procedures and work practices, so that a  safe and healthy working environment is maintained at all times.  

Mechanism for Consultation with Employees on OSH and Injury Management Matters 

ECU’s Occupational Safety and Health  Consultative Committee structure  comprises the following  four levels: 

1. University Health and Safety Committee.  This committee meets twice per year, consists  of both safety and health representatives and management representatives, and reports to  the Vice‐Chancellor.  

2. Health and Safety Advisory Group, meeting at least quarterly and reporting to  the 

Director, Human Resources and the University Health and Safety Committee. 

3. Faculty and Service Centre Work Safety and Health committees, meeting at least quarterly  and reporting to the Health and Safety Advisory Group. 

4. Institutional Bio‐safety Committee/ Radiation and Biosafety Committee, reporting to the 

University Health and Safety Committee. 

128 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

Each of these committees engages with elected safety and health representatives and other  relevant staff from faculties and service centres to facilitate consultation at all levels. 

 

Compliance with the Proposed Work Health and Safety Act 

 

Although Western Australia has yet to adopt the Commonwealth’s  Work Health and Safety Act 

( WHS Act) and Regulations, ECU has undertaken significant preparation for future implementation,  to meet current best practice in safety and health legislative requirements.   

In 2014 this work included: ongoing review and update of key safety and health policies, guidelines  and supporting material to meet  WHS Act requirements through an extensive consultation  process’ provision of training and information to managers and supervisors on the proposed  legislation’ enhanced reporting to all levels of the University on safety and health performance’  and regular briefings to the University Health and Safety Committee, QARC and Council on these  matters.  

Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management  

ECU has a formal  Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Policy  and  Guidelines  as well as  a detailed workers’ compensation claim and return to work process, which meets the  requirements of the  Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981 (WA).  Return to  work programs for employees with both work and non‐work related injuries and illnesses are  developed in consultation with the employee, their supervisor and the treating medical  practitioner. 

 

Performance indicators for Workers’ Compensation claims, costs and premiums, and accident and  injury metrics, are monitored and reported quarterly to QARC and Council.  

Assessment of the occupational safety and health management system  

ECU continues to promote self‐assessment of faculty and service centre OSH systems and  processes, based on the primary functions and supporting principles of the Australian and New 

Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4801:2001 and the International Standard OHSAS 18001:2007.  ECU  undertook both an internal and external audit of the OSH management system in 2014 against the  abovementioned standards respectively. The findings of these audits are being used to revise the  current framework, address identified gaps and promote continuous improvement to the system.   

 

 

Completion and regular review of an OSH Hazard Risk Register that identifies business‐inherent  and residual risks is mandated and also requires formal review and endorsement by Executive 

Deans /Faculty Executives and Service Centre Directors.   

Additionally, staff attitudes to, and perceptions of, safety in their work environment are  monitored through staff surveys. The 2014 staff survey showed a high level of satisfaction with  safety awareness and responsiveness at the University, maintaining the positive survey results of 

2012. 

 

129 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

Table 30: Performance against 2014 Injury Management Targets 

Indicator  Target 2014 

Number of fatalities  Zero (0) 

Lost time injury/diseases  incidence rate 

Zero or 10% reduction on  previous year 

Lost time injury severity rate  Zero or 10% improvement  on previous year 

Result 

2012 

Result 

2013 

Result 

2014 

Comment on 

2014 result 

0.31 

33.3 

0.66 

0.0 

0.49 

0.0 

Achieved 

Achieved 

Achieved 

Percentage of injured  workers returned to work  within  

(i) 13 weeks; and 

(ii) 26 weeks. 

Greater than or equal to 

80% return to work within 

26 weeks 

 

 

83% 

100% 

 

 

77% 

85% 

 

 

100% 

100% 

 

 

Achieved 

Achieved 

Percentage of managers  trained in occupational  safety and health and injury  management 

Greater than or equal to 

80% 

N/A  N/A  28%  Not achieved 

Notes: Lost time injury/diseases incidence rate is defined as the number of lost time injury claims lodged, divided by the  number of employees (FTE), multiplied by 100. Lost time injury severity rate is the number of lost time injury claims where  employees do not return to any work duties within 60 days, divided by the total lost time injury claims, multiplied by 

100.  The Percentage of injured workers returned to work within 13 weeks and 26 weeks measures employees returning to  full duties. There has been a change to figures reported in the 2013 Annual Report for the percentage of workers returned  to work within 13 and 26 weeks in 2013.  This is due to an injury that occurred in December 2013, where the timeframes of 

13 and 26 weeks had not been reached when the 2013 Annual Report was finalised.  Occupational safety and health and  injury management obligations were incorporated into formal OSH training sessions for managers in 2013 and the  percentage of managers and supervisors who have completed this training has been included from 2014.  

 

Insurance of Officers 

ECU paid a premium of $19,647 in respect of Directors and Officers Liability Insurance in 2014. The  cover applies to members of Council and Officers of the University and its controlled entities.  

Corporate Standards and Risk Management 

Equity Commitments and Compliance Reporting in 2014 

ECU values diversity and strives to maintain an environment free from inequality and  discrimination. ECU is committed to increasing access and providing opportunities for students  who face barriers to higher education. ECU’s staffing strategies also seek to achieve appropriate  representation and distribution of under‐represented groups in its workplaces. These values were  reiterated in the University’s 

Direction for Inclusive Practice

 that was finalised in 2014. 

The University has a number of specific equity plans that describe initiatives, performance  measures and responsibilities for progressing equity and social inclusion. ECU’s Equity Committee  advises and reports to the Vice‐Chancellor on matters related to equity, including on progress  against these equity plans. 

In 2014, the University made further progress in the implementation of its second 

Reconciliation 

Action Plan (RAP) for 2012‐2015. The RAP outlines the University’s vision for reconciliation and its 

130 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

objective to translate its commitments to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into  improved educational, social and economic outcomes.  

A report summarising the second year of implementation of ECU’s 2012‐2015 RAP was provided to 

ECU’s governing Council in 2014 and reporting data was submitted to Reconciliation Australia  through its online RAP Impact Measurement Questionnaire, as required.  

The  Indigenous Australian Employment Strategy and Action Plan, 2012‐2015 also continued to be  implemented in 2014 with activities including a major review of practices, training and  development to increase cultural competence for managers and supervisors and the appointment  of six new Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff to the University. 

 

Celebrating and Supporting Equity in 2014 

ECU hosted a range of events in 2014 for students, staff and the community to celebrate and  support equity initiatives, including: Harmony Week, International Women’s Day, NAIDOC Week, 

International Day of People with Disability, and Mental Health Week. 

 

ECU also continued to support two volunteer equity networks.  University Contact Officers provide  referral advice on equity policies and practices for students and staff who are concerned about  discrimination or harassment, while “ALLYs” provide a network of advocates for Lesbian, Gay, 

Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students and staff.   

 

Quality and Academic Governance 

A dedicated Quality and Academic Governance Unit within the Planning, Quality and Equity 

Services Centre supports ECU’s quality management and academic governance activities, including  academic committee management, unit and course review, school reviews, course accreditation,  research centre and institute reviews and annual faculty and centre reviews. 

The ECUonQ system was reopened in October 2013 for the review of units offered during 

Semester 1, 2014.  The system is based on the 

Excellence Framework

 and aims to provide a  consistent approach to continuous quality improvement of academic offerings.  

The replacement of the Course Management System by the Curriculum Approval and Publication 

System (CAPS) necessitated a number of changes to policies and procedures to support the  smooth transition to the new system. CAPS went live on 1 October 2014 and provides the means  to amend and approve all ECU curriculum. 

The introduction of a single PhD for ECU will require other academic policy development. This  work was commenced in 2014 and will continue into 2015 to coincide with the commencement of  the new doctoral research award.

 

 

A number of school reviews were completed successfully using revised guidelines and templates. 

Likewise, the accreditation guidelines, introduced in 2013, were used to manage the ongoing  process of applying for accreditation of courses by professional bodies. 

 

131 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

Governance 

ECU continues to comply with the 

Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian 

Universities (the Code). Item 4 of the Code (which deals with procedures for the removal of the 

Chancellor or Pro‐Chancellor) does not apply however, as the University’s legislation does not  contain the relevant provisions. That notwithstanding, in 2012 the Governance Committee  reviewed the Corporate Governance Statement and the Council Standing Orders to provide  greater guidance to Council on this issue. 

 

Risk Management Statement  

This statement is consistent with, and complies with, the 

Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the 

Governance of Australian Universities (Item 11). 

ECU has an Integrated Risk Management Framework and Policy. It is compliant with 

ISO Standard 

31000: Risk Management

Strategic oversight of risk management is included in the terms of reference for the Quality, Audit  and Risk Committee, as well as in the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee Charter and the Risk and 

Assurance Service Centre Charter approved by Council in August 2011.  A Risk Reference Forum,  chaired by the Deputy Vice‐Chancellor (Academic), assists with the exchange of experiences of  best practice and dissemination of risk management‐related material within the University. 

Functionally, the Risk and Assurance Service Centre is responsible for the development and  implementation of risk management strategies, methods and tools, legislative compliance,  business continuity, insurance, and fraud and misconduct prevention and management.  The 

Human Resources Services Centre is responsible for the day‐to‐day operation of occupational  safety and health strategies and workers’ compensation.  The Office of Legal Services is  responsible for the oversight of legal risk within ECU. 

 

Risk Management 

 

A major component of corporate governance at ECU is effective risk management.  During 2014, 

ECU improved the alignment between the University’s Strategic Risk Register and internal audit  planning and reporting.  The University also commenced revising the Integrated Risk Management 

Policy and the Strategic Risk Register.  The Quality, Audit and Risk Committee now receives  biannual updates on the status and management of ECU’s strategic risks. 

In relation to particular risks, fraud and misconduct prevention training for middle management  and supervisors was conducted during 2014. 

Business Continuity Plans are in place for all ECU campuses.  These plans are reviewed annually  and following incidents that have affected business area operations. As part of the review and  validation process, respective plans are incorporated into the University’s annual incident  management exercise with outcomes reported to the Quality Audit and Risk Committee.  

More information on  Risk Management  can be found on the ECU website. 

132 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

Advertising 

In accordance with the requirements of section 175ZE of the  Electoral Act 1907 (WA) the 

University is required to report all expenditure incurred by, or on behalf of, the University on  advertising, market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising during the financial year. 

Advertising expenditure in 2014 totalled $5,404,095.  The amount in each expenditure class and  the organisations paid, are listing in Table 31 below. 

 

Table 31: Advertising Expenditure, 2014 

Advertising agencies 

303 Lowe Group Pty Ltd 

Longtail Communications Company Pty Ltd 

Market research organisations 

Polling organisations 

Direct mail organisations 

Media advertising organisations 

Carat Australia Media Services Pty Ltd 

Google 

 

 

Other Organisations 

Total Expenditure 

 

$2,869,913 

 

 

$119,395 

 

 

$2,414,787 

 

$5,404,095 

133 

 Edith Cowan University Annual Report 2014 

 

Recordkeeping 

The University continued to embed record keeping practices across the University with the  ongoing rollout of the Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS).  

The EDRMS is the University’s approved record keeping system, allowing emails and documents  from any application to be saved electronically. The focus for the EDRMS project in 2014 was in  the academic areas of the University, with the rollout completed for faculty offices and the  majority of the schools across the University.  Extension work was undertaken to support the  management of course materials and course accreditation records. 

State Records Commission Standard 2 Record Keeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance 

ECU is subject to requirements in the  State Records Act 2000 (WA) and is committed to  compliance in its record keeping. ECU’s activities under each of the requirements include: 

The efficiency and effectiveness of the organisation’s record keeping system is evaluated not less than  once every 5 years. 

ECU’s Record Keeping Plan was approved for a further five‐year period in 2011, and is due for review  again in 2016.  

The West Australian University Sector Disposal Authority for records was approved by the State Record 

Commission and was updated in 2013.  It will be fully reviewed in 2016.  

Promotion of the ECU Vital Record program to ECU staff commenced in April 2012 and there has been  an increase of 29 per cent of vital records registered in the recordkeeping system in 2014. 

The organisation conducts a record keeping training program. 

ECU conducts regular record keeping training programs that are integrated into the University’s overall  professional development and training framework. These include: 

 A basic record keeping induction training session, available to all new staff.  

 The Records Awareness Training System, which was implemented in 2008 to raise record  management awareness for staff, continues to be offered to staff. Since implementation, 2,116  staff have completed, or are working through the course. 

 Monthly training courses on the University’s record keeping software (TRIM) are provided at Basic, 

Intermediate and Advanced levels.  In 2014, 361 staff undertook some form of records training. 

 Customised group sessions on TRIM continued to be developed and delivered, on request. 

 One‐on‐one training occurred, on request. 

The efficiency and effectiveness of the record keeping training program is reviewed from time to time 

The outcomes of all record keeping training are monitored and staff feedback is collected through  questionnaires. This feedback is reviewed to assess whether the training was effective.  Feedback is  then used to review training sessions and the overall training program. An Intermediate level course  and customised refresher sessions for users were introduced as a result of this feedback. 

The organisation’s induction program addresses employees’ roles and responsibilities with regards to 

their compliance with the organisation’s record keeping plan.  

All new ECU employees undergo an induction course that addresses employee roles and responsibilities  about the compliance aspects of the Record Keeping Plan. There has also been ongoing communication  throughout 2014 pertaining to the management of the Universities vital records as part of the EDRMS  implementation program.  Such sessions are delivered so that staff are aware of their responsibilities in  relation to the management of the University critical records. 

134 

 Section 4 – Disclosures and Legal Compliance  

 

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes 

In July 2014, as required under schedule 3 of the  Disability Service Regulations 2004 (WA), ECU  reported on achievements against its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for the 2013/14  reporting year. It is important to note that as the DAIP spans a five‐year period (2011‐2016), many  of the strategies will continue to be implemented throughout that period.  Some examples of  achievements against ECU’s DAIP Outcomes in 2013/14 are listed below. 

Outcome One: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the  services of, and any events organised by, the University. 

 A clause was included in all course and unit outlines promoting reasonable adjustments to the  learning program for people with disabilities. 

 Information on reasonable adjustments was made available via ECU’s website. 

Outcome Two: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the  buildings and other facilities of the University. 

 Construction of Ngoolark (Building 34) at the Joondalup Campus included accessibility features that  go beyond minimum access standards. 

 A bus stop at ECU’s South West Campus was revamped to improve its accessibility. 

Outcome Three: People with disabilities receive information from the University in a format that will  enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it. 

 Teaching and Learning guides (e.g. the Little Red Book) included updated sections on accessibility and  principles for inclusive curriculum design, delivery and assessment. 

 Progress was made towards Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 Level AA compliance across 

ECU authored webpages. 

Outcome Four: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of  the University as other people receive from the staff of the University. 

 Two mental health workshops were available for staff. 

 Anti‐discrimination training for staff (including coverage of disability issues) was mandated through  the Equal Opportunity Online training program. 

Outcome Five: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make  complaints to the University. 

 A centralised complaints website was created and conformed to University website accessibility  requirements. 

 The University Contact Officer and ALLY networks have been maintained.  

Outcome Six: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in  any public consultation by the University. 

 ECU’s standard survey software remained compliant with US section 508 accessibility requirements. 

 ECU’s DAIP 2011‐2016 made available for public consultation via ECU’s website. 

Outcome Seven: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to seek  employment and work experience placements with the University. 

 Staff records systems have been checked to ensure consistent disability definitions are available for  staff to record their status. 

 ECU has had regular contact (monthly) with leading disability agencies discussing positions that are  being advertised. 

EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY 2014 

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project