DET Annual Report 2010-2011

DET Annual Report 2010-2011
DEPART MENT O F E D U C ATION A N D TR A IN IN G
Annual Report
2010–2011
© Northern Territory Government 2011
Northern Territory Department of Education and Training
GPO Box 4821
Darwin NT 0801
www.det.nt.gov.au
Published by the Department of Education and Training
Reproduction of this work in whole or in part for educational purposes within an educational institution
and on condition that it is not offered for sale is permitted by the Northern Territory Department of
Education and Training.
ISSN 1448-0174
Design by Sprout Creative
ii
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
DEPARTME NT OF E DUCAT I O N AND T RAI NI NG
Office of the Chief Executive
Level 14, Mitchell Centre
55–59 Mitchell Street, Darwin
Postal address
GPO Box 4821
DARWIN NT 0801
Tel (08) 899 95857
Fax (08) 899 93537
[email protected]
The Hon Chris Burns MLA
Minister for Education and Training
Parliament House
DARWIN NT 0800
Dear Minister
RE: Department of Education and Training 2010–11 Annual Report
I am pleased to present this report on the Northern Territory Department of Education and Training’s
activities from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011 in line with section 28 of the Public Sector Employment and
Management Act and section 10 of the Education Act.
To the best of my knowledge and belief as Accountable Officer, pursuant to section 13 of the Financial
Management Act, the system of internal control and audit provides reasonable assurance that:
proper records of all transactions affecting the agency are kept and that the department’s employees
observe the provisions of the Financial Management Act, the Financial Management Regulations and
Treasurer’s Directions
department procedures provide proper internal control and a current description of those procedures
is recorded in the Accounting and Property Manual, which has been prepared in accordance with the
requirements of the Financial Management Act
no indication of fraud, malpractice, major breach of legislation or delegation, major error in or omission
from the accounts and records exists
in accordance with the requirements of section 15 of the Financial Management Act, the internal audit
capacity available to the department is adequate and the results of internal audits have been reported
the financial statements in this annual report have been prepared from proper accounts and records
and are in accordance with the Treasurer’s Directions
in accordance with the requirements of section 18 of the Public Sector Employment and Management
Act, all Employment Instructions issued by the Commissioner for Public Employment have been
satisfied and reported for 2010–11
procedures within the department complied with the requirements of the Information Act.
Yours sincerely
Gary Barnes
Chief Executive
29 September 2011
iii
PURPOSE OF THE REPORT AND TARGET AUDIENCE
The primary purpose of this report is to inform the Minister for Education and Training and the
Legislative Assembly about the Northern Territory (NT) Department of Education and Training’s activities
and achievements for 2010–11. It allows the Chief Executive to account for the department’s expenditure
and gives an overview of the scope of programs and their strategic intent.
Pursuant to section 28 of the Public Sector Employment and Management Act, section 10 of the
Education Act and section 13 of the Financial Management Act, the report contains information about
the department’s:
primary functions and responsibilities
unique education context and challenges, legislative and organisational governance, strategic intent
and workforce
specific activities undertaken during the year against budgeted outputs, significant achievements
and outcomes
financial management and performance relative to the Budget.
Although its primary audiences are the Minister for Education and Training and the Legislative Assembly,
this report is also prepared for Territorians and the wider public.
iv
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter of transmittal .................................................................................................................................... iii
Purpose of the report and target audience .............................................................................................. iv
OVERVIEW
Chief Executive’s foreword ........................................................................................................................ 1
Who we are and what we do ....................................................................................................................... 4
Highlights .................................................................................................................................................... 5
Looking ahead ........................................................................................................................................... 12
2010–11 major capital works .................................................................................................................... 15
Northern Territory education context ...................................................................................................... 20
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Outputs and performance......................................................................................................................... 36
Output performance reporting ................................................................................................................ 37
Output group: Government Education .................................................................................................... 39
Early years .............................................................................................................................................. 39
Preschool education ................................................................................................................................ 41
Primary education .................................................................................................................................. 42
Middle years education ........................................................................................................................... 44
Senior years education............................................................................................................................ 47
International education ............................................................................................................................ 53
Tertiary education .................................................................................................................................... 54
Output group: Non-government Education ............................................................................................ 55
Primary education ................................................................................................................................... 55
Middle years education ........................................................................................................................... 56
Senior years education............................................................................................................................ 57
Output group: Training ............................................................................................................................. 62
Progress against Department of Education and Training Strategic Plan ............................................ 65
Systemic targets by 2012.......................................................................................................................... 81
Performance of NT students: National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy 2010 ........... 96
v
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Corporate governance ............................................................................................................................ 121
Our organisation...................................................................................................................................... 122
2010–11 senior management team ........................................................................................................ 124
The Department of Education and Training Strategic Plan ................................................................. 126
Our people................................................................................................................................................ 127
Our schools.............................................................................................................................................. 132
Equity and diversity ................................................................................................................................ 133
Occupational health and safety ............................................................................................................. 136
Human Resource Development ............................................................................................................. 137
Standing committees ............................................................................................................................. 140
Advisory boards, councils and committees ......................................................................................... 141
Legislative framework ............................................................................................................................. 144
Compliance with the Information Act .................................................................................................... 145
Risk management .................................................................................................................................... 146
Insurance.................................................................................................................................................. 147
Audits Undertaken in 2010–11................................................................................................................ 149
Communication ....................................................................................................................................... 150
FINANCIAL REPORT
Financial statement overview................................................................................................................. 152
Certification of financial statements...................................................................................................... 157
Comprehensive operating statement .................................................................................................... 158
Balance sheet .......................................................................................................................................... 159
Statement of changes in equity ............................................................................................................. 160
Cash flow statements.............................................................................................................................. 161
Notes to financial statements................................................................................................................. 162
APPENDICES
Appendix 1: All staff by classification ................................................................................................... 188
Appendix 2: Compliance with the Carers Recognition Act ................................................................. 190
Appendix 3: How to contact us .............................................................................................................. 191
Appendix 4: Acronyms ........................................................................................................................... 194
Appendix 5: List of Territory 2030 education and related targets ...................................................... 196
Feedback form ......................................................................................................................................... 198
vi
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S FOREWORD
Welcome to the Northern Territory (NT) Department of Education and Training’s
2010–11 Annual Report. The following pages outline the gains and improvements
of the past financial year and highlight our directions for the next 12 months.
All of the department’s achievements and priorities are strongly aligned with the
Territory 2030 Strategic Plan. These links have been made explicit throughout
this report, for example: [T2030:ED2.1] identified a link to Education objective 2,
target 1, which relates to preschool participation. A full list of relevant targets is
available in Appendix 5.
We have used our 2010 performance data and targets to inform our strategic and regional operational
planning and implementation of initiatives in 2011. We are beginning to build real momentum and
demonstrate observable change through these initiatives.
Many of these initiatives, especially in the area of Indigenous education, have attracted attention from other
jurisdictions; with this expertise and experience being sought after and valued — we are setting the pace
and leading the way in areas where once before we were followers.
We introduced major legislative reform with the implementation of the Every Child, Every Day strategy that
allows the department to work better with families and children to help them re-engage with education and/
or training. Compulsory conferences, attendance agreements and infringement notices were introduced as
additional tools and the overall strategy has showed small but significant signs of improved attendance and
enrolment. [T2030:ED2.2]
We established three Strong Start Bright Future colleges in remote regions with strong community
involvement. The colleges support a child’s development from birth through to jobs. The results to date
are positive, with families and communities re-engaging with schools, strong participation of families in
early years strategies, improved attendance and clear pathways to real jobs in the secondary years.
[T2030:ED3.6]
Ensuring stronger community and industry ties was a focus for 2010–11 with school community partnership
agreements signed and active at eight sites, with nine agreements in draft and another 38 under
negotiation. We continued to work with the industry and business sector to produce more on-the-job
training and make more young Territorians job ready.
The NT has led the way nationally in introducing a vocational education and training (VET) component
in the middle years, called VET in the Middle. The scheme puts very remote students on a vocational
pathway much earlier and was firmly cemented in 2010–11, with 77 students in eight very remote
communities taking part in VET in the Middle. [T2030:ED1.3; 3.5]
The 2010–11 year saw a record number of VET students and apprentices in training and we are well on
track to meet our target of 10 000 apprenticeship commencements in four years. [T2030:ED2.8]
To continue our focus on getting our students job ready, the department formed a peak industry
group to better align training with industry needs. An inter-agency taskforce for the resources sector was
also established.
We also established Centres for Excellence, with 42 students attending Darwin High School which has a
focus on maths, science and engineering, and another 29 students attending Casuarina Senior College’s
Centre for Health Sciences. [T2030:ED3.5]
1
The department was equally focused on those important early years where good learning foundations are
set. The 2010–11 year saw the continued rollout of Families as First Teachers (FaFT) hubs to all regions.
This initiative recognises the importance of having families involved in education from an early age.
[T2030:ED1.1; ED2]
Work to establish two of five integrated child and family centres planned for the NT continued in 2010–11.
The centres will bring together a range of early learning, health, childcare, parenting and family support
services to improve the overall development and wellbeing of children and provide support for their
families. Early signs showed preschool enrolments up by nine per cent. [T2030:ED2.1]
To further support NT students, the implementation of the T-9 Literacy and Numeracy Continua net got
underway in remote schools, with the aim of mapping students’ literacy and numeracy levels to inform
appropriate learning programs.
The National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) showed positive outcomes with
cohort gains for some students, tested in 2008 and again in 2010, among the strongest in Australia and
above average national gains in 11 of 15 testing areas. [T2030:ED1.2]
Our people are an important aspect of the department’s philosophy and a new teacher screening and
induction program was implemented for very remote schools with promising results – a 20 per cent
plus improvement in teacher retention rates in the first half of 2011 compared with the first half of 2010.
[T2030:ED3.3]
To ensure our school leaders and teachers have strong professional growth opportunities, a new Centre for
School Leadership, Learning and Development was set up in partnership with Charles Darwin University
(CDU). The aim of the centre is to build the leadership capability of current and aspiring school leaders and
improve teachers’ capability to deliver strong educational outcomes. [T2030:ED3.3]
The 2010–11 year saw implementation of a regional delivery model, including agreed resourcing and
performance targets. The decentralising of selected operations and functions to regional settings aims to
provide a better and closer service to schools. [T2030]
Celebrating the innovative, inspiring and excellent programs and strategies in our public schools was
a priority in 2010. This included the inaugural Smart Schools Awards. It was the first time our schools,
teachers and communities were recognised by the whole department for the work they are involved in
every day to help grow educated and skilled Territorians.
The coming year will be a year of further consolidation as we embed and expand upon initiatives in our
updated Department of Education and Training (DET) Strategic Plan 2011–14, including:
increasing universal access to preschool programs
working with industry to implement the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education
and Care
partnering with government and non-government agencies to implement a NT wide Early
Childhood Plan
expanding investment and effort to ‘grow our own’ Indigenous teachers and paraprofessionals in both
early childhood and schooling settings
working with Professor Geoff Masters at the Australian Council for Educational Research to further
enhance school improvement and literacy and numeracy outcomes
2
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
further developing and refining our data to provide evidence based approaches
developing a whole-of-government approach that tackles youth disadvantage
extending our Beyond School Guarantee to ensure students a pathway to training, work or further study
enhancing implementation of our School and Corporate Accountability and Performance Improvement
Frameworks using integrated web based systems
implementing the first phase of the Australian Curriculum
continuing to build formal and informal partnerships with community and industry
The 2011–12 year is set to be significant, as we build on initiatives established over the past two years.
It will be an exciting time and one that all staff in the department should be proud to be part of. I would
especially like to thank staff for the hard work and dedication shown this year. It is evident in the buzz we
have created and the early positive outcomes being demonstrated that we can deliver a Smart Territory for
all students.
Gary Barnes
Chief Executive
29 September 2011
3
OVERVIEW
WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO
The role of the department is to improve educational and training outcomes and options for Territorians
from their early years to adulthood.
We are responsible for:
ensuring quality early learning and development programs
delivering high quality education services through government and non-government schools to
maximise student learning
providing pathways for school aged students aligned with their further education and work or
career aspirations
providing an Australian standard VET system that allows Territorians to gain and retain employment
and build lifelong skills capacity
supporting NT institutions delivering tertiary education.
4
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
HIGHLIGHTS
NATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING REFORM
Throughout 2010–11 the NT continued to contribute to the development of national reforms and
their implementation through embedding national directions in legislation, regulation and policy.
This included the ongoing implementation of reforms and initiatives to achieve outcomes under several
National Partnerships with the Australian Government.
Specifically, the department’s focus on implementing the national education and training reform
agenda included:
attracting, developing and retaining a strong, effective remote workforce [T2030:ED3.3]
building schools’ capability to implement targeted place based whole school improvement approaches,
with a particular focus on literacy and numeracy [T2030:ED1.2]
providing teachers with access to professional learning and coaching support to implement
evidence based approaches that target specific students’ learning needs [T2030:ED3.3]
building strong partnerships with families, community, business and industry to ensure readiness for
school in the early years and continued engagement through to the senior years of schooling to equip
students with the skills and learning to enter further education, training or work [T2030:ED21.1;1.3]
developing flexible and innovative solutions to increase school attendance and support remote students
to engage more fully with education and ensure their effective transition to post schooling pathways
[T2030:ED2.2]
increasing the educational engagement and attainment of young people and to improve their transition
to post school education, training and employment. [T2030:ED1.3]
Attracting, retaining and developing teachers continued to be a particular challenge. During 2010–11
a focus for the department was better preparation, support and incentives for teachers in remote contexts,
and building the capacity of the Indigenous workforce to increase the number of qualified local recruits in
schools. Improved workforce data systems also helped the department monitor and report more effectively,
and helped to enhance evidence based decision making about the suitability and effectiveness of
strategies and programs. [T2030:ED3.3]
FAMILIES AS FIRST TEACHERS
PROGRAM GOES MOBILE
Mobile FaFT programs have started in Central Australia and
the Barkly region to provide access to early learning and
parenting support for smaller communities. Mobile FaFT
are working with Wallace Rockhole, Areyonga, Titjikala and
Finke communities to deliver programs, while Barkly Mobile
FaFT consulted with community stakeholders in Epenarra,
Canteen Creek, Murray Downs, Neutral Junction and
Stirling about establishing services in these areas. There
has been great community enthusiasm about establishing
the mobile program and its benefits for remote families.
[T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
5
OVERVIEW
SHEPHERDSON COLLEGE
EMBRACES STRONG
START, BRIGHT FUTURE
Shepherdson College, located in Galiwin’ku
on Elcho Island off the coast of Arnhem
Land, is one of the Strong Start, Bright
Future pilot sites. Under the Strong
Start, Bright Future model, the college is
implementing a 3pm–9pm program that
enables the extended use of school facilities
to deliver extra-curricular learning for
children and adults. The program aims to
improve local awareness and commitment to learning. For older learners, the program builds adult
skills to create a stronger local economy.
In the first term of the 3pm–9pm program 154 participants regularly attended across a number of
courses including cultural awareness, literacy, numeracy, nutrition and hygiene, sewing, Yolngu Matha
language, basketball, basket weaving and vehicle driver licensing. [T2030:ED3.6]
STRONG START, BRIGHT FUTURE [T2030:ED3.6]
The Strong Start Bright Future service delivery model was developed to support the NT Government’s
Working Future initiative. The model aims to improve governance, enhance leadership and integrate
service delivery in the early years (0–8 years). It will also improve VET delivery, leading to real jobs for
school leavers and improve outcomes for Indigenous students in the 20 Territory Growth Towns and
surrounding areas.
In 2010–11 the Strong Start Bright Future service delivery model was implemented in the communities of
Jabiru/Gunbalanya, Yirrkala, Galiwin’ku and Groote Eylandt. Funding of $10.565 million has been provided
to extend the model to other communities including Ntaria and the Warlpiri Triangle from 2011–12.
A key element of the Strong Start Bright Future model is strong local or place based governance through
meaningful engagement with communities. Major initiatives under Strong Start Bright Future include
developing integrated child and family service delivery, VET, the 3pm–9pm program, engagement
programs, flexible service delivery and an extended school year for some remote and very remote schools.
Strong Start Bright Future colleges will be established in six communities under the leadership of a college
director who will implement place based responses to whole-of-government policy and initiatives such as
Remote Whole School Reform.
6
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
EVERY CHILD, EVERY DAY [T2030:ED2.2;2.1]
The department launched the Every Child, Every Day strategy in late 2010. The strategy aims to
improve enrolment, attendance and participation of young Territorians by implementing new and
innovative strategies in five priority action areas to help parents, schools and communities overcome
barriers to success.
Schools, regions and corporate areas within the department worked with parents, communities, peak
bodies and other agencies to implement a set of initiatives designed to improve the enrolment, attendance
and participation of young Territorians. These included:
developing an extended service delivery model to allow flexible timing of school programs
implementing legislation, processes and family and community partnerships to address student
absenteeism
expanding the Value of Schooling communication and media campaign promoting education as a
critical factor in gaining equity
implementing an integrated child and family services model to improve service delivery and
coordination of children’s services
increasing access to vocational pathways and implementing programs to help make students
work-ready
supporting local assistant teachers to upgrade their qualifications
expanding leadership and engagement programs.
An Interagency Reference Group was established to support ongoing implementation of the Every Child,
Every Day strategy.
SATURDAY SCHOOLING
Angurugu School has introduced Saturday schooling to
improve attendance and engagement of their students
as part of the Strong Start, Bright Future initiative. The
program started in 2010 when teacher Paul O’Hallahan
became concerned about attendance, particularly of
boys in the middle years. Offered initially as a reward for
students with good attendance on week days, Saturday
schooling at Angurugu aims to increase engagement and
encourage regular school attendance. Students not only
receive additional literacy and numeracy focused learning,
but they are also taught basic life skills through learning
activities such as making their own meals. Extra-curricular
learning activities such as bush outings, swimming, fishing
and camps are also a part of the program. Kristie Lloyd,
Principal at Angurugu School, says Saturday schooling has
provided an opportunity for students to be engaged in a
positive way on the weekend. Since its introduction, there
has been a noticeable increase in school attendance on
weekdays and improved behaviour at school. [T2030:ED2.2]
7
OVERVIEW
NATIONAL ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER EDUCATION ACTION PLAN
The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan is informed by the review of
Australian Directions in Indigenous Education 2005–08, and the Council of Australian Governments
schooling targets to halve the gap in Indigenous education outcomes. Implementation of the plan in the
NT brings together existing commitments made through key reforms including the National Indigenous
Reform Agreement and the Smarter Schools National Partnerships with the Australian Government.
Under the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan, focus schools in each state
and territory have been identified to implement specific actions in addition to actions being implemented
in all schools with Indigenous student enrolments. A total of 61 schools are identified as focus schools in
the NT, 55 of which are NT Government schools. The requirements in the plan align closely with many
of the strategies and initiatives already underway in the NT and are organised in six priority domains:
readiness for school; engagement and connections; attendance; literacy and numeracy; leadership, quality
teaching and workforce development; and pathways to real post school options.
In 2010–11 the department continued to implement its commitments under the plan through major
strategies, initiatives and programs including:
the Every Child, Every Day strategy [T2030:ED2.2]
Strong Start, Bright Future [T2030:ED3.6]
the Australian Early Development Index [T2030:ED1.1]
Families as First Teachers [T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
universal access to preschool [T2030:ED2.1]
VET in Schools [T2030:ED2.4;2.6;3.5]
school community partnership agreements
a range of leadership development programs for high potential school leaders and aspiring
school leaders. [T2030:ED3.3]
READ LIKE A DEMON
Students at Alekarenge School became the first
in the NT to participate in the Melbourne Football
Club’s Read like a Demon literacy program in June
2011. Students participated in a reading workshop,
including a Skype hook-up with players Neville Jetta
and Colin Garland live from the Melbourne Cricket
Ground. The next component of the program will
include a visit to Alekarenge School by well-known
NT author and teacher Rosemary Sullivan.
8
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NATIONAL QUALITY AGENDA FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE [T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
The National Quality Framework (NQF) for early childhood education and care was agreed to by the
Council of Australian Governments in 2009. It is a single national system for the regulation, quality and
assessment of early childhood education and care services. Three components of the NQF are:
national legislation, adopted by all jurisdictions to replace differing and occasionally overlapping
regulatory requirements
a national quality rating system and curriculum to be consistently applied throughout Australia
a new governance structure with jurisdictional regulatory authorities and an overseeing
national authority to ensure consistency, effective implementation and enhanced communication
between jurisdictions.
The NQF will apply to long day care centres, preschools, family day care services and outside school
hours care services from 1 January 2012. The NT continued to be involved in developing legislation and
regulations to ensure the unique challenges confronting the NT are accommodated within the national
system, including the quality assessment and rating system that will replace existing accreditation
processes. NT services participated in trials of the new system during 2010–11 and field testing occurred
with 11 services, including preschools. Project officers provided support to preschools and other services in
remote locations to prepare for compliance with the NQF.
Services began transitioning to their new arrangements under the NQF in 2010. This transition continued
in 2011, with an awareness campaign to provide information to all early childhood education and care
and school aged care services about implementing the NQF. Public information sessions about the NQF
and the Quality does Matter conference were held during 2010–11. These were well attended and the
department received positive feedback from the sector. Professional development opportunities on the new
national curriculum for children from birth to five years, known as the Early Years Learning Framework,
were provided for practitioners.
NT EARLY CHILDHOOD PLAN [T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
Under the auspices of National Partnership Agreements signed by the Council of Australian Governments
in 2009, it is the shared vision of all Australian state and territory governments that by 2020 all children
will have the best start in life to create a better future for themselves and the nation, and that Australia’s
children and young people are safe and healthy.
Through the Early Childhood Steering Committee, the department worked with several NT government
departments to develop a NT wide Early Childhood Plan. The plan will ensure the current national and NT
strategies and reforms for children from pre-birth to 8 years, are aligned and relevant to the NT context.
It will provide the direction for building better services and programs that have improved and measurable
outcomes for the NT’s children and their families. It will also address challenges across portfolios including
health, education, child care and child safety and will be a mechanism for working in partnership across
government and industry.
Consultations with key stakeholders were undertaken in April 2011, to ensure the plan aligns with the
needs and expectations of communities, children and their families. The plan will also respond to key
issues and recommendations outlined in the Board of Inquiry into the child protection system in the NT.
It is expected that the plan will be finalised and released in late 2011.
9
OVERVIEW
ICT* ENRICHED TEACHING AND LEARNING [T2030:ED3.6]
The Nightcliff Technology Precinct, located at the Nightcliff Middle School campus, was launched in
March 2011. The precinct incorporates the first of five Apple learning centres to be launched across
Australia. The precinct provides tools, resources and professional development opportunities for
teachers and students to access training in a variety of information and communication technology
(ICT) to improve student learning and to pilot, test and review emerging technologies and research.
As part of the precinct’s support to teachers and schools to enhance ICT capabilities and enrich
teaching and learning, an iPad trial began in February 2011, when all Year 7 students at Nightcliff
Middle School were issued with their own personal learning device. Students are able to take the iPad
home and are undertaking a variety of learning activities at school using the device. A professional
learning training calendar for teachers was developed to provide a variety of training opportunities in the
use of ICT within classrooms.
In collaboration with the department, the Centre for School Leadership, Learning and Development,
ran its first paperless conference for school leaders in the NT. ‘Leading Technology for Learning –
Time to Refresh’, was held from 6 to 8 April 2011. All conference material was digitally delivered and
conference participants experimented with loan iPads to access the materials.
Educational leaders were supported to experiment with social media technology throughout the
conference. The aim was to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a better understanding
of their students’ needs and the ever emerging technological culture, both in and out of the school
environment. The conference successfully provided practical learning opportunities for school leaders
to try something new and different and workshop ideas on how to introduce technology tools into
today’s educational practices.
Through the @school pilot, the department continued to deliver a virtual schooling service using
interactive technology and blended delivery models to improve availability of course offerings for
students. Materials were developed to increase access to learning programs for students who live in
remote and very remote contexts, where face-to-face support is limited and students in middle and
secondary years often come to vocational training with limited literacy and numeracy skills. Online
resources for delivery of a Certificate I in Hospitality now:
» enable access to learning for students by building industry literacy and numeracy requirements prior
to starting VET courses
» support teachers in delivering hospitality courses online, in the classroom and through blended
delivery models by providing a targeted teaching resource
» extend the quality and range of course offerings to students in remote locations.
The resources have been trialled in eight remote and very remote schools undertaking Certificate I in
Hospitality. The pilot findings highlighted pre-VET literacy and numeracy requirements for students in
middle and senior years. Teaching of these key skills will be embedded within senior years subjects to
ensure students are ready and able to access the VET curriculum.
* Information and Communications Technology
10
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
ANGURUGU SCHOOL LINKS INTO
NEW TECHNOLOGY
Angurugu School has become the first school in the Groote Eylandt
area to trial iPads. The devices will be used by Angurugu students for
everything from keeping in touch with exchange students from Victoria to
interactive numeracy and using Google Earth to study geography, music
and art. Principal Kristie Lloyd said the trial was designed to see what
the device could offer as an alternative learning tool. [T2030:ED3.6]
LEADING LEARNING: NATIONAL PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS FOR TEACHERS [T2030:ED3.3]
The department contributed to development of the National Professional Standards for Teachers. In
late 2010, practising teachers representing the four career dimensions – graduation, competence,
accomplishment and leadership – participated in a stakeholder survey to consider the standards and
provide extensive feedback in relation to:
usefulness, applicability to diverse teaching contexts in the NT
evidence required to meet standards
the challenges and issues that required further attention.
In 2011, the Centre for School Leadership Learning and Development convened an implementation group
that consists of 16 teachers and leaders from all school sectors in the NT. This group will provide ongoing
advice about implementing the standards, give updates and progress reports to stakeholders and identify
any professional learning required during the transition to the standards.
11
OVERVIEW
LOOKING AHEAD
EVERY CHILD, EVERY DAY [T2030:ED2.2]
The department will strengthen focus on the 20 Territory Growth Towns to improve school attendance,
enrolment and participation. This will be achieved through an unrelenting focus on understanding the
reasons behind non-attendance and targeting specific strategies for improvement. Our attendance
diagnostic tools, combined with the strong leadership of our principals, are allowing more precise data
driven actions to be implemented in each growth town through individual attendance improvement plans.
Amendments to Part 4 of the Education Act, relating to school enrolment, attendance and participation,
and association regulations, became effective from 1 June 2011. They are intended to complement
the Every Child Every Day strategy and associated initiatives by providing a strengthened regulatory
framework with greater capability to take enforcement action where it is needed. The amendments
modernised previous provisions under the Act, and complement the department’s capacity to manage
enrolment, attendance and participation issues relating to children in the NT under 17 years of age.
The rollout of the new legislation occurred a full seven months earlier than scheduled, with processes for
enforcing enrolment and attendance developed for application by schools together with other strategies.
RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN [T2030:ED1.5]
The department was the first within the NT Government to sign a Statement of Commitment to develop
a Reconciliation Action Plan under the Reconciliation Action Plan program. The program, launched
in July 2006 by Reconciliation Australia, aims to help build positive relationships between Indigenous
and non-Indigenous Australians, and to find new ways to advance an organisation’s objectives through
reconciliation. Development of the plan will commence in 2011–12. The plan will provide an overarching
framework to integrate the range of existing and future early childhood, literacy and numeracy, VET and
employment and workforce development programs and initiatives in the area of Indigenous education.
NT EARLY CHILDHOOD WORKFORCE PLAN [T2030:ED3.3;3.1]
The NT Early Childhood Workforce Plan will be launched in late 2011, as part of a suite of events
highlighting the importance of early childhood and building strong partnerships with families, government
and community agencies to achieve the best possible outcomes for all children in the NT. The plan aims to
position the NT to meet the workforce requirements under the early childhood reform agenda to ensure the
best possible outcomes for children. The plan will also support implementation of the NT Early Childhood
Plan, the overarching plan for early childhood development in the NT.
The NT Early Childhood Workforce Plan provides a vehicle for working in partnership across government,
non-government and industry organisations to build a coherent workforce to support and improve health
and education outcomes for children from pre-birth to eight years of age. It will inform future directions
for cross-government partnerships and investment in new workforce development initiatives.
12
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
TRAINING AND VET IN SCHOOLS MASTER PLANS AND NATIONAL
APPRENTICESHIPS REFORM [T2030:ED2.4;2.6;2.8]
The department will continue to work with key stakeholders to strengthen and align delivery of VET in
Schools to the future employment requirements of the NT, including regional requirements. The department
will continue to develop major corporate partnerships and focus training to enable students to achieve well
paid futures in our rapidly expanding industrial base. Work will continue with industry associations, training
providers and community organisations to develop a Training Master Plan encompassing all strategic
and operational priorities to support the skilling of Territorians and develop the industry’s workforce. The
Training Master Plan will inform the future allocation of funding towards industry training needs and provide
the strategic direction for achieving the NT’s annual VET targets. It will also support other NT Government
initiatives such as Jobs NT and Territory 2030, and will link to a VET in Schools Master Plan to be
developed in 2011–12.
The NT will continue to take part in the national apprenticeship reform agenda through the Ministerial
Council for Tertiary Education and Employment’s Apprentices Working Group. Reforms include
agreement by states and territories to national principles to develop training plans. These principles will see
greater emphasis on the relationship between the employer, apprentice and training organisation to develop
and monitor a training plan that meets the needs of the parties and the outcome of the qualification.
During 2011, states, territories and the Australian Government will work to finalise national policy principles
and defined roles and responsibilities for future apprenticeship support services arrangements.
Reforms are likely to focus strongly on:
pathways into an apprenticeship
effective support, including mentoring and pastoral care
the Australian Government financial investment in the system
the status of the apprenticeship system
simplifying the system.
NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR REMOTE INDIGENOUS SCHOOLS [T2030:ED3.6]
Through the department’s Remote Teaching Service (RTS), the NT is leading the National Alliance for
Remote Indigenous Schools (NARIS) initiative which involves over 170 remote and very remote schools
located in Indigenous communities across the NT, Queensland (Qld), New South Wales (NSW), South
Australia (SA) and Western Australia (WA). The NARIS recently received official recognition from the
Australian Government and $5 million will be invested over the next two years to develop and implement
programs such as the Teach Remote initiative. Teach Remote aims to develop and implement national
approaches to recruiting, training, supporting and rewarding teachers and leaders in NARIS schools.
In 2011–12, NARIS will host the first national remote teachers’ conference in Alice Springs, to:
celebrate and support quality teachers from remote communities
provide teachers with access to quality and relevant professional development
generate new ideas and partnerships and share best practice
promote teacher resilience, wellbeing, health and fitness.
13
OVERVIEW
200 INDIGENOUS TEACHERS [T2030:ED3.1;3.3]
Building and learning from past successes, the 200 Indigenous Teachers initiative provides potential
for a significant step forward in closing the educational gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous
Australians. The 200 Indigenous Teachers initiative aims to see an additional 200 Indigenous Territorians
being awarded a Bachelor of Teaching and Learning qualification and more than 5000 school students
being taught by a quality Indigenous teacher from 2018. This initiative will provide positive role models to
both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students alike. Target participants will include:
assistant teachers
other departmental employees (including focus on Aboriginal and Islander education workers,
school council employees, home liaison officers, inclusion support officers, and Indigenous tertiary
assistant employees)
current school aged students (with emphasis on those completing Year 12)
recent school leavers
current university students studying towards non-teaching qualifications
university graduates who have gained non-teaching qualifications
the wider public.
The department will work with tertiary institutions such as CDU, Batchelor Institute for Indigenous Tertiary
Education (BIITE) and the Australian Centre for Indigenous Knowledge and Education to recruit the first
participants to start their course in 2011–12. As part of this initiative the department is exploring options for
financial and academic assistance and flexible learning delivery.
FIRST SCHOOL-BASED
APPRENTICESHIP SIGNED
AT GROOTE EYLANDT
COLLEGE
The first two students have signed up to
do school-based apprenticeships at the
Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprise
(GEBIE) civil construction site. Angurugu
students Trent Mamarika and Jarenzo Davis
Mamarika, were at the signing with their
proud families, together with Groote Eylandt
College staff, the Anindilyakwa Land Council
chief executive, Apprenticeships Australia
and GEBIE staff. Trent and Jarenzo
completed work experience with GEBIE as part of their Stage 1 Personal Learning Plan subject.
Groote Eylandt College Director Mark Monaghan said it was an example of successful partnerships
between industry and education. He congratulated the boys on their hard work and the role they will
play as future leaders and role models. [T2030:ED2.4;2.6]
14
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
2010–11 MAJOR CAPITAL WORKS
WORKS CARRIED OVER AND COMPLETED IN 2010–11
WORKING FUTURE (FORMERLY CLOSING THE GAP — HOMELAND CENTRE UPGRADES):
Homeland learning centre upgrade — clinic. Completed September 2010.
$0.122 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Irrultja. Completed January 2011.
$0.192 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Langarra, new student ablutions.
Completed July 2010.
$0.360 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Mulga Bore, new ablutions.
Completed October 2010.
$0.228 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Gan Gan, new student ablutions.
Completed October 2010.
$0.377 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Mamadawerre, construction of two
general learning areas, store and general upgrades. Completed August 2010.
$0.358 million
SCHOOL UPGRADES:
Alawa Primary School — Stage 2 upgrade of classroom facilities.
Completed August 2010.
$2.000 million
Acacia Hill School — Stage 1 extensions to main building including new ablutions.
Completed January 2011.
$0.736 million
Centralian Middle School — upgrade of Alice Springs High School and
Anzac Hill High School. Completed June 2010.
$4.045 million
Tennant Creek Trade Training Centre. Completed December 2010.
$1.300 million
Angurugu School — refurbishment of the home economics building and
fencing of school. Completed April 2011.
$1.550 million
Gunbalanya School – extension and upgrade of administration area.
Completed October 2010.
$1.550 million
NEW SCHOOL:
Rosebery Primary and Middle School — construction of new preschool,
primary and middle schools. Completed January 2011.
**$56.535 million
EARLY LEARNING AND CARE CENTRES:
Palmerston Super Clinic — construction of an early learning and care centre
as part of the construction of the clinic. Completed September 2010.
*$2.250 million
*Australian Government funding
** Joint Northern Territory and Australian Government funding
15
OVERVIEW
WORK CARRIED OVER AND STILL IN PROGRESS IN 2010–11
SCHOOL UPGRADES:
Ross Park Primary School upgrade — Stage 4 project music room upgrade.
Target completion December 2011.
$2.980 million
Tennant Creek High School — construction of a new multipurpose sports facility.
Target completion August 2011.
$3.200 million
Shepherdson College — joint funding for gymnasium and cyclone centre with
Building the Education Revolution program. Completed February 2011. Savings
being used for preschool extension. Target completion December 2011.
**$1.550 million
Homeland learning centre upgrade — Manmoyi, new ablutions and general
upgrades. Targeted completion August 2011.
$0.355 million
CHILD AND FAMILY CENTRES:
Maningrida Child and Family Centre — completion subject to land tenure approval.
*$4.420 million
Ngukurr Child and Family Centre — completion subject to land tenure approval.
*$4.420 million
*Australian Government funding
** Joint Northern Territory and Australian Government funding
16
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NEW PROJECTS STARTED IN 2010–11
SCHOOL UPGRADES:
Acacia Hill School — Stage 2 construction of three new double classroom blocks
and ablutions. Target completion August 2011.
$3.164 million
Former ANZAC Hill campus — various works. Completed July 2011.
$0.565 million
Centralian Middle School — upgrade blocks A and G, installation of cover over
basketball courts, construction of Clontarf Building and installation of lift.
Target completion August 2011.
$2.065 million
Nemarluk School — relocate school to Alawa. Target completion January 2012.
$11.900 million
Casuarina Senior College – construction of new science building containing three
laboratories and preparation room. Upgrade of existing laboratories in Block C.
Target completion January 2012.
$5.000 million
Sanderson Middle School — construction of new amphitheatre and covered outdoor
learning area. Upgrade of existing music room. Target completion December 2011.
$1.000 million
Henbury School — school upgrade. Target completion June 2012.
$1.000 million
WORKING FUTURE (FORMERLY CLOSING THE GAP – SCHOOL AND
HOMELAND CENTRE UPGRADES):
Maningrida School — refurbishment of primary school block, conversion of senior
block and store into large staff preparatory area, air conditioning of canteen.
Target completion August 2011.
Ntaria School — half court basketball court, upgrades to classroom blocks B and C,
VET workshop and technical studies classroom. Target completion August 2011.
Elliott School — school upgrade. Target completion December 2012.
$1.550 million
*$1.689 million
**$1.423 million
Ji-Marda Homeland Centre — upgrade classroom. Target completion November 2011.
$0.165 million
Wudeja Homeland Centre — upgrade classroom. Target completion December 2011.
$0.285 million
Mirrngatja Homeland Centre — new classroom. Target completion January 2012.
$0.470 million
Mumeka Homeland Centre — upgrade classroom. Target completion December 2011.
$0.300 million
Rurrangala Homeland Centre — new classroom. Target completion January 2012.
$0.480 million
Mungkarta Homeland Centre — upgrade classroom. Target completion January 2012.
$0.300 million
CHILD AND FAMILY CENTRES/CHILD CARE CENTRES:
Ntaria Child Care Centre — target completion April 2012.
*$2.000 million
Umbakumba Child Care Centre – target completion April 2012.
*$1.000 million
Yuendumu Child and Family Centre – target completion April 2012.
*$4.420 million
Gunbalanya Child and Family Centre – completion subject to land tenure approval.
*$4.420 million
*Australian Government funding
** Joint Northern Territory and Australian Government funding
17
OVERVIEW
BUILDING THE EDUCATION REVOLUTION
The Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)
is facilitating the Building the Education Revolution (BER) initiative on behalf of the Office of the Prime
Minister, to provide $16.2 billion in funding for new facilities and refurbishments in Australian schools.
BER has three elements:
Primary Schools for the 21st Century (P21)
Science and Language Centres for 21st Century Secondary Schools (SLC)
National School Pride Program (NSP).
Education authorities across Australia were invited to apply for funding for projects for every school in
accordance with the Australian Government guidelines. The education authorities were also requested to
submit implementation plans including for procurement.
The department utilises the expertise and services of the NT Department of Construction and Infrastructure
(DCI) for the delivery of capital works projects. Following industry consultation it was determined that the
NT would leverage existing capital works capacity though DCI as an experienced and informed buyer.
Therefore procurement and project management of P21 and SLC projects was delivered through the
existing government arrangements managed by DCI with the inclusion of a tier of outsourced project
managers to assist with the volume and breadth of the program. As at 30 June 2011 contracts with a total
value of $181 million had been committed on P21 and SLC projects, with $168.2 million expended to date.
The BER officially ended on 31 March 2011. However, the Australian Government announced that it would
re-phase the BER initiative so $500 million is spent nationally in 2011–12. This represents $6.246 million
for NT Government schools.
18
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
PRIMARY SCHOOLS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
The P21 element of BER is providing $174.75 million for 135 projects across 133 NT Government schools.
Of the 134 schools approved for funding, 27 projects were not complete by 31 March 2011. As at the end
of June 2011, 18 projects remain incomplete, all of which are re-phased and due to be completed in the
2011–12 financial year.
SCIENCE AND LANGUAGE CENTRES FOR 21ST CENTURY SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The SLC element of BER is providing $15.76 million for a total of eight NT Government schools. All of the
SLC projects are complete, with enhancements including sustainability measures still in progress.
NATIONAL SCHOOL PRIDE PROGRAM
The NSP element of BER is providing $15.77 million for minor works in 150 NT Government schools to
renew and refurbish their existing facilities. There were two application rounds in 2010–11. The department
managed the application and administrative processes for NT Government schools.
Schools and school councils elected to manage the delivery (purchase of goods or construction) of their
own projects. Overall, the NSP program has been successfully implemented with only minor delays related
to the detailed processes involved in acquitting the grants to schools or delays caused by prolonged wet
season conditions. There was one incomplete project at 30 June 2011.
In the interest of transparency and public accountability, the department has moved to a nationally
common reporting structure with consistent definitions applied across all states, territories and sectors.
The reporting structure and publishing medium was developed in conjunction with all education authorities
and put in place by the Australian Government. The NT is in the process of publishing all P21 projects
as they are fully acquitted. NT School specific details and actual costs for P21 projects can be viewed at
www.deewr.gov.au and go to Schools and the Building the Education Revolution.
WORKING TOWARDS A
BETTER FUTURE IN NTARIA
The Ntaria (Hermannsburg) community has
celebrated the signing of the Ntaria Local
Implementation Plan outlining the future direction
and growth for the town and its residents. A
key aspect of the plan is a strong focus on
schooling and early childhood. Highlights include
the construction of a 40-place child and family
centre, upgrades to Ntaria School and the
construction of a trade training centre.
19
OVERVIEW
NORTHERN TERRITORY
EDUCATION CONTEXT
The NT has a population of 229 8741, which is one per cent of the total Australian population
(22 477 378)1. It is the third largest state or territory, with a land area of 1 346 200 km2, yet has the
smallest population. For the year ended 31 December 2010, natural increase was the major component
of population change in the NT (153 per cent), followed by Tasmania (Tas) (54 per cent), the Australian
Capital Territory (ACT) (50 per cent) and Qld (49 per cent)3, with the greatest proportion of births
being in the Indigenous population4. The NT has the highest proportion of young people (median age
31.3 compared to the national median age of 36.9)5, the highest proportion of Indigenous population
(approximately 30 per cent)2, and the largest proportion of the population living in very remote locations
compared with any other jurisdiction.
Figure 1: Age and gender distribution (%), NT – 30 June 2010
85+
80–84
Darwin Males
Northern Territory – Bal Males
Darwin Females
Northern Territory – Bal Females
75–79
70–74
65–69
60–64
55–59
50–54
45–49
40–44
35–39
30–34
25–29
20–24
15–19
10–14
5–9
0–4
5
4
3
2
Males (%)
1
0
0
1
2
3
4
Females (%)
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 3235.0 – Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia – NT 2010
Source: ABS 3101.0 Australian Demographic Statistics. December 2010. Table 4. Issue Released 23/06/2011
Source: ABS 1304.7 2011 Northern Territory at a Glance
3
Source: ABS 3101.0 Australian Demographic Statistics. December Quarter 2010. Page 8. Issue Released 23/06/2011
4
Source: ABS 3301.0 Births Australia, 2009. Table 9. Issue Released 03/11/2010
5
Source: ABS 3201.0 Population by Age and Sex, Australian States and Territories, June 2010. Issue released 21/12/2010.
1
2
20
5
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Age Group
Figure 2: Age distribution of the NT Indigenous and non-Indigenous population
85+
80–84
75–79
70–74
65–69
60–64
55–59
50–54
45–49
40–44
35–39
30–34
25–29
20–24
15–19
10–14
5–9
0–4
14 000
12 000
10 000
8000
6000
4000
2000
Indigenous
0
no.
2000
4000
6000
8000
10 000
12 000
14 000
Non-Indigenous
Source: ABS 2068.0 – Indigenous Status by Age, 2006 Census
Note: Non-Indigenous includes people who have not stated their Indigenous status.
21
OVERVIEW
A YOUNG POPULATION
The NT has the youngest population in Australia with 23.1 per cent under the age of 15 years compared
with the national average of 18.9 per cent.6
Figure 3: Percentage of population in each state and territory under the age of 15 years, June 2010
25%
% of Population
20%
23.1%
18.7%
18.3%
20.0%
19.4%
19.2%
WA
Tas
18.4%
18.9%
ACT
Aus
17.8%
15%
10%
5%
0%
NSW
Vic
Qld
SA
NT
Source: ABS 3201.0 Estimated Resident Population by single year of age, June 2010
The NT has 34 3267 children aged 5 to 14 years (14.9 per cent of the total population). The Australian
Bureau of Statistics (ABS) estimates the NT had 14 6588 Indigenous children aged five to 14 years at the
2006 Census (22.9 per cent of the Indigenous population).
Figure 4: Percentage of population in each state and territory under the age of five years, June 2010
9%
% of Population
8%
7%
8.2%
6.4%
6.4%
7.0%
6.7%
6.6%
WA
Tas
6.7%
6.5%
ACT
Aus
6.0%
6%
5%
4%
3%
2%
1%
0%
NSW
Vic
Qld
SA
NT
Source: ABS 3201.0 Estimated Resident Population by single year of age, June 2010
The NT has 18 7757 children aged zero to four years (8.2 per cent of the total population). A total of 77748
children under the age of 5 are Indigenous (12.1 per cent of the Indigenous population).
Source: ABS 3201.0 Population by Age and Sex, Australian States and Territories, June 2010. Issue Released
21/12/2010
7
Source: ABS 1304.7 2010 Northern Territory at a Glance 2011 (ERP at 30 June 2010)
8
Source: ABS 1304.7 2010 Northern Territory at a Glance (Experimental ERIP at 30 June 2006)
6
22
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 5: School-aged (five to 19 years) population, NT and Australia 2006 to 2010
4 500 000
90 000
4.16
4.18
4.21
49 369
50 078
50 775
70 000
NT
60 000
50 000
4.26
4 000 000
4.27
3 500 000
51 115
3 000 000
51 162
2 500 000
40 000
2 000 000
30 000
1 500 000
20 000
1 000 000
10 000
500 000
-
2007
2006
2008
NT
2009
Australia
80 000
-
2010
Australia
Source: ABS 32010.0 Estimated resident population by single year of age, June 2010, Table 7 (revised 2009 data) and Table 8
(new 2010 data)
Overall the NT population of 5 to 19 year olds has increased by 3.6 per cent (1793) since 2006.
A DIVERSE POPULATION
The NT has the largest proportion of Indigenous population with approximately 64 0059 Indigenous people,
representing 30.4 per cent of the total population.
Figure 6: Indigenous population as a percentage in each state and territory 2006
35%
30.4%
% of Population
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
3.5%
2.2%
0%
NSW
0.7%
Vic
3.4%
3.8%
1.8%
Qld
SA
WA
Tas
NT
1.3%
2.5%
ACT
Aus
Source: ABS 3238.0.55.001 - Experimental estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, June 2006, Table 1 and
Table 3. Issue released 19/08/2008.
9
Source: ABS 3238.0.55.001 – Experimental estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, June 2006, Table 1 and
Table 3. Issue released 19/08/2008.
23
OVERVIEW
Figure 7: Percentage Indigenous students (of total student cohort) by state and territory 2010
45%
40.6%
40%
% of Students
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
6.6%
4.4%
3.7%
6.4%
6.7%
2.2%
1.2%
0%
NSW
Vic
Qld
SA
WA
Tas
NT
ACT
4.6%
Aus
Source: ABS 4221.0 Schools, Australia — NSSC Table 43a — Full-time equivalent students — by states and territories, affiliation,
sex, age, Indigenous status and years (1996–2010)
The proportion of the Indigenous population is even greater in the school-aged population, with
40.6 per cent of students enrolled in Transition to Year 12 identified as Indigenous, compared with the
national average of 4.6 per cent.
Figure 8: Language background other than English (LBOTE) as a percentage of population
in each state and territory
40%
35%
% of Population
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
NSW
Vic
Qld
WA
LBOTE (Not Indigenous Language Speakers)
SA
Tas
NT
ACT
LBOTE (Indigenous Language Speakers)
Aust
Not Stated
Source: ABS 2068.0 b12 2006 Census Population and Housing, NT — Language spoken at home (narrow groups) by sex
As per the 2006 Census, about 44 71710 people living in the NT have a language background other than
English. Just 66.0 per cent of the population speak English only, 8.0 per cent are speakers of languages
from other countries, 15.1 per cent are speakers of Indigenous languages (29 192) and a further
10.8 per cent do not identify their language. Of the total number of Indigenous language speakers in
Australia (55 705), 52.4 per cent are located in the NT. For many Indigenous learners studying in remote
schools, English is rarely used in their communities outside of school. This means that while at school
they are learning English as an additional language.
10
Source: ABS 2068.0 2006 Census Population and Housing, NT — Language spoken at home (a) by sex
24
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
A DISPERSED POPULATION
The following classes of remoteness (often referred to as geographical locations, or geolocations) have
been developed using the Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA). They measure remoteness
based on the road distance to the nearest service centre. Remoteness affects access to goods, services
and opportunities for social interaction, including increased cost associated with service delivery (including
education) in remote and very remote areas.
Table 1: Percentage of population by remoteness classification
Jurisdiction
Major cities of
Australia
Inner regional
Australia
Outer regional
Australia
Remote
Australia
Very remote
Australia
NSW
73.0%
20.2%
6.3%
0.5%
0.1%
Vic
75.2%
20.0%
4.7%
0.1%
0.0%
Qld
59.8%
22.0%
15.2%
1.9%
1.1%
SA
72.8%
12.3%
11.3%
2.8%
0.9%
WA
71.2%
13.4%
9.0%
4.3%
2.2%
Tas
0.0%
64.8%
33.2%
1.5%
0.5%
NT
0.0%
0.0%
56.0%
21.2%
22.8%
ACT
99.8%
0.2%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Australia
68.7%
19.7%
9.3%
1.5%
0.8%
Source: ABS 3218.0 Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009–10
This table shows that the entire NT population is located in the three most remote categories, with
44.0 per cent in remote and very remote areas.
25
OVERVIEW
SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS
Socio-economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) is a suite of four measures created from Census information.
The measures summarise different aspects of socio-economic conditions in an area and are appropriate
for distinguishing between relatively disadvantaged areas. The Index of Relative Socio-economic
Disadvantage (IRSD) measures the proportion of:
low income households in an area
people who do not speak English well
households that pay low rent
people with no post school qualifications.
Areas within Australia are then ordered from the lowest to highest scores. The lowest 10 per cent of areas
are given a decile number of one and so on, up to the highest 10 per cent of areas which are given a decile
number of 10. This means that areas are divided into 10 groups, depending on their score.
The NT has over 57 per cent of its government schools in the bottom 10 per cent of the SEIFA-IRSD range.
Figure 9: Percentage of NT Government schools in each IRSD decile 2010
60%
57.2%
% of Schools
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
4.6%
7.2%
8.6%
5.3%
4.6%
6.6%
3.3%
2.6%
0%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0.0%
10
Source: ABS 2033.0.55.001 – Census of Population and Housing: SEIFA, Australia – Data only, 2006 and DET Performance and
Data Management Age Grade Census
Over 28 per cent of NT students attend schools in the bottom (most socio-economically
disadvantaged) decile.
26
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 10: Percentage of NT Government school enrolments by IRSD decile 2010
35%
% of Enrolments
30%
28.7%
25%
20%
15.0%
15%
12.6%
9.4%
10%
8.6%
7.4%
7.7%
6.2%
4.4%
5%
0.0%
0%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Source: ABS 2033.0.55.001 — Census of Population and Housing: SEIFA, Australia — Data only 2006 and DET Performance
and Data Management Age Grade Census
THE COST OF EDUCATING OUR STUDENTS
Due to the large proportion of NT schools in remote, isolated and very remote communities, the cost
of delivering educational services to students is significantly greater than in any other state or territory
in Australia.
Remoteness increases the additional infrastructure costs associated with staffing, housing, transport and
relocation of staff.
Figure 11: Real Australian, state and territory government recurrent expenditure per full-time
equivalent student in government schools 2008–09 including user cost of capital ($ per full-time
equivalent student)
$ per Full-time Equivalent Student
$25 000
$20 000
$15 000
$10 000
$5 000
$0
NSW
Vic
Qld
In school primary
WA
SA
In school secondary
Tas
ACT
NT
Aust
Out of school
Source: Table 4A.8 Report on Government Services (ROGS) 2011
For the same reasons, the cost of delivering children’s services is greater in the NT than in any other
Australian jurisdiction.
27
OVERVIEW
Figure 12: Total state and territory government real expenditure on children’s services per child in
the community aged zero to 12 years (2009–10 $ per child)
$800
$751
$700
$ per Child
$600
$489
$500
$496
$400
$488
$341
$300
$200
$185
$249
$219
$123
$100
$0
NSW
Vic
Qld
WA
SA
Tas
ACT
NT
Aust
Source: Table 3A.37 ROGS 2011
Figure 13: Percentage of children aged zero to five years using Australian Government approved,
plus state and territory government funded or provided child care 2009–10
60%
53.6%
50%
% of Children
42.5%
37.8%
40%
39.4%
41.4%
40.5%
33.5%
26.7%
30%
22.4%
20%
10%
0%
NSW
Vic
Qld
WA
SA
Tas
ACT
NT
Aust
Source: Table 3A.11 ROGS 2011
The Productivity Commission’s 2011 Report on Government Services shows that nationally during
2009–10 the proportion of children aged zero to five years using Australian Government approved and
state and territory government funded or provided child care was 41.4 per cent.
Approximately 50.0 per cent of the NT’s zero to five year old population lives in remote or very remote
areas. The majority of early childhood services in remote communities are Australian Government funded
crèches (referred to as budget based funded services) which are non-mainstream child care services.
Budget based funded services are currently not licensed under the Care and Protection of Children Act
and the Care and Protection of Children (Children’s Services) Regulations. It is estimated that there are
38 budget based funded services providing non-mainstream child care services located mainly in regional,
remote and Indigenous communities. These services account for approximately 33.0 per cent of child care
centres in the NT.
28
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
The NT was recorded as having 22.4 per cent of its zero to five year old population utilising Australian
Government approved child care, the lowest in Australia. However, this definition only includes services
eligible to provide a Child Care Benefit (CCB) to families. Budget based services and three year old kindies
are not eligible to provide CCB and are therefore not included in the Productivity Commission’s utilisation
figures. NSW does not differentiate between child care and preschool attendance and this makes its
proportion of zero to five year olds utilising Australian Government approved child care (53.6 per cent)
appear to be the highest in Australia, with Qld second at 42.5 per cent.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY SECTOR
Table 2: Number of schools by sector 2006 to 2010
Government
Non-government
Total
Homeland learning centres
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
151
150
1511
1522
1523
35
36
36
36
364
186
186
187
188
188
51
46
45
46
405
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Darwin Middle School opened in January 2008.
Arlparra High School opened in July 2009.
3
Alice Springs High and Anzac Hill High closed and merged to become Centralian Middle School. Baniyala Garrangali School also
opened in January 2010 (previously Yilpara Homeland Learning Centre).
4
Australian Technical College closed at the end of 2009. Maparu Christian School opened in July 2010 (but operated as Maparu
Homeland Learning Centre early 2010 and included in 2010 HLC numbers )
5
The homeland learning centres (HLCs) consist of 38 government homelands and 2 non government homelands (Pungajurruwu of
Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School and Wudikapildiyerr of St Francis Xaviers)
1
2
Of the 188 government and non-government schools in the NT, 85 schools have nearly 100 per cent
Indigenous enrolment. Ninety-five schools have Indigenous enrolments of over 80 per cent, which
accounts for about 23 per cent of all students.
Education services are also delivered to approximately 40 Homeland Learning Centres (HLCs).
HLCs are small remote sites delivering education services to small groups of students who are unable to
attend the central school in their area. They are administered by the designated central school, that sends
teachers to visit the HLCs on a regular basis. Due to the mobile nature of families living in homelands, the
number of HLCs fluctuates.
29
OVERVIEW
Figure 14: Number of Government Schools by Region 2010–11
DARWIN
(INC DARWIN CITY
AND NORTHERN
SUBURBS) (27)
ARNHEM (17)
PALMERSTON
& RURAL (30)
KATHERINE (23)
BARKLY (18)
ALICE SPRINGS (37)
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Of all the NT students enrolled in government schools, 51.5 per cent are enrolled in one of the 41 schools
in provincial areas (including Darwin and Palmerston). A total of 29.0 per cent of the student population is
enrolled in one of 80 schools in very remote areas of the NT (parts of the Palmerston and Rural, Arnhem,
Katherine, Barkly and Alice Springs regions). Schools in very remote locations tend to have much smaller
student populations but are required to ensure access to education for the entire dispersed NT population.
Students attending distance education schools, such as the NT Open Education Centre (NTOEC),
Alice Springs School of the Air, and Katherine School of the Air, make up 3.1 per cent of the student
population. Although classified as remote, the physical location of the students can be anywhere from
provincial to very remote.
30
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
ENROLMENTS BY SECTOR
Figure 15: Enrolments by sector 2006 to 2010
45 000
40 000
42 289
42 670
42 645
42 767
43 494
32 921
32 986
32 582
32 594
32 978
9368
9684
10 063
10 173
10 516
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Enrolments
35 000
30 000
25 000
20 000
15 000
10 000
5 000
0
Government
Non-Government
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
There has been a gradual increase in the total student enrolments from 2006 to 2010. In 2008 there
was a decrease in government school enrolments (-1.2 per cent) offset by a corresponding increase
in non-government school enrolments. From 2009 to 2010 both government and non-government
enrolments increased by a total of 1.7 per cent.
31
OVERVIEW
ENROLMENTS BY REGION [T2030:ED2.2;2.3]
Table 3: Proportion of enrolments by region in government schools 2010
Region
Number of schools
Enrolments
% of Enrolments
Darwin
27
11 060
33.5%
Palmerston and Rural
30
8 017
24.3%
Alice Springs
37
4513
13.7%
Arnhem
17
4172
12.7%
Katherine
23
3327
10.1%
Barkly
18
1889
5.7%
152
32 978
100.0%
Total NT
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 16: Percentage of enrolments by sector and geolocation 2010
100%
90%
% of Enrolments
80%
26.6%
38.1%
73.4%
61.9%
4.1%
24.2%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
95.9%
75.8%
Very Remote
Total NT
20%
10%
0%
Provincial
Remote
Northern Territory Government
Non-Government
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Almost one quarter of students in the NT attend non-government schools (10 516 students). This
proportion is greatest in remote Australia as there are a greater proportion of students in non-government
schools in and around Alice Springs that are classified as remote, compared to the Darwin/Top End area
and very remote communities.
32
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
ENROLMENTS BY LEVEL OF SCHOOLING [T2030:ED2.1;2.2;2.3]
Figure 17: Enrolments by level in NT Government schools 2006 to 2010
35 000
30 000
9708
Enrolments
25 000
20 000
5165
4881
5416
5212
4090
6172
5867
6012
18488
18 198
18 492
19 941
20 445
3272
3286
3041
3113
3262
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
15 000
10 000
5 000
Preschool
Primary
Secondary
Middle
Senior
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
*Includes NTOEC Enrolments
The NT moved to a system of middle years education:
Year 10s moved from junior secondary to senior years in 2007
Year 7s moved from primary to middle years in 2008.
Primary education now consists of Transition to Year 6. Middle years consist of Years 7 to 9 and senior
years consist of Years 10 to 12.
33
OVERVIEW
ENROLMENTS BY INDIGENOUS STATUS [T2030:ED2.1;2.2;2.3;2.4;2.6]
Figure 18: Enrolments by Indigenous status in NT Government schools 2006 to 2010
35 000
30 000
Enrolments
25 000
32 921
32 978
32 986
32 582
32 594
18 651
18 295
18 442
14 007
14 335
14 287
14 152
14 700
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
18 914
20 000
18 278
15 000
10 000
5 000
0
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Although overall total enrolment numbers in government schools remain constant, Indigenous student
numbers decreased slightly between 2007 and 2009, and increased significantly in 2010 (being the main
contributor to the overall enrolment increase). Non-Indigenous student numbers have generally decreased
since 2006.
In 2006, 42.5 per cent of NT government school student enrolments were identified as Indigenous. In 2010,
this proportion increased to 44.6 per cent.
Figure 19: Number of VET students 2006 to 2010
16 000
14 000
11 600
12 400
10 300
10 400
2006
2007
13 800
14 242
10 000
9800
9800
2008
2009
2010
12 200
VET Students
12 000
10 000
8 000
6 000
4 000
2 000
0
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Source: DET Training and Higher Education Division, using National Centre for Vocational Education Research Publication Scope
After a decline in non-Indigenous VET student numbers in 2008, numbers increased significantly in 2009
and to a lesser degree in 2010. The number of VET students rose by 16.7 per cent from 2008 to 2010.
There was no change in the number of Indigenous VET student numbers from 2009 to 2010.
34
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
STUDENT ATTENDANCE
Figure 20: Average attendance by Indigenous status in NT Government schools 2006 to 2010
100%
Average Attendance Rate
95%
90.7%
90.6%
90.5%
90.7%
82.0%
82.2%
81.4%
81.4%
80.4%
70.3%
71.3%
69.8%
69.7%
67.8%
2008
2009
2010
90.8%
90%
85%
80%
75%
70%
65%
60%
55%
50%
2006
2007
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management, enrolment and attendance data 2006 to 2010
Student mobility is high and continuity in learning programs is a major issue. Irregular attendance or
chronic under-attendance also impact on student outcomes. Where non-Indigenous attendance rates
have remained stable at about 90 per cent since 2006, Indigenous attendance rates are on average,
about 70 per cent. Indigenous attendance rates are volatile and often follow seasonal trends. The drop in
attendance rate from 2009 (69.7 per cent) to 2010 (67.8 per cent) is coupled with a corresponding increase
in enrolment numbers (+548). The combined effect of average enrolment numbers and attendance
rates seen in 2010 indicate that approximately 100 more Indigenous students attended school each day
compared to 2009.
Figure 21: Average attendance rate by Indigenous status and geolocation 2010
100%
Average Attendance Rate
95%
90%
85%
91.7%
90.5%
89.8%
81.2%
79.9%
80%
75%
70%
65%
58.3%
60%
55%
50%
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Provincial
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Remote
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Very Remote
Source: DET Performance and Data Management, enrolment and attendance data 2010
The average attendance rate in provincial and remote schools is over 85.0 per cent, however the average
attendance rate for Indigenous students in very remote schools is 58.3 per cent. A range of initiatives
under the Every Child, Every Day strategy are being implemented to address the issue of absenteeism,
particularly in very remote schools.
35
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
OUTPUTS AND PERFORMANCE
OBJECTIVE
To improve the educational and training outcomes and
To improve the educational and training outcomes and options
options for Territorians from their early years through
for Territorians from their early years through to adulthood.
to adulthood
Outcomes
Improved educational
outcomes for students,
particularly Indigenous
students,
students,
in in
allall
key
key
learning
learning
areas.
areas
Choice in quality
Choice in quality education
education alternatives
alternatives for NT students.
for Territory students
Maximised
Maximised training
training opportunities
opportunities for Territorians.
for Territorians
Output groups
Groups
Government education
Non-government education
Training
Early Years
years
Primary Education
education
Training
Preschool Education
education
Middle Years
years Education
education
Primary Education
education
Senior Years
years Education
education
Outputs
Middle Years
years Education
education
Senior Years
years Education
education
International Education
education
Tertiary Education
education
36
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
OUTPUT PERFORMANCE REPORTING
This section describes the department’s performance against planned outcomes for 2010–11. It also
includes performance measures to demonstrate efficiency and effectiveness in achieving those outcomes.
Reporting of performance is against outputs identified in Budget Paper 3.
Performance data available within the department informed strategic and operational planning at the
system, regional and school levels. Regions and schools set explicit targets around priority areas of
writing and numeracy, focusing regional resources on supporting schools to achieve these outcomes,
and embedding strategies in school operational plans. The Every Child Every Day strategy introduced
in October 2010 and amendments to Part 4 of the Education Act (effective from 1 June 2011) are
complementary initiatives introduced to address the issues of volatile and low attendance, enrolment and
participation in NT Schools. Supported by strong systems showing reasons for non-attendance, allowing
targeted strategies for improvement, early signs indicate promising improvement in these priority areas.
Progress against key strategies and initiatives in the DET Strategic Plan 2009–12 is also included in
this report. Links with the Territory 2030 Strategic Plan have been made explicit throughout this report.
For example: [T2030:ED2.1] identifies a link to Territory 2030 Education Objective 2, Target 1, which
relates to preschool participation.
Reporting of workforce development and professional learning activity aligned to the department’s
strategic priorities is integrated into the progress report against the DET Strategic Plan 2011–14 at page
65. Other training and development activity undertaken by the department is also reported in the Our
People section of this report, at page 127.
Reporting of achievements in relation to the Carer’s Recognition Act is in the Appendices.
In 2010–11 the department operated to a budget of $924.114 million across all output groups. The budget
increased by $38.5 million from the original published figure of $885.642 million, the increased resourcing
of the department’s budget was due to:
$20 million for additional funding from the Australian Government including additional funds for the
BER initiative and the Community Development Employment program
$6.8 million of additional funding from the NT Government primarily to meet additional expenses
relating to the new NT Public Sector Teacher and Educator 2010–13 Enterprise Agreement
$10.6 million to acquit outstanding Australian Government commitments from the 2009–10
financial year
$1.3 million additional fee for service revenue and inter-agency transfers.
The department’s reported expenses for the financial year of $925.574 million is within $1.4 million or 0.2%
of the budget target. The department has been faced with significant challenges in managing its externally
funded programs that are generally delivered over a calendar year, whilst funding agreements are tied to
financial years. The department has managed resources at the agency level, however the timing of some
of these significant tied funding agreements have led to a varied result when analysing performance of the
individual output groups. Delays have been experienced in delivering tied programs within the Training
and Government Education output groups, this has been offset by accelerated grant funded programs in
the Non-Government Education output group. Adjustments for these timing differences will be made to the
2011–12 Budget to ensure all programs are acquitted in terms of the relevant funding agreements.
37
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Overall, the department has managed resources to budgeted targets and has sufficient cash reserves and
budget capacity to fund its outstanding obligations in the 2011–12 financial year. The budget movement and
expense data for 2010–11 for all of the department’s output groups is listed in the following table.
Table 4: 2010–11 expenditure by output group
Output
2010–11
published
budget
Government education
636 481 000
658 953 626
Early years
12 003 000
14 236 614
12 430 126
Preschool education
34 524 000
38 006 294
35 733 099
Primary education
340 465 000
359 545 522
358 015 107
Middle years
126 358 000
123 313 869
123 719 324
Secondary education
109 932 000
110 299 654
112 709 187
584 000
760 691
383 886
12 615 000
12 790 982
11 881 435
International education
Tertiary education
Non-Government education
2010–11 final
estimate
% change
3.5%
654 872 164
152 307 000
166 883 826
Primary education
94 866 000
104 349 295
112 470 170
Middle years
39 461 000
42 603 201
44 769 157
Secondary education
17 980 000
19 931 330
20 067 488
Training
96 854 000
98 276 549
Training
96 854 000
98 276 549
885 642 000
924 114 001
Total output budget
38
9.6%
2010–11
expense
1.5%
177 306 815
93 395 858
% change
to final
estimate
-0.6%
6.2%
-5.0%
93 395 858
4.3%
925 574 837
0.2%
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
OUTPUT GROUP:
GOVERNMENT EDUCATION
The department provides and delivers quality educational programs to early years, preschool, primary,
middle, senior and VET students in government schools.
The department also provides funding to CDU.
OUTCOME
Improved educational outcomes for students, particularly Indigenous students, in all key learning areas.
EARLY YEARS
The department provides policy advice, standard setting and monitoring, and financial assistance that
supports and promotes children’s early learning and development as well as parenting information and
education. Activities include assistance to, and regulation of, child care services and provision of resources
to toy libraries, mobile services, playgroups and parenting support and information programs.
Table 5: Early years performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Subscribed child care places
4066
4458
41531
95%
95%
95%
Timeliness
Child care subsidy payments made on time
Based on 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers and data collected by DET Early Childhood Policy and Regulations.
1
Reduction in the number of childcare places is related to closure of several licensed childcare providers in the NT.
OVERVIEW OF THE CHILDREN’S SERVICES SECTOR
The children’s services sector in the NT provides a range of care, education and recreation programs for
children from birth to 12 years of age. Services operate throughout the NT, in urban, rural and remote
areas. There are currently 80 licensed long day care services in the NT providing approximately 4153
childcare places.
It is estimated there are about 263 licensed and unlicensed children’s services in the NT including long
day care, family day care, outside school hours care services and remote crèches. All licensed child care
centres in the NT are eligible for the NT Child Care Subsidy. The subsidy aims to help operators to contain
the cost of care for families and maintain child care fees at an acceptable level. In 2010–11 a total of
$3.8 million was paid to licensed children’s services providers.
39
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Table 6: Licensed and unlicensed children’s services, June 2011
Number of services
Number of places
Remote
Urban
Total
Remote
Urban
Total
4
74
78
151
3950
4101
nil
2
2
nil
52
52
Licensed
Long day care
Three-year-old kindy
Total
80
4153
Unlicensed
Outside school hours care (OSHC)
programs1 (including before school, after
school and vacation care)
Family day care providers4
Creche/remote child care centres
622
783
140
–
–
–
nil
5
5
–
–
–
38
–
–
38
5
Total
183
–
Source: DET Early Childhood Policy and Regulations and DEEWR.
1
OSHC services are currently not licensed under the Care and Protection of Children Act.
2
Data provided by DEEWR as at 30 June 2011.
3
Data provided by NT Outside School Hours Care Association.
4
Family day care services are currently not licensed under the Care and Protection of Children Act.
5
Data provided by DEEWR as at 30 June 2011.
Figure 22: Children aged 0–12, average attendance (hours per week) at Australian Government
approved child care services, 2010
45
40
Average Hours
35
30
40.2
35.4
25.7
29.3
27.2
25
26.6
19.3
20
15
11.8
11.2
7.4
10
5
0
0.0
Centre-based
long day care
Family day care
Vacation care
NT
Source: Table 3A.12 ROGS 2011
40
OSH care
Australia
Occasional care
0.0
Other care
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
PRESCHOOL EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.1]
The department provides access to optional part-time or full-time schooling in government schools for
children aged from four years in urban areas and from three years in remote areas.
Table 7: Preschool education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total preschool enrolments
3113
3152
3262
Indigenous student preschool enrolments
1289
1328
1352
Average attendance rates
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
89%
63%
89%
64%
89.7%
64.2%
Students attending over 80%
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
95%
21%
95%
23%
96.0%
31.6%
Quality
Based on 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers and DET enrolment and attendance collections data
In 2010 total preschool student enrolments represented 9.9% of the government school cohort. School
is not compulsory for children until they are six, however children turning four on or before 30 June, are
eligible to enrol in a regular preschool program at the start of the school year in urban areas and, when
accompanied by a responsible carer, from three years in remote areas. Children turning four after 30 June
are eligible to enrol in a preschool program on or after their fourth birthday, if places are available and with
the understanding that the child will access more than 12 months of preschool.
Figure 23: Preschool enrolments by Indigenous status (government schools) 2006 to 2010
3500
3000
3272
3041
3113
1914
1791
1824
1910
1372
1250
1289
1352
2007
2008
2009
2010
Enrolments
2500
2000
1894
3262
3286
1500
1000
1378
500
0
2006
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census August 2010
Figure 23 indicates there has been a small increase (4.8 per cent) in total preschool enrolments for 2010,
compared to 2009. The proportion of Indigenous children who were enrolled in and attending an early
childhood education program, calculated as a share of population, was 39.5 per cent. This is an increase
of 0.6 per cent above the 2009 figure11.
11
Bilateral Agreement on Achieving Universal Access to Early Childhood Education, Annual Report 2010
41
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
PRIMARY EDUCATION [T2030:ED1.2;2.2]
The department provides comprehensive education programs for students in government primary schools
from Transition to Year 6. This includes development and delivery of curriculum programs to develop the
knowledge, attitudes, skills and processes that promote children’s learning and development and prepare
them for further schooling.
Table 8: Primary education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total primary school student enrolments
18 198
18 290
18 492
8458
8550
8885
135
136
138
Non-Indigenous
93%
93%
93%
Indigenous
71%
72%
69%
100%
100%
97%
Indigenous primary student enrolments
Schools providing primary education
Quality
Average attendance rates1
Students attending over 80%
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
32%
33%
32%
NAPLAN*
NAPLAN*
NAPLAN*
Year 3
88%
89%
90%
Year 5
86%
87%
87%
Year 3
44%
47%
53%
Year 5
33%
36%
34%
Year 3
91%
92%
92%
Year 5
86%
87%
88%
Year 3
40%
43%
42%
Year 5
30%
33%
32%
Year 3
90%
91%
93%
Year 5
91%
92%
93%
Year 3
43%
46%
51%
Year 5
52%
55%
42%
Students achieving National Minimum Standard in:
Reading – Non-Indigenous students:
Reading – Indigenous students:
Writing – Non-Indigenous students:
Writing – Indigenous students:
Numeracy – Non-Indigenous students:
Numeracy – Indigenous students:
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, and 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
1
The drop in attendance rates from 2009 to 2010 is coupled with a corresponding increase in enrolment numbers.
* National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy
42
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 24: Primary enrolments by Indigenous status (government schools) 2006 to 2010
25 000
19 941
20 445
10 947
10 941
8994
9504
2006
2007
Enrolments
20 000
18 488
18 198
18 492
9781
9740
9607
8707
8458
8885
2008
2009
2010
15 000
10 000
5000
0
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 24 shows primary enrolments by Indigenous status in government schools from 2006 to 2010. In
2008, with the move to middle years, approximately 2100 Year 7 students moved from government primary
schools to government middle schools. This accounts for the large drop in primary enrolments in 2008.
In 2010, Indigenous students represented 48.0 per cent of the primary students in government primary
schools — an increase of 2.9 per cent since 2006.
ENGAGING URBAN STUDENTS
MacFarlane Primary School in the regional town of Katherine is one primary school demonstrating
success through the Engaging Urban Students (EUS) initiative. EUS activities at the school have
contributed to improved attendance and community and family engagement.
The student population at MacFarlane is highly transient, with 178 students enrolled in the school in
2010 and 134 leaving in that year. As with many EUS schools, the school leadership team identified
several issues related to the disadvantaged background and transience of students at the school,
such as low self esteem, loss of cultural and community identity and language barriers. Through EUS
the school was able to enhance their existing student support programs. [T2030:ED2.2]
43
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
MIDDLE YEARS EDUCATION [T2030:ED1.2;2.2]
The department delivers quality education tailored to the specific needs of young adolescents in
government schools from Year 7 to Year 9. The middle years of education transitions students from the
primary to senior years of education.
Since 2008 secondary education in the NT has officially started from Year 7.
Table 9: Middle years education performance measures
Performance measures
Quantity
Total middle years student enrolments
Indigenous middle years student enrolments
Schools providing middle years education
Quality
Average attendance rates
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Students attending over 80%
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Students achieving National Minimum Standard in:
Reading – Non-Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
Reading – Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
Writing – Non-Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
Writing – Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
Numeracy – Non-Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
Numeracy – Indigenous students:
Year 7
Year 9
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
58671
25003
88
5915
2577
88
60122
26794
89
89%
68%
89%
70%
89.0%
64.2%
99%
19%
NAPLAN*
99%
21%
NAPLAN*
93%
15%
NAPLAN*
88%
86%
89%
87%
91%
89%
40%
35%
43%
38%
43%
36%
85%
79%
86%
80%
85%
82%
30%
27%
33%
30%
31%
31%
91%
92%
92%
93%
92%
90%
47%
48%
50%
51%
44%
39%
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, and 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
* National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy
Note: Dual enrolled students at NTOEC have been included from 2009–10 onwards.
1
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (62 total students) but they have been included in this report.
2
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (49 total students,) but they have been included in this report.
3
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (33 Indigenous students) but they have been included in this report.
4
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (26 Indigenous students) but they have been included in this report.
44
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 25: Secondary enrolments by Indigenous status (government schools) 2006 to 2010
12 000
Enrolments
10 000
8000
9708
9255
6073
5796
6000
4000
2000
3635
2006
11 053
11 283
11 224
6723
6878
6761
4330
4405
4463
2008
2009
2010
3459
2007
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 25 shows secondary enrolments by Indigenous status in government schools from 2006 to 2010.
The move to middle years accounts for the large increase in secondary enrolments in 2008 which
corresponds with the decline in primary enrolments. With the introduction of middle years in 2007,
Year 10 students were reclassified from junior secondary to senior years. In 2008 Year 7 students were
reclassified from primary to middle years which accounts for the large increase in middle years enrolments
in 2008. There was a slight decrease in non-Indigenous secondary school enrolments (-1.7 per cent)
from 2009 to 2010.
In 2010, Indigenous students represented 39.8 per cent of all secondary students (middle and
senior years).
45
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
PERSUASIVE TEXT GOES
TO THE CIRCUS
A class of Year 5/6 English Second Language
(ESL) students at Sadadeen Primary School
have offered to join the circus. To develop
their persuasive writing ability, the students
wrote to Circus Oz, describing their hulahoop skills, hip-hop talents, gymnastics and
juggling, to persuade the circus to offer them
a job. The students received letters back from
Circus Oz who responded from Granada in
Spain, where they were performing at the
time. While impressed with the students’
skills, initiative and persuasive ability, the
circus (luckily for Sadadeen) did not ask
the students to audition at this stage. The
exercise proved a great example of writing for
a real purpose and the ESL students treasure
their letters from Circus Oz. [T2030:ED1.2]
Figure 26: Middle years enrolments by Indigenous status (government schools) 2007 to 2010
8000
7000
6172
Enrolments
6000
5000
3360
3367
3333
2267
2812
2000
1000
6012
4090
4000
3000
5867
2679
2500
1823
2007
2008
Indigenous
2009
Non-Indigenous
2010
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
In 2010, Indigenous students represented 44.6% of all middle years students in government schools. For
the first time, this was the same as the overall proportion of Indigenous students in government schools.
In previous years there was always a smaller proportion of Indigenous students in secondary education.
46
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
SENIOR YEARS EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.3;2.4]
The department provides access to full-time or part-time secondary schooling in government schools for
students from Year 10 to Year 12. This includes delivery of quality education to promote and enhance the
intellectual, personal and social development of students, including VET.
Table 10: Senior years education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total senior years student enrolments
54161
4909
52122
Indigenous senior years student enrolments
1905
3
1674
17844
56
57
56
Schools providing senior years education or
senior-aged programs
Students enrolled in one or more VET subjects
1827
1924
1730
16 804
17 301
14 609
Non-Indigenous
88%
89%
87.3%
Indigenous
72%
73%
68.6%
100%
100%
82.8%
30%
31%
24.9%
Students who qualified for the Northern Territory
Certificate of Education
752
765
739
Indigenous students who qualified for the Northern
Territory Certificate of Education
103
105
99
VET modules undertaken
Quality
Average attendance rates
Students attending over 80%
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, and 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
Note: Dual enrolled students at NTOEC have been included from 2009–10 onwards.
1
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (731 total students) but they have been included in this report.
2
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (628 total students,) but they have been included in this report.
3
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (405 Indigenous students) but they have been included in this report.
4
Budget Paper 3 excludes NTOEC enrolments (320 Indigenous students) but they have been included in this report.
47
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 27: Senior years enrolments by Indigenous status (government schools) 2007 to 2010
6000
5165
5416
4881
5212
Enrolments
5000
4000
3511
3529
3000
3428
3363
2000
1636
1518
1905
1784
2007
2008
2009
2010
1000
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
In 2010, 34.2 per cent of senior years students were Indigenous. This is a decrease of one per cent from
2009. This is also significantly lower than the number of Indigenous students in middle years education and
the overall proportion of Indigenous students in government education (44.6 per cent).
Figure 28: Secondary school students (government schools) enrolled in VET 2006 to 2010
2000
1800
Enrolments
1400
1200
1827
1762
1600
1730
1690
1437
1000
800
600
400
200
0
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using Australian Vocational Education and Training Management
Information Statistical Standard (AVETMISS) data
Figure 28 shows secondary school students enrolled in VET subjects in government schools from 2006 to
2010. In 2010 there was a decrease of 97 students enrolled in VET subjects (-5.3 per cent).
48
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 29: VET units undertaken by government students 2006 to 2010
18 000
Number of VET Units
16 000
14 000
12 000
16 804
15 807
15 197
2007
2008
14 609
14 256
10 000
8 000
6 000
4 000
2 000
2006
2009
2010
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using AVETMISS data
Figure 29 shows the number of VET units undertaken by secondary school students from 2006 to 2010.
In 2010 there was a decrease of 2195 VET units undertaken (-13.1 per cent) in line with the decrease in
number of students enrolled.
APPARENT RETENTION RATE
Apparent retention rate is based on the assumption that the same cohort of students will continue to
progress from one year to the next. It does not consider:
movement of students in and out of the NT
movement of students between government and non-government sectors
part-time students
students repeating a year
students completing their Northern Territory Certificate of Education (NTCE) over three years rather
than two
participation in VET and other training.
Figures 30 and 31 show the apparent retention rate of students in government schools as a percentage
of students. For the 2010 data, the Year 12 enrolments at August 2010 are compared with the Year 8
enrolments at August 2006, and the Year 10 enrolments at August 2008. The proportion of how many
enrolments remain is then calculated. Apparent retention is an aggregate and not constructed by tracking
individual students.
49
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 30: Year 8 to Year 12 apparent retention 2006 to 2010
100%
90%
92.3%
Apparent Retention Rate
80%
88.3%
85.8%
81.1%
79.3%
74.4%
70.9%
70%
65.1%
63.3%
60%
50%
44.1%
43.5%
41.8%
40%
36.9%
61.8%
33.0%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2006
2007
2008
Indigenous
2010
2009
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
The apparent retention rate for Year 8 to 12 has consistently decreased since 2006. The apparent retention
rate for Year 8 to 12 Indigenous students has consistently decreased since 2007.
Figure 31: Year 10 to Year 12 apparent retention 2006 to 2010
100%
97.3% 87.8%
Apparent Retention Rate
90%
88.4%
70%
86.6%
79.8%
80%
64.6%
59.4%
60%
86.6%
75.7%
86.2%
75.0%
70.9%
54.4%
54.3%
50%
44.6%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2006
2007
2008
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
2009
2010
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
The apparent retention rate for Year 10 to 12 students decreased from 2006 to 2009, and increased in
2010. The apparent retention rate for Year 10 to 12 Indigenous students decreased by 20 per cent between
2006 and 2009, but increased by nearly 10 per cent in 2010.
50
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NORTHERN TERRITORY CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.3]
The NTCE generally takes a minimum of two years to complete. It requires students to complete a pattern
of studies in Stage 1 (usually Year 11) and Stage 2 (usually Year 12) subjects. To qualify for a NTCE,
students must record achievement in 22 units and achieve satisfactory results in at least 16 of them.
The 2010 year was the final year of the NTCE. From 2011, students will complete the NT Certificate of
Education and Training (NTCET) which utilises performance standards in assessment. Students must
record satisfactory achievement at a C grade or better in 140 of 200 credits as well as gain a C grade or
better for the compulsory literacy, numeracy and Personal Learning Plan subject. Recognised learning
(including VET) can count for up to 160 credits at both Stage 1 and 2 towards a NTCET.
Figure 32: NTCE completions in government schools by Indigenous status 2006 to 2010
900
Number of Completions
800
724
730
632
656
92
74
2006
2007
755
752
739
649
649
640
106
103
99
2008
2009
2010
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE) Board of
South Australia (SA) data
There has been a steady increase in the number of students in government schools achieving the
NTCE in the past five years. Between 2009 and 2010 there was an overall decrease of 1.7 per cent
(13 students). Since 2006 there has been a net increase of 2.1 per cent. In 2010 the number of
Indigenous students receiving the NTCE was 99 students, a decrease of 3.9 per cent since 2009. The
number of non-Indigenous students achieving the NTCE decreased by 1.4 per cent for the same period.
51
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Improving NTCE completion rates is a priority for the department and there is a range of strategies and
initiatives being implemented to increase the number of students who complete their senior secondary
education. The new NTCET (the first certificates will be awarded in 2011) provides more options for
students who want a more direct path into the workforce. The NTCET remains the main credential for entry
into university and further training. Students wanting to gain entry to university will still need to complete
the correct combination of subjects required for an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) (formerly
known as a Tertiary Entrance Rank) and any pre-requisite subjects stipulated by the university course for
which they are applying.
The NTCET also offers senior secondary students a wide range of accredited activities to achieve their
NTCET, including school subjects, VET and vocational training courses, university subjects, online
courses, regular experience in a work environment, and community-based activities. Young people are
able to leave school well on the way to a trade or para-professional qualification.
Students who are active in their community gain valuable work and citizenship skills and the NTCET
enables them to count certain forms of community learning towards their NTCET. This may include
recognised volunteer training such as Country Fire Service training or the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award.
It may also include work experience and other roles such as being a caregiver or volunteering for a
community service organisation.
Figure 33: Average Tertiary Entrance Rank comparison 2006 to 2010 (government and
non-government schools)
74
72
70.9
71.6
70.9
71.8
72.2
Average TER
70
68
66
65.6
66.1
68.1
64.7
67.0
2008
2009
64
62
60
2006
2007
NT
2010
SA
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using SACE Board of South Australia data
Figure 33 shows an increase in the average Tertiary Entrance Rank12 (TER) score for NT students from
2006 to 2010 (+2.5 points). This increase is greater than the improvement in average TER scores of SA
students for the same period (+1.3 points).
12
In 2010, all Australian states and territories (except Qld) introduced the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) to describe
their Year 12 rank. There is no change from the way in which the previous TER was calculated
52
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION [T2030:ED3.7]
The department provides policy advice, facilitates teacher and student exchanges, manages the fee-paying
overseas student program and hosts and organises study tour groups.
Table 11: International education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Fee paying overseas students
63
60
60
Study tours
0
3
3
Student and teacher exchange program
9
12
61
90%
90%
90%
Quality
International students achieving minimum
requirement
Based on figures from the 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers, and data collected by DET Training and Higher Education
1
The number of students and teachers participating in the NT/Indonesia Teacher and Student Exchange Program was less than
anticipated because the Indonesian provinces of Bali and Nusa Tenggara Barat chose not to send representatives in 2010.
Figure 34: Number of international students by sector in the NT 2006 to 2010
80
71
Number of Students
70
60
63
55
40
51
46
50
46
60
55
50
44
30
20
10
0
2006
2007
2008
Government
2009
2010
Non-Government
Source: DET Training and Higher Education Division (International Services Branch)
The number of international student enrolments in NT Government schools remained relatively steady
despite a decline in student numbers in all sectors Australia-wide. Vietnam remains the major source of
international students that enrol in NT Government schools.
53
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
TERTIARY EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.5]
The department provides funding to CDU and assistance to tertiary level students. The department also
manages the accreditation of higher education courses and approval processes, ensuring the NT higher
education sector achieves and maintains high standards that are recognised nationally and internationally.
Table 12: Tertiary education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Operating grant to CDU
$7.45M
$7.67M
$7.66M
Other tertiary assistance
$0.4M
$1.12M
$0.4M1
100%
100%
100%
Timeliness
Payment of grant as scheduled
Based on the 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers
1
A change in the profile of teaching scholarship holders decreased the cost impacts of qualification completions ie, more students are
undertaking a one year program rather than a four year program. The number of scholarships holders is averaged at 21 per year.
The department continues to be engaged in negotiations and planning with the Australian Government
and the NT higher education sector to implement national reforms that help achieve economic, cultural
and social outcomes for Territorians through better access to, and delivery of, high quality education and
training.
A key reform is the establishment of the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) to
oversee regulation of the higher education sector undertaken by states and territories, and for the quality
assurance activities currently undertaken by the Australian Universities Quality Agency. The department
continued to work with the Australian Government and other states and territories to establish TEQSA.
At 30 June 2011, two registered non-self accrediting institutions were operating in the NT, offering three
higher education courses under mutual recognition arrangements — Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice,
Graduate Diploma of In-house Legal Practice and Graduate Diploma in Chartered Accounting.
The department continues to provide support for the two self accrediting public institutions, CDU and
BIITE, in addition to financial support for the CDU Institute of Advanced Studies and to host the United
Nations University Centre of Excellence in Traditional Knowledge.
54
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
OUTPUT GROUP:
NON-GOVERNMENT EDUCATION
The department provides financial and other support to help non-government schools to deliver quality
education across the NT.
OUTCOME
Access to quality education alternatives for NT students.
PRIMARY EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.2]
The department administers policies and Australian and NT Government grants for non-government
schools that provide primary education.
Table 13: Non-government primary education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total primary student enrolments
5042
5135
5171
Indigenous primary student enrolments
1269
1329
1346
29
29
28
100%
100%
100%
Schools providing primary education
Quality
Grants administered in accordance with policy
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, and 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
Figure 35: Primary enrolments by Indigenous status (non-government schools) 2006 to 2010
6 000
Enrolments
5 000
5461
5507
4922
5042
5171
3773
3825
4 000
4065
4127
3605
3 000
2 000
1 000
1396
1380
1317
1269
1346
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 35 shows primary enrolments by Indigenous status in non-government schools from 2006 to
2010. In 2008, with the change to middle years education in the NT, approximately 1000 Year 7 students
were reclassified from primary school to middle school (secondary). This accounts for the large drop in
primary enrolments in 2008. In 2010, Indigenous students represented 26.0% of the primary students in
non-government primary schools. This compares with 48.0% Indigenous students in government primary
schools in 2010.
55
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
MIDDLE YEARS EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.2]
The department administers policies and Australian and NT Government grants for non-government
schools that provide middle years education.
Table 14: Non-government middle years education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total middle years student enrolments
3183
3236
3250
Indigenous middle years student enrolments
1036
1049
1028
23
23
24
100%
100%
100%
Schools providing middle years education
Quality
Grants administered in accordance with policy
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, and 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
Figure 36: Middle years enrolments by Indigenous status (non-government schools) 2007 to 2010
3500
3000
3218
3183
3250
2103
2147
2222
1036
1028
Enrolments
2500
2000
2237
1500
1000
500
1335
902
1115
0
2007
2008
Indigenous
2009
Non-Indigenous
2010
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 36 shows secondary enrolments in middle years by Indigenous status in non-government schools
from 2007 to 2010. With the introduction of middle years in 2007, approximately 800 non-government
Year 10 students were re-classified from junior secondary to senior years. In 2008, approximately
1000 Year 7 students were re-classified from primary to middle years, which accounts for the large
increase in middle years enrolments in 2008.
Enrolments have remained relatively steady since 2008. Where there has been an increase in
non-Indigenous enrolments, there has been a slight decrease in Indigenous enrolments.
Indigenous students represented 31.6 per cent of all middle years students in non-government secondary
schools in 2010. This compares to 44.6 per cent Indigenous middle years students in government
secondary schools.
56
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
SENIOR YEARS EDUCATION [T2030:ED2.3]
The department administers policies and Australian and NT Government grants for non-government
schools that provide senior years education.
Table 15: Non-government senior years education performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Total senior years student enrolments
1685
1779
1829
Indigenous senior student enrolments
472
540
559
Schools providing senior education
Students enrolled in one or more VET subjects
VET modules undertaken
17
17
19
448
419
354
3659
3015
2948
297
282
302
51
51
40
100%
100%
100%
Quality
Students who qualified for the NTCE
Indigenous students who qualified for the
NTCE
Grants administered in accordance with policy
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census, 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers and data collected by
DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning.
Figure 37: Senior years enrolments by Indigenous status in non-government schools 2007 to 2010
2000
1800
Enrolments
1600
1400
1686
1829
1775
1685
1200
1000
1175
1192
1270
1213
800
600
400
200
583
511
559
472
0
2007
2008
Indigenous
2009
Non-Indigenous
2010
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 37 shows senior years enrolments by Indigenous status in non-government schools from 2007 to
2010. In 2010 there was an increase in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. Of the senior years
cohort in 2010, 30.6 per cent of students were Indigenous. This is only slightly lower than the proportion of
Indigenous senior years students in government schools, which is 34.2 per cent.
57
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 38: Non-government students enrolled in one or more VET subjects 2006 to 2010
500
450
Number of Students
400
350
448
447
404
300
354
340
250
200
150
100
50
0
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using AVETMISS data
Figure 39: VET units undertaken by non-government school students 2006 to 2010
4 500
Number of VET Units
4 000
4266
3 500
3659
3 000
3224
2 500
2948
2927
2 000
1 500
1 000
500
2006
2007
2008
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching and Phases of Learning using AVETMISS data
58
2009
2010
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 40: Total enrolments (all year levels including preschool) by Indigenous status in
non-government schools 2006 to 2010
12 000
Enrolments
10 000
8 000
6 000
10 063
10 173
10 516
7272
7480
3148
2901
3036
2008
2009
2010
9368
9684
6609
6736
6915
2759
2948
2006
2007
4 000
2 000
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
Figure 41: Enrolments by level in non-government schools 2006 to 2010
12 000
Enrolments
10 000
8 000
3766
1829
1686
1775
1685
2237
3218
3183
3250
5042
5171
6 000
5461
5507
141
254
148
263
266
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
4922
4 000
2 000
Preschool
Primary
Secondary
Middle Years
Senior Years
Source: DET Performance and Data Management Age Grade Census
59
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 42: NTCE completions in non-government schools by Indigenous status 2006 to 2010
350
Number of Completions
300
250
255
209
200
150
302
246
262
203
213
52
51
51
2007
2008
2009
175
100
50
297
264
34
40
0
2006
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Total
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching, and Phases of Learning using SACE Board of SA data
60
2010
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NON-GOVERNMENT EDUCATION
SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES AND ACHIEVEMENTS
The Non-Government Schools Ministerial Advisory Council provides strategic cross-sectoral governance
on implementation of legislation, programs and initiatives that relate to the non-government school sector,
including the Smarter Schools National Partnerships. Regular meetings are held with the council to advise
of progress on cross-sectoral initiatives and address any issues arising with the implementation and
monitoring of the Smarter Schools National Partnerships.
In 2010 a major achievement of the council was the commencement of new legislation and regulations
covering the non-government school sector. The Education Act amendment relating to non-government
schools increased registration and operational requirements of non-government schools and included
establishment of policies and structures for the registration of schools, and establishment of an
Assessment and Investigation Panel and associated processes and policies. The council oversaw
establishment of a pilot program for routine assessments to refine the procedures for the five-yearly
assessments of non-government schools.
Representatives from the department attended the annual Non-Government School Program Managers
Meeting, held in Canberra in October 2010. This national meeting is designed to help state and
territory government officials contribute to policy development and improve the management of
non-government school programs in the states and territories. Meetings are hosted by each jurisdiction
on a rotational basis.
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
The Capital and Interest Subsidy scheme helps non-government schools with funding for planned capital
works in priority areas. The Capital and Interest Subsidy scheme policy was refined in 2010.
In 2010–11, three new or revised infrastructure projects were approved for funding under the scheme:
Palmerston Christian College
Sattler Christian College (formerly Litchfield Christian School)
middle school facilities for The Essington School Darwin.
Non-government schools received funding under the Back to School scheme which provides a
$75 voucher per eligible student to offset the cost of textbooks, uniforms and other items.
FUTURE PRIORITIES
The Non-Government Schools Ministerial Advisory Council will continue to monitor the progress of the
Smarter Schools National Partnerships implementation across the non government school sector.
The Non-Government Schools Ministerial Advisory Council will monitor the implementation of policies
for the registration, accreditation and review of non-government schools.
Service provision arrangements and resourcing for non-government schools will be reviewed.
61
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
OUTPUT GROUP: TRAINING
The department provides VET to meet the present and future needs of industry and the community,
and which is nationally recognised to ensure ongoing compliance with the Australian Quality Training
Framework. The department also regulates and funds registered training organisations (RTOs) to deliver
responsive training programs leading to employment, particularly for Indigenous Territorians living in
regional and remote areas of the NT.
OUTCOME [T2030:ED1.4;2.4;2.5;2.6;2.8]
Maximised training opportunities for Territorians.
Table 16: Training performance measures
Performance measures
2009–10 actual
2010–11 estimate
2010–11 actual
Quantity
Annual hours of curriculum delivered
(DEEWR EAED)*
3.9M
3.7M
4.3M1
Number of students enrolled in VET2
23 500
24 000
24 054
Apprentice and trainee commencements2,3
2630
2750
3034
Apprentice and trainees in training
3700
3800
4000
100%
100%
100%
2
Quality
Registered training organisations’ compliance
with Australian Quality Training Framework
(Audit)
Proportion of invalid student enrolments (audit)4
Successful training completions2,5
2%
2%
1.6%
70%
70%
75%
95%
95%
95%
100%
100%
100%
Timeliness
Resource agreements issues and monitored
within appropriate timeframe
Agreed timeframes met for submission of
information to national agencies
Source: DET Training and Higher Education Division. Based on 2010–11 and 2011–12 budget papers.
* DEEWR Enrolment Activity End Date
1
From 2010 this figure incorporates more than just recurrent funding and caution should be used when comparing to previous years.
2
Relates to calendar year.
3
Commencements relate to contract registrations for the calendar year.
4
Public providers only.
5
Successful unit enrolment completions include apprentices, trainees and students undertaking short VET courses.
The department continued to fund the six industry Training Advisory Councils (TACs) in 2010–11. The TACs:
provide input on behalf of NT industry into the development, maintenance and review of
training packages
advise government on training package implementation in the NT
62
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
provide a link between business, industry and government on labour market policy, planning and
workforce issues and VET planning, policy and practice
undertake activities to increase awareness of the VET system across their industry sectors.
The NT achieved a record number of apprentices and trainees in-training in 2010–11 — over 4700.
At least 41 per cent of apprentices/trainees in training are in traditional trades in skill shortage areas.
Over the last three years, more than 3895 Territorians completed an apprenticeship or traineeship,
1485 of which were in occupations on the NT Occupation Shortage List.
Figure 43: Apprentice and trainee numbers (’000) 2006 to 2010
Number of Apprentices and Trainees
4.5
3.9
4.0
3.5
3.3
3.3
3.5
2.8
2.9
2.9
2007
2008
2009
3.0
2.5
2.0
2.6
4.1
3.1
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
2006
In-training
2010
Commencements
Source: DET Training and Higher Education using AVETMISS data
Apprenticeship and traineeship commencements increased by seven per cent from 2009 to 2010,
and there was a five per cent increase in numbers in training for the same period.
Figure 44: Annual hours of curriculum for VET 2006 to 2010 (millions)
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.763
3.804
2006
2007
Number of Hours
3.5
3.684
3.872
4.346
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
2008
2009
2010
Source: DET Training and Higher Education using AVETMISS data
Note: from 2010 this figure incorporates more than just recurrent funding and caution should be used when comparing to
previous years.
63
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 44 shows the total number of hours of VET delivered in the NT from 2006 to 2010. The number of
training hours has continued to increase since 2008, with an 18 per cent increase between 2008 and 2010.
The DEEWR Enrolment Activity End Date excludes students continuing their unit enrolment into the
following calendar year. It includes the full number of annual hours of curriculum activity undertaken
through Recognition of Prior Learning.
Figure 45: Annual hours of curriculum for VET 2006 to 2010 by Indigenous status (millions)
3.0
Number of Hours
2.5
2.0
1.5
2.627
2.186
1.672
2.286
2.138
2.280
1.592
1.536
1.580
1.684
0.041
0.018
0.020
0.047
0.035
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
1.0
0.5
0.0
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Not Stated
Source: DET Training and Higher Education using AVETMISS data
Notes: Figures for 2008 exclude invalid enrolment rates. Exclusion of invalid enrolment rates does not apply to figures in previous
years.
Figure 45 shows the total number of hours of VET delivered to Indigenous and non-Indigenous students in
the NT from 2006 to 2010. Curriculum hours for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students increased
between 2009 and 2010.
WORLD OF WORK
Twenty-one students from Casuarina Senior College were recently given the opportunity to participate
in the World of Work program. This national initiative builds the skills and beliefs necessary for
young people to make a successful transition into the workforce. Students gained valuable skills and
received some meaningful insights about life beyond school. [T2030:ED2.4]
64
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
PROGRESS AGAINST DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
STRATEGIC PLAN 2011–14
This section provides an overview of the department’s activities in 2010–11 that contributed to achieving
key initiatives identified under the DET Strategic Plans 2009–12 and 2011–14.
A review of the DET Strategic Plan 2009–12 was done in November 2010. The refreshed DET Strategic
Plan 2011–14 was released in March 2011. It contains several initiatives carried over from the 2009–12
plan, but also includes several new strategic priorities and initiatives.
Quality Strategies and Programs
ALL STAGES OF LEARNING
PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT [T2030:ED3]
The department refreshed the Accountability and Performance Improvement Framework (APIF) for schools.
Schools and regional directorates worked to align their improvement planning to the refreshed APIF. This
included developing whole-school literacy and numeracy planning and identifying explicit targets in their
operational plans around literacy and numeracy, which align to regional and systemic targets.
LITERACY AND NUMERACY [T2030:ED1.2]
The Prioritising Literacy and Numeracy 2010–12 strategy was launched on 1 July 2010. It aims to
improve students’ literacy and numeracy achievement by working at a whole of school level to develop
professional learning communities led by the principal and school leadership team. Schools were
supported through their regional structures to:
» implement literacy and numeracy support materials for teachers of students in remote and very
remote schools
» de-clutter and prioritise curriculum offerings and analyse their performance data through coaching
and mentoring professional learning approaches
» apply planning tools such as the T-9 Net.
The department developed the Evidence Based Literacy and Numeracy Practices Framework to guide
system endorsement of literacy and numeracy programs and to support schools and regions to select
quality, evidence-based approaches that support their whole-of-school improvement and classroom
program development.
In late 2010, Professor Geoff Masters at the Australian Council for Educational Research was
commissioned to do a review and evaluation of initiatives being undertaken by the department to
improve educational outcomes of students — particularly in the areas of literacy and numeracy.
Preliminary strategic advice resulting from this review will play a key role in identifying strategies and
directions in relation to improving literacy and numeracy outcomes for Territory students.
65
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
DIAGNOSTIC KEYPOINTS [T2030:ED1.2]
Following completion of the National Literacy and Numeracy Diagnostic Assessment Project, the
department endorsed a range of diagnostic assessment tools to help allocate resources and target
effective interventions for students identified as being ‘at risk’. A dedicated and comprehensive
assessment website is being constructed to support teachers to develop and improve their assessment
literacy. This website will house a Diagnostic Assessment Selector function to support schools in
making informed choices regarding diagnostic assessments. Schools across all regions were supported
to implement the mandatory Assessment of Student Competencies for students on entry to Transition,
which started in 2011. All Transition students are to be screened using this instrument enabling early
identification of students ‘at risk’ of not progressing in their learning.
Using National Partnership funding from the Australian Government, a position was established to
undertake research and development on common assessment tasks and marking guides for teachers
of students nearing the end of Year 1 to identify students potentially ‘at risk’ of not meeting national
minimum standards in Year 3. The initial focus of this work will be dedicated to developing oral language
(listening and speaking) common assessment tasks and associated marking guides.
STRONG SUPPORT FOR LEARNERS OF ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL) AND
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) [T2030:ED1.2;3.3]
The department continued to offer the Graduate Certificate Education (Teachers of English to Speakers
of Other Languages for Indigenous Learners — or TESOL) as part of a joint initiative with CDU. This
included offering the course to teachers who are new to the NT and working in remote schools. In
2011, the course was offered through orientation recall so teachers, having experienced the demands
of working in remote schools, could apply specific context knowledge to their learning program.
Thirty-nine teachers pursued this option. The department worked to finalise an agreement with CDU for
the ongoing provision of the qualification. A range of tools, including a website, online discussion forum
and newsletter have been established to encourage teachers to network and share practice as well as
provide and seek support and assistance.
The ESL for Indigenous Language Speaking Students (Early Childhood) Program continued to provide
professional learning on teaching spoken English, with a focus on Year 1 students and, using a regional
support model. Regional project officers were involved in moderation and validation processes to
ensure accurate measurement of progress of English as an additional language or dialect (EAL/D)
learners and informed school planning through timely and accurate feedback. Regional departmental
project officers continued to work with remote schools on whole school approaches to ESL teaching
across the curriculum to support teachers’ professional development and students’ improved outcomes.
The department continued to have strong involvement with the Australian Curriculum and Reporting
Authority (ACARA) on developing and refining Phase 1 of the Australian Curriculum (encompassing
Foundation to Year 10) in the learning areas of English, mathematics, science and history. A pilot of
the Phase 1 Australian Curriculum commenced in Term 2, 2011 involving 22 schools across the NT.
Pilot school focus groups were established to identify key implementation issues and identify systemic
support required for full implementation. A phased implementation of the Australian Curriculum is
planned, with English and mathematics in 2012, and science and history in 2013. NT educators were
involved in the early development of Phase 2 of the Australian Curriculum encompassing geography,
languages and the arts.
66
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
SPECIALIST SERVICES [T2030:SOC3.6]
The department introduced a new special education support services (SESS) model. The SESS
provides a range of services and case management for students who require support to access learning
programs. A new funding model for access to learning programs was developed for students with
additional support requirements. The model is consistent with the department’s regionalisation agenda
and provides schools with the flexibility to respond to a diverse range of student needs. The proposed
model will be fully implemented in 2011–12.
The department increased support for students with conductive hearing loss, providing school leaders
and teachers with induction, training and ongoing assessment to ensure learning environments meet
the needs of students with conductive hearing loss.
Professional learning was improved for staff through the use of interactive online technologies
and the continuation of forums provided through the department’s Student Services team. A total of
343 teachers attended forums held in the major regional centres across the NT. One hundred and
thirty-eight teachers, support staff and school leaders completed an online module focusing on
catering for the needs of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. A new behaviour module is under
development and due for release in Semester 2, 2011.
CHILD PROTECTION [T2030:SOC4.3]
The Keeping Safe Child Protection Curriculum (KSCPC) is part of a protective education strategy funded
in 2010–11 by the Australian Government to provide protective behaviour programs for all children.
Training in the KSCPC was provided to over 40 school communities across the NT during 2010–11. The
implementation of protective behaviours has a number of key elements, including:
training school staff to implement protective behaviour programs
engaging community members in the protective behaviour strategy
developing a support network for school-based trainers
providing train the trainer programs and tutor training
developing key staff as instructors.
In 2011–12 the curriculum will incorporate the Mandatory Reporting of Child Harm and Exploitation training
package. The new package will provide staff across all schools with not only the reporting obligations but
also practical and effective strategies to support schools in addressing child protection issues. School
counsellors support training in the department’s mandatory reporting program and implementation of the
KSPC for remote schools.
67
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
EARLY YEARS (UP TO YEAR 3)
UNIVERSAL ACCESS [T2030:ED2.1]
The department continued to work with schools and communities to implement the Bilateral Agreement
on Achieving Universal Access to Early Childhood Education which aims, by 2013, to provide access to
preschool for every child in the year before full-time schooling. Preschool programs are to be delivered
by a four-year university qualified early childhood teacher in accordance with the Early Years Learning
Framework for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year.
Evaluation of the Universal Access pilot programs conducted in 2010 is nearing completion and will inform
development of policy and resourcing models to achieve full implementation by 2013. The department now
operates eight mobile preschool hubs and Universal Access has established a number of outreach and
homelands preschool programs, most notably from Sadadeen Primary School to some of the Alice Springs
town camps and at Nama.
The number of schools across the NT delivering a preschool program for 15 or more hours per week
increased to 70 in 2010–11. This represents 55 per cent of preschools in the NT. In 2010, 36 per cent of
preschoolers attended a preschool that offered 15 hours or more per week and on average preschools
were offering 13.9 hours per week.
STRONG START [T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
MEN MAKE A MEAL OF IT AT
GAPUWIYAK
Families as First Teachers-Indigenous Parent Support
Services (FaFT — IPSS) staff held a successful
cooking session for 10 local men at Gapuwiyak in
March 2011. It was so successful that by the end
of the session about 20 men requested a follow up
session. FaFT — IPSS works with communities and
families to build skills and knowledge to improve
child development outcomes. Cooking and nutrition
knowledge helps families to support the healthy
development of their children. [T2030:ED1.1]
Through the Families as First Teachers
— Indigenous Parenting Support
Services (FaFT — IPSS), early learning
and parenting support programs were
established in 20 communities across the
NT to provide mentoring for families to
support their children’s early literacy and
numeracy development. In 2011, 1470
children and 850 parents participated
in FaFT — IPSS programs. A transition
to preschool strategy was introduced
in each FaFT — IPSS site to help early
identification of the potential preschool
cohort, collection of enrolment details and
increased school readiness of children
and initial participation in preschool
programs.
The Books in Homes strategy provided
806 Indigenous families with children
aged from birth to
three years with valuable book experience
and early language stimulation with
participant children receiving nine free
books a year. Professional staff coach
parents to use books effectively with their
children from birth.
68
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
PRIMARY AND MIDDLE
YEARS (4-9)
SCHOOLS AS POSITIVE LEARNING
PLACES [T2030:ED3.3]
The department continued to increase the
number of schools using School-Wide Positive
Behaviour Support (SWPBS), which is a
decision making framework that aims to improve
student academic and behaviour outcomes.
Training in SWPBS was delivered to 36 schools
in 2010–11, including several remote and very
remote schools.
POSITIVE LEARNING CENTRES
[T2030:SOC4.1;4.6]
MAKING MUSIC IN
ALICE SPRINGS
The NT Music School hosted a visit from
Mt Isa’s Spinifex State College band
in Alice Springs. The visit included an
evening workshop in the refurbished NT
Music School rooms at Centralian Middle
School and performances at Ross Park
and Larapinta primary schools. The 40
visiting Mt Isa students were later joined
by NT Music School students and the
Alice Springs Town Band for a shared
meal and renditions of The Pink Panther,
Lady Marmalade and The Pirates of the
Caribbean. [T2030:KC&I:2.4]
Four Positive Learning Centres (PLC) provided
interventions and specialist programs to
students with severe and persistently disruptive
behaviour in 2010–11. Access to these
programs was developed to be consistent with
the department’s SESS model and managed
through the department’s regional structures.
Students accessed PLC programs through
a combination of outreach, focus group and
individual programs.
VET IN THE MIDDLE [T2030:ED3.5;3.6]
The department worked with industry partners to develop alternative curriculum offerings to provide VET
pathways and opportunities for students in the middle years of schooling. VET in the Middle extends
vocational opportunities and work experience into years 7 to 9. In 2010–11, students were trained in three
qualifications across 10 remote and urban schools. As at June 2011, 10 schools across the NT offered
VET in the Middle programs.
ENGAGING WITH SUCCESS [T2030:ED2.4]
The Sporting Chance Program partially funds school-based academies that use sport as a vehicle to
engage Indigenous secondary students in school to improve their school attendance, education and life
outcomes. The remainder of funding is provided by the NT Government and private sector partners. In
2010–11 the department worked with the Clontarf Foundation and Role Models and Leaders Australia
to expand these programs. The Yirrkala Clontarf Academy was established and the Palmerston Girls
Academy was expanded to include Rosebery Middle School. Scoping was also undertaken for possible
further expansion of the Clontarf and girls academies at middle schools in the Darwin region. At the end of
Term 2, 2011, more than 900 students were enrolled in Clontarf Academies across 12 schools in the NT
and 290 students were enrolled in girls academies.
69
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
SENIOR YEARS (10-12)
CENTRES FOR EXCELLENCE [T2030:ED3.5]
Centres for Excellence began operating at Darwin High School (mathematics/science/engineering)
and Casuarina Senior College (health sciences) in January 2011. Seventy students were selected for
Year 10 or Stage 1 Centres for Excellence programs at both sites. The centres provide specialised
learning opportunities through partnerships with CDU and industry. The department started preliminary
planning in collaboration with Palmerston Senior College and Centralian Senior College to establish
Centres for Excellence in the arts and solar energy and sustainable futures to begin in 2011–12.
Scoping for the establishment of Centres for Excellence in two remote sites was also undertaken.
Barkly College and Katherine High School were identified as the two sites for the centres to be based.
GET VET, GET A FUTURE [T2030:ED2.3;2.4;2.6]
The department worked with industry and employers to target VET training in areas of need and
increase the number of school-based apprenticeships and traineeships. Recognition of VET at both
Stage 1 and 2 in the NTCET began in 2011 and schools made steps to increase opportunities for
students to complete full VET certificates at Certificate II, and above, through their operational planning
processes. A completed VET qualification at Certificate III can be used to calculate an ATAR with
appropriate NTCET completion.
As at June 2011, 55 schools in the NT offered VET in Schools programs, of which 36 were in remote
areas. In 2010, 1938 students achieved at least one unit of competency. A total of 377 students
received a full qualification, of which 84 students were Indigenous. Of the qualifications funded in
2011, 64 per cent of the funding went to qualifications aligned to the key industry areas of construction,
automotive and transport, engineering and mining, and utilities).
VET offerings were expanded in communities where Strong Start Bright Future colleges are to be
piloted. These remote schools were Yirrkala, Yuendumu, West Arnhem College, Groote Eylandt College
and Ntaria.
WORKPLACE LITERACY AND NUMERACY [T2030:ED2.6]
The department, in consultation with industry, developed a series of workplace literacy and numeracy
resources as part of the Australian Government’s Expanding Literacy and Numeracy initiative. These
tools will be selectively rolled out to schools from 2012 and include:
» Pre VET — a vocationally contextualised support identification tool (SIT) for literacy and numeracy
targeted at the middle years.
» workplace literacy and numeracy online nodes to complement Certificate I and II level courses.
Hospitality Certificate I and II nodes are currently in development.
Together with Group Training NT, the department expanded the WorkReady program into remote
schools. The program develops work readiness skills including workplace literacy and numeracy
and enables structured work placement aligned to VET certificates. This program brokers successful
transition to full-time work for students. As at June 2011, 338 students were engaged in the WorkReady
program — 136 of whom are Indigenous. The WorkReady program will be offered at 10 urban schools
in 2011. It is anticipated that 10 remote schools will offer a WorkReady program in Semester 2.
70
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
LEARNING OR EARNING PATHWAYS [T2030:ED3.4]
The Education Act was amended in late 2009 to extend the compulsory years of schooling to the
completion of Year 10 and now requires young people to remain in education or participate in eligible
options of training or employment to age 17. The department communicated with schools, industry and
businesses about the new requirements, data collection and monitoring processes. The department
established a corporate partnerships unit to build partnerships with industries to further expand pathways
to employment for young people.
SENIOR SECONDARY PATHWAYS — BEYOND SCHOOL [T2030:ED3.4]
The Beyond School Guarantee service was established to provide support and pathways to work,
university or training for NTCE/NTCET completers in 2010. The service was offered to 1046 students
in 2011. This is complemented by the Jobs Guarantee, which is designed to support graduates from
Territory Growth Towns which guarantees a pathway to employment within the NT Public Sector
(NTPS). All 2010 NTCE/NTCET graduates in Territory growth towns were offered job guarantee
support, with five students now employed by NT Government departments and a further six at various
pre-employment stages.
INDIGENOUS SCHOOL LEAVERS [T2030:ED3.4]
The Indigenous Students Leadership and Mentorship Program was replaced with the Young Indigenous
Leaders Program in 2011. Delivered by the Foundation for Young Australians, the program is targeted at
Indigenous students in Years 10 to 12. The program fosters skills in leadership, community contribution
and future pathways. Students are supported in the program over a three-year period. In Term 1, 2011,
fifteen students commenced the first stage of the program.
SKILLING TERRITORIANS
PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT [T2030:ED2.4;2.5]
Three of six programs funded under the Equity Training Grants Program in 2010 were completed, with
the remainder progressing well with high levels of student participation. An additional four programs
were funded in 2011 to support learners experiencing barriers to achieving successful training and
employment outcomes. Activities under the programs range from case management support for
students in job placements, tutoring support, specific skills training, and mentoring and life skills training,
including literacy and numeracy. Participants in the various programs include people with a disability,
mature-aged Territorians, parents returning to work, migrants and the very long-term unemployed.
In 2010, 177 Indigenous response training programs were delivered to over 2340 Indigenous
participants located across 49 communities throughout the NT. The program has an annual budget
of $2.6 million and supports training for Indigenous people in regional and remote locations in areas
such as civil construction, driving training and licensing, heavy equipment and machinery operations,
horticulture and pastoral, land management, first aid and occupational health and safety, tour guiding
and hospitality, sport and recreation, retail, textile and fibre arts.
The Pre-Employment Program provided funding for specific industry training for unskilled and
semi-skilled people to help them gain essential skills that will lead to increased opportunities to take
up and successfully complete an apprenticeship, traineeship or gain employment. Programs funded
in 2010–11, included general and civil construction, electrotechnology (career start), Taste of Trades
program, transport and logistics and a marine ranger course.
71
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
MAKING AN IMPACT
The IMPACT — Young Leaders
Making it Happen program held its
second workshop in Darwin. The
IMPACT program works to develop
a community of young Indigenous
students, and helps foster their
skills in leadership, community
contribution and future pathways.
All IMPACT students participated in
the workshop in person or by video
conference where the focus was on
public speaking and presentation.
[T2030:ED2.5]
RE-SKILLING AND UP-SKILLING [T2030:ED2.4;2.5]
The Buildskills Program aims to minimise the effect of current and emerging skill shortages and
increase the productivity of the NT workforce by providing funding for industry specific up-skilling and
re-skilling training for existing workers. A number of training programs were funded in 2010–11 including
environmental management, building and construction, pesticide and chemical use, governance,
international welding and up-skilling for licensed gas fitters and plumbers.
In 2010–11 under the Productivity Places Program, over 180 job seekers completed qualifications in
community services and health, tourism and hospitality, finance, telecommunications, and building and
construction. Of these, 10 participants identified as having a disability, 21 were from a non-English
speaking background and 37 were Indigenous. More than 600 training places were allocated to job
seekers in 2011 and more than 450 existing workers completed qualifications in community services
and health, tourism and hospitality, engineering, mining, primary industry, utilities, telecommunications,
and building and construction. More than 900 training places were allocated to existing workers.
72
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Quality People and Partnerships
GETTING THE RIGHT PEOPLE
NT EARLY CHILDHOOD WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PLAN [T2030:ED3.1]
Through the NT Early Childhood Workforce Development Working Group, the department led a
cross-government project to identify reforms and strategies to address issues affecting the early childhood
workforce. A workforce development pilot project, Building the Remote Workforce, was developed in
consultation with partner agencies including the NT Government departments of Business and Employment,
Health, and Children and Families for a draft NT Early Childhood Workforce Development Plan. Consultation
with stakeholders on the draft plan took place in November 2010 and a NT Early Childhood Development
Workforce Report was finalised. The plan is expected to be released in late 2011.
REMOTE TEACHING SERVICE [T2030:ED3.3;3.6]
Through the Remote Teaching Service (RTS), the department developed and implemented new
screening and selection processes to attract, select and retain suitable quality teachers for remote
schools across the NT. A website for remote teachers provided information and support in the areas
of preparing for, living and teaching in remote contexts and induction programs were provided for
RTS recruits. During 2010, the RTS achieved significant progress locally including establishment of:
» a “Teach Remote” marketing campaign to attract teachers to work in remote schools
» a refined online application process to allow candidates to specifically apply to teach in RTS schools
» an enhanced teacher recruitment website that includes comprehensive information for applicants
interested in teaching at NT remote schools
» innovative screening and assessment tools to assess the suitability of applicants to work in
remote locations
» remote teacher support officers to provide dedicated and personal support to remote teachers
» tailored professional development through recall conferences and online professional support,
as well as national conferences specifically targeting remote teachers and school leaders.
RTS Online, a one-stop shop was also developed to support the well-being and professional learning
of RTS teachers. The site incorporates a three-tiered induction program (system, region and school)
developed around three themes (preparing, living, teaching) and includes contextual orientation,
pre-service training and online professional and personal support for teachers in remote schools.
Under an excellence program, high performing RTS teachers have the opportunity to be recognised
for innovative approaches to literacy and numeracy and attendance improvement in remote schools.
A total of 12 RTS staff were sponsored to attend the Teaching for Learning conference in Melbourne
in Term 2, 2011. This program will be expanded to provide top leadership aspirants in RTS schools with
exclusive professional development opportunities to further support their careers.
The department worked with tertiary institutions to implement a remote pre-service placement program
to increase the potential pool of quality teachers suitable for remote school contexts. Information
sessions were held at four institutions across Australia in 2010–11 and 30 teaching students were
selected for a sponsored four-week teaching practicum in a very remote school.
73
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
DEVELOPING PEOPLE
LEADING LEARNING [T2030:ED3.3]
The department continued its focus on building the capacity of principals and school leaders to
drive school improvement and deliver improved outcomes for students. Through the Centre for
School Leadership, Learning and Development high-quality professional learning and development
programs and activities were provided for school leaders to build leadership capability of current and
aspiring school leaders. Through the centre, research was initiated to provide advice about innovative
leadership and professional learning program content and design to respond to workforce capacity
demands in the NT.
During 2010–11, through the Centre for School Leadership, Learning and Development, several key
professional development initiatives were coordinated:
» Arriving in the Territory teacher orientation program, held in January 2011, with 180 participants
» Preparation for School Leaders program in the Barkly, Alice Springs, Katherine, Palmerston and
Rural and Darwin regions, with 70 aspiring school leaders currently participating in these programs
» Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher (HALT) program, with 35 participants
» 2011 School Leaders’ Conference — Leading Technology for Learning: Time to Refresh was
attended by 260 school leaders from across the NT
» High Potential School Leaders Program with eight participants from across the NT
» research-based professional learning by two principals who received grants as part of a high
performing principal program.
The department also:
» Trialled a range of site-specific inclusive leadership models in very remote schools that provide
enhanced support to principals to develop strong partnerships with local community leaders/families
and enhance the cultural connections with the school and education.
» Introduced a strengthened organisational structure to enhance support for principals through a
regional service delivery model. This included six regionally based Directors of School Performance
to support principals to drive school improvement and enhance performance to deliver improved
outcomes for students.
» Assisted principals to lead school improvement through enhanced regional and school-based support
for literacy and numeracy learning, teaching of multilingual learners, data literacy, diagnostic systems
and business support systems.
» Developed regional plans aligned to system priorities that aim to provide enhanced clarity to
principals about their performance targets and measures of success expected of their schools.
74
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
RAMINGINING EDUCATORS GRADUATE
Congratulations to five assistant teachers at Ramingining School who became the first Territorians
to complete their Diplomas in Education Support. Rosita Gaykamangu, Shirley Nulumburrpurr, Jane
Miyatatawuy, Sophia Yinakarrangar and Linda Wulamana received their graduation diplomas at a
community celebration in December 2010. [T2030:ED3.1]
GROWING OUR OWN [T2030:ED3.3;3.6]
The department developed an Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy,
incorporating a range of site-based learning programs including qualification upgrade programs to allow
staff to continue working and living in their home communities throughout the duration of their course.
These include:
» The More Indigenous Teachers initiative providing fellowship, cadetship and scholarship opportunities
to help Indigenous Territorians to become teachers in the NT. In 2010–11, 12 recipients of these
programs graduated. Currently there are 24 participants in the program.
» The Remote Indigenous Teacher Education (RITE) program, an intensive site-based Bachelor
of Teaching and Learning pre-service teacher program combining formal study with full time
employment for Indigenous assistant teachers. The course was delivered at two sites in 2010–11
and there are currently nine pre-service teachers in this program.
» The Indigenous Teachers Upgrade Program, which assists Indigenous teachers with an Associate
Diploma or Diploma of Teaching to upgrade to a bachelor degree. As at 30 June 2011, eight
participants had graduated from this program.
» Support for sixty Indigenous school based para-professionals across the NT to complete certificates
in Education Support, Children’s Services and Indigenous Education Work.
» Support for 31 FaFT Family Liaison Officers in the 20 Territory Growth Towns who were enrolled
in Certificate III in Community Services Work. About 20 participants are due to graduate in
October 2011.
» A total of 20 FaFT Family Liaison officers completed Indigenous Parent Factor training with early
childhood representatives from schools in the 20 Territory Growth Towns. This training was aligned
to the Certificate III Education Support. Participants are now accredited to deliver the course to
parents in their communities.
75
OVERVIEW
RECOGNISING QUALITY TEACHING [T2030:ED3.3]
The department introduced the Highly Accomplished and Leading Teacher (HALT) program to
acknowledge practising teachers who achieve a high standard of teaching leading to improved student
outcomes, through remuneration and career opportunities. Developed and coordinated by the Centre
for School Leadership, Learning and Development, the transition period from the existing Teacher of
Exemplary Practice program is expected to be completed by the end of 2013. The first HALT certification
will be granted from 2012.
PARTNERSHIPS
STRONG COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT [T2030:ED2.2]
The department started partnership work with 55 focus schools identified under the National Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan and numerous community members across the NT to develop
school community partnership agreements. The agreements aim to develop a shared vision for education
at the local level, mapping out stakeholder roles accountabilities for educating young people. They set out
the preferred ways of working together and the mechanisms required for implementation. As at 30 June
2011, eight agreements had been finalised, nine were under negotiation and 38 were being developed.
INDUSTRY DRIVEN [T2030:ED2.2;2.4;2.6;3.5]
NIGHTCLIFF
REWARDED FOR
COMMUNITY
PARTNERSHIP
Congratulations to Nightcliff Primary
which has won the $100 000
Schools First Territory Impact award.
The award recognises developing
partnerships between schools and
their communities that improve the
education of young people. This
award celebrated Nightcliff Primary’s
partnership with Darwin’s Melaleuca
Refugee Centre. Nightcliff is now
in the running for the National
Impact Award to be announced in
November 2011.
The department worked with local industry across the
NT to place students in formal structured work placements
as part of their VET studies. The department also began
an intense program of corporate engagement with
industry across the NT and Australia to inform industry
of the department’s activities and establish formal and
informal partnerships. The Peak Industry Advisory Group
was established to provide advice on industry training
needs, skill requirements, workforce development
priorities and vocational education and training sector
issues. The Peak Industry Advisory Group met five times
in 2010–11 and had major input into the review of the
Productivity Places Program.
A Frequent Attender Program comprising a developing
set of rewards for school attendance was launched,
targeted at NT Government schools in the 20 growth
towns. Telstra is a major corporate partner in this program
together with Outback Stores and the Arnhem Land
Progress Association.
The department concluded a three year agreement with the MacArthur River Mine Community
Benefits Trust totalling $1.012 million. The trust provided funding for an embedded trainer, uniforms,
travel to and from the mine and a Frequent Attender Program for Borroloola, Kiana Station and
Robinson River schools.
76
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Negotiation to establish the Maurice Rioli Scholarship between Tiwi College and the Richmond
Football Club were successful.
The department worked in consultation with key stakeholders including Job Services Australia providers,
peak industry associations, Training Advisory Councils, employers and community organisations to
develop the priority qualifications list for the 2010 and 2011 Productivity Places Program.
CROSS-SECTORAL AND CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL
The department continued its involvement with the Tri Border Attendance Strategy. This joint venture
between the NT, WA and SA to share enrolment and attendance information through a centralised
database will allow jurisdictions to effectively map and monitor student enrolment and attendance
within and across borders. A tracking system was developed and piloted in early 2011, that included
participation by a small proportion of NT schools located close to the WA and SA borders. The success
of the database for internal NT tracking has led to a decision to expand the system to include all
NT schools. [T2030:ED2.2]
The Targeting Health, Improving Engagement pilot commenced in Alice Springs in Term Two 2011 — in
focus schools identified under the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan.
The program was developed in partnership with the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress and the NT
Department of Health to improve school attendance through better student health. It is established on
the premise that kids who are healthy are happy to attend school. Under the jointly funded program, a
comprehensive primary health care service is provided that includes school visits by Central Australian
Aboriginal Congress health officers. Early signs of success include increased student attendance at
participating schools and a decline in the number of students coming to school with common and easily
treatable health issues. [T2030:ED2.2]
The department worked with the Australian Government to supply data for the School Enrolment and
Attendance Measure trial. This involved liaising with the Department of Families, Housing, Community
Services and Indigenous Affairs and Centrelink to streamline processes and agree on standard
business rules to enable efficient and accurate reporting.
Strong cross-sectoral working relationships were maintained with the non-government schools
sector. The department worked together with the Non-Government Schools Ministerial Advisory
Council to progress the Council of Australian Governments’ education reform agenda through the
common direction set out in the Smarter Schools National Partnerships NT Implementation plan. The
department worked with the council and non-government schools to implement a range of common
cross-sectoral initiatives.
77
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Quality Systems and Support
TRANSPARENCY AND DATA DRIVEN DECISION-MAKING
CONTEMPORARY SYSTEMS [T2030:ED3.6]
The department contributed to a national approach to improve the quality and availability of teacher
workforce data through participation on taskforces associated with the Teacher Quality reform agenda
and representation on the National Teacher Dataset sub-group. Increasing the availability of workforce
data to improve the quality, coverage and completeness of staff demographics, occupancy and payroll
information was implemented through:
» developing a professional development database to capture professional learning
» improving the Staff Management System to collect and report on more granular datasets
» improved reporting functionality in the Teaching in the Territory online recruitment application
» cleansing of datasets to allow for longitudinal workforce reporting on metrics such as length of stay
(within school/organisation) and teacher turnover
» establishing a dedicated team to report on workforce metrics
» developing a repository to capture data on training undertaken by Indigenous staff.
Development was progressed on a school planning and improvement system to provide a ‘one stop
shop’ web-based system for schools to plan, monitor and report on strategic priorities, actions, targets
and compliance requirements. This will provide an easy-to-use space where school leaders can access
a range of data to inform and underpin their school improvement processes. The system will streamline
existing school-level and system-level planning and reporting processes under the APIF.
The department scoped and piloted an improved application for managing and reporting systemic
budget forecast information to streamline associated processes, improving efficiency and increasing
accuracy of reporting. The new Budget Forecast Estimate System interfaces with the department’s
business intelligence platform and gives budget managers access to more current information and
greater autonomy in generating reports.
The department, in collaboration with Menzies School of Health Research, produced a NT-specific
report on data collected through the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) survey. The report
titled Northern Territory Results for the Australian Early Development Index 2009 provides an analysis
of the AEDI data within the NT’s unique context and aims to provide a useful tool for a range of early
childhood stakeholders. The report is available from the department’s website at http://www.det.nt.gov.
au/parents-community/early-childhood-services/aedi. [T2030:ED1.1]
78
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
RESEARCH AND EVALUATION [T2030:ED3.6]
The department worked with Menzies School of Health Research on the Strong Start, Bright Future
evaluation to assess the impact of the Indigenous education reform agenda in very remote NT schools.
The evaluation’s focus is on local and systemic reforms and will help target resourcing to areas that
will make the most difference to students as they prepare for and participate in school and transition to
further education, employment or training pathways. This work is longitudinal and has been started in
three of the five Strong Start, Bright Future pilot sites.
An evaluation program of a number of Smarter Schools National Partnerships initiatives was started.
The first evaluation on the Engaging Urban Students initiative was completed in early 2011 and the
findings from this work have been used to inform the future direction of the program. An evaluation is
underway to identify enabling factors for accelerated literacy and numeracy achievements in schools
participating in the Maximising Indigenous Literacy and Numeracy program. The findings will help target
resources and contribute to a national Smarter Schools National Partnerships evaluation and evidence
base under development by DEEWR.
ALIGNMENT AND COHERENCE [T2030:ED3.6]
ALIGNED BUSINESS PLANNING
The department’s corporate areas were supported to embed the APIF through their strategic
and operational business planning and reporting processes. The department is working to design
an integrated web-based strategic planning and reporting system to streamline processes and
align systemic initiatives to operational activity. Implementation of this system is scheduled for
Semester 2, 2011.
STRATEGIC POLICY ALIGNMENT
A policy framework was developed to improve policy governance and accountability within the
department and ensure a consistent approach to planning, developing and implementing departmental
policy. Professional learning opportunities helped give policy makers an understanding of the context
for policy development, promote good practice in policy making and provide resources to support
quality policy making. The policy framework clearly identifies the role of the DET Strategic Plan in the
policy hierarchy. The plan was refreshed to align with emerging strategic priorities.
The department developed processes and systems to ensure alignment of systemic, regional and
school-level targets with Council of Australian Governments and Territory 2030 targets in relation
to attendance, participation and student achievement, and mapped projected incremental progress
towards meeting those targets. Reporting against National Partnerships was provided to the Australian
Government through annual reports on implementation progress.
REGIONALISATION
In January 2011, regionalised service delivery commenced with more localised and integrated support
for schools. Regional plans were introduced to align specific regional focus areas and operations to the
department’s priorities and directions. Regional offices are staffed with a range of curriculum, student
services, early childhood, human and financial resources support staff who provide coaching and
assistance and help to progress initiatives and reforms at a local and system level.
79
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
REGULATORY AND CROSS-AGENCY
INTEGRATED CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES [T2030:ED1.1;2.1]
Through its membership on the Integrated Family Services Working Group, the department helped
to develop an implementation plan and continued work on an integrated model for the delivery
services for children and families. The plan features community-led partnerships to improve service
delivery at the local level. The department continued to establish processes to help integrate
services at the department, government and sector-wide levels, while child and family leaders worked
at the community level.
In 2010–11, the department held community consultations on the design of child and family centres
to be established across the NT using funding provided under the National Partnership on Indigenous
Early Childhood Development. The centres will support a range of integrated services to reduce the
gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children’s development outcomes including:
» early learning and care
» parenting and family support services
» mothers and babies health care
» targeted intervention services for vulnerable children and families.
An Indigenous reference group provided guidance on development of the FaFT — IPSS program. This
group represents the interests of the major remote regions and convenes four times a year to respond
to and guide policy and program development.
A collaborative project with the Department of Health, Department of Children and Families and the
Menzies School of Health Research was undertaken to trial the Care for Child Development program
developed by the World Health Organization and UNICEF. This project provided interagency training
and two remote pilots were facilitated through FaFT — IPSS at Yirrkala and Galiwinku.
NON-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLING [T2030:ED3.6]
Following the commencement of the new Part 7 of the Education Act in 2010 relating to
non-government schools, the department in consultation with the non-government school sector
developed a five-yearly schedule for routine school assessments. A register of non-government
schools is published on the department’s website.
A review of the way funding to non-government schools is determined by the department was initiated
and is expected to be finalised in 2011–12.
80
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
SYSTEMIC TARGETS BY 2012
The DET Strategic Plan 2009–12 was launched in July 2009. Seven systemic targets by 2012 were
included in the plan, relating to attendance and student outcomes. Baseline data has been set for
each target. The plan has since been refreshed for 2011–14. The 2012 attendance and participation
targets were revised and set as ‘at least 90 per cent for every child at school’, regardless of geolocation
of students.
The 2009 NAPLAN results are used as the baseline data for all NAPLAN related targets. Targets for
NTCE completions, VET in Schools certificate completions and attendance use 2008 data as a baseline
as 2009 data was not available at the time of publishing the DET Strategic Plan.
An anticipated improvement trajectory has been plotted as a curve for the systemic targets. These reflect
a possible rate of improvement in results as the momentum of programs and initiatives implemented under
the DET Strategic Plan begins to take effect.
ATTENDANCE [T2030:ED2.2]
Target — at least 90 per cent in provincial schools
Figure 46: Systemic targets by 2012 — attendance in provincial schools
Average Attendance Rate
100%
90%
88.6%
88.7%
88.7%
2009
2010
90.0%
Year
Actual
2008
88.6%
2009
88.7%
2010
88.7%
80%
70%
60%
2008
Target
Actual
2011
2012
Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
81
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Target — at least 90 per cent in remote schools
Figure 47: Systemic targets by 2012 — attendance in remote schools
Average Attendance Rate
100%
90%
90.0%
86.4%
86.5%
86.1%
2008
2009
2010
Year
Actual
2008
86.4%
2009
86.5%
2010
86.1%
80%
70%
60%
Target
Actual
2011
2012
Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
New target — at least 90 per cent in very remote schools
(revised from 2009–10 target of 80 per cent)
Figure 48: Systemic targets by 2012 — attendance in very remote schools
Average Attendance Rate
100%
90%
90.0%
80%
70%
62.3%
60%
65.4%
65.2%
2008
2009
Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
82
2010
Actual
2011
Curve
2012
Year
Actual
2008
65.4%
2009
65.2%
2010
62.3%
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NTCE COMPLETIONS [T2030:ED1.3;2.3]
Target — 20 per cent increase in NTCE completions
Figure 49: Systemic targets by 2012 — NTCE completions
1000
900
906
Number of Completions
800
700
600
755
752
739
2008
2009
2010
Year
Actual
2008
755
2009
752
2010
739
500
400
300
200
100
0
Target
Actual
2011
2012
Curve
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching, and Phases of Learning
VET IN SCHOOLS [T2030:ED2.3;2.4;2.6]
Target — 20 per cent completion rate for attaining a VET certificate in schools
Figure 50: Systemic targets by 2012 — completion rate for attaining a VET in schools certificate
25%
Year
Completion Rate
20%
17.1%
20.0%
15%
Actual
2008
11.7%
2009
12.3%
2010
17.1%
10%
11.7%
12.3%
2008
2009
5%
0%
Target
2010
Actual
2011
2012
Curve
Source: DET Curriculum, Teaching, and Phases of Learning
83
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
NAPLAN [T2030:ED1.2]
Target — 3 per cent increase in proportion of non-Indigenous students at or
above national minimum standard (NMS) in all NAPLAN tests
READING
Figure 51: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
88%
2010
88%
95%
90%
88%
91%
88%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 52: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in reading
100%
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
86%
2010
85%
% Achieving NMS
95%
90%
86%
85%
2009
2010
89%
85%
80%
75%
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
84
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 53: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
88%
2010
89%
95%
90%
89%
88%
91%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 7 Target
2011
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 54: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
86%
2010
86%
95%
90%
86%
86%
2009
2010
89%
85%
80%
75%
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
85
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
WRITING
Figure 55: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
100%
95%
91%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
91%
2010
91%
94%
91%
90%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 56: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
86%
2010
86%
95%
90%
86%
89%
86%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
86
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 57: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
85%
2010
82%
95%
90%
85%
88%
85%
82%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 7 Target
2011
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 58: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
100%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
79%
2010
79%
95%
90%
85%
80%
82%
79%
79%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
87
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
NUMERACY
Figure 59: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
100%
95%
92%
90%
93%
90%
85%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
90%
2010
92%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 60: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
100%
95%
91%
90%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
88
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
91%
2010
91%
94%
91%
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 61: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
100%
95%
91%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
91%
2010
90%
94%
90%
90%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 7 Target
2011
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 62: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of non-Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
100%
95%
95%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
92%
2010
87%
92%
90%
87%
85%
80%
75%
2009
2010
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
89
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
READING
Target — 9 per cent increase in proportion of Indigenous students at or above
NMS in all NAPLAN tests
Figure 63: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
70%
54%
60%
50%
53%
44%
40%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
44%
2010
54%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 64: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
42%
40%
30%
33%
33%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
90
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
33%
2010
33%
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 65: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
49%
40%
30%
40%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
40%
2010
39%
39%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 7 Target
2011
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 66: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in reading
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
40%
44%
36%
35%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
35%
2010
36%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
91
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
WRITING
Figure 67: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
49%
42%
40%
40%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
40%
2010
42%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 68: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
40%
39%
31%
30%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
92
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
30%
2010
31%
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 69: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
40%
39%
30%
27%
2009
2010
30%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
30%
2010
27%
20%
2011
Yr 7 Target
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 70: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in writing
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
27%
36%
29%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
27%
2010
29%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
93
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
NUMERACY
Figure 71: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 3 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
52%
52%
50%
40%
43%
Year
Yr 3
Actual
2009
43%
2010
52%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 3 Target
2011
Yr 3 Actual
2012
Yr 3 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 72: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 5 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
61%
50%
42%
40%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 5 Target
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
94
Year
Yr 5
Actual
2009
52%
2010
42%
52%
2011
Yr 5 Actual
2012
Yr 5 Curve
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 73: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 7 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
Year
Yr 7
Actual
2009
47%
2010
41%
56%
47%
40%
41%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 7 Target
2011
Yr 7 Actual
2012
Yr 7 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
Figure 74: Systemic targets by 2012 — proportion of Indigenous Year 9 students at or above
NMS in numeracy
% Achieving NMS
70%
60%
50%
Year
Yr 9
Actual
2009
48%
2010
40%
57%
48%
40%
40%
30%
20%
2009
2010
Yr 9 Target
2011
Yr 9 Actual
2012
Yr 9 Curve
Source: DET Performance and Data Management
95
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
PERFORMANCE OF NT STUDENTS —
2010 NATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
LITERACY AND NUMERACY
PARTICIPATION IN NATIONAL COMMON ASSESSMENT
Since 2008, NT students have participated in a common national assessment of literacy and numeracy
skills (National Assessment Program, Literacy and Numeracy, or NAPLAN). This national assessment
program replaced the previous NT multi-level assessment program (MAP) in 2008. Students in Years 3,
5, 7 and 9 participate annually in tests covering reading, writing, language conventions (spelling, grammar
and punctuation) and numeracy skills and understandings. Each year more than a million students in
Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 across Australia participate in the tests, and provide an important measure of how all
Australian students are performing against national achievement bands.
The NAPLAN tests also provide valuable information about what students know, to inform and support
teaching practice and help students improve their learning outcomes. This report is based on the 2010
NAPLAN results.
Participation by NT students in NAPLAN assessments increased dramatically in 2009 (ranging from
87.5 per cent to 96.3 per cent participation rate), but dropped in 2010 (ranging from 82.7 per cent to
90.5 per cent).
In 2010, Year 7 spelling and grammar and punctuation students had the highest participation rate in the
NT with 90.5 per cent of students participating. Year 9 numeracy students had the lowest participation
rate in the NT with 82.7 per cent of students participating in the test. This was 9.8 per cent lower than the
Australian average.
For Indigenous students in 2010, Year 5 spelling and grammar and punctuation had the highest
participation rate with 81.1 per cent of Indigenous students participating in the test while Year 9
numeracy had the lowest participation with 63.9 per cent of Indigenous students participating in the test.
For non-Indigenous students, Year 7 spelling had the highest participation rate with 97.4 per cent of
students participating in this test, which was 0.7 per cent higher than the Australian average.
Year 9 numeracy had the lowest participation rate with 94.7 per cent of non-Indigenous students
participating in the test, which was still 1.4 per cent higher than the Australian average rate of nonIndigenous students participating in the test.
NAPLAN results are not comparable to MAP results in previous years due to differences in testing
methods and the change in the timing of the test from August to May. NAPLAN tests were equated so
the 2010 results can be compared with those for 2009 and 2008. Equating enables the results from
NAPLAN tests in different years to be reported in the same achievement scale.
Equating one test with another is a complex process and involves some degree of statistical error. For this
reason, there may appear to be minor fluctuations in the average NAPLAN test results from year to year
which are not statistically significant. It is only when there has been a meaningful change in the results
from one year to the next, or where there has been a consistent trend over several years that statements
can be confidently made about meaningful change. As such this report contains additional information
96
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
about confidence intervals, that indicate whether changes from 2009 to 2010 are significant (see page 99
for further information. The results are presented by assessment area and year level, by Indigenous status
and by geolocation. Indigenous students include students who have identified as Aboriginal or Torres
Strait Islander or both. Students for whom Indigenous status was not stated are excluded from the data
that is presented by Indigenous status. All students who sat the test at government and non-government
(Catholic, independent and Christian) schools are included.
The following results include government and non-government schools because nationally comparable
data is only available at state or territory level and not disaggregated by sector.
LITERACY AND NUMERACY PERFORMANCE OF NT PRIMARY
SCHOOL STUDENTS — WHAT THE 2010 RESULTS SHOW
The following figures and tables show the achievement of NT Year 3 and Year 5 students, including by
Indigenous status, in 2008, 2009 and 2010, compared to results at the Australian level. Across year levels
and all assessment areas, the proportion of NT students achieving the NMS remains consistently lower
than other states and territories, and the Australian average.
Across Australia Indigenous students did not perform as well as non-Indigenous students. In the
NT, Indigenous students achieved significantly lower than non-Indigenous students. However,
provincial Indigenous students in years 3, 5 and 7 performed comparably to provincial Indigenous
students across Australia.
Year 3 writing students were the highest achievers in the NT with 72.6 per cent achieving NMS.
Non-Indigenous students achieved their best results in Year 3 writing with 94.2 per cent achieving
NMS. Similar to the previous year, 2010 Year 3 spelling students were the lowest achievers in the
NT with 59.5 per cent.
EXPLANATORY NOTES
Participation rates are calculated as all assessed and exempt students as a percentage of the total
number of students in the year level which includes absent and withdrawn students.
Achievement rates are calculated as all students who were at or above the NMS as a percentage of the
total number of students assessed. Students for whom Indigenous status was not stated are not included
in data which is provided by Indigenous status.
Scaled scores tell you how much students’ scores deviate from the mean or average score. That is, by
looking at a scaled score, you can tell immediately how far above or below the mean a student’s score is.
Mean scale scores are the average scaled score of a particular group of students and it can indicate the
average performance of this cohort, and how much better or worse they performed than the average of all
students who sat the test (ie comparison to the national mean).
A feature of gain in NAPLAN performance is that the size of the gain tends to be associated with the level
of prior performance: the lower the prior performance, the more likely the possibility of greater gain. This is
evident in the results for Year 3 students in the NT, who registered some of the largest gains in 2010 of any
students (as measured by increases in mean scale scores from one year to the next). This was the case
particularly in the results for its most educationally disadvantaged students, who are often Indigenous.
97
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
This report includes some key comparisons. Where the significance of differences in performance is
indicated it relates to the comparison of the mean scale score across the 2008 and 2010 testing years.
If the significance of difference is not indicated, care should be taken when comparing results over time
or between groups of students.
Mean scale score significantly higher, statistically, than in 2008.
No significant difference, statistically, than 2008 mean scale score.
Mean scale score significantly lower, statistically, than in 2008.
Figure 75: Year 3 and Year 5 reading participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
93.5%
80%
% Participating
70%
95.7%
88.0%
14.3%
82.7%
89.7%
84.9%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 3
Year 5
2008
2009
2010
Source: Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA), 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 76: Year 3 and Year 5 numeracy participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
80%
92.2%
83.1%
94.5%
87.7%
14.3%
% Participating
70%
88.4%
85.0%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 7
Year 9
2008
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
98
2009
2010
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 77: Year 3 and Year 5 writing participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
80%
% Participating
70%
94.5%
96.2%
89.0%
81.9%
14.3%
89.6%
84.3%
13.2%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 3
Year 5
2008
2009
2010
CONFIDENCE INTERVALS
In the achievement graphs that follow, the intervals shown at the top of
each bar are 95 per cent confidence intervals.
As an example, the bar here shows that 68.3 per cent of the student
cohort achieved the NMS. The interval in this case is 2 per cent,
indicating a 95 per cent chance that the true percentage lies between
66.3 per cent and 70.3 per cent.
80%
70%
68.3%
60%
50%
99
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 78: Year 3 reading achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
93.7%
92.1%
80%
93.9%
70%
60%
50%
69.7%
68.5%
62.7%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 79: Percentage of Year 3 students achieving NMS in reading 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 17: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 3 reading by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean scale scores
2008
208.1
2010
246.3
2008
382.5
2010
392.0
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
100
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 80: Year 5 reading achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
80%
91.7%
91.0%
91.3%
70%
60%
50%
65.4%
62.5%
64.4%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 81: Percentage of Year 5 students achieving NMS in reading 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 18: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 5 reading by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
307.3
2010
326.7
2008
474.5
2010
475.4
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
101
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 82: Year 3 numeracy achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.2%
92.7%
93.7%
80%
70%
60%
73.5%
69.1%
69.2%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 83: Percentage of Year 3 students achieving NMS in numeracy 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 19: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 3 numeracy by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
275.0
2010
266.0
2008
386.9
2010
377.0
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
102
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 84: Year 5 numeracy achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.0%
94.3%
94.0%
80%
70%
77.0%
60%
72.4%
70.4%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 85: Percentage of Year 5 students achieving NMS in numeracy 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 20: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 5 numeracy by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
355.9
2010
351.6
2008
459.4
2010
472.7
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
103
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 86: Year 3 writing achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.7%
95.4%
95.5%
80%
70%
74.0%
73.7%
60%
72.6%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 87: Percentage of Year 3 students achieving NMS in writing 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
NT
Australia
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 21: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 3 writing by Indigenous status
Indigenous status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
% achieved NMS
2008
258.2
2010
252.9
2008
398.3
2010
391.1
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
104
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 88: Year 5 writing achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
93.1%
93.0%
92.6%
80%
70%
60%
66.2%
66.3%
50%
63.8%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 89: Percentage of Year 5 students achieving NMS in writing 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 22: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 5 writing by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
325.4
2010
313.6
2008
471.2
2010
463.9
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
105
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Students attending schools in remote and very remote areas experience educational disadvantage in
a variety of ways. In remote areas, some of the major issues include recruiting and retaining teachers,
barriers to accessing educational services and issues surrounding access to, costs and use of ICT.
These geographic locations (geolocations) have been coded using the MCEECDYA Schools Geographic
Location Classification.
Geolocations are determined by a combination of physical distance from the nearest services and the
Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA). The NT is mapped as follows:
Metropolitan
There are no areas in the NT classified as metropolitan
Provincial
Darwin, Palmerston and rural areas as far as and including Bees Creek
Remote
Alice Springs, Katherine, Darwin rural beyond Bees Creek including Batchelor, Adelaide
River and Jabiru
Very Remote
All other areas of the NT
Figures 90 to 95 show the proportion of students, by geolocation, achieving the NMS for all government
and non-government schools in the NT, compared with Australia, for Years 3 and 5 in reading, numeracy
and writing in 2010.
106
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 90: Year 3 reading achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.9%
93.1%
80%
87.2%
85.6%
70%
76.8%
60%
58.6%
50%
40%
36.5%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 91: Year 5 reading achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
80%
92.7%
90.0%
85.5%
78.6%
70%
60%
71.1%
50%
47.3%
40%
30%
20%
23.4%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 92: Year 3 numeracy achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.1%
80%
93.7%
89.7%
88.8%
70%
83.6%
60%
60.5%
50%
40%
30%
37.0%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
107
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 93: Year 5 numeracy achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.8%
80%
93.0%
90.1%
83.5%
70%
76.3%
60%
50%
52.2%
40%
30%
28.4%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 94: Year 3 writing achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
96.3%
80%
95.4%
91.0%
90.1%
70%
84.4%
60%
58.1%
50%
40%
30%
35.0%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 95: Year 5 writing achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.4%
80%
92.1%
86.3%
81.3%
70%
69.6%
60%
50%
48.9%
40%
30%
20%
21.1%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
108
NT
Very Remote
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
INFLUENCES IN THE NT
National and international studies consistently demonstrate that three major demographic factors have a
strong impact on student performance:
Indigenous status
geolocation
socio-economic status.
These patterns are particularly evident in NT student NAPLAN outcomes.
INDIGENOUS STATUS
The NT NAPLAN results show clearly that Indigenous disadvantage is still a significant issue for all of
Australia and particularly for the NT. While Indigenous students as a group have lower NAPLAN results
than non-Indigenous students, NT Indigenous student results are lower than Indigenous student results
Australia wide.
GEOLOCATION
The national NAPLAN results show a consistent and strong relationship between performance and
geolocation. That is, metropolitan students have the highest outcomes and very remote students the
lowest. This is obviously a factor for the NT where there are no centres categorised as metropolitan
and where 46.5 per cent of students live in remote or very remote geolocations.
SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS
While there is no national data on the specific correlation between socio-economic status (SES) and
NAPLAN results, most jurisdictions have done this assessment at state level (using different SES source
data) and have found a high correlation. The NT has a significantly higher proportion of students in the
bottom 10 per cent of SES (based on ABS data).
MULTIPLE AND OVERLAPPING DISADVANTAGE FACTORS
Several influences impact on student outcomes, particularly in the NT, including that 40.6 per cent of
students are Indigenous compared to the Australian average of 4.6 per cent. Furthermore, 44.0 per cent of
students live in remote or very remote areas compared to the NSW figure of 0.6 per cent or the WA figure
of 6.5 per cent. These striking facts are complicated further when combined. Most of the NT’s low SES
students are also Indigenous and live in remote or very remote locations
National and international research shows a longstanding relationship between education outcomes and
student background (especially SES, Indigenous status and, to a lesser extent, geolocation). However,
more recent education research demonstrates that this is not an inevitable relationship. The research
shows that education systems that put in place coherent, consistent and comprehensive reform agendas,
which prioritise supporting schools to undertake rigorous evidence-based whole school improvement, can
disrupt this relationship, given time. The evidence also suggests that one of the most significant barriers to
achieving this is beliefs and expectations of teachers, parents, principals and system administrators.
109
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
LITERACY AND NUMERACY PERFORMANCE OF MIDDLE YEARS
STUDENTS — WHAT THE 2010 RESULTS SHOW
In 2010, the highest participation rate for numeracy was achieved by Year 7 students, with
90.0 per cent of NT students participating. For numeracy, Year 7 students were closest to the Australian
average participation rate in 2010.
In 2010, the highest participation rate for writing was also achieved by Year 7 students, with 90.2 per cent
of NT students participating. For writing, Year 7 students were the closest to the Australian average
participation rate in 2010.
In 2010, 93.1 per cent of non-Indigenous Year 7 students achieved NMS in reading, compared to
92.4 per cent in 2009 — an increase of 0.7 per cent. For the same test, 40.4 per cent of NT Indigenous
Year 7 students achieved NMS in reading, compared to 36.4 per cent in 2009. This represents an
increase of 4.0 per cent.
Overall in 2010, 68.1 per cent of NT Year 9 students achieved NMS in reading. A total of 91.1 per cent
of NT non-Indigenous Year 9 students achieved NMS in reading, compared to 90.7 per cent in 2009.
This represents an increase of 0.4 per cent. For the same test, 32.1 per cent of NT Indigenous Year 9
students achieved NMS in reading.
The following figures and tables show the achievement of NT Year 7 and Year 9 students, including by
Indigenous status, in 2008, 2009 and 2010, compared to results at the Australian level.
110
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 96: Year 7 and Year 9 reading participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
93.0%
% Participating
80%
70%
89.1%
87.6%
14.3%
79.5%
79.9%
84.3%
13.2%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 7
Year 9
2008
2009
2010
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 97: Year 7 and Year 9 numeracy participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
92.6%
% Participating
80%
70%
90.0%
87.5%
14.3%
80.5%
79.3%
82.7%
13.2%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 7
Year 9
2008
2009
2010
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 98: Year 7 and 9 writing participation 2008 to 2010
100%
90%
94.1%
% Participating
80%
70%
90.2%
89.5%
14.3%
78.8%
78.5%
84.3%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Year 7
Year 9
2008
2009
2010
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
111
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 99: Year 7 reading achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
80%
94.9%
94.0%
94.2%
70%
60%
50%
70.9%
67.1%
71.5%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 100: Percentage of Year 7 students achieving NMS in reading 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 23: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 7 reading by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean scale score
2008
386.1
2010
412.4
2008
531.0
2010
539.2
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
112
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 101: Year 9 reading achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
92.9%
80%
92.2%
90.8%
70%
60%
69.1%
69.9%
50%
68.1%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 102: Percentage of Year 9 students achieving NMS in reading 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 24: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 9 reading by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean scale score
2008
446.5
2010
445.1
2008
578.1
2010
572.7
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
113
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 103: Year 7 numeracy achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.1%
94.8%
95.4%
80%
70%
74.8%
75.9%
60%
72.4%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 104: Percentage of Year 7 students achieving NMS in numeracy 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 25: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 7 numeracy by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
428.3
2010
416.5
2008
534.2
2010
534.1
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
114
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 105: Year 9 numeracy achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
93.1%
95.0%
93.6%
80%
70%
76.2%
74.1%
60%
70.5%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 106: Percentage of Year 9 students achieving NMS in numeracy 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 26: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 9 numeracy by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
470.5
2010
456.9
2008
575.4
2010
575.2
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
115
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 107: Year 7 writing achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
92.6%
92.5%
91.8%
80%
70%
60%
50%
66.7%
63.6%
62.7%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 108: Percentage of Year 7 students achieving NMS in writing 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 27: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 7 writing by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
362.2
2010
356.4
2008
526.1
2010
511.9
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
116
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 109: Year 9 writing achievement 2008 to 2010
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
87.8%
87.2%
80%
87.2%
70%
60%
50%
63.1%
63.3%
59.6%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2008
2009
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 110: Percentage of Year 9 students achieving NMS in writing 2008 to 2010 by
Indigenous status
100%
% Achieving NMS
80%
60%
40%
20%
2008
2009
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Indigenous
0%
2010
Australia
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Table 28: 2008 to 2010 change in mean scale scores — Year 9 writing by Indigenous status
Indigenous Status
Indigenous
Non-Indigenous
Year
Mean Scale Score
2008
417.0
2010
386.9
2008
569.2
2010
553.2
Significance of difference
in mean scale scores*
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
* Refer to explanatory notes about mean scale scores on pages 97–98.
117
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figures 111 to 116 show the proportion of students, by geolocation, achieving the NMS for all government
schools in the NT, compared with Australia, for Years 7 and 9 in reading, numeracy and writing in 2010.
Figure 111: Year 7 reading achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.6%
94.6%
80%
87.9%
88.8%
80.1%
70%
60%
58.4%
50%
40%
30%
29.0%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 112: Year 9 reading achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
80%
91.9%
89.7%
83.2%
78.9%
70%
74.9%
60%
50%
40%
45.0%
30%
20%
22.1%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
118
NT
Very Remote
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Figure 113: Year 7 numeracy achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
95.9%
80%
94.6%
89.5%
87.7%
78.0%
70%
60%
60.6%
50%
40%
30%
32.6%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 114: Year 9 numeracy achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.0%
80%
92.2%
84.9%
82.9%
70%
77.5%
60%
50%
52.2%
40%
30%
26.7%
20%
10%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
119
PERFORMANCE REPORTING
Figure 115: Year 7 writing achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
94.0%
80%
91.0%
83.0%
81.1%
70%
72.5%
60%
50%
50.4%
40%
30%
20%
10%
17.2%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Very Remote
NT
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
Figure 116: Year 9 writing achievement 2010 by geolocation
100%
% Achieving NMS
90%
80%
89.0%
84.2%
70%
75.6%
72.8%
60%
64.5%
50%
40%
39.7%
30%
20%
10%
13.2%
0%
Metro
Provincial
Remote
Australia
Source: MCEECDYA, 2010 NAPLAN Report
120
NT
Very Remote
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
The department is led and managed in an accountable and responsible way through effective corporate
governance at all levels to achieve its strategic goals and operational objectives.
Through corporate governance we:
understand our roles and responsibilities
continually improve our performance and minimise risks
enhance stakeholder and public confidence
meet our legal, ethical and public service obligations.
The department achieves good governance through the application of a framework of sound principles and
practices underpinned by values.
Corporate Governance Framework
Practices
Principles
Accountable management
Accountability
Effective planning
Integrity
Ethical decision making
Due diligence
Stakeholder engagement
Transparency
Performance improvement
Economy and efficiency
Information management
Management of risk and opportunity
Compliance and internal control
Robust reporting
Values: Professionalism, Respect, Innovation, Diversity, Excellence.
All elements are effectively integrated into a coherent corporate approach by individuals and business units
and applied throughout the department.
121
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
OUR ORGANISATION (30 JUNE 2011)
Chief Executive
Executive Director
Corporate Services
Senior Advisor
Transforming
Indigenous Education
Head School Education
and Training Operations
Director School Operations,
Performance and Review
Senior Director Centre for
School Leadership, Learning
and Development
Director Corporate
Accounting
Executive Director
Literacy and Numeracy
Taskforce
Director Strategic Policy
and Capability
Director Financial Policy
and Projects
General Manager
Participation and Pathways
Executive Director School
Education Services
Chief Financial Officer
General Manager
Human Resources
Senior Director Industry
Engagement and
Employment Pathways
Director Client Services
Director Online Education
General Manager Student
Services
Director Staffing
and Reporting
Director VET in Schools
Director Policy and
Performance
Director Workforce
Operations
Director Workforce
Capability
Chief Information
Officer
Senior Director Strategy
and Implementation
Director IT Services
Senior Director Planning
and Infrastructure
Building Education
Revolution Program
Director
General Manager
Curriculum, Teaching and
Phases of Learning
Director Youth Attainment
and Transitions
Director
Curriculum
Director Enrolment,
Attendance and
Participation
General Manager
Early Childhood Policy
and Regulations
Director Integrated
Family Services
Director
eLearning Systems
122
Senior Director
ICT for Learning
Executive Director
Central Australia
Executive Director
Darwin and Katherine
Director School Support
Director School
Performance Katherine
Director School
Performance
Alice Springs
Director School
Performance Darwin
Director School
Performance Barkly
Director Community
Engagement
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Director Strategic Projects
Executive Director
Training and
Higher Education
Executive Director
Strategic Policy
and Planning
General Manager Office
of the Chief Executive
Director
Strategic Policy
Director Planning,
Research and
Non Government Schools
Director Audit and
Ethical Standards
Director Training Services
Director Performance
and Data Management
Director Internal
Communications,
Media and Marketing
Consulting Principal
Transforming Indigenous
Education Policy
and Research
Director Ministerial Liaison
Director Strategic Policy
and Projects
Director Strategic Initiatives
Director Legal
Director Student Services
Director Early Childhood
Executive Director Arnhem,
Palmerston and Rural
Director Indigenous
Early Learning Program
Director NT Regulatory
Authority
Chair Indigenous
Education Council
Director Teacher
Registration Board
Director School
Performance Arnhem
Director School
Performance
Palmerston and Rural
123
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
2010–11 SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM
GARY BARNES, CHIEF EXECUTIVE
Gary Barnes was appointed to the position of Chief Executive in May 2009.
Gary has a long association with schools and has a particular interest in
developing people, Indigenous education, rural and remote education (including
distance learning) and the use of ICT to promote learning. His philosophy is
built on three important cornerstones — strong leadership and quality teachers,
connected communities, innovation and hard work. Gary is the founding chair
of NARIS. He also sits on the boards of CDU, Menzies School of Health Research
and the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership.
KEVIN GILLAN, HEAD,
SCHOOL EDUCATION AND TRAINING OPERATIONS
Kevin is Head of School Education and Training Operations. He was a former
District Director and principal in various regions throughout WA before joining the
department in 2007. He has also taught in New Zealand and the United Kingdom.
In the NT he has previously been General Manager of Schools (Palmerston and
Rural), and Executive Director Schools North. Kevin has had a long-term research
interest in Indigenous education, in which he completed his PhD. He believes that
successful schools are those that have a real focus on optimising relationships at
all levels throughout the school community and having an unrelenting focus on
quality pedagogy.
MARCIA HOFFMANN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CORPORATE SERVICES
Marcia started in her position as Executive Director Corporate Services in early
2011. Marcia’s prior role was with the Qld Department of Transport and Main
Roads where she was responsible for facilities and infrastructure, occupational
health and safety and human resources. Marcia has experience in many portfolios
including health, lands and planning, roads, transport, public works, shared
services and Indigenous affairs. She has a wealth of executive management
experience in corporate services, strategic direction setting, government relations,
social and employment policy, major change and commercialisation initiatives and
property and facilities management.
EVA LAWLER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA REGION
Eva is a born and bred Territorian who undertook her schooling and university
studies in Darwin. Eva has a Masters of Education (Curriculum Development)
and a Masters in International Management. Eva has been employed with
the department since 1983, starting her career as a teacher and working as
a classroom teacher for 15 years before moving into curriculum writing and
implementation. Eva returned to schools to work as an assistant principal and
then principal. This was followed by working as the Education Adviser to two
NT Ministers of Education. Eva took up the position of Executive Director
Central Australia Regions in April 2010. She strongly believes that every decision
she makes must be through the lens of how it will benefit NT students. She is
passionate about the importance of the early years of a child’s life and the impact
this has on their future.
124
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
DEBBIE EFTHYMIADES, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
STRATEGIC POLICY AND PERFORMANCE
Debbie started her role as Executive Director Strategic Policy and Performance
early in 2009. Prior to this Debbie held a range of roles in the curriculum area
including General Manager of Teaching, Learning and Standards from 2004–08.
Debbie started her career as a primary teacher in South-Western Sydney and
spent a number of years as a lecturer in mathematics education at the University
of New South Wales. She came to the NT in 1998. Her current passion is providing
rigorous evidence and strategic advice to support the substantial improvement
agenda underway within the department — with a particular emphasis on evaluating
success. Debbie is currently the NT Education and Training Minister’s nominee on
the ACARA Board.
KIM JENKINSON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
TRAINING AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Kim came to the NT in 1987, starting his career as a science teacher at Casuarina
Secondary College and then Darwin High School where he held roles as the
Science Faculty Senior and as the Assistant Principal Senior School. After a year
in the private sector in 2001, Kim returned to the department as the General
Manager Employment and Training. In 2008 he moved to the Department of
Business and Employment as the Executive Director Employment and Policy
Coordination. He came to his current role as Executive Director Training and
Higher Education in January 2011. His major focus for 2011 is to ensure training
and employment initiatives are aligned to respond to occupational skills shortages
for emerging major projects.
JOHN HASSED, DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE,
TERTIARY, CORPORATE AND PORTFOLIO SERVICES
John was the Deputy Chief Executive Tertiary, Corporate and Portfolio Services
until taking up a 12 month secondment as Pro Vice-Chancellor, Vocational
Education and Training with CDU in January 2011. He held several positions with
the department since he started in May 2004. Before this, John held executive
positions in the Qld Public Service, including General Manager Training Services,
General Manager Workforce Services and Director Workplace Relations. He has
also held senior management positions in the Qld Department of Education and
has business and industrial relations qualifications.
125
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND
TRAINING STRATEGIC PLAN 2009–12
The DET Strategic Plan 2011–14 outlines the department’s strategic direction and priorities. It provides
our collective vision, values, commitments, shared beliefs and strategies. These lay the foundations for
activities and functions of all areas in the department. The DET Strategic Plan 2011–14, together with the
NT Government’s Budget Paper No. 3, provide the framework for reporting our performance in this report.
A review of the DET Strategic Plan 2009–12 was undertaken in November 2010. The refreshed DET
Strategic Plan 2011–14 was released in March 2011.
OUR VISION:
To achieve real and improved student outcomes through access to, and participation in, quality
strategies, programs, people, partnerships and systems.
WE VALUE:
Professionalism, respect, innovation, diversity and excellence.
WE ARE COMMITTED TO:
Delivering education and training that will grow educated and smart Territorians.
OUR GOALS:
A Good Start — quality care and education for all NT children to build strong foundations for life
and learning.
Every Child a Learner — primary and middle years schooling to ensure attendance, engagement
and attainment.
Bright Futures — education and training that meets the diverse needs of young Territorians and
maximises their post-school options.
Skilled Territorians — providing skills for jobs to enable Territorians to contribute to and benefit from
the NT’s economic growth.
126
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
OUR PEOPLE
WORKFORCE PROFILE [T2030:ED3.1;3.3]
On 24 June 2011, the number of staff (headcount) employed by the department was 5145, an increase of
235 (or 4.8 per cent) compared to the same time in 2010. The average full-time equivalent (FTE) for these
employees was 4428.3, an increase of 206.5 (or 4.9 per cent). These increases were primarily due to
additional Australian Government funded initiatives and the opening of new schools.
Table 29: Workforce at a glance, 2009–10 and 2010–11
2009–10
2010–11
4910
5145
4221.7
4428.3
Number (headcount)
Average FTE
Part-time employees
10.9%
11.1%
Temporary employees
28.5%
30.1%
43.8
43.6
Female employees
76.7%
77.2%
Male employees
23.3%
22.8%
Average age (years)
Source: PIPS 2009–10 and 2010–11
Employees on paid and unpaid leave are included in calculating the headcount and FTE
Figure 117 shows the number of employees and the actual paid FTE for each pay period during 2009–10
and 2010–11.
Figure 117: Number of employees and actual paid FTE, 2009–10 and 2010–11
5200
5000
4800
Employees
4600
4400
4200
4000
3800
3600
3400
3200
3000
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Pay Period
2009–10 Headcount
2010–11 Headcount
2009–10 FTE
2010–11 FTE
Source: PIPS 2009–10 and 2010–11
127
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
The seasonal trends for both the number of employees and the actual paid FTE were consistent between
both financial years — with decreases during the school holiday periods.
For 2010–11, the percentage of employees who were part-time was 11.1 per cent (an increase of
0.3 per cent) and the percentage of employees with temporary contracts increased by 1.6 per cent to
30.1 per cent. Additional Australian Government funded positions contributed to the latter increase.
AGE-GENDER PROFILE
The average age of employees decreased slightly from 43.7 years to 43.6 years in 2010–11.
The department’s workforce continues to be predominantly female, with 3973 female and 1172 male
employees. The proportion of female employees in 2010–11 was 77.2 per cent — an increase of
0.5 per cent.
Figure 118: Number of employees by age group and gender, 2009–10 and 2010–11
700
Number of Employees
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
16 to 20
21 to 25
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 to 45
46 to 50
51 to 55
56 to 60
61 to 65
66 to 70
71 to 75
Age Group
2010 Female
2010 Male
2011 Female
2011 Male
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2010 and 2011
Although there was no significant change in the average age of all employees, there were some noticeable
changes in various age groups. There have been significant increases in the number of female employees
in the 26 to 30, 36 to 40 and 51 to 55 age groups. There has been virtually no change in the number of
female or male employees in the 41 to 45 age group, the number of male employees aged less than
40 years has increased and the number aged over 40 has decreased.
128
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
AGE–GENDER PROFILE — EXECUTIVE CONTRACT OFFICERS
The department has more female employees than male employees in executive contract positions.
Of the department’s entire female workforce, 2.1 per cent are in executive contract positions. Of the
department’s entire male workforce, 6.3 per cent are in executive contract positions.
Figure 119: Number of executive contract officers by age group and gender, 2009–10 and 2010–11
30
Number of Employees
25
20
15
10
5
0
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 to 45
46 to 50
51 to 55
56 to 60
61 to 65
66 to 70
Age Group
2010 Female
2010 Male
2011 Female
2011 Male
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2010 and 2011
In 2011, there was an increase in the number of female executive contract officers in the 51 to 55 age
group and a decline in each of the higher age groups. For male executives, there was a significant
increase in the number of officers in the 36 to 40 age group.
Generally, there were more male executive contract officers in the lower age groups (41 to 45 and below)
and more female executives in the higher age groups (46 to 50 and above).
129
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
RETENTION
The year-to-year retention rate is calculated by identifying the staff employed at the end of the second
school term and determining the percentage of these employees who are still employed by the department
at the end of the second term in the following year. For example, of the 4616 staff members employed at
the end of Term 2, 2010, there were 3558 who continued to be employed at the end of Term 2, 2011 —
giving a year-to-year retention rate within the department for 2010–11 of 77.1 per cent.
Figure 120: Year-to-year retention rate, 2008–09 to 2010–11
100%
Retention
80%
79.2%
76.1%
79.1%
76.5%
78.1%
77.8%
76.0%
77.1%
71.0%
60%
40%
20%
0%
2008 to 2009
2010 to 2011
2009 to 2010
Teacher
Non-Teacher
All Staff
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2008 to 2011
The retention rate for the department’s employees from 2009–10 to 2010–11 was 77.1 per cent. There was
a 2.0 per cent increase in retention rate from 2008–09 to 2009–10 followed by a 1.0 per cent decrease
from 2009–10 to 2010–11.
For teaching staff, the retention rate for 2010–11 was 77.8 per cent (a decrease of 1.3 per cent from the
previous year) and for non-teaching staff, the retention rate was 76.0 per cent (a decrease of 0.5 per cent).
130
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
RETENTION OF TEACHING STAFF IN VERY REMOTE SCHOOLS [T2030:ED3.3]
For the start of the 2011 school year, new selection and screening processes were implemented for the
first time as part of the RTS initiative. Analysis of data relating to employees recruited during the first
semester of this school year indicated significant improvements in the retention of new recruits to very
remote schools.
Table 30: Retention of teaching staff in very remote schools, Semester 1, 2010 and 2011
2009–10
2010–11
Retained in department
86.4%
94.7%
Difference
8.3%
Retained at school
76.8%
87.6%
10.8%
Source: PIPS 2009–10 and 2010–11
Table 30 shows the retention rates for teaching staff recruited to very remote schools during the first term
that were retained within the department and within the individual schools at the end of Term 2 for each
year. For these schools, the retention rate within the department improved by 8.3 per cent and within
individual schools the retention rate improved by 10.8 per cent.
131
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
OUR SCHOOLS
On 24 June 2011, the number of school-based employees (headcount) was 4242 which was an increase of
172 (or 4.2 per cent) when compared to the same time in 2010. The actual paid FTE for these employees
was 3674.6, an increase of 150.8 (or 4.3 per cent). These increases were primarily due to additional
Australian Government funded initiatives and the opening of new schools.
Table 31: School-based workforce at a glance, 2009–10 and 2010–11
School
2009–10
2010–11
4070
4242
Average FTE
3523.8
3674.6
Part-time employees
11.0%
11.3%
Temporary employees
28.4%
29.9%
Number (headcount)
Average age (years)
43.8
43.6
Female employees
76.7%
77.2%
Male employees
23.3%
22.8%
Source: PIPS Pay 26, 2009–10 and 2010–11
For 2010–11, the percentage of school-based employees who were part-time was 11.3 per cent
(an increase of 0.3 per cent) and the percentage of employees with temporary contracts increased
by 1.5 per cent to 29.9 per cent. Additional Australian Government funded positions contributed to
these increases.
On 24 June 2011, the number of classroom teachers (headcount) was 2317 which was an increase of
83 (or 3.7 per cent) when compared to the previous year. The actual paid FTE for these employees was
2007.6, an increase of 41.6 (or 2.1 per cent). These increases were primarily due to additional Australian
Government funded initiatives and the opening of new schools.
Table 32: Classroom teachers at a glance, 2009–10 and 2010–11
Classroom teachers
Number (headcount)
2009–10
2010–11
2234
2317
1966.0
2007.6
9.2%
10.9%
28.3%
28.8%
42.5
42.4
Female employees
77.5%
78.3%
Male employees
22.5%
21.7%
Average FTE
Part-time employees
Temporary employees
Average age (years)
Source: PIPS Pay 26 2010–11
For 2010–11, the percentage of classroom teachers who were part-time was 10.9 per cent (an increase
of 1.7 per cent) and the percentage of employees with temporary contracts increased by 0.5 per cent to
28.8 per cent.
132
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
EQUITY AND DIVERSITY [T2030:ED3.1]
The department values the diversity of its workforce and is committed to the principle of Equal Employment
Opportunity and to creating inclusive work environments where people are valued for their diverse cultures,
experiences, skills, knowledge and capabilities to provide culturally inclusive and responsive services.
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
In this section please note that nominating equal employment opportunity status is voluntary for all
NTPS staff. All generic Indigenous classifications, such as assistant teachers, Aboriginal health workers,
Indigenous trainee teachers and cadets on the National Indigenous Cadetship Project, are deemed to be
Indigenous whether self-identified or not.
Table 33: Equal employment opportunity, 2009–10 and 2010–11
Year
2010–11
2009–10
Equal employment opportunity
categories
Department of
Department of
Education and
Education and
Training total Training percentage
NTPS
percentage
Indigenous employees
627
12.1%
8.1%
People with a disability
77
1.5%
1.4%
Non-English speaking background
162
3.1%
3.6%
Indigenous employees
592
12.1%
8.1%
People with a disability
83
1.7%
1.8%
156
3.2%
4.0%
Non-English speaking background
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2009–10 and 2010–11
The number of Indigenous employees in the department during 2010–11 was 627 (an increase of
5.9 per cent). The proportion of the department’s workforce classified as Indigenous remained constant
at 12.1 per cent and continued to be higher than across the NTPS.
In 2010–11, the number of employees with a disability decreased to 77 and the number of employees from
a non-English speaking background increased to 162.
133
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
INDIGENOUS EMPLOYEES
At the end of Term 2, 2011, there were 627 Indigenous employees across a wide range of classifications
within the department. The most common classification was Assistant Teacher with 273 employees
(or 43.5 per cent). A large proportion of the Indigenous employees are female — 515 or 82.1 per cent.
Table 34: Indigenous employees by classification, 2010 to 2011
Female
Male
Total
Administrative Officer 1
1
0
1
Administrative Officer 2
30
3
33
Administrative Officer 3
22
6
28
Administrative Officer 4
61
15
76
Administrative Officer 5
6
0
6
Administrative Officer 6
7
2
9
Administrative Officer 7
7
5
12
240
33
273
75
10
85
Executive Contract Principal Level 3
0
1
1
Executive Contract Officer 1
0
1
1
Executive Contract Officer 2
1
0
1
Executive Contract Officer 3
0
1
1
Indigenous Cadetship Support
10
2
12
Indigenous Training Teacher 1
3
2
5
Indigenous Training Teacher 2
3
3
6
Indigenous Training Teacher 3
2
0
2
NTPS Adult Apprentice
2
1
3
NTPS Apprentice
2
4
6
Physical 2
3
18
21
Physical 3
2
1
3
Principal Level 1
3
0
3
Assistant Teacher
Classroom Teacher
Professional 3
2
0
2
Senior College Teacher
1
0
1
Senior Teacher 1
20
0
20
Senior Teacher 2
1
0
1
Senior Teacher 3
1
1
2
Senior Teacher 4
2
0
2
Senior Administrative Officer 1
6
1
7
Senior Administrative Officer 2
2
1
3
Technical 2
0
1
1
515
112
627
TOTAL
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2011
134
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NON SCHOOL-BASED ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
Figure 121 compares the proportion of Indigenous employees in the corporate (non-school) section of the
department by administrative classification with the proportion for non-Indigenous employees. There was a
large proportion of Indigenous employees at the Administrative Officer (AO) 7 classification.
Figure 121: Non school-based administrative officers by Indigenous status, 2010 to 2011
25%
21.64%
20%
16.7%
18.5% 18.49%
14.8%
14.08%
15%
22.2%
13.45%
10.92%
11.1%
10%
7.4%
5%
1.9%
0%
8.82%
8.19%
3.7% 3.78%
3.7%
0.63%
AO1
AO2
AO3
AO4
Indigenous
AO5
AO6
AO7
SA01
SA02
Non-Indigenous
Source: PIPS last day of Term 2, 2011
135
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY
The department continues its commitment to providing a healthy and safe environment to all staff,
students and visitors. A renewed focus on the Occupational Health and Safety Management
System through the department’s Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management Plan sees
implementation at a strategic and operational level. The high level OHS Coordination Committee is
made up of representatives from across the department and unions. Employee engagement will be
further strengthened through the consolidation of workgroups and full functioning of health and safety
representatives.
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
A 22 per cent reduction in the number of injures since last year, as well as reduction in claims and costs,
reflect the effort being made in this important area.
Table 35: Workers’ compensation costs and number of injuries and claims 2007–08 to 2010–11
TOTAL COST
NEW
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
$5 015 315
$4 115 262
$4 333 915
$4 266 246
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
Injuries
319
Claims
STRESS
92
2007–08
Claims
Source: DET Human Resources Services
136
18
281
115
2008–09
19
317
247
118
104
2009–10
29
20
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
The department values the contribution of its employees and considers investing in training and
development of our people to be a priority to ensure we deliver on our strategic priorities. The Human
Resources Services (HRS) team provides a range of professional development services to its school
based and corporate workforce, including:
Capability and Leadership Framework
Community Development Employment
Project transition
Organisational management and
Job Evaluation System
Employment and early career programs
More Indigenous teachers
Workforce planning and development
Cross cultural awareness
Orientation programs
Indigenous remote workforce development
Studies assistance
Individual corporate business areas within the department are responsible for managing employees’
training and development based on their skill needs and available resources. The HRS team supports
corporate business areas with staff management, training and development. The department recognises
that providing equitable training and development opportunities to employees in remote and isolated
locations is a particular challenge. The use of ICT is helping to overcome this.
Throughout 2010–11 the department provided a range of training and professional development programs
that both support the department’s strategic objectives and aim to value and enhance the individual
contributions and capabilities of staff.
LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT [T2030:ED3.3]
Table 36: Expenditure on learning and development
Learning and Development Expenditure
2009–10
2010–11
Total employees (actual headcount number)
4910
5145
Total learning and development expenditure
$6 903 424
$9 604 887
$373 264 361
$406 377 744
Learning and development costs as a percentage
of employee expenditure
1.85%
2.36%
Average training expenditure per employee
$1406
$1867
Total employee expenditure
Source: DET Financial Services
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
The department sponsored more than 12 employees to attend The Regional Leadership Journey — run
by Women and Leadership Australia. This one-day skills development program specifically targeted at
women, covered themes including ethics, communication and resilience. The program aims to empower
women and develop their leadership potential by bringing them together to explore their challenges and
experiences in a supportive and empathetic environment.
137
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
The Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment (OCPE) offers accredited programs Kigaruk
(for Indigenous males) and Lookrukin (for Indigenous females) at the AO4 level or above who are
currently working as supervisors, front-line managers, coordinators, project managers or in similar roles
across the sector.
Three male employees of the department started Kigaruk in March 2011 and will graduate in
February 2012. Four female employees started Lookrukin in April 2011. Upon completion these
employees will be awarded a Diploma of Business (Frontline Management). In addition, one
Indigenous female is currently enrolled in the Discovery Women as Leaders program (non-accredited)
also run by OCPE.
APPRENTICESHIPS AND TRAINEESHIPS
Eight Indigenous people participated in the NTPS Apprenticeship Program across departmental
workplaces. The program provided Territorians with an opportunity to gain a qualification through
structured employment and training within the NTPS and is coordinated through the Department of
Business and Employment.
INDIGENOUS EMPLOYMENT AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT
The department is committed to improving Indigenous career outcomes. This commitment is highlighted
in the department’s four year Indigenous Employment and Career Development Strategy, which has
set a target of 15 per cent for the total number of Indigenous employees. Currently, the department
has 12.1 per cent Indigenous employees. Within the Human Resources Services division, a dedicated
Indigenous Workforce Development team is co-ordinating a range of Indigenous employment and career
pathway initiatives.
SUPPORTING WORK-LIFE BALANCE
The department recognises the importance of achieving balance between work and the personal lives
for all employees. Flexible arrangements such as part-time work, flexible working hours, purchased
leave, leave without pay and part-time work all contribute to positive, healthy work sites and ultimately to
productive work environments.
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
The Employee Relations team provided advice and resources to implement various commitments arising
from enterprise agreements, and supported the OCPE in the development of the NTPS 2010–13 Teacher
and Educator Enterprise Agreement. The team monitored national trends in terms and conditions for
teachers and educators in other jurisdictions to ensure that the salaries and employment conditions of
teachers remain among the best in Australia. The new agreement came into effect on 29 December 2010
and delivered significant benefits for NT teachers including:
restructure of classroom teacher classification, including the introduction of a ninth increment for
staff in the Classroom Teacher classification
improved non-contract principal structure
introduction of the new Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher scheme
introduction of the new Specialist Teacher classification.
138
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
These initiatives enhanced the package of options available to teachers when choosing a career pathway
in the department.
The Human Resources team also facilitated implementation of new initiatives under the NTPS 2010–13
Enterprise Agreement. Key initiatives included introducing of the Senior Administrative Officer and Senior
Professional Officer classifications and substantial changes to parental leave provisions.
A new Executive Contract Principal classification and structure was introduced and included changes to
remuneration levels. The new structure addressed limitations of the previous framework and is expected to
enhance the recruitment of principals by providing the flexibility necessary to attract high calibre applicants.
The new structure is more equitable and efficient and allows for organic growth over time. All Executive
Contract Principal positions were evaluated and their levels determined in the new structure.
A pilot scheme for the advertising and selection of executive contract principals was developed. The
pilot is in the process of implementation to establish a pool of prospective candidates for appointment as
executive contract principals for vacancies that occur during the year.
The department’s Human Resources Delegations were reviewed, amended and republished as required
throughout the year to reflect structural changes and the new enterprise agreements.
During the year preparations continued for the implementation of Working with Children clearance notices
(Ochre Cards). From 1 July 2011, section 187 of the Care and Protection of Children Act will require all
Territorians in child-related work to have a Working with Children Clearance Notice, also known as an
Ochre Card. Accordingly all school-based departmental employees, as well as corporate staff involved in
child-related work, require an Ochre Card. Many school council employees and volunteers also require an
Ochre Card. Recruitment procedures were also revised to accommodate the new requirement.
The Human Resources Consultancy Services team continued to coach managers in best practice and
provide guidance and support in preliminary and formal processes in accordance with the Public Sector
Employment and Management Act.
Cases managed included:
Inability
Medical incapacity
2
3
Discipline
13
Grievances
34
Requests for compassionate transfer
40
Complaints of bullying or harassment
1
The team addressed complaints by or against staff, responded to queries on entitlements and facilitated
approvals of requests from individual staff where required to senior delegated officers. Eleven staff were
also seconded to a range of external organisations.
Development of the Human Resources Case Management Database continued, with testing to begin in
August 2011.
139
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
STANDING COMMITTEES
The department has several internal standing committees that help to ensure good governance and
effective leadership and management. Each committee is chaired by a member of the Executive Board.
The committees are:
AUDIT AND RISK STANDING COMMITTEE
The primary objective of this committee is to help the Chief Executive and the Senior Executive Group to
meet statutory and accountability responsibilities relating to internal control and risk management.
The committee is chaired by the General Manager, Office of the Chief Executive, and is made up
of senior departmental officers, a member external to the public sector and an observer from the
NT Auditor-General’s Office.
The committee met four times in 2010–11 to oversee the internal and external audit program and the
Strategic Risk Register Action Plan, reporting to the department’s Executive Board.
BUDGET COMMITTEE
This committee ensures effective resource allocation, controls and measures to prevent any deficit
and ensure outcomes are achieved. The committee is made up of select members of the department’s
Executive Board. The committee met nine times in 2010–11.
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
This committee manages the strategic directions and operational priorities for information management
and information technology across the department. It meets regularly and is chaired by a senior executive
staff member.
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY COORDINATION COMMITTEE
This committee is made up of members representing the interests of employees across the department.
It is responsible for implementing, reviewing and suggesting modifications to occupational health and
safety policies and procedures. The committee is chaired by a senior executive staff member and met four
times in 2010–11.
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
This committee develops and reviews risk, emergency and recovery management to improve the ability to
act upon and recover from a major disruptive event, emergency or disaster. A member of the department’s
Executive Board chairs the committee.
140
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
ADVISORY BOARDS, COUNCILS
AND COMMITTEES
Several independent advisory boards, councils and committees have been established under Acts of The
NT Parliament to support the Minister for Education and Training, the Chief Executive and the department’s
Executive Board. These board, councils and committees report directly to the Minister.
NORTHERN TERRITORY BOARD OF STUDIES
The Northern Territory Board of Studies has 16 members representing parents, employers, principals,
teachers, post-school educators, unions, government and non-government schools and the Indigenous
community. It has an independent chair appointed by the Administrator of the NT.
The board advises the Minister for Education and Training and the Chief Executive on curriculum policy.
It also works with other authorities on education matters, issues certificates of educational attainment and
maintains records of student assessment.
In 2010–11 the board met four times.
Members at 30 June 2011 were:
Professor Steven Larkin (Chair)
Saraswathi Griffiths-Chandran
Judith Austin
Wendy Troe
Sharon Duong
Pauline Schober
Susan Crowe
Jenny Nash
Rodney Smith
Susan Bandias
Shelley Martin
David Cannon
John Emslie
Christopher Young
Henry Gray
Peter Kell
141
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
NORTHERN TERRITORY INDIGENOUS EDUCATION COUNCIL
The Northern Territory Indigenous Education Council, established on 5 December 2007, is an Indigenous
representative advisory body consisting of 13 Indigenous people with expertise in education, health,
housing and business. The council provides strategic policy advice and recommendations to NT and
Australian Government ministers on education for Indigenous students in the NT.
A key role of the council is to consult directly with Indigenous people across the NT on a regular basis
and reflect Indigenous people’s views, aspirations and concerns on education services and outcomes for
Indigenous students.
The council’s 2010–12 Strategic Plan identified areas on which members would focus their attention
in 2010:
engagement and connections
attendance and retention.
Since its inception the council has held 14 meetings and 12 rounds of community consultations including
school visits. In 2010 the council made 11 recommendations from the community consultation and
community forums conducted throughout 2010. A total of 118 recommendations have been made to the
NT and Australian Government ministers for education on various matters.
Members at 30 June 2011 were:
Mark Motlop (Chair)
Patrick Anderson
Ian Woods
Dr Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann AM
Donna McMasters
Patrick Browne
Nalwarri Ngurrwutthun
Jannette McCormack
Marius Puruntatameri
John Morgan
142
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
NON-GOVERNMENT SCHOOL MINISTERIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Non-Government School Ministerial Advisory Council advises the Minister for Education and Training
on matters relating to the non-government schools sector, including funding and registration. The council
was formally established under Section 19 of the Education Act on 9 December 2002, to provide policy
advice to the Minister on the registration, regulation, and standards of non-government schools.
Membership of the Council comprises:
an independent Chair
one nominee from the Association of Independent Schools of the NT
one nominee from the Catholic Education Office
one nominee from the NT Christian Schools Association
two nominees from the department’s Executive, school planning or quality assurance areas.
Each of the three non-government school organisations nominated a representative for membership of the
council, and the department nominated two representatives. The term of these positions is not time-limited.
The Minister is responsible for appointing members to the council, and for appointing the independent
Chair. The appointment of the Chair is for a limited term, and John Cossons commenced a new three-year
term on 27 January 2009.
The Minister reserves the authority to accept or reject a nominee. The Chair of the council may determine
whether substitute delegates to council meetings are acceptable. Proxies have not been accepted into
the council.
An executive officer and administrative officer support the council. The council met six times in 2010–11.
Members at 30 June 2011 were:
John Cossons (Chair)
Gail Barker, Association of Independent Schools of the NT
Greg O’Mullane, Catholic Education Office
Geoff Bateman, NT Christian Schools Association
Eva Lawler, DET
Debbie Efthymiades, DET
Joanne Schilling (Executive Officer — non-member), DET
143
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK
The department, on behalf of the Minister for Education and Training, is responsible for administering
several Acts of the NT Parliament and subordinate legislation relating to education, children’s services and
training. They are:
Education Act
Education (Board of Studies) Regulations
Education (College and School Councils) Regulations
Education (Infringement Notice) Regulations
Education (Non-Government Schools) Regulations
Higher Education Act
Higher Education Regulations
Care and Protection of Children Act with respect to Chapter 4 of the Act
— Regulation of Children’s Services
Care and Protection of Children (Children’s Services) Regulations
Northern Territory Employment and Training Act
Teacher Registration (Northern Territory) Act
Teacher Registration (Northern Territory) Regulations.
The department, on behalf of the Australian Government, is responsible for administering
the Education Services for Overseas Students Act.
144
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
COMPLIANCE WITH THE INFORMATION ACT
During 2010–11 the department’s Freedom of Information and Privacy policy officer managed the
department’s compliance with the Information Act. Information as required by section 11 of the Information
Act is published on the department’s website.
INFORMATION ACCESS AND CORRECTION
The department has policies and procedures for accessing information and making requests to correct
personal information under the Information Act. These are available online at: http://www.det.nt.gov.au/
about-us/foi/access-information.
The following table shows the total number of formal applications accepted between 1 July 2010 and
30 June 2011 in line with the access and correction provisions of the Information Act.
Table 37: Information requests, 2006–07 to 2010–11
Application type
2006–07
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
Access government information
1
6
5
10
9
Access personal information
6
7
7
5
3
Correct personal information
2
2
-
-
-
Internal review
2
4
2
1
1
Note: Only applications that met the formal requirements for acceptance under the Information Act are counted. Although some
applications may be dealt with and finalised over several reporting periods, applications are only counted in the reporting period in
which they were accepted.
PRIVACY
The department’s privacy statement is available on its website. Other resources for clients and employees
are also available via the website.
During the year there was a focus on updating privacy policies as well as providing advice to business
areas regarding the use and disclosure of personal information. There were also professional learning
sessions conducted for staff and on-line training in Freedom of Information and Privacy was developed.
In 2010–11 the department did not receive any privacy complaints.
RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
The department’s Records Management Unit provides the policy and operational framework for continuing
improvements in the way information and records are managed throughout the department, with a focus
on the management, storage and disposal of records. The unit administers the TRIM database for the
department, providing user training, account management and compliance monitoring. The unit also
provides internal mail services and courier services to government and non-government schools via a
contracted service provider.
145
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
RISK MANAGEMENT
Good corporate governance requires processes and practices to manage, in an integrated way, all
significant risks associated with the department’s operations and the achievement of its goals.
The department has adopted processes from AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009 Risk Management — Principles
and Guidelines in the conduct of risk management, as an ongoing process and applied in context at many
levels of the department.
A strategic risk assessment is used to identify whole-of-department risk issues. This relates to risks
associated with the department carrying out its business objectives as articulated in the DET Strategic
Plan. It is undertaken every two years and reviewed regularly, and was last conducted in April 2011. The
risks are identified and documented in the Strategic Risk Assessment and monitored through the Strategic
Risk Register and Strategic Action Plan by the Audit and Risk Standing Committee.
146
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
INSURANCE
In accordance with Treasurer’s Directions R2.1 — Insurance Arrangements, the following information
provides an overview of the department’s insurance arrangements and details the key mitigation strategies
and processes in each insurable risk category identified in the Treasurer’s Directions.
In accordance with NT Government policy, the department self insures for risk exposures under the
categories of:
Workers’ compensation
Property and assets
Public liability
Indemnities
NT Government departments may procure commercial insurance if after undertaking a thorough risk
assessment a net benefit from the commercial insurance arrangements can be demonstrated. The
department procures commercial insurance for school council employees and volunteers covering risk
exposures under the categories of:
Public liability
Workers’ compensation
Personal injury volunteer insurance
Personal injury work experience insurance.
The following table details the mitigations strategies in relation to the insurance risk categories identified in
Treasurer’s Direction R2.1.
Table 38: Insurance risk and mitigation strategies
Insurable risk
category
Mitigation strategies
Workers’
compensation
Occupational health and safety (OH&S) policy and procedures; application of early
intervention principles; and orientation and training for employees covering areas
such as OH&S, appropriate workplace behaviours, job specific training and support.
Property and
assets
The department’s capital works program is managed by DCI. Construction is
governed by NT Government construction contracts, ensuring contractors and service
providers have appropriate levels of skill and insurance in place.
A repairs and maintenance program is in place for the department’s property and
asset management.
Public Liability
Commercial insurance is procured by the department on behalf of school councils to
cover other school council activities.
Processes and procedures are in place to regulate use of NT Government school
assets by the broader community.
Indemnities
Risk assessment conducted for each new agreement, legal review, and policies and
processes for recording, monitoring and reporting.
147
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Table 39: Claims — self-insured risks
Self-insured risk
Total value of
claims
$’000
Average cost
of claims
$’000
Number of claims
Workers compensation
2009–10
4400
118
17.7
2010–11
4266
104
16.3
2009–10
4.4
3
1.5
2010–11
24.9
7
3.6
Property and Assets – Vehicles
Property and Assets – Buildings
1
2009–10
-
-
-
2010–11
695.1
78
8.9
Information in relation to claimable damage to buildings is not reported for 2009–10. Costs form part of repairs and maintenance
expenditure but could not be reliably quantified at reporting date.
Table 40: Claims — commercially insured risks
Commercially insured risk
Premium*
$’000
Total value of
claims*
$’000
Average cost
of claims
$’000
Number of
claims*
Workers Compensation
2009–10
730
101
15
6.7
2010–11
786.2
276.9
24
11.2
2009–10
85.5
1.8
1
1.8
2010–11
57.4
Nil
Nil
Nil
2009–10
37.8
Nil
Nil
Nil
2010–11
22.0
0.6
1
0.6
Public Liability
Personal Injury Insurance
* Values are exclusive of taxes and charges.
148
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
AUDITS UNDERTAKEN 2010–11
Audits and reviews are scheduled as part of the department’s internal and external audit program,
and reported to the Audit and Risk Management Committee, followed by a report to the department’s
Executive Board.
INTERNAL AUDITS
Financial and compliance audit — Yirrkala School
A financial and compliance audit was completed to confirm that the financial records of Yirrkala School
comply with the policy, guidelines and procedures of school finance as set out by the department, and to
receive recommendations for improving budget, financial and procurement management and controls,
school council reporting and the administrative support structures for this school.
Financial audit — Centralian Middle School
A financial audit was conducted to confirm the financial records of Centralian Middle School comply
with the policy, guidelines and procedures of school finance as set out by the department.
Review the 2010 Audited Financial Statements of schools.
A review was conducted on the 2010 audited financial statements of schools to examine compliance
with specific requirements of financial management as contained in the Education Act and Education
(College and School Council) Regulations and the level of financial risk of individual schools was
assessed. The review made recommendations to improve the management of financial risk, as it pertains
to school accounts.
EXTERNAL AUDITS
End of year review
A compliance audit was undertaken to review the adequacy of selected aspects of end-of-year financial
controls, reporting, accounting and material financial transactions and balances. The purpose is to provide
support to the audit of the Treasurer’s Annual Financial Statement.
AVETMISS financial data acquittal
An audit of VET financial data acquittal for the period ending 31 December 2010 was undertaken in
July 2011. Reporting on public funds is part of the AVETMISS requirements. The AVETMISS financial data
collection requires an external audit of key data elements within that collection, including financial data.
Agency compliance audit
An agency compliance audit was conducted in April 2011 to assess and test the adequacy of the
systems developed by the Accountable Officer to achieve compliance with their accountability and
control requirements.
149
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
COMMUNICATION
The department recognises the importance of effective, transparent and timely communication systems
and networks. A number of systems are used to communicate with staff and other stakeholders.
INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS
Chief Executive’s messages
In 2010-11, 43 messages from the Chief Executive were delivered to all staff by email.
Executive communications
The department’s senior executives regularly use this group email function to deliver information about
high level departmental issues to all staff.
Critical communications
In the event of an emergency, the affected school or business unit is contacted by any available means for
immediate action.
Principal’s Weekly Update
The Principal’s Weekly Update is now in its fifth year and continues to effectively streamline and highlight
information for principals.
Staff intranet
The staff intranet site is a hub of news and information for school and corporate staff. It is updated several
times a day and a weekly Staff eNews summary is emailed to all staff. The consistent management of the
staff intranet has significantly reduced the need for group emails on routine matters.
Media monitoring
News clippings, radio alerts and online news articles referencing issues and activities within NT education
are posted to the staff intranet daily.
EXTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS
Online presence
The department’s website provides positive stories and updates on achievements, activities, strategic
direction, policy and projects. It provides accountable and transparent information to the public in line with
Australian Government requirements. The website is used as a tool for feedback and comment from the
community. The department’s website homepage received more than 157 000 page visits in 2010–11.
Electronic student profile
Parents and carers can log onto their child’s student profile and find up-to-date records of enrolment
history, attendance records, assessments, achievements, certificates, awards and samples of work.
This is a first for government schools in Australia.
150
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Media releases
Media releases from the department, schools, Minister for Education and Training and other NT and
Australian Government parliamentarians are accessible from the department’s website. A total of
111 media releases were posted to the website in 2010–11.
Media enquiries
Internal Communications, Media and Marketing received an average of 10 media enquiries per week,
fluctuating from five during the school holiday period to 20 enquiries during peak times.
School websites
Schools may choose to host a website through ntschools.net or via an independent service provider.
The schools are responsible for maintaining their own websites.
151
FINANCIAL REPORT
FINANCIAL STATEMENT OVERVIEW
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2011
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER’S REPORT
The 2010–11 budget and financial statements for DET have been prepared on an accrual basis and
provide information in respect of the financial operations, balance sheet, changes in equity and cash flow
of the department for the year.
Budgets and performance are established by output, ensuring that resource allocation decisions are
directed towards achieving the results intended by Government. Details of the department’s performance
by output group are provided at Note 3 of the financial statements. Performance against budget by output
group is provided in the Performance Reporting section of the Annual Report.
Key results at year end for the department were:
An operating deficit of $22.8 million which is slightly less than the budget of $20.812m1, but an increase
of $3.4 million on last year’s deficit of $19.4 million. The deficit is due to depreciation expense, which is
an expected outcome under the NT Government financial framework.
equity of $906.7 million as at 30 June 2011, an improvement of $157.1 million on 2009–10 primarily
due to:
» completed infrastructure of $133.4 million being transferred from the Department of Construction and
Infrastructure, which largely relates to the new Rosebery Primary and Middle Schools and projects
funded under the BER program
» an increase in asset values of $48.8 million due to land and building revaluations
cash of $50.2 million at year end, an increase of $3.5 million from 2009–10
OPERATING STATEMENT
The operating result for 2010–11 was in line with the department’s budget targets. Revenue was within
0.1% of budget and expense was within 0.2% of budget.
1
Increase of $3.8 million since Budget Paper No. 3 due to increase in Commonwealth appropriation.
152
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Table 1: Operating Statement Summary
2010–11
Original
budget
$M
Revised
budget
$M
Change
%
Actuals
$M
Variance
%
Revenue
NT Government output appropriation
592.9
591.9
(0.2)
591.9
0.0
Commonwealth appropriation*
236.9
273.0
15.2
273.0
(0.0)
4.7
21.8
363.8
20.0
(8.3)
Commonwealth specific purpose grant revenue
Commonwealth capital grant revenue
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
13.2
16.6
25.8
17.7
6.3
847.7
903.3
6.6
902.8
(0.1)
Operating expenses
885.6
924.1
4.3
925.6
0.2
Total expenses
885.6
924.1
4.3
925.6
0.2
Net operating result (deficit)
(37.9)
(20.8)
45.2
(22.8)
(9.9)
Fees, charges and other revenue
Total income
Expenses
* Increase of $3.7 million since Budget Paper No. 3 due to increased Commonwealth appropriation
OPERATING INCOME
Total operating income for 2010–11 was $902.8 million, an increase of $43.1 million over 2009–10 and
in line with planned budget. This was primarily comprised of output appropriation (65% — $559.3 million)
from the NT Government, Commonwealth appropriation (30% — $254.3 million) and income from grants
and subsidies (4% — $31.4 million) mainly from the Australian Government. In addition, there was notional
income to recognise the corporate service value, provided free of charge, by the Department of Business
and Employment of $12.6 million. Other minor sources of income amounted to $2.1 million.
Operating income $902.8 million
2%
2%
30%
66%
Miscellaneous revenue
Grants and subsidies
NT output appropriation
Commwealth output appropriation
Services received free of charge
Sales of goods and services
Interest revenue
153
FINANCIAL REPORT
OPERATING EXPENSES
Total operating expenses for 2010–11 was $925.6 million. The main components of these costs are
employee expenses of $405.9 million (42%) and grants and subsidies expenses of $375.7 million (41%).
Table 2 summarises expenditure trends by category. There was an overall growth in expenditure during
the year of 5.3% (compared to growth of 13.1% in 2009–10). This is attributed to:
Employee expenses being higher by $32.6 million in 2010–11, representing 70% of the total increase
in expenses. The increase is the result of enterprise bargaining agreement salary increases and
increased staffing in remote schools.
Purchases of goods and services expenses higher by $7.0 million in 2010–11, primarily due to
consumer price index increases and a planned move from leasing to purchasing of information
technology equipment resulting in a one-off increase in expenditure in 2010–11.
An increase in repairs and maintenance expenses by $7.6 million in 2010–11, in line with an
increased approved program to meet the repairs and maintenance needs on both an increasing and
aging asset base.
An increase in current grants and subsidies by $31.8 million in 2010–11, which reflected planned
changes in expenditure within the department’s budget.
A decrease in capital grants and subsidies by $37.6 million over 2009–10, primarily due to a decrease
in funding under the BER initiative and the Teaching and Learning Capital Fund for VET.
Table 2: Expenditure Trend
2008–09
Actuals
$M
2009–10
Change
%
Actuals
$M
2010–11
Change
%
Actuals
$M
Change
%
Operating expenses
Employee expenses
347.7
6.5
373.3
7.4
405.9
8.7
60.9
17.8
60.8
(0.2)
67.8
11.5
Repairs and maintenance
31.6
39.2
26.9
(14.9)
34.5
28.3
Depreciation and amortisation
21.2
9.8
23.6
11.3
27.5
16.5
Other administrative expenses
13.5
11.6
13.0
(3.7)
14.2
9.2
Grants and subsidies — current
278.7
12.4
313.9
12.6
345.7
10.1
Grants and subsidies — capital
23.5
16.9
67.6
187.7
30.0
(55.6)
777.1
11.0
879.1
13.1
925.6
5.3
Purchases of goods and services
Total
Movement year on year
154
76.8
102.0
46.5
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Operating expenses $879.1 million
41%
44%
12%
3%
Employee expenses
Depreciation and amortisation
Administrative expenses
Grants and subsidies
BALANCE SHEET
The Balance Sheet shows the department’s financial position. The balances reported are the net worth
to the NT Government of the department’s asset holdings (what is owned) against liabilities (what is
owed). A positive balance in the Balance Sheet indicates that the department owns sufficient assets to
meet any debts it owes as a result of operation. This balance is known as Net Equity. The majority of the
department’s assets comprise of land and buildings, which are used by NT Government schools.
TABLE 3a: Balance Sheet Trend
2006–07
actuals
$M
2007–08
actuals
$M
2008–09
actuals
$M
2009–10
actuals
$M
2010–11
actuals
$M
622.4
698.2
745.5
805.8
970.2
Financial position
Total assets
Total liabilities
Net equity
39.4
55.2
53.8
56.3
63.4
583.0
643.0
691.7
749.6
906.7
2008–09
change
%
2009–10
change
%
2010–11
change
%
Table 3b: Balance sheet trend – percentage change
2006–07
change
%
2007–08
change
%
Financial position
Total assets
2.9
12.2
6.8
8.1
30.1
Total liabilities
7.7
40.1
(2.5)
4.6
17.9
Net equity
2.6
10.3
7.6
8.4
31.1
155
FINANCIAL REPORT
The majority of the department’s assets comprise of land and buildings which are used by NT Government
schools. The principal reason for the increase in the value of the department’s assets is due to capitalised
school construction projects for the new Rosebery Primary and Middle Schools and projects funded
by the Australian Government under the BER initiative and increase to the values of land and buildings
upon revaluation.
No assets impairment was recorded in 2010–11.
The department held liabilities totalling $63.4 million at 30 June 2011, an increase of $7.1 million from
2009–10 predominantly reflecting an increase in payables and employee provisions.
In 2010–11, the department continued to maintain a strong financial position, with liabilities representing
less than seven per cent of total assets.
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOW
The statement of cash flows shows how cash was received and applied during the year impacting on the
cash balances held at year end. Table 4 summarises the movement of cash over the year.
Table 4: Statement of cash flow summary
2009–10
actuals
$M
2010–11
actuals
$M
Variance
$M
Variance
%
Cash Flow
Cash at beginning of year
Cash received
Less cash spent
Cash at end of reporting period
43.8
46.7
2.9
6.7
888.7
918.6
29.9
3.4
(885.8)
(915.1)
(29.3)
3.3
46.7
50.2
3.5
7.6
Cash at bank of $50.2 million at the end of 2010–11 was $7.6 million higher than the previous year. The
cash and deposits held will be utilised in 2011–12 to meet the department’s obligations under externally
funded programs.
David Ryan
Chief Financial Officer
16 September 2011
156
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
CERTIFICATION OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
We certify that the attached financial statements for the department have been prepared from proper
accounts and records in accordance with the prescribed format, the Financial Management Act and
Treasurer’s Directions.
We further state that the information set out in the Comprehensive Operating Statement, Balance Sheet,
Statement of Changes in Equity, Cash Flow Statement, and notes to and forming part of the financial
statements, presents fairly the financial performance and cash flows for the year ended 30 June 2011
and the financial position on that date.
At the time of signing, we are not aware of any circumstances that would render the particulars included
in the financial statements misleading or inaccurate.
………………………………….……………………………….
GARY BARNES
DAVID RYAN
Chief Executive
Chief Financial Officer
31 August 201131 August 2011
157
FINANCIAL REPORT
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
COMPREHENSIVE OPERATING STATEMENT
As at 30 June 2011
NOTE
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
INCOME
Grants and subsidies revenue
Current
19 956
27 003
Capital
228
4 434
Output
591 945
559 277
Commonwealth
273 000
254 327
Appropriation
Sales of goods and services
Interest revenue
653
1 071
2 202
-
Goods and services received free of charge
4
13 593
12 606
Assets acquired for nil consideration
5
17
308
1 227
706
3
902 821
859 732
405 884
373 264
Other income
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENSES
Employee expenses
Administrative expenses
Purchases of goods and services
7
66 018
58 063
34 529
29 946
1 796
2 578
11,12
27 456
23 523
4
13 593
12 558
573
584
Current
345 685
313 945
Capital
30 041
67 631
925 575
879 092
(22 754)
(19 360)
(48 751)
(9 379)
(48 751)
(9 379)
25 997
(9 981)
Repairs and maintenance
Property management
Depreciation and amortisation
Services received free of charge (1)
Other administrative expenses
Grants and subsidies expenses
Community service obligations
TOTAL EXPENSES
NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)
3
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Asset revaluation reserve
Changes in accounting policies
Correction of prior period errors
TOTAL OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
COMPREHENSIVE RESULT
The Comprehensive Operating Statement is to be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.
1
Includes DBE service charges.
158
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
BALANCE SHEET
As at 30 June 2011
NOTE
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
ASSETS
Current assets
Cash and deposits
Receivables
9
50 235
46 717
10
9 330
3 300
Prepayments
Total current assets
1 265
709
60 830
50 726
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment
11
909 322
755 089
Heritage and cultural assets
12
11
11
Total non-current assets
909 333
755 100
TOTAL ASSETS
970 163
805 826
7
3
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities
Deposits held
Payables
13
13 639
9 969
Provisions
14
42 022
36 000
55 668
45 972
7 762
10 288
7 762
10 288
63 430
56 260
906 733
749 566
1 017 705
886 535
97 416
48 665
(208 388)
(185 634)
906 733
749 566
Total current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Provisions
14
Total non-current liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
NET ASSETS
EQUITY
Capital
Asset revaluation reserve
Accumulated funds
15
TOTAL EQUITY
The Balance Sheet is to be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.
159
FINANCIAL REPORT
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
For the year ended 30 June 2011
NOTE
Equity at
1 July
$’000
Comprehensive
result
$’000
Transactions with
owners in their
capacity as owners
$’000
Equity at
30 June
$’000
(185 634)
(22 754)
-
(208 388)
(185 634)
48 665
48 665
(22 754)
-
48 751
48 751
-
(208 388)
48 665
48 751
97 816
2010–11
Accumulated funds
Changes in accounting policy
Correction of prior period errors
Transfers from reserves
Other movements directly to equity
Reserves
Asset revaluation reserve
15
Capital — transactions with owners
Equity injections
Capital appropriation
Equity transfers in
Other equity injections
Specific purpose payments
National partnership payments
Commonwealth – capital
Equity withdrawals
Capital withdrawal
Equity transfers out
886 535
886 535
886 535
Total equity at end of financial year
1 000
133 773
1 000
133 773
(3 400)
(203)
131 170
(3 400)
(203)
1 017 705
749 566
25 997
131 170
906 733
(166 275)
(19 360)
-
(185 634)
(166 275)
39 286
39 286
818 676
(19 360)
-
9 379
9 379
-
(185 634)
39 286
9 379
48 665
818 676
2009–10
Accumulated funds
Changes in accounting policy
Correction of prior period errors
Transfers from reserves
Other movements directly to equity
Reserves
Asset revaluation reserve
Capital — transactions with owners
Equity injections
Capital appropriation
Equity transfers in
Other equity injections
Specific purpose payments
National partnership payments
Commonwealth – capital
Equity withdrawals
Capital withdrawal
Equity transfers out
TOTAL EQUITY AT END OF
FINANCIAL YEAR
160
15
81 343
81 343
(12 414)
(1 070)
886 535
749 566
818 676
-
(12 414)
(1 070)
67 859
691 687
(9 981)
67 859
This Statement of Changes in Equity is to be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
CASH FLOW STATEMENT
For the year ended 30 June 2011
NOTE
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Operating receipts
Grants and subsidies received
Current
19 956
34 762
Capital
228
4 434
Output
591 945
559 277
Commonwealth
273 000
254 327
30 771
35 854
1 700
-
917 600
888 654
Payments to employees
400 691
366 496
Payments for goods and services
135 269
124 919
Current
345 685
313 945
Capital
30 041
67 631
911 686
872 991
5 914
15 663
-
365
Appropriation
Receipts from sales of goods and services
Interest received
Total operating receipts
Operating payments
Grants and subsidies paid
Total operating payments
Net cash from/(used in) operating activities
16
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Investing payments
Purchases of assets
Total investing payments
-
365
Net cash from/(used in) investing activities
-
(365)
4
-
Capital appropriation
1 000
-
Total financing receipts
1 004
-
3 400
12 414
3 400
12 414
(2 396)
(12 414)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Financing receipts
Deposits received
Equity injections
Financing payments
Equity withdrawals
Total financing payments
Net cash from/(used in) financing activities
Net increase/(decrease) in cash held
Cash at beginning of financial year
CASH AT END OF FINANCIAL YEAR
9
3 518
2 884
46 717
43 833
50 235
46 717
The Cash Flow Statement is to be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.
161
FINANCIAL REPORT
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
For the year ended 30 June 2011
INDEX OF NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1.
Objectives and funding
2.
Statement of significant accounting policies
3.
Comprehensive operating statement by output group
INCOME
4.
Goods and services received free of charge
5.
Assets acquired for nil consideration
EXPENSES
6.
Employee expenses
7.
Purchases of goods and services
8.
Depreciation and amortisation
ASSETS
9.
Cash and deposits
10.
Receivables
11.
Property, plant and equipment
12.
Heritage and cultural assets
LIABILITIES
13.
Payables
14.
Provisions
EQUITY
15.
Reserves
OTHER DISCLOSURES
16.
Notes to the cash flow statement
17.
Financial instruments
18.
Commitments
19.
Contingent liabilities and contingent assets
20.
Events subsequent to balance date
21.
Write-offs, postponements, waivers, gifts and ex gratia payments
22.
Schedule of Territory items
162
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
1. OBJECTIVES AND FUNDING
The role of the department is to improve the educational and training outcomes and options for
Territorians from their early years through to adulthood, by these key functional responsibilities:
access to quality day care facilities and early learning and development programs
delivering high quality education services through government and non-government schools to
maximise student learning
providing pathways for school aged students aligned with their further education and work/career
aspirations
providing an Australian standard VET system that allows Territorians to gain and retain employment
and build lifelong skills capacity
supporting NT institutions delivering tertiary education.
Additional information in relation to the department and its principal activities may be found in earlier
sections of this report.
The department is predominantly funded by, and is dependent on the receipt of parliamentary
appropriations. The financial statements encompass all funds through which the department controls
resources to carry on its functions and deliver outputs. For reporting purposes, outputs delivered by the
department are summarised into several output groups. Note 3 provides summary financial information
in the form of an operating statement by output group.
2. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
a)
Basis of accounting
The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Financial
Management Act and related Treasurer’s Directions. The Financial Management Act requires the
department to prepare financial statements for the year ended 30 June based on the form determined
by the Treasurer. The form of the financial statements is to include:
(i)
Certification of the Financial Statements
(ii) Comprehensive Operating Statement
(iii) Balance Sheet
(iv) Statement of Changes in Equity
(v) Cash Flow Statement
(vi) applicable explanatory notes to the financial statements.
The financial statements have been prepared using the accrual basis of accounting, which recognises
the effect of financial transactions and events when they occur, rather than when cash is paid out or
received. As part of the preparation of the financial statements, all intra departmental transactions and
balances have been eliminated.
163
FINANCIAL REPORT
Except where stated, the financial statements have also been prepared in accordance with the
historical cost convention.
The form of the financial statements is also consistent with the requirements of Australian Accounting
Standards. The effects of all relevant new and revised standards and interpretations issued by the
Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that are effective for the current annual reporting
period have been evaluated. The standards and interpretations and their impacts are:
AASB 2009-5 Further Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual
Improvements Project [AASB 5, 8, 101, 107, 117, 118, 136 & 139]
A number of amendments are largely technical, clarifying particular terms or eliminating unintended
consequences. Other changes include current/non-current classification of convertible instruments, the
classification of expenditure on unrecognised assets in the cash flow statement and the classification of
leases of land and buildings. The standard does not impact the financial statements.
b) Australian accounting standards and interpretations issued but not yet effective
At the date of authorisation of the financial statements, the standards and interpretations listed below
were in issue but not yet effective.
Standard/interpretation
AASB 124 Related Party
Disclosures (Dec 2009)
AASB 2009-12 amendments
to Australian Accounting
Standards [AASB 5, 8,
108, 110, 112, 119, 133,
137, 139, 1023 & 1031 and
interpretations 2, 4, 16, 1039
& 1052]
AASB 2010-4 further
amendments to Australian
Accounting Standards arising
from the annual improvements
project [aasb 1, 7, 101 & 134
and interpretation 13]
164
Summary
Government-related entities are granted
partial exemption from related party disclosure
requirements.
Amends AASB 8 Operating Segments to require
an entity to exercise judgement in assessing
whether a government and entities known to
be under the control of that government are
considered a single customer for purposes of
certain operating segment disclosures.
This standard also makes numerous editorial
amendments to other Standards.
Key amendments include clarification of content
of statement of changes in equity (AASB 101) and
financial instrument disclosures (AASB 7).
Effective
for annual
reporting
periods
beginning
on or after
Impact on
financial
statements
1 Jan 2011
No impact
1 Jan 2011
No impact
1 Jan 2011
No impact
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Effective
for annual
reporting
periods
beginning
on or after
Impact on
financial
statements
Standard/interpretation
Summary
AASB 2010-5 amendments
to Australian Accounting
Standards [AASB 1, 3, 4,
5, 101, 107, 112, 118, 119,
121, 132, 133, 134, 137,
139, 140, 1023 & 1038 and
interpretations 112, 115, 127,
132 & 1042]
Interpretation 4 determining
whether an arrangement
contains a lease
AASB 9 Financial instruments,
AASB 2009-11 amendments
to Australian Accounting
Standards arising from AASB
9, AASB 2010-7 amendments
to Australian Accounting
Standards arising from AASB 9
(Dec 2010)
Makes numerous editorial amendments to a range
of standards and interpretations.
1 Jan 2011
No impact
Provides guidance on identifying lease
arrangements
1 Jan 2011
No impact
AASB 9 simplifies requirements for the
classification and measurement of financial
assets and liabilities resulting from Phase 1 of
the IASB’s project to replace IAS 39 Financial
instruments: recognition and measurement
(AASB 139 Financial Instruments: recognition and
measurement).
1 Jan 2013
No impact
165
FINANCIAL REPORT
c)
Department and Territory Items
The financial statements of the department include income, expenses, assets, liabilities and equity
over which the department has control (department items). Certain items, while managed by the
department, are controlled and recorded by the Territory rather than the department (Territory items).
Territory items are recognised and recorded in the Central Holding Authority as discussed below.
Central Holding Authority
The Central Holding Authority is the parent body that represents the NT Government’s ownership
interest in government controlled entities.
The Central Holding Authority also records all Territory items, such as income, expenses, assets
and liabilities controlled by the NT Government and managed by departments on behalf of the NT
Government. The main Territory item is Territory income, which includes taxation and royalty revenue,
Australian Government general purpose funding (such as GST revenue), fines, and statutory fees and
charges.
The Central Holding Authority also holds certain Territory assets not assigned to departments as well
as certain Territory liabilities that are not practical or effective to assign to individual departments such
as unfunded superannuation and long service leave.
The Central Holding Authority recognises and records all Territory items, and as such, these items are
not included in the department’s financial statements. However, as the department is accountable for
certain Territory items managed on behalf of government, these items have been separately disclosed
in note 22 — Schedule of Territory Items.
d) Comparatives
Where necessary, comparative information for the 2009–10 financial year has been reclassified to
provide consistency with current year disclosures.
e)
Presentation and rounding of amounts
Amounts in the financial statements and notes to the financial statements are presented in Australian
dollars and have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars, with amounts of $500 or less being
rounded down to zero.
f)
Changes in accounting policies
There have been no changes to accounting policies adopted in 2010–11 as a result of
management decisions.
g) Accounting judgements and estimates
The preparation of the financial report requires the making of judgements and estimates that affect
the recognised amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent
liabilities. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and various
other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form
the basis for making judgements about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily
apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates.
The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects
166
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
only that period, or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current
and future periods.
Judgements and estimates that have significant effects on the financial statements are disclosed in the
relevant notes to the financial statements. Notes that include significant judgements and estimates are:
Employee benefits — Note 2(v) and Note 14: non-current liabilities in respect of employee benefits
are measured as the present value of estimated future cash outflows based on the appropriate
government bond rate, estimates of future salary and wage levels and employee periods of service.
Contingent liabilities — Note 19: the present value of material quantifiable contingent liabilities are
calculated using a discount rate based on the published 10-year government bond rate.
Allowance for impairment losses — Note 2(o), 10: receivables & 17: financial Instruments
Depreciation and amortisation — Note 2(k), Note 11: property, plant and equipment and Note 12.
h) Goods and Services Tax
Income, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST),
except where the amount of GST incurred on a purchase of goods and services is not recoverable from
the Australian Tax Office (ATO). In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of
acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense.
Receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included. The net amount of GST
recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the Balance
Sheet.
Cash flows are included in the Cash Flow Statement on a gross basis. The GST components of cash
flows arising from investing and financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to, the
ATO are classified as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the
amount of GST recoverable or payable unless otherwise specified.
i)
Income recognition
Income encompasses both revenue and gains.
Income is recognised at the fair value of the consideration received, exclusive of the amount of GST.
Exchanges of goods or services of the same nature and value without any cash consideration being
exchanged are not recognised as income.
Grants and other contributions
Grants, donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions are recognised as revenue when the
department obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions. Control is normally obtained
upon receipt.
Contributions are recognised at their fair value. Contributions of services are only recognised when a
fair value can be reliably determined and the services would be purchased if not donated.
Appropriation
Output appropriation is the operating payment to each department for the outputs they provide and
is calculated as the net cost of department outputs after taking into account funding from department
income. It does not include any allowance for major non-cash costs such as depreciation.
167
FINANCIAL REPORT
Commonwealth appropriation follows from the Intergovernmental Agreement on Federal Financial
Relations, resulting in special purpose payments and national partnership payments being made by the
Australian Treasury to state treasuries, in a manner similar to arrangements for GST payments. These
payments are received by Treasury on behalf of the Central Holding Authority and then on passed to
the relevant agencies as Commonwealth Appropriation.
Revenue in respect of appropriations is recognised in the period in which the department gains control
of the funds.
Sale of goods
Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised (net of returns, discounts and allowances) when:
the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods have transferred to the buyer
the department retains neither continuing managerial involvement to the degree usually associated
with ownership nor effective control over the goods sold
the amount of revenue can be reliably measured
it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the department
the costs incurred or to be incurred in respect of the transaction can be measured reliably.
Rendering of services
Revenue from rendering services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of the contract.
The revenue is recognised when:
the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably
measured; and
it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.
Interest revenue
Interest revenue is recognised as it accrues, taking into account the effective yield on the financial asset.
Goods and services received free of charge
Goods and services received free of charge are recognised as revenue when a fair value can be
reliably determined and the resource would have been purchased if it had not been donated. Use of
the resource is recognised as an expense.
Contributions of assets
Contributions of assets and contributions to assist in the acquisition of assets, being non-reciprocal
transfers, are recognised, unless otherwise determined by government, as gains when the department
obtains control of the asset or contribution. Contributions are recognised at the fair value received
or receivable.
j)
Repairs and maintenance expense
Funding is received for repairs and maintenance works associated with department assets as part
of output revenue. Costs associated with repairs and maintenance works on department assets are
expensed as incurred.
168
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
k)
Depreciation and amortisation expense
Items of property, plant and equipment, including buildings but excluding land, have limited useful lives
and are depreciated or amortised using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives.
Amortisation applies in relation to intangible non-current assets with limited useful lives and is
calculated and accounted for in a similar manner to depreciation.
The estimated useful lives for each class of asset are in accordance with the Treasurer’s Directions
and are determined as follows:
2010
2009
Buildings
Public buildings
Sheds/demountables
Plant and equipment
Computer hardware
Leased plant and equipment
Transport equipment
Heritage and cultural assets
50 Years
50 Years
10–20 Years
10–20 Years
4–10 Years
4–10 Years
4 Years
4 Years
1–5 Years
1–5 Years
5 Years
5 Years
100 Years
100 Years
Assets are depreciated or amortised from the date of acquisition or from the time an asset is completed
and held ready for use.
l)
Cash and deposits
For the purposes of the Balance Sheet and the Cash Flow Statement, cash includes cash on hand,
cash at bank and cash equivalents. Cash equivalents are highly liquid short-term investments that
are readily convertible to cash. Cash at bank includes monies held in the Accountable Officer’s trust
account that are ultimately payable to the beneficial owner.
m) Receivables
Receivables include accounts receivable and other receivables and are recognised at fair value less
any allowance for impairment losses.
The allowance for impairment losses represents the amount of receivables the department estimates
are likely to be uncollectible and are considered doubtful. Analyses of the age of the receivables that
are past due as at the reporting date are disclosed in an aging schedule under credit risk in Note 17
financial instruments. Reconciliation of changes in the allowance accounts is also presented.
Accounts receivable are generally settled within 30 days.
n) Property, plant and equipment
Acquisitions
All items of property, plant and equipment with a cost, or other value, equal to or greater than $10 000
are recognised in the year of acquisition and depreciated as outlined below. Items of property, plant
and equipment below the $10 000 threshold are expensed in the year of acquisition.
The construction cost of property, plant and equipment includes the cost of materials and direct labour,
and an appropriate proportion of fixed and variable overheads.
169
FINANCIAL REPORT
Complex assets
Major items of plant and equipment comprising a number of components that have different useful
lives, are accounted for as separate assets. The components may be replaced during the useful life
of the complex asset.
Subsequent additional costs
Costs incurred on property, plant and equipment subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when
it is probable that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the
asset will flow to the department in future years. Where these costs represent separate components of
a complex asset, they are accounted for as separate assets and are separately depreciated over their
expected useful lives.
Construction (work in progress)
As part of the Financial Management Framework, the NT DCI is responsible for managing general
government capital works projects on a whole of government basis. Therefore appropriation for the
department’s capital works is provided directly to DCI and the cost of construction work in progress
is recognised as an asset of that department. Once completed, capital works assets are transferred
to the department.
o) Revaluations and impairment
Revaluation of assets
Subsequent to initial recognition, assets belonging to the following classes of non-current assets are
revalued with sufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount of these assets does not differ
materially from their fair value at reporting date:
land
buildings
Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or liability settled, between
knowledgeable, willing parties in an arms length transaction.
Plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less depreciation, which is deemed to equate to
fair value.
Impairment of assets
An asset is said to be impaired when the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount.
Non-current physical and intangible department assets are assessed for indicators of impairment on an
annual basis. If an indicator of impairment exists, the department determines the asset’s recoverable
amount. The asset’s recoverable amount is determined as the higher of the asset’s depreciated
replacement cost and fair value less costs to sell. Any amount by which the asset’s carrying amount
exceeds the recoverable amount is recorded as an impairment loss.
Impairment losses are recognised in the Comprehensive Operating Statement. They are disclosed
as an expense unless the asset is carried at a revalued amount. Where the asset is measured at a
revalued amount, the impairment loss is offset against the asset revaluation surplus for that class of
asset to the extent that an available balance exists in the asset revaluation surplus.
170
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
In certain situations, an impairment loss may subsequently be reversed. Where an impairment loss
is subsequently reversed, the carrying amount of the asset is increased to the revised estimate of its
recoverable amount. A reversal of an impairment loss is recognised in the Comprehensive Operating
Statement as income, unless the asset is carried at a revalued amount, in which case the impairment
reversal results in an increase in the asset revaluation surplus. Note 15 provides additional information
in relation to the asset revaluation surplus.
p) Leased assets
Leases under which the department assumes substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of an
asset are classified as finance leases. Other leases are classified as operating leases.
Finance leases
Finance leases are capitalised. A leased asset and a lease liability equal to the present value of the
minimum lease payments are recognised at the inception of the lease.
Lease payments are allocated between the principal component of the lease liability and the
interest expense.
Operating leases
Operating lease payments made at regular intervals throughout the term are expensed when the
payments are due, except where an alternative basis is more representative of the pattern of benefits
to be derived from the leased property. Lease incentives under an operating lease of a building or office
space is recognised as an integral part of the consideration for the use of the leased asset. Lease
incentives are to be recognised as a deduction of the lease expenses over the term of the lease.
q) Payables
Liabilities for accounts payable and other amounts payable are carried at cost which is the fair value of
the consideration to be paid in the future for goods and services received, whether or not billed to the
department. Accounts payable are normally settled within 30 days.
r)
Employee benefits
Provision is made for employee benefits accumulated as a result of employees rendering services up
to the reporting date. These benefits include wages and salaries and recreation leave. Liabilities arising
in respect of wages and salaries and recreation leave and other employee benefit liabilities that fall due
within twelve months of reporting date are classified as current liabilities and are measured at amounts
expected to be paid. Non-current employee benefit liabilities that fall due after twelve months of the
reporting date are measured at present value, calculated using the government long term bond rate.
No provision is made for sick leave, which is non-vesting, as the anticipated pattern of future sick leave
to be taken is less than the entitlement accruing in each reporting period.
Employee benefit expenses are recognised on a net basis in respect of the following categories:
wages and salaries, non-monetary benefits, recreation leave, sick leave and other leave
entitlements
other types of employee benefits.
171
FINANCIAL REPORT
As part of The Financial Management Framework, the Central Holding Authority assumes the long
service leave liabilities of government departments, including the department and as such no long
service leave liability is recognised in the financial statements.
Special remote study leave
According to the Public Sector Employment and Management Determination 2 of 2003, employees
who have undertaken periods of service in designated remote localities since 1 January 1990 are
eligible to accumulate credit points towards special remote study leave at the rates specified in the
determination. Employees can accumulate a maximum of 40 credit points and must have accumulated
a minimum of 20 credit points before applying for leave under this provision. The leave cannot be
cashed out and ceases with the departure of the employee from the NTPS.
Twenty credit points is the equivalent of taking leave on full pay for one school semester, or on half
pay for two school semesters. Forty credit points is the equivalent of taking leave on full pay for two
school semesters.
The department recognised a liability for employees who have accumulated points since
1 January 2005 (excludes points for leave already taken) and has been measured at and restricted
to the following:
(i)
liability calculated for those employees who have accrued 20 or 40 study leave points
(ii) no recognition for probability and actuarial estimates of staff availing the benefit, mortality,
employee turnover, disability, retirement etc
(iii) non-inclusion of data from prior years
(iv) current liability represents the value of leave that is representative of that taken in a 12 month
period, whereas noncurrent liability encompasses study leave points accrued at 30 June 2010 less
current liability.
s)
Superannuation
Employees’ superannuation entitlements are provided through the:
NT Government and Public Authorities Superannuation Scheme
Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme
non-government employee nominated schemes for those employees commencing on or after
10 August 1999.
The department makes superannuation contributions on behalf of its employees to the Central Holding
Authority or non-government employee nominated schemes. Superannuation liabilities related to
government superannuation schemes are held by the Central Holding Authority and as such are not
recognised in the financial statements.
t)
Contributions by and distributions to government
The department may receive contributions from government where the NT Government is acting
as owner of the department. Conversely, the department may make distributions to government.
In accordance with the Financial Management Act and Treasurer’s Directions, certain types of
contributions and distributions, including those relating to administrative restructures, have been
designated as contributions by, and distributions to, government. These designated contributions and
distributions are treated by the department as adjustments to equity.
172
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
The Statement of Changes in Equity provides additional information in relation to contributions by, and
distributions to, government.
u) Commitments
Disclosures in relation to capital and other commitments, including lease commitments are shown at
Note 18 and are consistent with the requirements contained in AASB 101, AASB 116 and AASB 117.
Commitments are those contracted as at 30 June where the amount of the future commitment can be
reliably measured.
173
174
(48 751)
(48 751)
26 786
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Asset revaluation reserve
TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
COMPREHENSIVE SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)
0
( 40)
138 028
24 637
177 307
( 40)
7 453
10
41
537
1 291
36
5 274
62 601
112 847
16
0
1 291
2
432
177 267
78
0
57
0
0
( 416)
123 211
44 152
181 051
( 416)
6 215
4
32
512
1 193
309
5 423
51 172
128 025
7
0
1 204
73
97
180 635
Non–government
education
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
This Comprehensive Operating Statement by output group is to be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.
(9 379)
(9 379)
(8 983)
112 885
14 220
600 214
(18 362)
130 138
898
654 872
(21 965)
11,12
361 920
49 841
26 388
1 904
21 831
10 949
276
394 275
433 453
109 330
821
0
10 986
235
607
581 852
458 912
140 973
306
2 202
11 852
15
671
632 907
56 162
34 191
1 235
25 610
11 852
511
7
4
5
26 320
100
17 976
0
EXPENSES
Employee expenses
Administrative expenses
Purchases of goods and services
Repairs and maintenance
Property management
Depreciation and amortisation
Services received free of charge
Other administrative expenses
Grants and subsidies
Current
Capital
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
NET OPERATING SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)
INCOME
Grants and subsidies revenue
Current
Capital
Appropriation
Output revenue
Commonwealth
Sales of goods and services
Interest revenue
Goods and services received free of charge
Assets acquired for nil costs
Other/miscellaneous income
TOTAL INCOME
Note
Government
education
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
3. OPERATING STATEMENT BY OUTPUT GROUP
0
( 749)
77 519
4 506
93 396
( 749)
2 403
328
520
1 309
450
26
6 335
70 432
19 180
331
0
450
0
124
92 647
1 902
228
2011
$’000
(48 751)
(48 751)
25 997
345 685
30 041
925 575
(22 754)
66 018
34 529
1 796
27 456
13 593
573
405 884
591 945
273 000
653
2 202
13 593
17
1 227
902 821
19 956
228
2011
$’000
58 063
26 946
2 578
23 523
12 558
584
373 264
559 277
254 327
1 071
0
12 606
308
706
859 732
27 003
4 434
2010
$’000
(9 379)
(9 379)
(9 981)
313 945
67 631
879 092
(19 360)
Total
(1) Includes DBE service charges
0
( 582)
77 849
9 259
97 827
( 582)
2 007
554
642
1 180
416
( 1)
5 921
74 652
16 972
243
0
416
0
2
97 245
626
4 334
2010
$’000
Training
FINANCIAL REPORT
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
2011
$’000
4.
2010
$’000
GOODS AND SERVICES RECEIVED FREE OF CHARGE
Corporate and information services
13 593
Agency goods and services free of charge
5.
12 606
17
308
17
308
345 209
318 199
22 900
20 028
3 658
2 968
30 048
27 914
4 069
4 155
405 884
373 264
3 171
1 504
16
25
1 121
952
810
1 385
99
407
Recruitment (5)
2 574
3 150
Training and study
2 960
2 342
Official duty fares
3 287
3 627
Travelling allowance
1 437
1 393
30 998
24 804
Motor vehicle expenses
7 210
7 084
Relocation expenses
2 147
1 476
10 188
9 914
66 018
58 063
ASSETS ACQUIRED FOR NIL CONSIDERATION
EMPLOYEE EXPENSES
Salaries and related expenses
Payroll tax
Fringe benefits tax
Superannuation expenses
Workers compensation
Total employee expenses
7.
48
13 593
Assets acquired for nil consideration
6.
12 558
PURCHASES OF GOODS AND SERVICES
The net surplus/(deficit) has been arrived at after charging the following
expenses:
Goods and services expenses:
Consultants (1)
Advertising
(2)
Marketing and promotion
(3)
Document production
Legal expenses (4)
Information technology charges, hardware & software expenses
Other goods and services
(1)
Includes marketing, promotion and IT consultants.
(2)
Does not include recruitment advertising or marketing and promotion advertising.
(3)
Includes advertising for marketing and promotion but excludes marketing and promotion
consultants’ expenses, which are incorporated in the consultants’ category.
(4)
Includes legal fees, claim and settlement costs.
(5)
Includes recruitment related advertising costs.
175
FINANCIAL REPORT
2011
$’000
8.
DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION
Buildings
25 870
22 015
1 514
1 755
Computer hardware
50
(270)
Transport equipment
22
22
-
1
27 456
23 523
10
10
50 225
46 707
50 235
46 717
2 094
762
Plant and equipment
Cultural assets
9.
2010
$’000
CASH AND DEPOSITS
Cash on hand
Cash at bank
10. RECEIVABLES
Current
Accounts receivable
Less: allowance for impairment losses
(498)
(119)
1 596
6v43
502
-
6 669
2 651
563
6
7 734
2 657
9 330
3 330
65 620
42 517
65 620
42 517
At fair value
1 465 719
1 058 176
Less: accumulated depreciation
(627 080)
(352 186)
838 639
705 990
Interest receivables
GST receivables
Other receivables
Total receivables
11. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Land
At fair value
Buildings
Plant and equipment
At fair value
10 732
10 667
Less: accumulated depreciation
(5 822)
(4 308)
4 912
6 359
At fair value
221
234
Less: accumulated depreciation
(80)
(43)
141
191
Computer hardware
176
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
Leased plant and equipment
At capitalised cost
Less: accumulated depreciation
101
101
(101)
(101)
-
-
112
112
(102)
(80)
10
32
909 322
755 089
Transport equipment
At cost
Less: accumulated depreciation
Total property, plant and equipment
Property, plant and equipment valuations
The latest revaluations as at 30 June 2011 were independently conducted. The valuer was
Australian Valuation Office. The revaluation was based on either market value or fair value which
was assessed with reference to the asset’s replacement cost less accumulated depreciation where
there was no established, identifiable market for the asset.
Impairment of property, plant and equipment
Property, plant and equipment assets were assessed for impairment as at 30 June 2011.
No impairment adjustments were required as a result of this review.
177
FINANCIAL REPORT
11.
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (CONTINUED)
2010 property, plant and equipment reconciliations
A reconciliation of the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of
2010–11 is set out below:
Carrying amount as at
1 July 2010
Buildings
$’000
42 517
705 990
Plant &
equipment
$’000
6 359
Computer
hardware
$’000
191
Transport
equipment
$’000
32
Total
$’000
755 089
Additions
-
-
-
-
-
-
Depreciation
-
(25 870)
(1 514)
(50)
(22)
(27 456)
(25)
132 896
67
-
-
132 938
23 128
25 623
-
-
48 751
-
-
-
-
-
-
65 620
838 639
4 912
141
10
909 322
Additions/(disposals) from
asset transfers
Revaluation increments/
(decrements)
Impairment losses
Carrying amount as at
30 June 2011
178
Land
$’000
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
11.
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (CONTINUED)
2010 property, plant and equipment reconciliations
A reconciliation of the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end
of 2009–10 is set out below:
Buildings
$’000
Plant &
equipment
$’000
Computer
hardware
$’000
Transport
equipment
$’000
38 745
632 387
4 979
2 383
-
678 494
Additions
-
-
167
198
-
365
Depreciation
Land
$’000
Carrying amount as at
1 July 2009
Total
$’000
-
(22 015)
(1 755)
270
(22)
(23 522)
Additions/(disposals) from
asset transfers
(700)
90 968
2 968
(2 660)
112
90 688
Revaluation increments/
(decrements)
4 472
4 907
-
-
-
9 379
-
(257)
-
-
(58)
(315)
42 517
705 990
6 359
191
32
755 089
Impairment losses
Carrying amount as at
30 June 2010
179
FINANCIAL REPORT
2011
$’000
12.
2010
$’000
HERITAGE AND CULTURAL ASSETS
Carrying amount
At valuation
Less: accumulated depreciation
Written down value — 30 June
22
22
(11)
(10)
11
12
11
12
-
(1)
11
11
Reconciliation of movements
Carrying amount at 1 July
Depreciation
Carrying amount as at 30 June
13.
PAYABLES
Accounts payable
5 478
671
Accrued expenses
8 161
9 298
13 639
9 969
25 474
23 148
Special remote study leave
5 466
3 097
Leave loading
3 100
2 694
947
1 048
Employer super contribution
2 792
2 705
Fringe benefits tax
1 287
1 079
Payroll tax
2 956
2 229
42 022
36 000
Recreation leave
5 877
5 222
Special remote study leave
1 885
5 066
7 762
10 288
49 784
46 288
Total payables
15.
PROVISIONS
Current
Employee benefits
Recreation leave
Recreation leave fares
Other current provisions
Non-current
Employee benefits
Total provisions
The department employed 4430 employees as at 30 June 2011
(4222 employees as at 30 June 2010).
180
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
2011
$’000
15.
2010
$’000
RESERVES
Asset revaluation reserve
(i) Nature and purpose of the Asset Revaluation Surplus
The asset revaluation surplus includes the net revaluation
increments and decrements arising from the revaluation of
non-current assets. Impairment adjustments may also be
recognised in the Asset Revaluation Surplus.
(ii) Movements in the Asset Revaluation Surplus
Balance as at 1 July
48 665
39 286
Increment/(decrement) — land
23 128
4 472
Increment/(decrement) — buildings
25 623
4 907
97 416
48 665
(22 754)
(19 360)
27 456
23 523
-
315
Assets acquired for nil consideration
(17)
(308)
R&m – minor new works non cash
650
212
(5 529)
8 246
Decrease/(increase) in cha receivables
(501)
501
Decrease/(increase) in prepayments
(557)
84
(Decrease)/increase in payables
3 169
(2 435)
Balance as at 30 June
16.
NOTES TO THE CASH FLOW STATEMENT
Reconciliation of cash
The total of department cash and deposits of $50.235 million
recorded in the Balance Sheet is consistent with that recorded as
‘cash’ in the Cash Flow Statement.
Reconciliation of net surplus/(deficit) to net cash from
operating activities
Net surplus/(deficit)
Non-cash items:
Depreciation and amortisation
Asset write-offs/write-downs
Changes in assets and liabilities:
Decrease/(increase) in receivables
(Decrease)/increase in cha payables
501
(501)
(Decrease)/increase in provision for employee benefits
2 474
4 560
(Decrease)/increase in other provisions
1 022
826
5 914
15 663
Net cash from operating activities
181
FINANCIAL REPORT
2011
$’000
17.
2010
$’000
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
A financial instrument is a contract that gives rise to a financial
asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of
another entity. Financial instruments held by the department include
cash and deposits, receivables and payables. The department has
limited exposure to financial risks as discussed below.
(a)
Categorisation of financial instruments
The carrying amounts of the department’s financial assets and
liabilities by category are disclosed in the table below.
Financial assets
Cash and deposits
50 235
46 717
GST receivable
6 669
2 651
Accounts receivable
Receivables
1 596
643
Other receivables
563
6
Interest receivables
502
-
59 565
50 017
13 639
9 969
7
3
13 646
9 972
Total financial assets
Financial liabilities
Payables
Deposits held
Total financial liabilities
(b)
Credit risk
The department has limited credit risk exposure (risk of default). In respect of any dealings with
organisations external to government, the department has adopted a policy of only dealing with
credit worthy organisations and obtaining sufficient collateral or other security where appropriate,
as a means of mitigating the risk of financial loss from defaults.
The carrying amount of financial assets recorded in the financial statements, net of any allowances
for losses, represents the department’s maximum exposure to credit risk without taking account of
the value of any collateral or other security obtained.
182
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Receivables
Receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis to ensure that exposure to bad debts is
not significant. A reconciliation and aging analysis of receivables is presented below.
Ageing of
receivables
$’000
Ageing of
impaired
receivables
$’000
Net
receivables
$’000
18. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (CONTINUED)
2010–11
Not overdue
1 234
-
1 234
154
2
152
3
-
3
703
496
207
2 094
498
1 596
264
-
264
(501)
-
(501)
Overdue for less than 30 days
163
-
163
Overdue for 30 to 60 days
530
-
530
Overdue for more than 60 days
306
119
187
Total
762
119
643
Overdue for less than 30 days
Overdue for 30 to 60 days
Overdue for more than 60 days
Total
Reconciliation of the allowance for impairment losses(a)
Opening
119
Written off during the year
-
Recovered during the year
-
Increase/(decrease) in allowance recognised in profit or loss
379
Total
498
2009–10
Not overdue
Receivable to Central Holding Authority
Reconciliation of the allowance for impairment losses(a)
Opening
255
Written off during the year
(32)
Recovered during the year
Increase/(decrease) in allowance recognised in
profit or loss
Total
1
(105)
119
183
FINANCIAL REPORT
17.
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (CONTINUED)
(c)
Market risk
Market risk is the risk that the fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate
because of changes in market prices. It comprises interest rate risk, price risk and currency risk.
i)
Interest rate risk
The department is not exposed to interest rate risk as financial assets and financial liabilities are
non-interest bearing. The department currently has no finance lease arrangements.
(d)
Net fair value
The fair value of financial instruments is estimated using various methods. These methods are
classified into the following levels:
Level 1 — derived from quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2 — derived from inputs other than quoted prices that are observable directly or indirectly.
Level 3 — derived from inputs not based on observable market data.
2011
Total
carrying
amount
$’000
Net fair
value
level 1
$’000
50 235
50 235
50 235
9 330
9 330
9 330
59 565
59 565
59 565
13 639
13 639
13 639
7
7
7
13 646
13 646
13 646
Total
carrying
amount
$’000
Net fair
value
level 1
$’000
46 717
46 717
46 717
3 300
3 300
3 300
50 017
50 017
50 017
9 969
9 969
9 969
3
3
3
9 972
9 972
9 972
Net fair
value
level 2
$’000
Net fair
value
level 3
$’000
Net fair
value
level 1
$’000
Financial assets
Cash and deposits
Receivables
Total financial assets:
Financial liabilities
Payables
Deposits held
Total financial liabilities:
2010
Net fair
value
level 2
$’000
Net fair
value
level 3
$’000
Net fair
value
level 1
$’000
Financial assets
Cash and deposits
Receivables
Total financial assets:
Financial liabilities
Payables
Deposits held
Total financial liabilities:
The net fair value of cash, deposits, receivables, payables and deposits held are based on their carrying amounts.
184
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
2010
$’000
18.
COMMITMENTS
(i)
Capital expenditure commitments
2009
$’000
Capital expenditure commitments primarily relation to the construction of
buildings. Capital expenditure commitments contracted for at balance date
but not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows:
(ii)
Within one year
0
0
Later than one year and not later than five years
0
0
Later than five years
0
0
0
0
115 039
87 354
Later than one year and not later than five years
46 276
68 096
Later than five years
15 468
13 017
176 783
168 467
Other expenditure commitments
Other non-cancellable expenditure commitments not recognised as liabilities
are payable as follows:
Within one year
(iii)
Operating lease commitments
The department leases property under non-cancellable operating leases.
Leases generally provide the department with a right of renewal at which time
all lease terms are renegotiated. The department also leases items of plant
and equipment under non-cancellable operating leases. Future operating
lease commitments not recognised as liabilities are payable as follows:
Within one year
3 851
8 081
Later than one year and not later than five years
3 220
3 655
46
0
7 117
11 736
Later than five years
19.
CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CONTINGENT ASSETS
a)
Contingent liabilities
The department had no contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2011 or 30 June 2010.
b)
Contingent assets
The department had no contingent assets as at 30 June 2011 or 30 June 2010.
20.
EVENTS SUBSEQUENT TO BALANCE DATE
No events have arisen between the end of the financial year and the date of this report that require
adjustment to, or disclosure in these financial statements.
185
186
21.
-
Total written off, postponed and waived by the Treasurer
Ex gratia payments under the Financial Management Act
Gifts under the Financial Management Act
under other legislation (a)
Write-offs, postponements and waivers authorised
-
-
-
-
Waiver or postponement of right to receive or recover money or
property
Public property written off
Losses or deficiencies of money written off
Irrecoverable amounts payable to the Territory or a department
written off
Amounts written off, postponed and waived by the Treasurer
Total written off, postponed and waived by delegates
Waiver or postponement of right to receive or recover money or
property
Public property written off
Losses or deficiencies of money written off
Irrecoverable amounts payable to the Territory or a department
written off
Amounts written off, postponed and waived by delegates
Represented by:
Write-offs, postponements and waivers under the
Financial Management Act
WRITE-OFFS, POSTPONEMENTS, WAIVERS, GIFTS
AND EX GRATIA PAYMENTS
2011
$’000
-
-
-
-
-
No. of
trans.
Department
19
1
18
-
-
2010
$’000
3
1
2
1
1
No. of
trans.
Department
2011
$’000
No. of
trans.
Territory items
2010
$’000
No. of
trans.
Territory items
FINANCIAL REPORT
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
22.
SCHEDULE OF TERRITORY ITEMS
The following Territory items are managed by the department on behalf of the NT Government and
are recorded in the Central Holding Authority (refer Note 2(c)).
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
TERRITORY INCOME AND EXPENSES
Income
Grants and subsidies revenue
640
4 582
504
520
1 144
5 102
Central Holding Authority income transferred
1 144
5 102
Total expenses
1 144
5 102
-
-
Grants and subsidies receivable
-
501
Total assets
-
501
Central holding authority income payable
-
501
Total liabilities
-
501
Net assets
-
0
Capital
Fees from regulatory services
Total income
Expenses
Territory income less expenses
TERRITORY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
Assets
Liabilities
187
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1: ALL STAFF BY CLASSIFICATION
Headcount
2009–10
FTE
2009–10
Headcount
2010–11
FTE
2010–11
Administrative Officer 1
9
4.98
12
4.44
Administrative Officer 2
389
307.09
373
308.36
Administrative Officer 3
269
226.39
201
172.49
Administrative Officer 4
241
213.32
370
323.06
Administrative Officer 5
122
109.37
130
118.1
Administrative Officer 6
118
104.89
128
115.24
Administrative Officer 7
49
44.42
65
59.4
Administrative Officer 8
60
53.44
3
4
2
4
3
1
1
NTPS Adult Apprenticeship AQ3S Level A
NTPS Adult Apprenticeship AQ3S Level B
NTPS Adult Apprenticeship AQ3S Level C
1
1
1
1
NTPS Apprenticeship AQF3 Level A
5
4.25
11
10.55
1
1
NTPS Apprenticeship AQF3 Level B
NTPS Apprenticeship AQF4 Level A
1
1
1
1
271
163.36
273
163.45
2234
1920.6
2317
2007.23
Executive Contract Principal 1
18
16.85
Executive Contract Principal 1A
35
31.96
3
2.5
Executive Contract Principal 2
31
27.6
1
0.5
Executive Contract Principal 3
13
13
NTPS Apprenticeship AQF4 Level C
Assistant Teacher
Classroom Teacher
5
5
Executive Contract Principal Level 2
59
59
Executive Contract Principal Level 3
24
23
Executive Contract Principal Level 4
9
9
Executive Contract Principal Level 5
3
3
Executive Officer 1
15
Executive Officer 1C
29
29
24
23
Executive Officer 2C
14
12.8
18
17.7
Executive Officer 3C
9
9
8
7
Executive Officer 4C
3
3
3
3
Executive Officer 6C
1
1
1
1
Graduate Trainee
3
3
5
5
Indigenous Cadet Support
13.55
11
0.5
12
0
Indigenous Trainee Teacher 1
7
5.74
5
4.88
Indigenous Trainee Teacher 2
3
3
6
4.95
Indigenous Trainee Teacher 3
10
10.89
2
2
Professional 2
29
28.38
1
1
Professional 3
5
4.47
39
35.5
188
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Headcount
2009–10
Professional 4
FTE
2009–10
Headcount
2010–11
FTE
2010–11
2
1.5
Physical 2
65
38.03
69
41.91
Physical 3
36
24.83
33
26.78
Physical 4
29
26.2
28
26
6
5.5
Senior Administrative Officer 1
62
57.61
Senior Administrative Officer 2
22
22
Principal Level 1
School based Apprentice
0.39
School College Administrator 2
9
7.2
8
6.1
School College Administrator 5
2
2
3
2.5
41
33.8
40
34.75
Senior Professor Officer 1
7
7
Senior Professor Officer 2
1
1
433
392.53
Senior College Teacher
Senior Teacher 1
468
405.76
Senior Teacher 2
75
70.88
70
67.41
Senior Teacher 3
108
93.81
112
107.82
Senior Teacher 4
59
55.42
62
60.63
Senior Teacher 5
3
4
2
2
Senior Teacher 6
7
6
2
2
Senior Contract Teacher 8
2
2
Technical 2
1
1
2
1.45
Technical 3
2
2
2
2
51
47.5
Teaching Principal 1
Teaching Principal 2
Total
4918
4144.67
15
14
5149
4424.84
Source: PIPS Pay 26, 2009–10 and 2010–11
NB: In 2010–11 several classification codes were replaced with new classification codes and several others were created.
189
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 2: COMPLIANCE WITH THE
CARERS RECOGNITION ACT
The department recognises that carers are an integral part of the community, and is committed to abiding
by the NT Carers Charter. The department involves carers in the same way as parents and guardians in
providing services to students with special needs.
Carers receive communications from schools such as newsletters and, where appropriate, are consulted
in the development and implementation of student individual education plans. Carers are considered in
school processes such as school-level strategic planning, in the same way as parents, guardians and other
members of the community.
190
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
APPENDIX 3: HOW TO CONTACT US
Department of Education and Training
GPO Box 4821
DARWIN NT 0801
Internet: www.det.nt.gov.au
Intranet (staff only): intranet.det.nt.gov.au
MITCHELL CENTRE
55–59 Mitchell Street
DARWIN NT 0800
LEVEL 12
Information Services
Ph: (08) 8999 5980
General enquiries: (08) 8999 5659
Finance
Ph: (08) 8901 4949
LEVEL 10
Human Resources
Ph: (08) 8999 5659
Audit and Ethical Standards
Ph: (08) 8901 4994
Records Information Management
Ph: (08) 8999 5787
LEVEL 11
Training and Higher Education
Ph: (08) 8901 1366
Legal Services
Ph: (08) 8999 5886
Internal Communications, Media and Marketing
Ph: (08) 8901 4910
International Services
Ph: (08) 8901 4905
Planning and Infrastructure
Ph: (08) 8901 4933
LEVEL 13
Schools Operations, Performance and Review
Ph: (08) 8999 5630
Early Childhood Policy and Regulations
Ph: (08) 8901 4906
LEVEL 14
Office of the Chief Executive
Ph: (08) 8999 5858
School Education and Training Operations
Ph: (08) 8999 3534
Strategic Policy and Performance
Ph: (08) 8999 5793
Freedom of Information and Privacy
Ph: (08) 8999 5623
Transforming Indigenous Education
Ph: (08) 8901 4997
Ministerial Liaison and Executive Services Unit
Ph: (08) 8999 5762
191
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
OTHER LOCATIONS
Participation and Pathways
Level 1, Harbour View Plaza
McMinn Street
GPO Box 4821
DARWIN NT 0800
Ph: (08) 8944 9351
Barkly Regional Office
99 Patterson Street
PO Box 696
TENNANT CREEK NT 0861
Ph: (08) 8962 4566
GROUP SCHOOLS
School Education and Early Childhood Services
Level 1, Harbour View Plaza
McMinn Street
Katherine Group School
MacFarlane Primary School
Grevillea Road
GPO Box 4821
DARWIN NT 0800
Ph: (08) 8999 4161
PO Box 1546
KATHERINE NT 0851
Ph: (08) 8972 8777
VET in Schools
Taminimin College
Challoner Ct
Lasseter Group School
56 Milner Road
PO Box 21
HUMPTY DOO NT 0836
Ph: (08) 8988 0000
PO Box 1420
ALICE SPRINGS NT 0870
Ph: (08) 8950 4200
Arnhem Education Office
Matthew Flinders Way
Arnhem Group School
Alyangula Area School
Cnr Flinders Street and Ayawarra Crescent
PO Box 446
NHULUNBUY NT 0881
Ph: (08) 8987 0807
PMB 3 Alyangula
Groote Eylandt NT 0885
Ph: (08) 8987 6366
Katherine Office
Level 1, Government Centre
First Street
Sandover Group School
Remote Schools Resource Centre
56 Milner Road
PO Box 1246
Katherine NT 0851
Ph: (08) 8972 5389
PO Box 1420
ALICE SPRINGS NT 0870
Ph: (08) 8950 4260
Central Australia Office
Level 1, Alice Plaza, Todd Mall
Tanami Group School
Remote Schools Resource Centre
56 Milner Road
PO Box 1420
ALICE SPRINGS NT 0871
Ph: (08) 8951 3400
192
PO Box 1420
ALICE SPRINGS NT 0870
Ph: (08) 8950 4230
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
Top End Group School
Ludmilla Education Campus
1st Floor, Ludmilla Primary School
41 Bagot Road
TRAINING CENTRES
PO Box 39946
WINNELLIE NT 0801
Ph: (08) 8999 3208
PO Box 1435
NHULUNBUY NT 0881
Ph: (08) 8987 0488
Gulf Group School
Borroloola CEC
Robinson Road
Katherine Training Centre
19 Second Street
PMB 5
BORROLOOLA NT 0854
Ph: (08) 8975 8780
Nhulunbuy Training Centre
Chesterfield Circuit
Locked Bag 200
KATHERINE NT 0852
Ph: (08) 8972 5300
Tennant Creek Training Centre
65 Staunton Street
PO Box 29
TENNANT CREEK NT 0861
Ph: (08) 8962 4350
Jabiru Training Centre
Van Delft Street
PO Box 645
JABIRU NT 0880
Ph: (08) 8979 2442
Alice Springs Training Office
Level 1, Alice Springs Plaza
PO Box 1420
ALICE SPRINGS NT 0871
Ph: (08) 8951 1626
193
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 4: ACRONYMS
AASB
Australian Accounting Standards Board
ABS
Australian Bureau of Statistics
ACARA
Australian Curriculum and Reporting Authority
ACT
Australian Capital Territory
AEDI
Australian Early Development Index
AO
Administrative Officer
APIF
Accountability and Performance Improvement Framework
ARIA
Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia
ATAR
Australian Tertiary Admission Rank
ATO
Australian Tax Office
AVETMISS
Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information and
Statistical Standard
BER
Building the Education Revolution
BIITE
Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
CCB
Child Care Benefit
CDU
Charles Darwin University
DCI
Department of Construction and Infrastructure
DEEWR
Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations
DET
Department of Education and Training
EAED
Enrolment Activity End Date
EAL/D
English as an additional language or dialect
EUS
Engaging Urban Students
ESL
English as a Second Language
FaFT
Families as First Teachers
FTE
Full Time Equivalent
GEBIE
Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprise
GST
Goods and Services Tax
HALT
Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher
HLC
Homeland Learning Centre
HRS
Human Resources Services
ICT
Information and Communications Technology
IPSS
Indigenous Parenting Support Services
IRSD
Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage
KSCPC
Keeping Safe Child Protection Curriculum
LBOTE
Language Background Other than English
MAP
Multilevel Assessment Program
194
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
MCEECDYA
Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs
NAPLAN
National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy
NARIS
National Alliance for Remote Indigenous Schools
NMS
National Minimum Standard
NQF
National Quality Framework
NSP
National School Pride
NSW
New South Wales
NT
Northern Territory
NTCE
Northern Territory Certificate of Education
NTCET
Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training
NTOEC
Northern Territory Open Education Centre
NTPS
Northern Territory Public Sector
OCPE
Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment
OHS
Occupational Health and Safety
OSHC
Outside School Hours Care
PLC
Positive Learning Centres
P21
Primary Schools for the 21st Century
Qld
Queensland
RITE
Remote Indigenous Teacher Education
ROGS
Report on Government Services
RTO
Registered Training Organisation
RTS
Remote Teaching Service
SA
South Australia
SACE
South Australian Certificate of Education
SEIFA
Socio-economic Indexes for Areas
SES
Socio-economic Status
SESS
Special education support services
SLC
Science and Language Centre
SWPBS
School Wide Positive Behaviour Support Program
T2030
Territory 2030
Tas
Tasmania
TEQSA
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
TER
Tertiary Entrance Rank
TESOL
Teaching English as a second Language
VET
Vocational Education and Training
WA
Western Australia
195
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 5: LIST OF TERRITORY 2030
EDUCATION AND RELATED TARGETS
A list of education and other targets from the Territory 2030 Strategic Plan referenced throughout this report
is included below. For a full list of targets, visit: http://www.territory2030.nt.gov.au
T2030:ED1 – Education Objective 1: Territorians meet or exceed the national standards for education
and training.
T2 030:ED1.1
Communities across the Territory have improved the proportion of children who start school
with the skills for life and learning as measured by the AEDI.
T2030:ED1.2
By 2020, halve the gap in NT students achieving national reading, writing and numeracy
standards against the national average and, by 2030, Territory students will comfortably
meet the national achievement rates for both literacy and numeracy.
T2030:ED1.3
Improve Year 12 achievement among Territory students.
T2030:ED1.4
Continue to increase the number of students who are completing higher education or VET
courses at Territory institutions.
T2030:ED1.5
Improve understanding of Indigenous culture: by 2020 all Territory students demonstrate
achievement in Indigenous Studies as part of the NT Curriculum Framework.
T2030:ED2 – Education Objective 2: Promote lifelong participation in education.
T2030:ED2.1
Increase preschool participation: by 2020 participation by young Territorians in preschool will
meet, and by 2030 exceed, national levels.
T2030:ED2.2
Increase school participation among Indigenous Territorians.
T2030:ED2.3
Improve Year 11 and 12 enrolments in Territory schools by 2020.
T2030:ED2.4
Increase the proportion of young people aged 15–24 participating in post-school education,
training or employment by 2020.
T2030:ED2.5
By 2030, double the number of people undertaking higher-education study at a Territory
institution.
T2030:ED2.6
Improve participation in VET.
T2030:ED2.7
Expand the availability of education and training in the prison system, creating the
opportunity for a better life outside prison.
T2030:ED2.8
Increase the number of Territorians participating in adult education.
196
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
T2030:ED3 – Education Objective 3: Develop a world class education system.
T2030:ED3.1
By 2030, the DET education workforce reflects the cultural profile of the student population.
T2030:ED3.2
Students from regional and remote areas have access to residential facilities that are closer
to home.
T2030:ED3.3
The Territory will have a highly-skilled and stable education workforce, home-grown as much
as possible.
T2030:ED3.4
In 2010, commence implementation of a sophisticated approach to fund schools based on
enrolment and need.
T2030:ED3.5
By 2030, all students can access high-quality education and more curriculum choices across
the Territory.
T2030:ED3.6
The Territory is recognised as a world leader in providing education and training in remote
settings, built around evidence-based practice and maximising the innovative use of
information and communication technology.
T2030:ED3.7
By 2030, Darwin will be recognised as a university town and a hub for international
education and Alice Springs as a national hub for remote education.
T2030:SOC – Society Objective 3: The Territory maintains an enviable lifestyle.
T2030:SOC3.6
People with a disability have access to a wide range of opportunities.
T2030:SOC4 – Society Objective 4: Ensuring public safety.
T2030:SOC4.1
Ensure citizens feel safe from the risk of assault and property crime.
T2030:SOC4.3
Keep Territory children safe from all forms of abuse.
T2030:SOC4.6
Improve workplace safety across the Territory.
T2030:KC&I – Knowledge, Creativity and Innovation Objective 2: Participation in arts and cultural activities
and events.
T2030:KC&2.4
Establish the Territory as a major centre for creative industries.
197
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
FEEDBACK FORM
We welcome your feedback on the 2010–11 Annual Report.
Organisation (optional):
____________________________________________________________________________________
1.
The report is informative and meets your needs.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly disagree
Comments (including a description of your needs):
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
2.
The format of the report enables easy access to matters of particular interest to you.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly disagree
Comments:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
3.
The report addresses issues that are in the public interest.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly disagree
Comments:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
198
DET ANNUAL REPORT 2010–11
4.
The report is an appropriate length.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly disagree
Comments:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
5.
The report is easy to understand.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly disagree
Comments:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Thank you for participating in the survey.
Please return completed form by email to: [email protected]
or in person to: Strategic Policy and Performance
Department of Education and Training
Level 14 Mitchell Centre
or by post to:
GPO Box 4821
DARWIN NT 0801
or by fax:
(08) 8999 5788
199
FINANCIAL REPORT
APPENDICES
200
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement