VMware* vSphere ESX 5.x iSCSI Boot Support with VLANs on Intel Adapters

VMware* vSphere ESX 5.x iSCSI Boot Support with VLANs on Intel Adapters
VMware* vSphere ESX 5.x
iSCSI Boot Support with VLANs
on Intel Adapters
A supplement to the VMware* vSphere 5.x Storage Administrators’
Guide and the Intel Network Connections User Guide
®
Intel Networking Division
Revision 1.0
May 2013
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Revisions
Date
May 2013
2
Revision
1.0
Description
Initial Release
Contents
1
Introduction & Intended Audience ................................................... 4
2
Scope .......................................................................................... 4
3
Preconfiguring the Network & Storage Targets .................................. 5
4
Enabling & Configuring Integrated Flash for iSCSI Boot ...................... 6
5
Booting, Install OS, & Post-Build Check .......................................... 16
6
Summary................................................................................... 19
3
1 Introduction &
Intended Audience
Prior to the Intel Network Division’s 17.4 software release, it was not possible to use iSCSI
boot with VLANs in an ESX environment. This document covers the necessary software,
eeprom configurations and processes required to use iSCSI boot with VLAN support in a
SAN environment with Intel’s 17.4 software release or greater.
It is intended to supplement both the VMware vSphere 5.x Storage Administrators Guide as
well as the Intel Network Connections User Guide—the companion document accompanying
Intel LAD’s Ethernet SW releases. It includes specific information regarding Intel’s solution
for iSCSI boot using VLAN’s Intel 1GB and 10 GB adapters.
This information is for experienced system administrators who are familiar with datacenter
operations, networks, virtualization technologies and SAN storage concepts.
2 Scope
This document covers the configuration and operation of iSCSI Boot for Intel server adapters and highlights the basic active-passive redundancy use case. It covers the LAN on Motherboard and adapter setup for both primary and secondary iSCSI boot priority using VLANs.
Note: While all screen captures are done on 1GB (LOM & Add-In Adapter), the steps are the
same for 10GB.
Parameters of switch and target configurations are only briefly discussed so we recommend
that customers consult the documentation of their specific hardware vendors for boot configuration details for their switches and targets.
iSCSI storage and network configuration values referenced throughout this document are
shown in the following table.
iSCSI (Boot) Parameters
iSCSI Storage/Network Configuration Values
VLAN iSCSI
23
VLAN Mgmt
269
ESXi 5.x Mgmt IP
10.1.69.241 /24
Client Initiator IP/Mask - Primary
192.168.23.2 /24
Client Initiator Name (IQN) - Primary
iqn.2013-03.com.vmware:fmsnet02
Client Initiator IP/Mask - Secondary
192.168.23.22 /24
Client Initiator Name (IQN) - Secondary
iqn.2013-03.com.vmware:fmsnet02-2
Target Initiator IP
192.168.23.250
Target Initiator Name (IQN)
Iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.apm0010601040.b8
4
3 Preconfiguring the
Network & Storage Targets
Network configuration for iSCSI is typically a single VLAN. For this experiment, a Cisco*
switch was used but most any 1G or 10G switch will work. Since this document covers iSCSI
with VLANs, the port is configured using Multi-Link Aggregation or Trunking at the port level
as shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1—Administrative Ownership Table
Note: iSCSI Boot VLANs must match VLANs on the switch when the switch is configured for
Multi-Link Aggregation or Trunking. In this example, one VLAN is used for iSCSI Boot
(v23) and a second VLAN (v269) for management of the ESXi 5.x host. Both VLANs
are on port 1.
Additionally, two switch ports are configured identically in the example—one for primary iSCSI boot and one for secondary iSCSI boot.
For proper LUN Masking, storage configuration for primary and secondary iSCSI boot requires IP addresses for each individual NIC to be part of a storage group mapped to the target LUN as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2—Mapped Storage Groups
Note: Each NIC port receives its own IQN; one for the primary target and one for the
secondary target.
5
4 Enabling & Configuring
Integrated Flash for iSCSI Boot
Intel® adapters incorporate a factory-installed, integrated flash ROM device, preprogrammed with an Intel® Boot Agent software image. The flash ROM is not enabled by
default. This document shows how to configure the two primary NICS types; the LAN-onMotherboard (LOM) and the add-in 1GB PCI-e adapter. Additionally, two different ways to
enable the flash ROM are shown:
1. Enabling the LOM is through the BIOS and configuring it with the EFI version of Intel
Bootutil software.
2. Configuring the add-in card using a DOS-bootable USB device with Intel Bootutil
software.
Intel iSCSI Boot software is supported in these environments: DOS, EFI (x64 and 64), Linux
(32 and x64) and Windows (32 and x64).
The following examples explain the steps required to perform iSCSI boot with Intel LOM
adapters in a VMware* ESX 5.x environment. While systems or switches may differ from
this example, the concepts to prepare and perform iSCSI boot with Intel adapters or LOM
remain similar. A USB flash drive containing the required bootutil files is used to make the
changes to the Intel LOM and adapter.
For the Primary iSCSI Boot setup, the iSCSI initiator portion is setup with Bootutil inside the
EFI shell. The iSCSI target portion is then configured with the iSCSI Boot Initialization tool.
The syntax necessary to perform all the commands within the Bootutil EFI session follows
Table 2.
The process begins within the BIOS in the LOM. Enter the BIOS by depressing F2 during
system POST and navigate to the PCI Configuration area of Advanced Settings. Disable the
onboard NIC ROM prior to enabling the onboard NIC iSCSI ROM as shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3—Enable the iSCSI ROM in the BIOS
6
Within the BIOS, navigate to the Boot Manager tab to enter the Internal EFI Shell as shown
in Figure 4.
Figure 4—Entering the EFI Shell
After entering the EFI Shell, a mapping table with system known devices will be printed to
the screen. Then type “fs0” to enter the flash device containing the EFI version of bootutil
as shown in Figure 5
Figure 5—Accessing the USB Flash Drive
Using the EFI version syntax of bootutil <bootutil64e>, change the iSCSI boot priority of
NIC 1 to be the primary iSCSI Boot port as shown in Figure 6.
7
Figure 6—Setting NIC 1 to Become the iSCSI Primary Boot
Note: Bootutil looks for an iSCSI image on local FLASH. The LOM adapters have their iSCSI
image integrated into BIOS. This is why FLASH/Firmware shows “Not Present”.
Next, set the VLAN for the primary iSCSI Boot port as shown in Figure 7.
Figure 7—Changing the iSCSI VLAN
The next two steps configure a static IP address and mask on the iSCSI Boot port as shown
in Figure 8.
8
Figure 8—Adding the iSCSI Initiator IP and Mask to NIC 1
As the last step in the EFI configuration, the iSCSI Initiator Name is added to NIC 1 as
shown in Figure 9.
Note: For more information on iSCSI Initiator names, see section 2 of the iSCSI Quick Connect Guide for VMware.
Figure 9—Adding the iSCSI Initiator Name to NIC 1
Before exiting the EFI Shell, type “bootutil64e -nic=1” to verify the configuration made to
this point as shown in Figure 10.
9
Figure 10—Verifying iSCSI Boot Setting with Bootutil
To leave the EFI Shell, type exit and press the enter key. Upon entering the BIOS, hit F10 to
save all changes and exit the BIOS.
The option to enter into the iSCSI Boot initialization tool is presented during POST. Enter
Ctrl-D to enter the iSCSI Boot initialization tool as shown in Figure 11.
Figure 11—Enter the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool
Navigate to the network adapter that will be used for the primary iSCSI Boot device on the
first screen of the iSCSI Boot initialization tool as shown in Figure 12.
Note: Use the Blink LED function to verify that the network cable is plugged into the correct
adapter port of the server.
10
Figure 12—Navigating the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool
Highlight the correct adapter and press enter to complete the configuration (Target Name &
IP) of the iSCSI Boot parameters as shown in Figure 13.
11
Figure 13—Using the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool for Verification (Port 1).
Note: The “target port” and “boot lun” were left in default settings for the storage appliance
used in this test bed. Users should consult the documentation of their specific hardware vendors for boot configuration details for their target.
Save all change and press Esc to exit the iSCSI Boot initialization tool.
After exiting the iSCSI Boot initialization tool, the host will complete the POST and boot to
the DOS bootable USB flash drive. The adapter NIC port will be configured using DOS
bootutil commands to become a secondary iSCSI Boot device. DOS bootutil commands running identically to the EFI, Linux, and Windows versions of bootutil command sets.
Note: The secondary iSCSI Boot port was set up on a separate add-in adapter to highlight
the differences in configuration. Because the secondary iSCSI Boot configuration is on
a separate adapter, a unique initiator name is used. Typically two LOM ports or two
add-in adapter ports would be used for primary and secondary iSCSI Boot setup. In
this case the initiator name would remain constant for both primary and secondary.
Starting with adapter 3, the NIC is set to iSCSI Boot as shown in Figure 14.
12
Figure 14—Setting the Second iSCSI Boot port.
To configure the iSCSI Boot command set for a secondary port, all naming and IP commands are simply repeated with the values. Enter the commands in Table 2 at the command prompt as shown in Figure 14.
Command Set
Function
bootutil –nic=3 –up= iscsi
Turn iSCSI Boot on
bootutil –nic=3 –bootpriority=secondary
Set Boot Priority
bootutil –nic=3 -initiatordhcp=disable
Turn off DHCP
bootutil –nic=3 iscsivlan=23
Set iSCSI VLAN
bootutil –nic=3 -initiatorip=192.168.23.22
Set Client IP
bootutil –nic=3 -netmask=255.255.255.0
Set Client Mask
bootutil –nic=3 –initiatorname=iqn.2013-03.com.vmware:fmsnet02-2
Set Client IQN name
bootutil –nic=3 –targetname=iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.apm0010601040.b8
Set Target name
bootutil –nic=3 –targetip=192.168.23.250
Set Target IP
bootutil –nic=3 /p
View iSCSI settings
Note: For additional command line syntax for Intel Bootutil, please refer to the online help
(bootutil -?), the documentation provided on the CD accompanying the adapter or
search www.intel.com for Ethernet Controllers. The Bootutil documentation is available in the Apps/Bootutil directory.
13
All configuration changes made for the iSCSI Boot Secondary port shown in Figure 15 can
be viewed via the command line by typing bootutil –nic=3 /p.
Figure 15—bootutil -nic=x Fully Configured
To leave bootutil, simply reboot the system.
The option to enter into the iSCSI Boot initialization is presented again during the POST.
Enter Ctrl-D to start the initialization tool again then navigate to the desired network adapter for the secondary iSCSI Boot device on the first screen as shown in Figure 16.
14
Figure 16—Navigating the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool
Highlight the correct adapter and press Enter to verify the configuration of the iSCSI Boot
parameters as shown in Figure 17.
15
Figure 17—Using the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool for Verification (Port 2)
Note: It is possible to have combination images supporting iSCSI boot, FCoE Boot and PXE
boot concurrently depending on the size of the adapter flash or eeprom. This discussion is beyond the scope of this paper. Please contact your Intel representative with
any questions.
5 Booting, Install OS,
& Post-Build Check
With the adapter, switch and target correctly configured, booting from iSCSI to VMware*
ESX 5.x is now possible. With two ports configured (primary & secondary), the iSCSI boot
initialization shows both ports but boots only from the Primary iSCSI Boot port as shown in
Figure 18.
16
Figure 18—Using the iSCSI Boot Initialization Tool for Verification (Port 2)
To verify the secondary works and redundancy is functioning as expected, the cable to NIC
1 was disconnected. As shown in figure 19, the host failed to detect a link on the Primary
iSCSI Boot port and failed over to the Secondary port.
Figure 19—Testing Failover
17
With the target attached, the system is now ready for the VMware* ESXi 5.x software installation. While the full installation of VMware* ESXi 5.x is outside the scope of this document, it is worth noting that installation must be to the correct storage device. When asked
to select a disk for the software to be installed, chose the remote or VRAID volume as
shown in Figure 20.
Figure 20—Choosing the Correct Volume for Software Load
Once VMware* ESXi 5.x is installed, add the host to vSphere as in any other installation.
From the Hosts and Cluster view, navigate to the Network area of the Configuration tab to
view the VMware* vSwitch settings that reflect two VLANs—the iSCSI (Boot) Datastore and
the Management Network as shown in Figure 21.
18
Figure 21—Verifying VLAN Tagging within ESXi 5.x
While still on the VMware* vSphere configuration tab of the Host and Clusters view, navigate to the storage area to view the datastore as shown in Figure 22.
Figure 21—ESXi 5.x View of iSCSI Boot Target
6 Summary
Intel’s Server adapter line in both 1gigabit and 10 gigabit solutions fully support a wide
range of storage capabilities. Customers get the ease of Ethernet support along with
VMware* storage support in a single adapter.
For more information on iSCSI on VMware* ESXi 5.0, see the vSphere Storage for ESXi 5.1
and vCenter Server 5.1 Administrators Guide.
For more iSCSI Boot configuration information on Intel® Server Adapters, get the User
Guide for Intel® Ethernet Adapters
19
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