RF Series Integrated Storage Element User Guide Order Number: EK-RF72D-UG-008

RF Series Integrated Storage Element User Guide Order Number: EK-RF72D-UG-008

RF Series Integrated Storage

Element

User Guide

Order Number: EK-RF72D-UG-008

Digital Equipment Corporation

April 1993

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation.

Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.

No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not supplied by Digital Equipment Corporation or its affiliated companies.

Restricted Rights: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in

Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.

© Digital Equipment Corporation 1993.

All Rights Reserved.

Printed in U.S.A.

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: BASIC, DEC,

DECmailer, DECservice, DSA, MicroVAX, MSCP, Q–bus, SERVICenter, VAX,

VAXsimPLUS, VMS, and the DIGITAL logo.

Contents

About This Guide

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 General Information

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DSSI Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31/31F Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T and RF36 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF72, RF73, and RF74 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31/31F ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF36 ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF72 ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

xiii

1–12

1–14

1–14

1–14

1–15

1–15

1–16

1–18

1–18

1–8

1–9

1–10

1–10

1–10

1–11

1–11

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–6

1–7

1–7

1–7

1–8

1–1

1–1

1–1

1–2

1–2 iii

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF73 ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF74 ISE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current and Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Media Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Theory of Operation

Physical Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FRUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF3x/RF7x Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Interface Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive Module Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Divided Area Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Data Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Command Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Command Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Firmware Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATUS THREADS Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Thread Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Communication Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

iv

1–22

1–23

1–24

1–24

1–24

1–25

1–25

1–26

1–18

1–19

1–19

1–20

1–21

1–21

1–21

1–22

2–7

2–9

2–9

2–11

2–12

2–13

2–14

2–15

2–1

2–1

2–1

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–5

2–16

2–17

2–17

2–18

2–18

2–18

2–19

2–19

MSCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Multihost Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Seek Ordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Request Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Read Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RCT Caching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sector Format and Error Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Disk Sector Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sector Header Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R/W Portion of Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LTN0 Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EDC Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ECC Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Head and Track Scatter Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LTN0 Track Reference Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diagnostics and Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POST Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POST Verifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

After POST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DUP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diagnostic and Utility Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Program Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Detecting Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Detecting Errors Using PARAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fatal Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transient Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Error History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Detecting Soft Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MSCP Error Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Error Log Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Soft Errors not Reported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–33

2–34

2–34

2–34

2–35

2–35

2–36

2–36

2–26

2–27

2–28

2–28

2–28

2–28

2–29

2–29

2–29

2–31

2–32

2–36

2–36

2–37

2–23

2–23

2–24

2–25

2–25

2–25

2–25

2–25

2–19

2–20

2–21

2–21

2–21

2–22

2–22

2–23 v

3 Controls and Indicators

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA200 Series Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA400 Series Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Control and Indicator Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T and RF36 Write-Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SF7x Enclosure Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

OCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Control and Indicator Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the DSSI Node ID Plugs (BA200 and BA400 Series

OCPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Spare Plugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Insertion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Renumbering ISEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISE Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Assigning DSSI Node ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive Module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Local Programs

Accessing Local Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using VMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using Console Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Q–bus Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Embedded Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using MDM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Local Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DIRECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DRVEXR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–5

3–6

3–7

3–13

3–13

3–14

3–1

3–1

3–1

3–2

3–2

3–3

3–4

3–5

3–15

3–15

3–15

3–15

3–15

3–16

3–16

3–19

3–20

4–4

4–5

4–6

4–7

4–7

4–7

4–7

4–7

4–8

4–1

4–1

4–1

4–3

4–4 vi

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stopping DRVEXR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DRVEXR Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mode/Dialogue Relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DRVTST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DRVTST Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ERASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LBN and RBN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ERASE Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing ERASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stopping ERASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VERIFY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing VERIFY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Warning Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DKUTIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing DKUTIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DKUTIL Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stopping DKUTIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DKUTIL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DKUTIL Command Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DEFAULT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DEFAULT Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DEFAULT Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DISPLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DISPLAY Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DISPLAY Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DISPLAY Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–19

4–19

4–19

4–20

4–23

4–24

4–25

4–25

4–15

4–16

4–17

4–17

4–17

4–18

4–19

4–11

4–12

4–13

4–14

4–14

4–14

4–15

4–15

4–8

4–8

4–9

4–10

4–10

4–10

4–11

4–11

4–25

4–25

4–25

4–26

4–27

4–29

4–29

4–29

4–30

4–30

4–30

4–31 vii

viii

DUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DUMP Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DUMP Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DUMP Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

GET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

GET Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

GET Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

GET Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POP Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POP Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PUSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PUSH Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PUSH Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

REPLACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

REPLACE Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

REPLACE Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET SIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET SIZE Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET SIZE Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PARAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing PARAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PARAMS Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stopping PARAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PARAMS Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXIT Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HELP Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCATE Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LOCATE Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–41

4–41

4–41

4–42

4–42

4–42

4–42

4–42

4–38

4–39

4–39

4–39

4–40

4–40

4–40

4–36

4–36

4–36

4–37

4–37

4–37

4–38

4–38

4–32

4–32

4–33

4–34

4–35

4–35

4–35

4–36

4–43

4–44

4–44

4–44

4–45

4–45

4–45

4–46

4–46

4–46

4–47

4–47

SET Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SET and SHOW Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHOW Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHOW Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SHOW Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATUS Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATUS Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATUS Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reasons for Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

WRITE Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

WRITE Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ZERO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ZERO Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Counter Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ZERO Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 Troubleshooting Procedures

Performing Troubleshooting Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Self-Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Failure Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Before Calling Digital Customer Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6 Digital Customer Services

Types of Service Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

On-Site Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BASIC Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DECservice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Carry-In service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DECmailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Per Call Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–52

4–53

4–54

4–54

4–55

4–55

4–56

4–56

4–56

4–57

4–47

4–48

4–49

4–49

4–50

4–51

4–52

4–52

5–1

5–1

5–1

5–2

5–3

5–4

6–1

6–1

6–1

6–1

6–2

6–2

6–2

6–3

6–3 ix

Index

Examples

3–1

3–2

Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through Firmware . . . . .

Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through VMS . . . . . . . . .

Figures

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

1–5

2–1

2–2

2–3

2–4

2–5

2–6

2–7

2–8

2–9

2–10

2–11

2–12

2–13

2–14

2–15

2–16

2–17

2–18

2–19

3–1

3–2

3–3

RF31 ISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T ISE Side and Bottom Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF36 ISE Side and Bottom Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31/31F and RF72/73/74 ISE Basic Components . . . . . . . . .

RF31/RF31F Drive Module Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T Drive Module Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31 Drive Module Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T Drive Module Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Drive Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Data Flow Through the Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Command Flow Through the Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Firmware Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Multihost Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Request Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RCT is Cached in Controller RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31 Sector Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Head and Track Scatter Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

On-Disk Format Anchored at LTN0 on Each Surface

(RF31/31F) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

POST Coverage (RF31 shown) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Multihost DUP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diagnostics and Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Location of the Fault LEDs (RF31 Shown) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA200 Series DSSI Operator Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BA400 Series OCP for DSSI ISEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SF7x Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–11

3–12

1–3

1–4

1–5

1–13

1–17

2–2

2–5

2–6

2–9

2–10

2–12

2–13

2–15

2–17

2–20

2–21

2–22

2–23

2–26

2–27

2–28

2–30

2–31

2–33

3–2

3–5

3–13 x

3–4

3–5

Tables

2–1

2–2

3–1

3–2

RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 Drive Module Switch and

LED Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/31T and RF36 Drive Module Options Connector and

LED Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–17

3–18

RF31/RF31F Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/RF31T Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 DSSI IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF35/31T and RF36 DSSI IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–7

2–8

3–19

3–19 xi

About This Guide

Introduction

Structure

This user guide is intended for users of the RF Series Integrated

Storage Elements (ISEs).

This user guide includes the following six chapters with information on the RF31/31F, RF35/31T, RF36, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs.

• Chapter 1, General Information, describes the RF series

ISEs, and the DSSI bus function and performance features.

It also lists specifications.

• Chapter 2, Theory of Operation, covers ISE physical descriptions, head-disk assemblies (HDAs), functional descriptions, firmware, and diagnostics and utilities.

• Chapter 3, Controls and Indicators, describes the operator control panel (OCP) on the system enclosure and the ISE drive module.

• Chapter 4, Local Programs, describes the local programs and how they can be accessed through VMS, from the console, and through MDM.

• Chapter 5, Troubleshooting Procedures, describes what to do if an ISE operates incorrectly. It also describes failure indications and internal self-tests.

• Chapter 6, Digital Customer Services, describes a range of flexible services offered by Digital Services.

xiii

1

General Information

Overview

In this Chapter

Introduction

This chapter covers the following topics:

• Definition of RF31/31F, RF35/31T, RF36, RF72, RF73, and

RF74 Integrated Storage Elements (ISEs)

• DSSI bus function

• Performance features

• Specifications

The RF31/31F, RF35/31T, RF36, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs are disk storage devices based on the Digital Storage Architecture

(DSA) using the DSSI bus and interface. The RF31/31F is a half-height, 5¼-inch disk storage device. The RF35/31T and the

RF36 are both 3 ½-inch disk storage devices. The RF72, RF73, and RF74 are full-height, 5 ¼-inch disk storage devices.

The RF31F is a high-speed, lower-capacity version of the RF31

ISE. Unless otherwise specified, references to the RF31 ISE in this manual apply to the RF31F ISE also.

The RF31T is a high-speed, lower-capacity version of the RF35

ISE. Unless otherwise specified, references to the RF35 ISE in this manual apply to the RF31T ISE also.

General Information 1–1

DSSI Bus

ISE

The DSSI bus is a logical equivalent to the CI bus used on larger

Digital systems. The DSSI bus allows one or more hosts to communicate directly with storage devices, using the Systems

Communications Architecture (SCA) protocols. As many as eight nodes (ISEs and adapters) can be connected to one DSSI bus.

The DSSI bus is a 50-conductor cable. Inside an enclosure, the bus may be a flat ribbon cable or a round bundle of twisted pairs. Between enclosures, the bus is a shielded round cable approximately ½-inch in diameter.

An ISE is a DSSI device that contains an embedded intelligent controller and an on-board MSCP server. Each ISE executes commands and transfers data independently of other ISEs attached to the DSSI bus. Commands and data are transferred over the DSSI bus in small packets, so multiple ISE transfers are efficiently multiplexed.

1–2 General Information

RF31/31F

Description

The RF31 ISE (Figure 1–1) is a half-height, 5¼-inch fixed disk storage device. Its dimensions are 20.9 cm (8.21 in) by 14.7 cm

(5.79 in) by 4.1 cm (1.62 in).

Figure 1–1 RF31 ISE

S H R _ 0 0 7 3 _ 8 8 S C N

S H R _ X 1 0 7 5 _ 8 9 _ S C N

General Information 1–3

RF35/RF31T and RF36

Description

The RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISE, shown in Figure 1–2, is a

3½-inch fixed disk storage device. Its dimensions are 14.60 cm

(5.75 in) by 10.16 cm (4.0 in) by 4.1 cm (1.62 in).

Figure 1–2 RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISE

1–4 General Information

RF72, RF73, and RF74

Description

The RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISE, shown in Figure 1–3, is a full-height, 5¼-inch fixed disk storage device. Its dimensions are

20.9 cm (8.21 in) by 14.7 cm (5.79 in) by 8.3 cm (3.25 in).

Figure 1–3 RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISE

S H R - 0 2 2 6 - 8 8

S H R _ X 1 0 7 4 _ 8 9 _ S C N

General Information 1–5

Performance

Features

The RF31, RF31T, RF35, RF36, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs offer powerful performance features not typically available on disk storage devices in this form factor. The following table lists some of the features, many of which are described in more detail in Chapter 2.

Feature

Multihost support

Seek ordering

Request fragmentation

Quadruplicated headers

264-bit ECC

Controller-initiated

BBR

RCT Cache

Read-ahead Cache

Function

This allows a single ISE to be used by two hosts at the same time. For example, two

MicroVAX 3800 systems can be booted from a single ISE.

When more than one I/O command is outstanding, the ISE performs the commands in an order that minimizes seek time. The commands considered for seek ordering include the commands from all hosts.

This technique breaks single I/O requests into smaller pieces that may be optimized independently. The result is lower rotational latency and, consequently, faster access time for large requests.

The headers preceding each data block are replicated four times to make sure data is not lost because of header errors.

DSSI ISEs store a large, 264-bit error correction code (ECC) in each block, capable of correcting up to 120 erroneous bits.

With controller-initiated bad block replacement

(BBR), the ISE presents the host with a set of logically contiguous blocks, and disk capacity never shrinks because bad blocks are detected and automatically moved to spare blocks.

DSSI ISEs cache the replacement control table

(RCT), allowing replaced blocks to be located without the time required for seeks to and from the RCT stored on the media.

The ISEs incorporate a multitrack read cache to reduce latency.

1–6 General Information

RF31/31F ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF31 and RF31F ISEs.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF31 and RF31F ISEs.

Specification

Formatted storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Total start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

RF31 RF31F

381 Mbytes

15.3 ms

200 Mbytes

12.2 ms

23.6 ms 20.5 ms

4.0 Mbytes/second

<60 seconds

<15 seconds

<33 seconds

<15 seconds

General Information 1–7

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF31 and

RF31F ISEs.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

1.2 A max.

3.0 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

0.7 A max. (idle)

1.3 A max. (continuous random seeks)

12.6 W typical (idle)

18.7 W typical (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the specifications for the RF31 and RF31F storage media.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

RF31

1,861

50 data sectors

1 replacement sector

8

1,875

30,064

57.35 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

RF31F

984

50 data sectors

1 replacement sector

8

1,875

30,064

57.35 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

1–8 General Information

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF31 and RF31F ISEs.

Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

Relative humidity

Operating

Value

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of 20°C (36°F) per hour

10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C (36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

Agency compliance

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<5.1 Bels, idle

<5.6 Bels, seeking

10 ft³/min (minimum)

UL, CSA, IEC 380, IEC 435, VDE 804

General Information 1–9

RF35/RF31T ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF35/RF31T ISE.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF35/RF31T ISE.

Specification

Formatted storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Total start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

RF35

852 Mbytes

9.5 ms

15.1 ms

4.0 Mbytes/s

<30 s

<15 s

<15 s

<15 s

RF31T

381 Mbytes

7.5 ms

13.1 ms

4.0 Mbytes/s

<30 s

<15 s

<15 s

<15 s

1–10 General Information

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF35/RF31T

ISE.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

0.85 A max.

2.29 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

0.74 A max. (idle)

1.56 A max. peak (continuous random seeks)

0.96 A max. avg. (continuous random seeks)

11.3 W typical (idle)

13.8 W typical (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the specifications for the RF35

/RF31T storage media.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

RF35

2,086

57 data sectors

1 replacement sector

14

2,650

48,300

128 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

RF31T

933

57 data sectors

1 replacement sector

14

2,650

48,300

128 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

General Information 1–11

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF35/RF31T ISE.

Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

Relative humidity

Operating

Value

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of 20°C (36°F) per hour

10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C (36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

(Figure 1–4)

HDA

E2 CPU

E5 ADASP

E13 QTPD

E14 Apache

Agency compliance

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<5.4 Bels, idle

<5.0 Bels, seeking

Airflow to the drive should be sufficient to component case temperatures below the following maximums:

60°C

85°C

80°C

90°C

80°C

UL, CSA, IEC 950, TUV

Figure 1–4 shows the side and bottom views of the RF35/RF31T

ISE.

1–12 General Information

Figure 1–4 RF35/RF31T ISE Side and Bottom Views

General Information 1–13

RF36 ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF36 ISE.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF36 ISE.

Specification

Formatted storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Total start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

RF36

1600 Mbytes

9.7 ms

15.6 ms

5.0 Mbytes/s

<30 s

<15 s

<15 s

<15 s

1–14 General Information

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF36 ISE.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

0.86 A max.

2.89 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

0.69 A max. (idle)

1.70 A max peak (continuous random seeks)

0.96 A max avg. (continuous random seeks)

11.46 W typical (idle)

14.9 W typical (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the specifications for the RF36 storage media.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

RF36

2,086

Band 0—53 data sectors

1 replacement sector

Band 1—71 data sectors

1 replacement sector

Band 2—80 data sectors

1 replacement sector

Band 3—107 data sectors

1 replacement sector

16

2,756

52,500

144 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

General Information 1–15

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF36 ISE.

Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

Relative humidity

Operating

Value

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of 20°C (36°F) per hour

10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C (36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

(Figure 1–5)

HDA

E2 CPU

E5 ADASP

E13 QTPD

E14 Apache

Agency compliance

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<4.4 Bels, idle

<5.0 Bels, seeking

Airflow to the drive should be sufficient to component case temperatures below the following maximums:

60°C

85°C

80°C

90°C

80°C

UL, CSA, IEC 950, TUV

Figure 1–5 shows the side and bottom views of the RF36 ISE.

1–16 General Information

Figure 1–5 RF36 ISE Side and Bottom Views

General Information 1–17

RF72 ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF72 ISE.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF72 ISE.

Specification

Data storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

Value

1 Gbyte, formatted

13.3 ms

21.6 ms

4.0 Mbytes/second

<60 seconds, total

<15 seconds

<33 seconds

<15 seconds

1–18 General Information

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF72 ISE.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

1.5 A

5.4 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

1.1 A (idle)

2.3 A (continuous random seeks)

20.7 W (idle)

34.5 W (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the storage media specifications for the RF72 ISE.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

Value

1,861

50 data sectors

1 replacement sector

21

1,875

30,064

57.35 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

General Information 1–19

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF72 ISE.

Value Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of

20°C (36°F) per hour

Relative humidity

Operating 10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C

(36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<5.1 Bels, idle

<5.8 Bels, seeking

15 ft³/min (minimum)

1–20 General Information

RF73 ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF73 ISE.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF73 ISE.

Specification

Data storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

Value

2 Gbytes, formatted

12.9 ms

21.2 ms

4.0 Mbytes/second

<60 seconds, total

<15 seconds

<33 seconds

<15 seconds

General Information 1–21

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF73 ISE.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

1.20 A

5.00 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

1.20 A (idle)

4.00 A max peak (continuous random seeks)

1.75 A max avg. (continuous random seeks)

17.0 W (idle)

22.9 W (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the storage media specifications for the RF73 ISE.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

Value

2,620

71 data sectors

1 replacement sector

21

2,432

43,880

106.72 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

1–22 General Information

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF73 ISE.

Value Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of

20°C (36°F) per hour

Relative humidity

Operating 10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C

(36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<4.6 to 4.9 Bels, idle

<5.7 Bels, seeking

10 ft³/min (minimum)

General Information 1–23

RF74 ISE Specifications

Introduction

Performance

Specifications

This section lists performance, power, media, and environmental specifications for the RF74 ISE.

The following table summarizes the performance specifications of the RF74 ISE.

Specification

Data storage capacity

Average seek time

Average access time

Peak transfer rate to DSSI bus

Start time

Time to attain full r/min

Internal diagnostics

Spin-down

Value

3.5 Gbytes, formatted

12.5 ms

18.1 ms

5.0 Mbytes/second

<30 seconds, total

<20 seconds

<15 seconds

<20 seconds

1–24 General Information

Current and Power

Consumption

Media

Specifications

The following table summarizes the maximum current and typical power consumption specifications for the RF74 ISE.

Specification

5 V supply current

12 V supply current

Total power

Value

1.20 A

5.60 A (peak, first 3 seconds (nominal) of spin-up)

2.40 A (idle)

4.00 A max peak (continuous random seeks)

2.90 A max avg. (continuous random seeks)

34.8 W (idle)

40.8 W (continuous random seeks)

The following table summarizes the storage media specifications for the RF74 ISE.

Specification

Data tracks per surface

Sectors per track

Data surfaces per drive

Tracks per inch

Bits per inch

Areal density

Disk type

Servo

Positioner

R/W code

Value

3,058

Band 0—Not used

Band 1—79 data sectors

1 replacement sector

Band 2—89 data sectors

1 replacement sector

Band 3—119 data sectors

1 replacement sector

25

2,756

44,700

123 Mbits/in²

Thin film

Fully embedded

Rotary

RLL 1,7

General Information 1–25

Environmental

Specifications

The following table summarizes the environmental specifications for the RF74 ISE.

Value Specification

Temperature

Operating

Non-operating

10 to 50°C (50 to 122°F), ambient, with a gradient of 11°C (20°F) per hour (as introduced to the drive enclosure)

-40 to 66°C (-40 to 151°F), ambient, with a gradient of

20°C (36°F) per hour

Relative humidity

Operating 10 to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature of 28°C (82°F) and a minimum dew point of 2°C

(36°F), with no condensation

8 to 95%, with no condensation Non-operating

(storage/shipping)

Altitude

Operating

Non-operating

Noise (closed office environment)

Airflow

2,438 meters (8,000 feet)

4,876 meters (16,000 feet)

<5.2 Bels, idle

<5.7 Bels, seeking

10 ft³/min (minimum)

1–26 General Information

2

Theory of Operation

Physical Description

In this Chapter

Overview

This chapter covers the following topics on RF31/31F, RF35/31T,

RF36, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs:

• Physical descriptions

• Head-disk assemblies (HDAs)

• Functional descriptions

• Firmware

• Diagnostics and utilities

The ISE consists of two basic components:

• An HDA that contains the disks and drive mechanisms

• A printed circuit board called the drive module, which contains the disk controller and drive electronics

The RF31 and RF31F ISEs use similar drive modules. The RF35 and RF31T ISEs use similar drive modules. The RF36 uses a unique drive module. The RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs use similar drive modules. The HDA is different for each ISE:

– RF31/RF31F ISE has 4 disks

– RF35/RF31T ISE has 7 disks

– RF36 ISE has 8 disks

– RF72 and RF73 ISEs each have 11 disks

– RF74 ISE has 13 disks

Theory of Operation 2–1

FRUs

Figure 2–1 shows the RF31/31F, RF72, RF73 and RF74 ISEs with the field replaceable units (FRUs). The mechanics set consists of the HDA, drive chassis, and shock mount assembly.

Note that the ISE for both the RF35/31T and the RF36 is a single FRU.

Figure 2–1 RF31/31F and RF72/73/74 ISE Basic Components

M E C H A N I C S

S E T

D R I V E

M O D U L E

M E C H A N I C S

S E T

D R I V E

M O D U L E

M A - X 0 9 6 7 - 8 8

S H R _ X 1 0 7 2 _ 8 9 _ S C N

2–2 Theory of Operation

HDA

The HDA contains the:

• Disks

• Heads

• Spindle motor

• Rotary positioner

The RF31/31F HDA has four disks and eight heads. The

RF35/31T HDA has seven disks and fourteen heads. The RF36

HDA has eight disks and sixteen heads. The RF72 and RF73

HDAs each have eleven disks and twenty-two heads. The RF74

HDA has thirteen disks and twenty-six heads. Each ISE uses an embedded digital servo for track following, so there is no dedicated servo surface. All surfaces are used for user data storage.

Theory of Operation 2–3

RF3x/RF7x

Comparison

The following table compares the amount of data storage among the RF Series ISEs.

ISE

RF31

RF31F

RF35

RF31T

RF36

RF72

RF72

RF73

RF74

1

1

1

1

Usable data surfaces (tracks)

8

8

14

14

16

21

21

21

25

Data tracks/surface

(cylinders/spindle)

1,861

984

2,086

933

2,599

1,861

1,861

2,620

3,058

Sectors per track

51 (50 data, 1 replacement)

51 (50 data, 1 replacement)

58 (57 data, 1 replacement)

58 (57 data, 1 replacement)

Band 0 - 54 (53 data, 1 replacement)

Band 1 - 72 (71 data, 1 replacement)

Band 2 - 81 (80 data, 1 replacement)

Band 3 - 108 (107 data, 1 replacement)

51 (50 data, 1 replacement)

51 (50 data, 1 replacement)

72 (71 data, 1 replacement)

Band 0 - Not used

Band 1 - 80 (79 data, 1 replacement)

Band 2 - 90 (89 data, 1 replacement)

Band 3 - 120 (119 data, 1 replacement)

1

The RF72 and RF73 ISEs use only 21 of 22 available disk surfaces and the RF74 ISE uses only 25 of

26 available disk surfaces. The surface with the most media defects is marked unusable at manufacture.

Although the unused surface varies from ISE to ISE, this fact is transparent to the user, the operating system, and most utilities.

2–4 Theory of Operation

Drive Module

Interfaces

The drive module combines the functions of disk controller and drive electronics onto a single, surface-mount-technology printed circuit board.

Each drive module has a ready and a fault LED. The RF31/31F drive module uses a green ready LED and a red fault LED. The

RF35/31T, RF36, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs use green ready and amber fault LEDs surface mounted on the drive module.

Figure 2–2 shows the interfaces on the RF31 drive module and

Figure 2–3 shows the interfaces on the RF35 drive module.

Figure 2–2 RF31/RF31F Drive Module Interfaces

P o w e r

O C P

A c t u a t o r a n d R / W

S I D E 1

D S S I B u s

S p i n d l e

S H R _ X 1 0 5 0 B _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–5

Figure 2–3 RF35/RF31T Drive Module Interfaces

Bottom View of Drive Module

ROM

FLT

(Fault LED)

RAM

DSSI

Buffer

Disk Controller

Servo

Spindle

Power Connector

OCP

Connector

RDY

(Ready LED)

DSSI Connector

OCP

Connector

R/W

To HDA

To Spindle

Microprocessor

2–6 Theory of Operation

Interface

Functions

As shown in previous figures, each interface is a connector.

Table 2–1 describes the function of each RF31 drive module interface.

Table 2–1 RF31/RF31F Interfaces

Interface

DSSI bus

Power

OCP

Actuator and

R/W

Spindle

Description

50-pin flat cable connector

5-pin Molex connector

10-pin flat cable connector

34-pin flat cable connector that mates to the flexible circuit strip from the HDA

10-pin DIP connector that mates to the HDA

Function

Connects ISE to

DSSI bus

Connects +5V,

+12V, and POK to

ISE

Connects ISE to operator control panel

Connects ISE to read/write preamps and to rotary positioner

Connects spindle motor to drive module

Theory of Operation 2–7

Table 2–2 describes the function of each RF35 drive module interface.

Table 2–2 RF35/RF31T Interfaces

Interface

DSSI bus

Power

OCP

Actuator and

R/W

Spindle

Description

50-pin flat cable connector

5-pin Molex connector

20-pin bulkhead connector

22-pin connector

4-pin DIP connector that mates to the HDA

Function

Connects ISE to

DSSI bus

Connects +5V,

+12V, and ACLO to ISE

Connects ISE to operator control panel

Connects ISE to rotary positioner

Connects spindle motor to drive module

2–8 Theory of Operation

Functional Description

Drive Module

Electronics

To understand the drive module, think of it as being divided into six major functional areas (Figures 2–4 and 2–5). Largescale integration is used extensively, so the function of an area typically includes the function of one or a few of the chips in the corresponding area.

Figure 2–4 RF31 Drive Module Electronics

B u f f e r

S p i n d l e

D S S I

S I D E 1

M i c r o

A c t u a t o r

R / W

S H R _ X 1 0 5 0 A _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–9

2–10 Theory of Operation

Figure 2–5 RF35/RF31T Drive Module Electronics

DSSI

Spindle

Buffer

Disk

Controller

Micro

Servo

R/W

Divided Area

Functions

The following table describes the function of each divided area in

Figures 2–4 and 2–5.

Area

Micro

DSSI

Buffer

Spindle

Actuator

R/W

Function

The on-board intelligence resides here, in a firmware driving an MC680x0 microprocessor with static scratchpad RAM and nonvolatile RAM.

A single chip (Swift) interfaces the Micro area to the DSSI bus. It provides a queued-packet interface to the Micro area, segregates data from commands, and generates and checks error detection codes.

A single chip acts as a 3-port RAM controller, serving the static RAM as a data buffer and read cache for the Micro, R/W, and DSSI areas. Most of the digital R/W tasks, such as ECC generation and checking, are also done by this chip.

This circuitry manages the spin-up and speed regulator.

This circuitry activates active and passive controls the rotary positioner uses to maintain the position of the heads over a track.

This circuitry handles the remaining digital and analog read/write chain.

Theory of Operation 2–11

Drive Module

Block Diagram

Figures 2–4 and 2–5 show how the drive module is laid out.

Figure 2–6 is a block diagram of the same module including interfaces, areas, and functions.

Figure 2–6 Drive Module Block Diagram

uP ROM RAM EEROM

Microprocessor Bus

BUDI

Front

Panel

DSSI

Power

DSSI

DISK

CONTROLLER

Buffer RAM

Spindle

R/W

Actuator

Spindle

Flex

Connector

2–12 Theory of Operation

Data Flow

The microprocessor bus connects almost every functional area

(Figure 2–6). However, the microprocessor is not directly involved with the data flow.

The buffer RAM collects and temporarily stores data. The disk controller chip performs I/O operations using the R/W hardware.

Figure 2–7 shows the data flow.

Figure 2–7 Data Flow Through the Drive Module

uP ROM RAM EEROM

Microprocessor Bus

BUDI

Front

Panel

DISK

CONTROLLER

DSSI

Power

DSSI

DATA

Buffer RAM

DATA FLOW

Spindle

R/W

Actuator

Spindle

Flex

Connector

Theory of Operation 2–13

Data Protection

The following table describes how data is protected while traveling through the drive module.

Stage

1

2

3

4

5

6

Description

The Swift chip in the DSSI area generates and checks

DSSI parity and error detection code (EDC).

Another EDC is generated and appended to each

512-byte block of data to protect the data in buffer

RAM.

This EDC travels with the data through the disk controller chip, where the 264-bit ECC is generated before the data is written to the media.

The block number where the data was written is "added" to the Swift-generated EDC, further protecting against media-addressing errors.

The ECC is checked as data is being read from the media while the block number, where the data should be located, is "subtracted" from the EDC.

The EDC is then checked after the DSSI parity and

EDC are generated by the DSSI area, as the data is transmitted onto the DSSI bus.

2–14 Theory of Operation

Command Flow

Commands are segregated into packets by the DSSI area and stored in the buffer RAM. The microprocessor then copies these commands (typically 36 bytes or less) into its local RAM before it acts on them.

As commands are completed, the process is reversed.

Figure 2–8 shows how commands are routed through the drive module.

Figure 2–8 Command Flow Through the Drive Module

uP ROM RAM EEROM

Front

Panel

Microprocessor Bus

DSSI

BUDI

DATA

DISK

CONT.

C

O

M

M

A

N

D

Spindle

R/W

Spindle

Actuator

DSSI

Power

Flex

Connector

Buffer RAM

DATA FLOW

Theory of Operation 2–15

Command

Protection

4

5

2

3

Stage

1

The following table describes how commands are protected while traveling through the drive module.

6

7

8

Description

On the DSSI bus, parity and EDC are appended to the commands.

The Swift chip in the DSSI area checks and generates

DSSI parity and EDC.

The Swift chip generates an EDC to protect the commands during their short stay in the buffer RAM.

The microprocessor copies the commands to its parityprotected scratchpad RAM, while EDC is generated.

After the copy is complete, the microprocessor compares the EDC in the Micro area with the EDC generated by Swift.

When commands are transmitted out to the DSSI bus (such as the end packet for an I/O operation), the process is reversed.

The EDC is generated by the BUDI chip when the microprocessor copies the command to the buffer

RAM.

This EDC is checked by the Swift chip after it generates the DSSI bus parity and EDC, as the command is transmitted onto the DSSI bus.

2–16 Theory of Operation

Firmware

Introduction

The ISE is called an integrated storage element because the drive, controller, and even some host functions are all integrated into the same package.

Figure 2–9 shows the firmware structure that makes the integration possible.

Figure 2–9 Firmware Structure

D S S I B u s

D S S I , C I , a n d S C S L a y e r s

S C S $ D S S I

M S C P S e r v e r w i t h

B a d B l o c k R e p l a c e m e n t

D U P S e r v e r

D i s k I / O , I n c l u d i n g

E C C a n d E r r o r R e c o v e r y

C o n t r o l l e r

F u n c t i o n s

D i a g n o s t i c s a n d

U t i l i t i e s

H o s t

F u n c t i o n s

F r o n t

P a n e l

R e a d / W r i t e A c t u a t o r S p i n d l e

D r i v e

F u n c t i o n s

F l e x

F r o n t

P a n e l

S p i n d l e

S H R _ X 1 0 5 5 _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–17

Firmware

Structure

Initialization

STATUS

THREADS

Command

Several aspects of the ISE firmware structure are not shown in Figure 2–9. For example, a mini operating system runs the multiple programs in the ISE. Most of the firmware is coded in

C, and a C run-time library is included.

At initialization, power-on self-tests check the various chips on the module, start the spin-up sequence, and so on. Periodic diagnostics and calibrations adjust the servo and R/W systems for changing conditions.

The programs that run in the ISEs are displayed when you access the PARAMS local program and type the STATUS

THREADS command.

The following is an example of such a display.

PARAMS>STATUS THREADS

Pid TCB Addr Process Name WQ Addr State Pri

0 FFFFB52C NULL 00000000 RDY

CPU

255 0 00:06:49.46

1 FF840C06 PERIODICS

65 FF8414A4 PRFMON

67 FF841544 DRVEXR

68 FF841594 DRVTST

69 FF8415E4 HISTRY

70 FF841634 DIRECT

71 FF841684 ERASE

FFFF9F74

FFFFB57A

FF8415F4

FF841544

FF841594

FF8415E4

FF841634

BLK

IDL

IDL

IDL

IDL

IDL

IDL

254 0 00:00:16.10

130 0 00:00:00.00

124 0 00:00:00.00

121 0 00:00:00.00

118 0 00:00:00.00

115 0 00:00:00.00

112 0 00:00:00.00

72 FF8416D4 VERIFY

73 FF841724 DKUTIL

74 FF841774 PARAMS

2 FF841814 MSCP$DUP

FF841684 IDL 109 0 00:00:00.00

FF8416D4 IDL 106 0 00:00:00.00

FFFFB582 CUR 103 0 00:00:03.54

FFFFA3E6 TIM 28 0 00:00:01.17

3 FF8420C8 SCS$DIRECTORY FFFFA516 BLK 25 0 00:00:00.07

5 FF8431AA MSCP$BBR FFFFA3CA BLK 19 0 00:00:00.00

6 FF8439FA PPT$DISK

7 FF84424A SCS$DSSI

8 FF8488CE MSCP$DISK

FFFF8B7A

FFFF9FDE

FFFFA17A

BLK

BLK

BLK

16 0 00:00:01.37

13 0 00:00:02.09

10 0 00:00:00.00

2–18 Theory of Operation

Thread

Interfaces

Communication

Services

MSCP Server

The threads listed in the above example correspond to the firmware layers shown in Figure 2–9. For instance, the DSSI,

CI, and SCS layers are implemented by the SCS$DSSI thread.

The SCS$DSSI thread interfaces the DSSI hardware to the system applications (SYSAPs) that run in the ISE.

For each application, SCS$DSSI provides communication services to the other nodes on the bus. The two important

SYSAPs are directly beneath the SCS$DSSI in Figure 2–9: the disk MSCP server described on the next page and the diagnostic and utility protocol (DUP) server described in the Diagnostics and Utilities section of this chapter.

The MSCP server is implemented by the MSCP$DISK thread, and the bad block replacement layer is implemented by the

MSCP$BBR thread.

Theory of Operation 2–19

Multihost

Server

The MSCP server is a multihost server because it can maintain a command dialogue with multiple hosts at the same time.

I/O commands received from all hosts are combined to form a seek-ordered list of commands.

Figure 2–10 shows a multihost server.

Figure 2–10 Multihost Server

V A X / V M S C P U 1 V A X / V M S C P U 2

M S C P

C l a s s

D r i v e r

M S C P

C l a s s

D r i v e r

D S S I B u s

S e e k O r d e r e d

L i s t f r o m

A l l H o s t s

R e a d 1

R e a d 1

W r i t e 2

R e a d 1

W r i t e 2

M S C P

S e r v e r

I S E

S H R _ X 1 0 5 6 A _ 9 3

2–20 Theory of Operation

Seek Ordering

Request

Fragmentation

Example

Fragmentation

A seek-ordered list of commands determines the order of command execution that minimizes the amount of time the drives spend seeking. Since seek time is typically the largest component of the total access time, seek ordering improves overall performance.

To minimize the effects of rotational latency, the disk I/O firmware uses request fragmentation. Request fragmentation works by cutting up a long transfer into smaller pieces, and then completing the smaller pieces optimally. Although access to data on the disk is serial, DSSI provides random access to buffer memory.

Assume, for example, that a full track read is issued to the

ISE. The request is broken up into fragments (Figure 2–11).

Each fragment is delivered to the host as it is read, so that the apparent rotational latency is only .07 revolutions, as opposed to the expected .50 revolutions.

Figure 2–11 Request Fragmentation

S e c t o r

0

1

7

2

1 . 0 7

R e v o l u t i o n s

3

5

4

A r r i v e o n

T r a c k

O r d e r o f F i l l i n g

A p p l i c a t i o n B u f f e r

1 F i l l e d 4 t h

2 F i l l e d 5 t h

3 F i l l e d 6 t h

4 F i l l e d 7 t h

5 F i l l e d 1 s t

6 F i l l e d 2 n d

7 F i l l e d 3 r d

6

S H R _ X 1 0 5 8 A _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–21

Read Cache

RCT Caching

To further reduce latency, the disk I/O firmware manages a multitrack read cache. After a request is satisfied, the sectors on the current track are read into one of the track lines in the cache unless a new command preempts this read operation. If the firmware detects that contiguous blocks are being read, the next track is also preread. Write requests try to disturb the cache as little as possible by using the least recently used (LRU) track line(s).

The MSCP server caches the entire replacement control table (RCT). The RCT contains the list of bad blocks and the replacement block numbers (RBNs) that hold the data for each bad block in the list. In the past, tertiary replacements (those made to an RBN not on the track of the defective LBN) caused the controller to seek to the RCT to locate the RBN.

With RCT caching, the performance impact of tertiary revectors is greatly reduced (Figure 2–12).

Figure 2–12 RCT is Cached in Controller RAM

R B N s R B N s

R C T

W i t h o u t R C T C a c h i n g

B a d

L B N

B a d

L B N

R C T

W i t h R C T C a c h i n g

S H R _ X 1 0 5 7 _ 8 9

2–22 Theory of Operation

Sector Format and Error Handling

Introduction

Disk Sector

Format

The PPT$DISK also implements many other functions including error recovery and ECC correction.

The format of each disk sector (Figure 2–13) helps explain error handling.

Figure 2–13 RF31 Sector Format

Header (16)

Head, Track, Sector

( four copies )

Servo (4) Data (512)

Flags (1) LTN0 (1)* EDC (2)

* Used on RF31/31F only

Forced Error Type of Block

(LBN, XBM, etc.)

ECC (33)

Theory of Operation 2–23

Sector Header

Process

3

4

5

6

The following table lists the stages of the sector header process.

Stage

1

2

Description

Each sector header has four copies of its address

(head, track, and sector number).

Firmware instructs the disk controller chip to match three out of four copies prior to a read or write operation.

If the header compare fails on a write operation, the block is replaced.

If the header compare fails to match three copies on a read operation, it attempts to match two copies.

Once the data is recovered, the block is replaced.

Note that the header is read only and represents the physical address of the block.

2–24 Theory of Operation

R/W Portion of

Block

Flags Field

LTN0 Field

EDC Field

ECC Field

The read/write portion of the block starts with the four-byte

Flags field, then contains the customer data in 512 bytes, and ends with a 33-byte ECC field.

The flags byte contains the forced error indicator and the type of block. The forced error indicator is a bad data mark. It means that the data is logically ‘‘bad’’ even though the sector it resides in may be defect-free.

The LTN0 (RF31/31F only) field is used to compensate for head and track scatter. The heads on the head stack are not aligned above one another. In fact, the tracks themselves are not aligned above one another. (See Figure 2–14.) The value in the LTN0 byte is the physical track number of the head that is directly above or below the LTN0 track for all other heads. (See

Figure 2–15.)

The value in the EDC field is what is generated by the Swift chip when the data arrives over the DSSI bus with the block address

‘‘added’’ to it. This value is checked when the data is sent to the host.

ECC is one of the error recovery mechanisms. ECC covers both

Flags and Data fields and can correct up to 15 bytes in a single sector. However, a much lower error threshold (number of bytes in error in the sector) causes the block to be replaced to ensure that plenty of correction capability remains in the ECC.

Theory of Operation 2–25

Head and

Track Scatter

Compensation

Figure 2–14 illustrates head and track scatter compensation in the LTN0 field used in the RF31/31F only.

Figure 2–14 Head and Track Scatter Compensation

L o g i c a l T r a c k Z e r o ( L T N 0 ) C o r r e c t s T h i s :

H e a d S t a c k T r a c k N

H U B

H e a d s A r e N o t

A l i g n e d A b o v e

E a c h O t h e r

T r a c k s A r e N o t

A l i g n e d A b o v e

E a c h O t h e r

S H R _ X 1 0 6 0 _ 8 9

2–26 Theory of Operation

LTN0 Track

Reference Point

To improve performance and retain the concept of a cylinder (a vertically aligned set of tracks), the RF31/31F defines a track reference point for each head. The value in the LTN0 byte is the physical track number of the head that is directly above or below the LTN0 track for all other heads. This LTN0 track is the reference point for each surface (Figure 2–15).

Figure 2–15 On-Disk Format Anchored at LTN0 on Each

Surface (RF31/31F)

L T N 0

F C T o r R C T

L B N s

D B N s

L a n d i n g Z o n e

H U B

S H R _ X 1 0 6 1 _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–27

Diagnostics and Utilities

Introduction

POST

POST Coverage

The rectangle labeled Diagnostics and Utilities in Figure 2–9 represents those user-accessible programs that run under the diagnostic and utility protocol (DUP) server. These programs are listed later in this section, and are described in greater detail.

The other diagnostic program that runs at system initialization is called power-on self-test (POST). The POST firmware tests the hardware on the drive module and in the HDA, and achieves almost complete coverage.

The only hardware not verified by the POST is a small part of the DSSI area (shaded part of Figure 2–16). This part of the module is verified by the ISE’s ability to communicate with the host.

Figure 2–16 POST Coverage (RF31 shown)

S I D E 1

S H R _ X 1 0 6 2 _ 8 9

2–28 Theory of Operation

POST

Verifications

After POST

DUP Server

POST, and the diagnostics and calibrations that run after head load, verify:

• That each head in the HDA works

• That the drive can seek across all tracks

• That each head can read and write correctly

Once POST has run successfully, you need only access the drive over the DSSI bus to achieve full diagnostic coverage.

After POST runs, the diagnostic tasks are picked up by the

PERIODICS thread and by the DUP server (MSCP$DUP thread). The PERIODICS thread invokes POST diagnostics and runs calibrations on the drive periodically. This process is automatic, running as the lowest priority thread in the system.

You can think of the DUP server as a window into the ISEresident diagnostic and utility programs. Like the MSCP server, the DUP server is a multihost server, allowing several diagnostic and utility programs to run in the ISE at the same time (Figure 2–17). The RF31, RF35, RF36, RF72, RF73, and

RF74 ISEs include nine diagnostic and utility programs.

Theory of Operation 2–29

2–30 Theory of Operation

Figure 2–17 Multihost DUP Server

VAX/VMS CPU 1

DUP

Class

Driver

VAX/VMS CPU 2

DUP

Class

Driver

DSSI Bus

ERASE

PARAMS

ISE

DUP

Server

Diagnostic and Utility

Programs

The nine diagnostic and utility programs resident in each ISE can be broken down into three categories:

• Management utilities

• Diagnostics

• System-level utilities

Figure 2–18 shows how the programs are categorized.

Figure 2–18 Diagnostics and Utilities

D i a g n o s t i c s

V E R I F Y

D R V T S T

D R V E X R

P R F M O N

D I R E C T

H I S T R Y

( M D M U s e )

P A R A M S

M a n a g e m e n t U t i l i t i e s

D K U T I L

E R A S E

S y s t e m U t i l i t i e s

S H R _ X 1 0 6 4 _ 8 9

Theory of Operation 2–31

Program

Descriptions

The following table briefly describes each program.

Category

Management utilities

Diagnostics

System-level utilities

Program

PARAMS

HISTRY

DIRECT

PRFMON

DRVEXR

DRVTST

VERIFY

ERASE

DKUTIL

Description

A SYSGEN-like parameter editor and interactive query utility used to view ISE and DSSI bus status.

An abbreviated version of a portion of PARAMS. HISTRY is used by host-level software such as MDM.

A directory program, output only, that lists the available diagnostic and utility programs.

An abbreviated version of a portion of PARAMS. PRFMON can be used by host-level software such as the

VAX performance analyzer (VPA).

A comprehensive drive exerciser.

A quick pass/fail test of the drive.

A complete read check of the disk and verification of the DSDF

1 ondisk structure.

A data ‘‘scrubber’’ utility that writes alternating patterns to each LBN, including the second sector of the

RCT and the previous locations of the bad blocks, and then verifies that the scrubbing process succeeded.

An interactive block display and replace utility. Typically used to confirm ERASE scrubbing.

1

DEC Standard Device Format specification

2–32 Theory of Operation

Detecting

Errors

The ISE makes errors visible in a variety of ways. Knowing where to look for errors helps you to communicate with Digital

Customer Services personnel.

If the controller portion of the ISE is not functioning, the fault

LED on the drive module and the fault LED on the operator control panel turn on (Figure 2–19). Also, the ISE is not visible on the DSSI bus. The failing component, in this case, is the drive module itself, because it houses the controller electronics.

Figure 2–19 Location of the Fault LEDs (RF31 Shown)

B A 2 0 0 - S E R I E S O C P

B A 4 0 0 - S E R I E S O C P

( E X C E P T R F 3 1 T / R F 3 5 / R F 3 6 )

F A U L T

L E D

D R I V E

F A U L T

L E D S

F A U L T

L E D

B A 4 0 0 - S E R I E S O C P

( R F 3 1 T / R F 3 5 / R F 3 6 O N L Y )

F A U L T

L E D

12 3

D R I V E M O D U L E

S H R - X 0 0 5 9 A - 9 3

Theory of Operation 2–33

Detecting

Errors Using

PARAMS

Error Codes

Fatal Error

If the controller portion of the ISE passes diagnostics but the unit portion does not, the fault LED still turns on. However,

(because the controller is operational), the ISE is visible on the DSSI bus and can be queried to further resolve the error condition. At this point, the fault may be within the unit electronics or the HDA.

To obtain an error code, use the PARAMS utility program as shown in the following example.

PARAMS> STAT CONF

Node R1WSRA is an RF31 controller

Software RFX X200 built on 8-AUG-1989 03:38:51

Electronics module name is EN83804656

Unit is inoperative, error code 9802(X)

Last known unit failure 9802(X)

In 1275 power-on hours, power has cycled 767 times

System time is 19-AUG-1989 18:13:33

In the example, the unit error code is 9802(X). This is also shown as the last known error (stored in nonvolatile RAM). These error codes are defined in the service guide. Your Customer Services representative uses them to determine the field replaceable unit

(FRU) most likely to have failed.

The errors described above are usually fatal. That is, once the error occurs, the fault LED stays on and the ISE is not usable until the error condition is corrected.

2–34 Theory of Operation

Transient

Errors

Error History

Transient errors, however, can also occur. For example, a bit in

RAM can flip, or an address collision can occur on the DSSI bus.

The most recent transient errors (up to 11) are kept in a log in nonvolatile RAM, which is accessible though the PARAMS utility program.

To access this error history, use the STAT LOG command as shown in the following example.

PARAMS> STAT LOG

Log History:

Log #000-2B-73-07/0000 21-AUG-1989 13:22:04

FFFF8450 FFFFB354 4E554E55 4E554E55 4E554E55 4E554E55 4E554E55 0000AA01

FF80C1B0 FF80C1B0 000029F6 4E554E55 FF817D5E FFFF83BE 4E554E55 FFFF96BC

5CABF380 009239C1 00002EA0

The primary users of the error history are module repair personnel. The error history may also serve as an indication to Customer Services personnel that the system is configured incorrectly or that the drive module should be replaced.

Theory of Operation 2–35

Detecting Soft Errors

Introduction

MSCP Error

Logs

Error Log

Summary

Soft errors may be caused by external environmental factors

(for instance, temperature or shock) or errors that are expected to occur throughout the lifetime of the product (such as an infrequent bad block replacement). These errors are reported in

MSCP error logs.

MSCP error logs are displayed by the error log report generators of many different operating systems. These logs are analyzed by the VAXsimPLUS program to predict failures.

The ISE produces three kinds of error logs, as summarized in the following table.

MSCP Error Log

Read/Write Error Log

Bad Block Replacement

Summary

Servo Performance Warning

Reason Generated

Any failure to read or write (above certain thresholds).

Any time a read/write error log is generated, this log summarizes the attempt to replace the ‘‘bad’’ block.

If, during the past hour, the servo system suffered more than its threshold of performance hits.

2–36 Theory of Operation

Soft Errors not

Reported

Certain soft errors are not reported in logs. For example, a single symbol (byte) error on a read is corrected, but not reported.

The threshold for reporting an error (and replacing the block) in the case of an ECC error on a read command is three. This means that until three or more symbols are corrected in a block, the block is not replaced. Three symbols in error is well within the safety margin of the ECC. The ECC can correct up to 15 symbols in error in a single block.

Theory of Operation 2–37

3

Controls and Indicators

Introduction

In this Chapter

OCP

This chapter describes the controls and indicators associated with ISE operation. The controls and indicators are located in two places:

• Operator control panel on the system enclosure

• ISE drive module

The operator control panel (OCP) is a set of controls on the enclosure that overrides the ISE’s switches or jumpers and enables the operator to set the DSSI node ID and write-protect mode for the ISE.

1

The OCP also contains a fault LED that indicates if the ISE is malfunctioning.

The following table compares the OCPs in the BA200 and BA400 series enclosures.

In the ...

BA200 series enclosures

BA400 series enclosures

an OCP ...

contains three identical sets of controls and indicators, one set for each ISE that may be connected to it.

is contained on each ISE and is mounted on a panel in front of the

ISE.

1

There are no controls for 3½-inch devices in BA400 series enclosures.

Write protect is accomplished through software commands.

Controls and Indicators 3–1

BA200 Series Controls and Indicators

OCP

The BA200 series enclosures each have a standard DSSI OCP.

Figure 3–1 shows controls and indicators on the OCP.

Figure 3–1 BA200 Series DSSI Operator Control Panel

L E F T P O W E R

S U P P L Y

R I G H T P O W E R

S U P P L Y

T O B A C K P L A N E

1 0 - P I N

T O R F O

1 0 - P I N

T O R F 1

1 0 - P I N

T O R F 2

D R I V E S E L E C T

P L U G S

D R I V E F A U L T S

( R E D )

W R I T E - P R O T E C T

B U T T O N S

R E A D Y

B U T T O N S

S Y S T E M D C

O K ( G R E E N )

R E S T A R T C P U H A L T

M A - X 0 9 6 5 - 8 8

S H R _ X 1 0 5 3 _ 8 8 _ S C N

3–2 Controls and Indicators

OCP Controls

The following table describes the function of the three drive controls on the BA200 series DSSI operator control panel.

Control

Drive Select

Plug

Write-Protect

Button

Status

Installed

Removed

Out

In

Ready Button Out

In

Function

Sets the DSSI node ID to the number specified on the plug. A drive select plug must be installed for every ISE connected to the

OCP.

Causes a fault condition. The drive fault LED flashes at 10 Hz. DSSI node ID is undefined.

Enables the system to read and write to the media (normal operating position).

Causes the system to be writelocked, the system can only read from the media.

Puts the ISE on line (normal operating position).

Puts the ISE off line.

Controls and Indicators 3–3

OCP Indicators

The following table gives the meaning of each indicator on the

BA200 series DSSI operator control panel.

Indicator

Fault LED

Write-Protect

LED

Ready LED

Status

On

Off

Slow flash

(5 Hz)

Quick flash

(10 Hz)

On

Off

On

Off

Flashing

Meaning

Fault condition present (except during POST).

No fault present (normal operating condition).

Internal ISE calibrations are being performed.

OCP failure, or drive select plug is missing.

Write-protect enabled.

Write-protect disabled.

ISE is on line and ready.

ISE is off line.

Drive is active.

3–4 Controls and Indicators

BA400 Series Controls and Indicators

OCP

Each ISE installed in a BA400 series enclosure has a front panel with the following controls and indicators.

• DSSI bus node ID plug

• Fault LED

• Write-protect button (not for RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE)

• Run/Ready button (not for RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE)

Figure 3–2 shows two different front panels for the BA400 series enclosure.

Figure 3–2 BA400 Series OCP for DSSI ISEs

Bus Node

ID Plug

Fault Indicator

Run/Ready

Button

Write-Protect

Button

Bus Node

ID Plugs

Fault

Indicator

Run/Ready

Indicator

MLO-007175

Controls and Indicators 3–5

Control and

Indicator

Functions

The following table describes the function of the controls and indicators on the BA400 series DSSI operator control panel.

Control

Fault LED

Run/Ready

Button

Button

1

Write-Protect

1

Status

On

Off

In (on)

Out (off)

In (on)

Out (off)

Function

Indicates an error condition within the ISE.

Indicates an error-free condition within the ISE.

The ISE is on line. When the ISE is available for use, the green LED is on. When the ISE is being used, the green LED flashes.

The ISE is off line and cannot be accessed. The green LED cannot be on when the Run/Ready button is out.

The ISE is write-protected. System software cannot write to the ISE.

The ISE is not write-protected. This is the normal position for software operation. System software is free to read or write to the ISE.

1

Button not present on RF35/RF31T or RF36 OCP. Refer to RF35/RF31T and

RF36 Write-Protection.

3–6 Controls and Indicators

RF35/RF31T and RF36

Write-Protection

In a BA400 series enclosure . . .

You may want to write-protect an ISE containing sensitive data you do not want changed or accidentally erased.

Your system disk (the ISE containing system software) and ISEs containing work areas for users should be write-enabled, the normal operating setting.

For the RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISE, you set write-protection through VMS commands or through firmware commands in console mode. This is explained later in this section. The BA400 series OCP for the RF35/RF31T and RF36 does not have a write-protect button.

Software Write-Protect for RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISEs

Software write-protect is available through VMS using the

MOUNT utility with the /NOWRITE qualifier.

To software write-protect an ISE, enter the following DCL command from the VMS operating system.

MOUNT <device_name> <volume_label>/SYSTEM/NOWRITE

Where:

<device_name> is the device name, as shown using the VMS

DCL command SHOW DEVICE DI, and <volume_label> is the volume label for the device. For example,

$ MOUNT $1$DIA1 OMEGA/SYSTEM/NOWRITE

will software write-protect device $1$DIA1.

Dismounting, and then remounting the device (without using the

/NOWRITE qualifier), will write-enable the device.

Controls and Indicators 3–7

Use the VMS DCL command SHOW DEVICE DI to check the protection status of the drive. A write-protected drive will show a device status of ‘‘Mounted wrtlck’’. Refer to your VMS documentation for more information on using the MOUNT utility.

Caution

When you dismount, and then mount the device again, it is no longer write-protected.

Hardware Write-Protect for RF35/RF31T and RF36 ISEs

Hardware write-protect provides a more permanent writeprotection than software write-protect. Once you hardware write-protect an RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE, the ISE remains write-protected regardless of the availability of the operating system or the state of system power.

In addition, hardware write-protect cannot be removed using the

MOUNT command. Hardware write-protect simply provides the same degree of write-protection available to RF series ISEs with write-protect buttons.

Consider hardware write-protecting an RF35/RF31T or RF36

ISE in the following situations:

• If you want to write-protect an RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE when the VMS operating system is unavailable, such as before running the MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor (MDM).

• If you want to ensure that an RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE remains write-protected, since the hardware write-protect cannot be removed using the VMS command MOUNT and will remain in effect even if the operating system is brought down.

3–8 Controls and Indicators

You can hardware write-protect an RF35/RF31T or RF36 ISE from VMS or through firmware commands entered at the console prompt (>>>). Use the following instructions:

1. Access the Diagnostic and Utility Program (DUP) driver for the device you want to write-protect.

• To access the DUP driver from console mode: a. Enter console mode by pressing the halt button or powering up the system with the break enable/disable switch set to enable (up, position 1).

Caution

Halting your system without following the shutdown procedure described in your system software manuals may result in loss of data.

b. Access the DUP driver by setting host to the specific device you want to write-protect.

Use the following command for embedded DSSI:

SET HOST/DUP/DSSI/BUS: <bus_number>

<node_number> PARAMS

Where:

<bus_number> is the DSSI bus number (0 or 1), and <node_number> is the bus node ID (0–6) for the device on the bus (bus number and node number are listed in the SHOW DSSI display).

Use the following command for KFQSA-based DSSI:

SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP/DISK <controller_number> PARAMS

Where:

<controller_number> is the controller number (listed in the SHOW UQSSP display) for the device on the bus.

Controls and Indicators 3–9

• To access the DUP driver from VMS: a. Connect to the DUP and load its driver using the

VMS System Generation Utility (SYSGEN) as shown below:

$ MCR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CONNECT/NOADAPTER FYA0

SYSGEN> EXIT

$ b. Access the DUP driver by setting host to the specific device you want to write-protect. Use the following command:

SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=PARAMS <node_name>

Where:

<node_name> is the device node name (the node name, in parentheses, is listed in the SHOW

DEVICE DI display).

2. At the

PARAMS>

prompt, enter

SET WRT_PROT 1

the ISE to which you are currently connected.

to write-protect

Note

To verify that you have set host to the intended drive, you can enter the command LOCATE at the PARAMS> prompt. The LOCATE command causes the drive’s fault indicator to flash momentarily.

3–10 Controls and Indicators

3. Enter

SHOW WRT_PROT

set to 1.

to verify the WRT_PROT parameter is

4. After you have finished setting and examining the WRT_

PROT device parameter, enter the WRITE command at the

PARAMS>

prompt to save the device parameter. The change is recorded in nonvolatile memory.

5. Enter the EXIT command at the

PARAMS>

DUP driver utility for the specified device.

prompt to exit the

Example 3–1 shows how to set hardware write-protect through firmware. Example 3–2 shows how to set hardware write-protect through VMS.

Example 3–1 Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through

Firmware

>>>SET HOST/DUP/DSSI/BUS:0 1 PARAMS

Starting DUP server...

Copyright (c) 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>SET WRT_PROT 1

PARAMS>WRITE

PARAMS>SHOW WRT_PROT

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

--------- ------------------------------------------

WRT_PROT

PARAMS>EXIT

1 0 Boolean 0/1

Exiting...

Stopping DUP server...

>>>

Controls and Indicators 3–11

Example 3–2 Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through VMS

$ MCR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CONNECT/NOADAPTER FYA0

SYSGEN> EXIT

$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=PARAMS R35F3C

Starting DUP server...

Copyright (c) 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>SET WRT_PROT 1

PARAMS>WRITE

PARAMS>SHOW WRT_PROT

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

--------- ------------------------------------------

WRT_PROT

PARAMS>EXIT

1 0 Boolean 0/1

Exiting...

Stopping DUP server...

$

To remove hardware write-protection, repeat the procedure but set the WRT_PROT value to 0.

You can verify that the device is write-protected while running

VMS. When you issue the VMS DCL command SHOW DEVICE

DI, a write-protected drive will show a device status of ‘‘Mounted wrtlck’’. If you issue the VMS command SHOW DEVICE/FULL, a write-protected drive will be listed as ‘‘software write-locked’’.

Note

You cannot remove hardware write-protection using the

VMS MOUNT utility.

3–12 Controls and Indicators

SF7x Enclosure Controls and Indicators

OCP

Each ISE in the SF7x storage enclosure is represented by an icon on the door located on the OCP. Each set of controls and indicators is dedicated to one of the four storage compartments in the enclosure (Figure 3–3).

Figure 3–3 SF7x Controls and Indicators

DSSI ID

SELECT

TERMINATOR

POWER d i g i t a l

Ready

Write

Protect

Fault

DSSI

ID

1

2

DSSI

ID

Ready

Write

Protect

Fault

MSCP

ENABLE

SPLIT

BUS

S H R _ X 1 1 2 8 A _ 9 3

Controls and Indicators 3–13

Control and

Indicator

Functions

The following table describes the functions of the controls and indicators on the SF7x enclosure DSSI OCP.

Control/Indicator

Ready

Fault

DSSI Node ID

Write Protect

Terminator Power

Split Bus

DSSI Node ID Select

MSCP Enable/Disable

DC power switches (4)

Color

Green

Red

Green

Yellow

Green

Green

N/A

N/A

Green

Function

Turns on when ISE is on line and read

/write ready.

Turns on when fault is detected.

Displays ISE DSSI node ID.

Commands writeprotect mode.

Shows write-protect enabled.

On when terminator power is being supplied.

On when enclosure is in split bus mode.

3 bits, selects DSSI node ID number.

1 bit, enables or disables the ISE

MSCP server.

Apply dc power to

ISE. Show power status.

3–14 Controls and Indicators

Changing the DSSI Node ID Plugs (BA200 and BA400 Series

OCPs)

Spare Plugs

Removal

Insertion

Renumbering

ISEs

Spare DSSI node ID plugs are supplied with your system. Use these spare plugs to renumber your DSSI system when you:

• Need to reconfigure because you add or remove ISEs

• Create a multihost configuration

The DSSI node ID plugs have prongs on the back that indicate the bus node number (and by default, the unit number) of the

ISE. To remove a DSSI node ID plug, grasp it firmly and pull it straight out.

To insert a new plug, align the two center prongs with the two center slots and press the plug into the slots.

Use the following rules to renumber your ISEs:

• For each DSSI bus, do not use duplicate DSSI node IDs.

• By convention, ISEs are numbered in increasing order from right to left and top to bottom.

• Use a blank DSSI node ID plug where no ISE is present.

Note

If you change the bus node ID plugs while the system is operating, you must turn off the system and then turn it back on for the new plug positions to take effect.

Controls and Indicators 3–15

ISE Controls and Indicators

Description

The RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs each have two LEDs and a DIP switchpack containing three switches mounted on the edge of the drive module. The RF35/31T, and RF36 ISEs each have two LEDs and an options connector mounted on the edge of the drive module. Jumpers are inserted into this connector.

On the RF35/31T and RF36 ISE, this connector is located at the opposite end of the DSSI connector. On the RF72, RF73, RF74 and RF31/31F ISEs, this connector is located next to the power connector.

The switches (on the RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs) and option connector (on the RF35/31T and RF36 ISEs) provide a means of setting the DSSI node ID if an OCP is not connected to the drive, or if the OCP fails.

The following two LEDs indicate drive status:

• Ready LED

• Fault LED

Figure 3–4 shows the location of the switches and LEDs on the drive module for the RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 ISEs.

3–16 Controls and Indicators

Figure 3–4 RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 Drive Module

Switch and LED Locations

R E A D Y

L E D

F A U L T

L E D

12 3

D S S I

N O D E I D

S W I T C H E S

M A - X 0 9 6 7 - 8 8

S H R _ X 1 0 6 5 _ 8 9

Figure 3–5 shows the location of the options connector and LEDs on the drive module for the RF35/31T and RF36 ISEs.

Controls and Indicators 3–17

Figure 3–5 RF35/31T and RF36 Drive Module Options

Connector and LED Locations

Fault LED

Ready LED

2

1

FRONT VIEW OF A RF35/36 DISK DRIVE

1

2

Remote Panel

20

19

0 1 2

DSSI ID

REAR VIEW OF A RF35/RF36 DISK DRIVE

50

DSSI Interface Connector

49

Power

1

5

RF3x_front_back−rags

3–18 Controls and Indicators

Assigning DSSI

Node ID

Assignment of the DSSI node ID is done by setting the three switches to the binary equivalent of the selected ID number, as shown in the following tables. These switches are ignored when an OCP is connected to the ISE.

Table 3–1 RF31/31F, RF72, RF73, and RF74 DSSI IDs

DSSI Node ID

Address

Switch Positions

1

1 2 3

6

7

4

5

2

2

3

0

1

Up

Up

Up

Up

Down

Down

Down

Down

Down

Down

Up

Up

Down

Down

Up

Up

Down

Up

Down

Up

Down

Up

Down

Up

1

Up is toward the HDA, down is toward the module.

2

DSSI address 7 is normally assigned to a host adapter.

Table 3–2 RF35/31T and RF36 DSSI IDs

DSSI Node ID

Address

Jumper

1

1 2

6

7

4

5

2

2

3

0

1

In

In

In

In

Out

Out

Out

Out

Out

Out

In

In

Out

Out

In

In

1

In = inserted, Out = removed.

2

DSSI address 7 is normally assigned to a host adapter.

3

Out

In

Out

In

Out

In

Out

In

Controls and Indicators 3–19

Drive Module

LEDs

The two LEDs mounted on the drive module monitor ISE status during operation. The following table describes the state of these two LEDs during the various phases of ISE operation.

When . . .

The ISE is first powered up

POST has run successfully

The read/write heads are on cylinder and ready

The drive is active

A read/write or serious physical error is detected

The green LED is . . .

On

Off

On

Flashing

Off

And the

Fault LED is . . .

On

Off

Off

Off

On

3–20 Controls and Indicators

4

Local Programs

Accessing Local Programs

In this Chapter

Overview

This chapter covers the following topics:

• Accessing local programs through VMS, from the console, and through MDM

• Local programs that can be accessed

Local programs are diagnostics and utilities internal to the ISE.

They are accessed in one of the following three ways, depending on the system you are using.

To access local programs ...

Through VMS, using the SET HOST command,

From the console, using the SET HOST command,

Through MDM, using the Device Resident Programs menu,

See page

4-3

4-4

4-6

Local Programs 4–1

4–2 Local Programs

Once a connection is established, operations are performed under the control of the local program. The following is a list of local programs found in this chapter:

Programs

DIRECT

DRVEXR

DRVTST

HISTRY

ERASE

VERIFY

DKUTIL

PARAMS

See page

4-7

4-8

4-10

4-12

4-13

4-16

4-22

4-39

When the program ends, control is returned to the system. To abort the program and return control to the system, press

Ctrl/C or

Ctrl/Y

.

Using VMS

To access a local program from a MicroVAX system running VMS version 5.3-2 or later, the command is:

$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=taskname nodename

Where: taskname = name of the local program nodename = node name of the ISE

Names and descriptions of the local programs are provided later in this chapter. To find the node name of an ISE, type SHOW

DEVICES or SHOW CLUSTER at the $ prompt and press

Return

.

To produce a file in your directory of what appears on the screen, add the qualifier /log=filename.ext (where filename.ext is what you want to name the file) before you press

Return

.

Local Programs 4–3

Using Console

Commands

Q–bus

Adapters

Some systems allow you to access the local programs using console commands. The command you use depends on whether your system uses a Q–bus adapter like the KFQSA module, or an embedded adapter such as the KA640 module.

To access a local program from a system with a Q–bus adapter, the command is:

>>> SET HOST/UQSSP/DUP/DISK # taskname

Where: taskname = name of the local program

# = controller number of the ISE

To find the controller number, type SHOW UQSSP at the console prompt (>>>). An example of the SHOW UQSSP command is:

>>> show uqssp

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772150)

-DUA0 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 1 (760334)

-DUB1 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 2 (760340)

-DUC2 (RF31)

UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUA0 (TK70)

>>>

4–4 Local Programs

Embedded

Adapters

To access a local program from a system with an embedded adapter, the command is:

>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI/BUS:n #

Where: n = bus number where the ISE is located

# = DSSI node number of the ISE

The system prompts you for the name of the local program you want to run.

To find the DSSI node number and node name, type SHOW DSSI at the >>> prompt. To see a list of the devices on the Q–bus, type SHOW QBUS or SHOW UQSSP at the >>> prompt.

To abort the program and return control to the system, press

Ctrl/C or

Ctrl/Y

.

Local Programs 4–5

Using MDM

If neither VMS nor console commands are available on your system, you can run local programs using MDM. Use the following procedure:

1. Boot MDM.

2. Enter the date and time.

3. Select the menus in the following order:

• Service menu

• Device menu

• KFQSAA-KFQSA subsystem menu

• Device Utilities menu

• Device Resident Programs menu

When you select the Device Resident Programs menu, the following is displayed:

RUNNING A UTILITY SERVICE TEST

To halt the test at any time and return to the previous menu, type CTRL-C by holding down the CTRL key and pressing the C key.

KFQSAA started.

KFQSAA pass 1 test number 3 started.

Copyright 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation

Completed.

EXIT

HISTRY

DIRECT

VERIFY

DRVEXR

ERASE

DKUTIL

DRVTST

PARAMS

PRFMON

Please choose a local program or press <RETURN> to continue.

4. Type in the name of the local program you want to run and press

Return

. For information about the available local programs, refer to the program descriptions on the following pages.

5. To exit MDM, press the

Break key.

4–6 Local Programs

Local Programs

Overview

The rest of the chapter describes the local programs you can access.

DIRECT

Description

Example

DIRECT provides a directory of local programs resident in the

ISE.

The following is an example of what is displayed when you run the DIRECT program.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

PRFMON V1.0

D 21-AUG-1989 13:39:09

DRVEXR

DRVTST

V2.0

V2.0

D

D

21-AUG-1989

21-AUG-1989

13:39:09

13:39:09

HISTRY

DIRECT

ERASE

VERIFY

DKUTIL

V1.1

V1.0

V2.0

V1.0

V1.0

D

D

D

D

D

PARAMS V2.0

D

Total of 9 programs.

21-AUG-1989

21-AUG-1989

21-AUG-1989

21-AUG-1989

13:39:09

13:39:09

21-AUG-1989 13:39:09

21-AUG-1989 13:39:09

13:39:09

13:39:09

Local Programs 4–7

DRVEXR

Description

Stopping

DRVEXR

DRVEXR is a diagnostic that applies several types of stress to the ISE.

You access DRVEXR the same way you access other local programs. Once a connection is established, the user is prompted to answer a series of questions. The responses determine the mode and test duration.

To stop DRVEXR in progress, press

Ctrl/C

,

Ctrl/Y

, or

Ctrl/Z

. When

DRVEXR stops, a short report is printed.

4–8 Local Programs

Dialogue

To run DRVEXR, you must respond to the following dialogue messages first:

Message

Copyright © 1989 Digital

Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

User data will be corrupted.

Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

(This question is omitted if you typed 0 to answer the previous question.)

Test time in minutes?

[(10)-100]

Number of sectors to transfer at a time? [0 - 50]

Compare after each transfer?

[1=Yes/(0=No)]

(This question is omitted if you typed 0 to answer the previous question.)

Test the DBN area?

[2=DBN only/(1=DBN and

LBN)/0=LBN only]:

Explanation

No response is expected.

Do you want to write to the media?

Do you really want to overwrite existing data on the media?

Your response determines the length of the test, in minutes.

Your response determines the length of each I/O issued. If you type 0, this is a seek-only test.

Your response determines whether the processor ‘‘manually’’ compares the results of the read with the expected data (if writing is enabled) or the hardware does the compares after each read.

Your response determines how to include the DBN area in the test. If you type 2, the test always includes writes, even if you answered the first question with 0.

Local Programs 4–9

DRVEXR Modes

Mode/Dialogue

Relationship

Example

DRVEXR can be run in one of the following modes, depending on your responses to the dialogue questions:

Mode

Read/Write

Data Integrity

Seek Intensive

Max Stress

Function

Writes and reads as many blocks as possible in the given amount of time.

Similar to Read/Write mode, but with a ‘‘manual’’ check of data buffers done by the ISE processor.

Only seeks are performed in this mode.

Reads the inner DBNs and outer DBNs alternately.

The following table shows the relationship between the four test modes and the responses to the six questions in the dialogue.

Modes

Read/Write

Data Integrity

Seek Intensive

Max Stress

1

0

0

1

1

2

1

1

NA

NA

Response to Question

3 4 5

Any

Any

Any

Any

0

0

Any

Any

0

1

NA

NA

6

Any

Any

0 or 1

2

The following is an example of what is displayed when you run

DRVEXR.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

User data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

Test time in minutes? [(10)-100] 10

Number of sectors to transfer at a time? [0 - 50] 18

Compare after each transfer? [1=Yes/(0=No)]: 0

Test the DBN area? [2=DBN only/(1=DBN and LBN)/0=LBN only]:

73990 blocks (512 bytes) read.

73990 blocks (512 bytes) written.

18666 DBN blocks (512 bytes) read.

18666 DBN blocks (512 bytes) written.

Complete.

4–10 Local Programs

DRVTST

Description

Dialogue

DRVTST provides a comprehensive test of the ISE hardware.

Errors detected by this program can be isolated to the FRU level.

The following table describes the DRVTST dialogue.

Message

Copyright © 1989 Digital

Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

User data will be corrupted.

Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

5 minutes to complete.

Test passed.

Explanation

No response is expected.

Do you want to write to the media?

If you type 0, this is a read-only test.

DRVTST does, however, write to a diagnostic area on the disk.

Do you really want to overwrite existing data on the media? If you type 0, this is a read-only test.

No response is expected.

The test was successful. Choose another local program or return control to the system.

Local Programs 4–11

Error Messages

The following table describes DRVTST error messages.

Message

Unit is currently in use.

Operation aborted by user.

Soft read error on head xx track yyyy.

Soft write error on head xx track yyyy.

Soft compare error on head xx track yyyy.

xxxx - Unit diagnostics failed.

xxxx - Unit read/write test failed.

Description

This can mean that the ISE unit is inoperative, in use by a host, or is currently running another local program.

This message appears if the user stops the program while it is in progress.

These are soft error messages which indicate that an operation succeeded, but that the error recovery firmware was invoked. These messages may indicate a forced-error flag or correctable ECC error, or that the read/write head was temporarily off-track. These are corrected during normal operation.

This is a fatal error message where xxxx is the MSCP error code. Call Digital Customer

Services.

This is also a fatal error message where xxxx is the

MSCP error code. Call Digital

Customer Services.

4–12 Local Programs

DRVTST

Examples

The following is an example of what is displayed when DRVTST runs successfully.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

User data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

5 minutes to complete.

Test passed.

The following is an example of what is displayed when DRVTST has failed.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

0106 - Unit read/write test failed.

Local Programs 4–13

HISTRY

Description

Example

HISTRY displays ISE information that is used by programs running in the host (such as MDM). The information is displayed in the following order:

Copyright notice

Product name

Serial number

Node name

Allocation class

Firmware revision level

Hardware revision level

Power-on hours

Power cycles

Last bug check codes (up to 11)

The following is an example of what is displayed when you run the HISTRY program.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

RF31

EN92300124

R1EJAA

0

RFX X201

RF31 PCB-3/ECO-00

1

45

Complete.

4–14 Local Programs

ERASE

Description

LBN and RBN

ERASE is a utility that overwrites data on each ISE. Every writeable LBN and RBN block on the ISE is written several times with a complementary data pattern, and finally is overwritten with zeros.

ERASE writes every block in the LBN and RBN space twice the specified number of times: once with the pattern 99(X), and once with the complement pattern 66(X). These two values were selected because they are bit complements of each other in both decoded and encoded formats. That is, the bits toggle in controller memory and the fixed frequency pulse trains on the disk are 180 degrees out of phase with one another, assuming the pulse trains start together.

Local Programs 4–15

ERASE Process

Stage

1

2

3

4

5

6

Description

After the specified number of write/write-complement operations have been performed, a final pattern of all zeros is written on each block.

A failure to write these patterns or to read back all zeros means that the block is ‘‘bad’’ and was previously replaced.

The failure and the status of each such block is displayed.

If the block is marked bad in the FCT, the user may inhibit this output.

The following is repeated to the second block of each RCT copy:

• write/write complement

• write of zeros

• read back of zeros

The second block of the RCT is:

• used as an intermediate holding area for data during bad block replacement

• treated as an extension of the user data area by

ERASE

4–16 Local Programs

Accessing

ERASE

Stopping

ERASE

Dialogue

You access ERASE the same way you access other local programs. Once a connection is established, the user is prompted to answer a series of questions.

To stop an ERASE in progress, press

Ctrl/C

,

Ctrl/Y

, or

Ctrl/Z

.

The following table explains the ERASE dialogue.

Message

Copyright © 1989 Digital

Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

User data will be corrupted.

Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

How many times should the disk be pre-written before erasing? [0-99]

Display errors erasing known bad blocks? [(1=Yes)/0=No]:

Is this information correct?

[(1=Yes)/0=No]:

Do you wish to continue?

[1=Yes/(0=No)]: n minutes to complete.

Erase complete.

Explanation

No response is expected.

Do you want to write to the media?

Do you really want to overwrite existing data on the media?

Specify the number of passes ERASE should make on each sector. A pass is a write with a pattern followed by a write with the pattern complement. A message is displayed indicating your choice.

Do you want a list of all ERASE errors in the RCT and the FCT? A message is displayed indicating your choice.

If you type 0, you are asked the following question.

If you type 1, you are once again prompted to specify the number of passes, and so on. If you type 0, the session ends.

This lists the number of minutes (n) until completion of the erase operation.

This number is a function of the number of passes you specified and the ISE type. No response is expected.

This message indicates that the erase operation is complete. The program stops automatically.

Local Programs 4–17

Example

The following is an example of the ERASE utility. The blocks that are listed did not write or did not contain an all-zeros pattern when ERASE read back each track on the LBN/RBN space. In most cases, the failing blocks are listed as "bad" in the

FCT.

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

User data will be corrupted.

Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

How many times should the disk pre-written before erasing? [1-99]:

Display errors erasing known bad blocks? [(1=Yes)/0=No]:

The disk will be pre-written 3 times.

All errors will be reported, including FCT bad blocks.

Is this information correct? [(1=Yes)/0=No]:

58 minutes to complete.

ERASE BAD BLOCK LIST

LBN Head Track Sector Block Status

----- ---- ----- ------ ------------

14602 4 132 19 Unable to write sector (marked bad in FCT)

14603 4 132 20 Unable to read sector (marked bad in FCT)

14604 4

14605 4

132

132

629079 5 1661

629080 5 1661

21 Unable to write sector (marked bad in FCT)

22 Unable to write sector (not found in FCT)

12 Non-zero data in sector (marked bad in FCT)

13 Unable to write sector (marked bad in FCT)

Erase complete.

4–18 Local Programs

VERIFY

Description

Accessing

VERIFY

Dialogue

VERIFY is a utility that is used to determine the amount of

‘‘margin’’ remaining in on-disk structures (for instance, the number of bad blocks in the RCT and thus the number of RBNs consumed). VERIFY is useful when you verify an installation.

The VERIFY utility is read only. It does not overwrite user data and does not perform bad block replacement.

You access VERIFY the same way you access other local programs. Once a connection is established, you are prompted to answer a series of questions.

The following table describes the VERIFY dialogue.

Message

Copyright © 1989 Digital

Equipment Corporation

Print informational (nonwarning) messages? [1=Yes

/(0=No)]

Report transient error by block? [1=Yes/(0=No)]

Explanation

No response is expected.

Your response controls the amount of output produced by VERIFY. Type 1 if you want informational messages displayed.

Again, your response controls the amount of output produced by VERIFY.

By default, a transient, correctable error in a block is not displayed as blocks are read. Type 1 if you want transient errors reported.

Local Programs 4–19

Example

The following is an example of VERIFY run on an RF31 ISE.

The example is interrupted several times by text that describes the next part of the example.

The first part of this example contains the VERIFY dialogue and the FCT header dump. The FCT header dump provides basic information, such as the serial number and the date of last format (typically the date the HDA was manufactured).

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

Print informational (non-warning) messages? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

Report transient error by block? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1

*** FCT Block 0 Information

Serial Number:

Mode:

First Formatted:

Date Formatted:

Format Instance:

FCT:

Bad PBNs in FCT:

***

0000123400000000

ADDE(X)

22-MAY-1989 11:58:26

22-MAY-1989 11:58:26

1

VALID

34

Scratch Area Offset: 30032

Size (Not Last):

Size (Last):

2480

2480

Flags:

Format Version:

0000(X)

1

The next part of the example contains the RCT header dump followed by a read check of the RCT. Note that one sector of one copy of the RCT (the fifth copy, block 68) is not usable.

*** RCT Block 0 Information

Serial Number:

Flags:

***

0000123400000000

0000(X)

LBN Being Replaced:

Replacement RBN:

0

0

Bad RBN:

*****

0

Revector Control Table for R1VJAA$DIA3

Copy 5 of RCT block 68 (LBN 745103.) is bad.

*****

4–20 Local Programs

After the read check of the RCT, each bad block in the RCT is displayed. In this abbreviated syntax, the symbol *-> means that a bad LBN is replaced by an RBN not on its track. The symbol

–> means that the bad LBN is replaced by its primary (on-track)

RBN.

2 -->

9566 *->

14603 -->

18762 -->

22695 -->

0, 2083 -->

190, 9564 -->

292, 15361 -->

375, 19403 -->

453, 22788 *->

41, 3569 -->

191, 9563 *->

307, 15398 *->

388, 21198 -->

454, 22791 -->

71,

192,

308,

423,

455,

22790 *->

23182 *->

31027 *->

45046 -->

457, 22789 *->

464, 28081 -->

621, 33589 -->

900, 45339 -->

458, 23183 *->

561, 31026 *->

671, 35495 -->

906, 48484 -->

462,

619,

709,

969,

57875 --> 1157, 63818 --> 1276, 70125 --> 1402,

: : : : : :

(many lines have been deleted from this example)

:

Bad RBN:

: : : : :

12041, 602527 --> 12050, Bad RBN: 12073,

609475 --> 12189, Bad RBN: 12217, 613875 --> 12277,

645331 --> 12906, 645330 *-> 12907, 645885 --> 12917,

652795 --> 13055, 656745 --> 13134, 657589 --> 13151,

664108 --> 13282, 675509 --> 13510, 679607 --> 13592,

693585 --> 13871, 694130 --> 13882, 694129 *-> 13883,

707101 --> 14142, 707100 *-> 14143, 711501 --> 14230,

711607 --> 14232, 717484 --> 14349, 721878 --> 14437,

722237 --> 14444, 723439 --> 14468, 729597 --> 14591,

732140 --> 14642, 732372 --> 14647, 735723 --> 14714,

737467 --> 14749, 739349 --> 14786, 742125 --> 14842,

The next part of this example summarizes the contents and state of the RCT.

RCT Statistics:

47 Bad RBNs

185 Bad LBNs

140 Primary Revectors

45 Non-Primary Revectors

1 Bad RCT Blocks

0 Bad First Copy RCT Blocks

Local Programs 4–21

4–22 Local Programs

A similar scan of the FCT follows. Each bad block in the FCT is displayed. Entries in this display are physical blocks. The syntax DKUTIL uses for PBNs is also used here. It is h:t:s:, where h is the head number, t is the track number, and s is the sector number. If the bad block is used by the disk format, the corresponding block number is displayed in parentheses.

***** Factory Control Table for R1VJAA$DIA3 *****

1: 96:50(LBN 2083) 1: 161:48(LBN 28081) 1: 181: 0(LBN 36084)

1: 212: 0(LBN 48484) 2: 259: 8(LBN 70125) 1: 374: 0(LBN 113284)

3: 452:23(LBN 142973) 1: 558: 0(LBN 186884) 5: 564:17(LBN 188684)

5: 565:17(LBN 189084) 3: 630:38(LBN 214188) 3: 634:16(LBN 215766)

2: 673:43(LBN 235709) 6: 822: 0(LBN 293100) 3: 938:25(LBN 337375)

1:1009:40(LBN 367273) 5:1160:30(LBN 427097) 7:1208: 1(LBN 447185)

5:1321: 8(LBN 491475) 3:1440: 8(LBN 538158) 3:1442: 8(LBN 538958)

5:1449: 8(LBN 542675) 3:1454: 8(LBN 543758) 3:1459: 8(LBN 545758)

6:1471:40(LBN 552740) 5:1532: 8(LBN 575875) 5:1546: 8(LBN 581475)

5:1559: 8(LBN 586675) 0:1556:20(LBN 587620) 5:1616: 8(LBN 609475)

5:1627: 8(LBN 613875) 6:1731:45(LBN 656745) 6:1778: 9(LBN 675509)

0:1786: 7(LBN 679607)

The state of the FCT is displayed next.

FCT Statistics:

0 Bad FCT Blocks

0 Bad First Copy FCT Blocks

In the last part of this example, the LBN area is scanned. Each

LBN block is read, some LBN statistics are displayed, and

VERIFY ends. In this example, transient error reporting was enabled so the transients are displayed.

***** Scan of LBN Area *****

LBN 2740. has a transient (5 out of 6) error.

LBN 7904. has a transient (3 out of 6) error.

LBN 77100. has a transient (4 out of 6) error.

LBN 95831. has a transient (1 out of 6) error.

LBN 577712. has a transient (1 out of 6) error.

LBN 730484. has a transient (1 out of 6) error.

LBN Statistics: 6 Block(s) with a Transient error.

6 Total Block(s) in error.

Complete.

Error Messages

The following table describes the VERIFY error messages.

Message Description

00C5 - Unit diagnostics failed.

xxxx - Multicopy read operation of xCT block n failed.

Copy n of RCT block m (LBN x) is bad.

xBN n has a forced error.

The ISE unit diagnostics failed and VERIFY cannot run.

Block n of a multicopy structure, the FCT, or the

RCT, is not readable. xxxx is the MSCP error code.

Copy n of RCT block m, corresponding to LBN block x, is bad.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n was marked with a forced error flag.

xBN n has an invalid header error.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n had a problem with its header.

xBN n has a data sync timeout error.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n had problems syncing up to the data bits.

xBN n has an ECC field correctable error.

xBN n has an uncorrectable ECC error.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n suffered an error, but only in the ECC field.

While scanning the LBN,

DBN, or XBN space, block n was unreadable due to an uncorrectable ECC error.

xBN n received error status : xxxx(X).

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n has some other error. The MSCP error code is xxxx.

Local Programs 4–23

Warning

Messages

The following table describes the VERIFY warning messages.

Message

xCT block n used copy m.

xBN n has a transient

(e out of six) error.

xBN n has a k symbol correctable

ECC error.

Table is empty (NO BAD PBNs).

Description

The first copy of block n of a multicopy structure, the FCT, or the RCT, is not readable. Copy m of that block was used instead.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n suffered a transient error. Out of six reads, the transient error happened e times.

While scanning the LBN, DBN, or XBN space, block n suffered a correctable ECC error of k bytes.

This message is very rare, and indicates that no blocks are marked bad in the FCT. The media was perfect when the ISE unit was formatted.

4–24 Local Programs

DKUTIL

Description

Accessing

DKUTIL

DKUTIL

Process

Stopping

DKUTIL

DKUTIL is a utility that displays disk structures and disk data. The utility can be used to verify that an ERASE worked correctly. DKUTIL is also useful in problem diagnosis and manual bad block replacement.

You access DKUTIL the same way you access other local programs. Once a connection is established, all interaction occurs through the use of commands and responses. DKUTIL has its own command line interpreter. It has a command syntax similar to the hierarchical storage controller (HSC) DKUTIL utility.

• DKUTIL prompts the user for a command with the DKUTIL> prompt.

• In most cases, the user issues a GET command to acquire an ISE unit from the MSCP server. (See GET later in this chapter.) Subsequent commands are applied to this unit.

• DKUTIL acquires the unit and then returns to the command mode, prompting for a command, executing it, and prompting for another command.

To stop DKUTIL, press

Ctrl/C

,

Ctrl/Y

,

Ctrl/Z

, or type EXIT at the

DKUTIL> prompt.

Local Programs 4–25

DKUTIL

Commands

Command

DEfault

DIsplay

DUmp

Exit

Get

Help

POp

PUsh

REplace

Set size

The following table lists the available DKUTIL commands. You do not need to type the entire command because the program is set up to recognize the matching command from the abbreviated command. The abbreviated command is shown in uppercase bold letters.

Definition

Changes the default modifiers for subsequent

DKUTIL commands.

Displays characteristics, error history, and RCT

/FCT information.

Dumps the contents of a sector on the disk or the contents of the current buffer.

Stops the DKUTIL utility.

Acquires the ISE unit from the MSCP server.

Displays information on how to use the DKUTIL commands.

Restores the save buffer to the current buffer.

Stores the current buffer in the save buffer.

Replaces a specified LBN.

Changes the block size of the ISE unit.

4–26 Local Programs

DKUTIL

Command

Modifiers

A number of modifiers are used with the DKUTIL GET,

DISPLAY, and DUMP commands. These modifiers can be typed with the command or they can be stored using the DEFAULT command. The following tables describe the modifiers and their functions.

GET Modifier

IMF

Default

Setting

/NOIMF

WP /WP

Function

Ignore media format. If this modifier is specified, the unit is acquired for physical (PBN) access only.

Write protect. If this modifier is specified, the media is write protected. This inhibits replacements.

DISPLAY

Modifier

FULL

ITEMS

Default

Setting

/NOFULL

/NOITEMS

Function

Display full. If this modifier is specified, a full dump of the RCT or

FCT header is displayed.

Display items. If this modifier is specified, the items in the RCT or

FCT are displayed.

Local Programs 4–27

4–28 Local Programs

DUMP

Modifier

HEADER

EDC

DATA

ECC

ALL

RAW

NZ

Default

Setting

/HEADER

/EDC

/DATA

/NOECC

/NOALL

/NORAW

/NONZ

Function

Display header. If this modifier is specified, the block type and LTN0 fields of the block are displayed.

Display the EDC. If this modifier is specified, the EDC and the expected

EDC of the block are displayed.

Display data. If this modifier is specified, the data in the block is displayed.

Display ECC. If this modifier is specified, the ECC residue of the block is displayed.

Display all fields. Use of this modifier is equivalent to specifying the modifiers /HEADER/EDC/DATA

/ECC.

Display the raw LBN. If this modifier is specified, the original

LBN that was replaced is used instead of the RBN. This modifier affects only the replaced LBNs.

Display nonzero data. If this modifier is specified, the data field is displayed if it contains all nonzero data. This modifier has no effect if

/NODATA is also specified.

DEFAULT

DEFAULT

Syntax

DEFAULT

Example

The DEFAULT command changes the default modifiers for subsequent DKUTIL commands. This command ‘‘remembers’’ modifiers so they do not have to be typed each time a command is issued. Modifiers that do not apply to a command are ignored when that command is issued. So, you can specify modifiers that apply to GET, DUMP, and DISPLAY at the same time.

The syntax for the DEFAULT command is:

DEFAULT [modifiers]

The available modifiers are described in the tables on the preceding two pages.

The following example shows how to access the DKUTIL program on an ISE with the unit name R1EJAA.

Once DKUTIL is accessed, the DEFAULT command is issued to set new default values for subsequent commands. GET will apply /NOWP; DUMP will apply /NZ; and DISPLAY will apply

/FULL and /ITEMS.

Note that both the DEFAULT command and the /ITEMS modifier are abbreviated.

$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=DKUTIL R1EJAA

%HSCPAD-I-LOCPROGEXE, Local program executing

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

DKUTIL> DE/NOWP/NZ/FULL/ITE

Local Programs 4–29

DISPLAY

DISPLAY

Syntax

DISPLAY

Modifiers

The DISPLAY command displays characteristics, error history, and RCT/FCT information.

There are three basic variations to the DISPLAY command:

• DISPLAY CHARACTERISTICS DISK

This displays the characteristics of the ISE unit.

• DISPLAY [/FULL][/ITEMS] {RCT,FCT}

This displays the header of the RCT or the FCT. The

/FULL modifier controls the amount of RCT or FCT header information displayed. If the /ITEMS modifier is specified, the contents of the RCT or FCT are also displayed.

• DISPLAY ALL

This is equivalent to typing DISPLAY RCT, DISPLAY FCT, and DISPLAY CHARACTERISTICS DISK.

The following table describes the modifiers used with the

DISPLAY command.

Modifier

FULL

ITEMS

Default

/NOFULL

/NOITEMS

Function

Display full. If this modifier is specified, a full dump of the RCT or

FCT header is displayed.

Display items. If this modifier is specified, the items in the RCT or

FCT are displayed.

4–30 Local Programs

DISPLAY

Example

The following example shows how the DISPLAY command lists the ISE unit characteristics.

DKUTIL> DISP CHA DIS

Drive characteristics for drive R1EJAA$DIA1

Type:

Media:

Cylinders:

Geometry:

RF31 (512 byte mode only)

Fixed

1861 LBN, 5 XBN, 5 DBN

1 tracks/group, 8 groups/cylinder,

8 tracks/cylinder, 50 LBNs/track,

1 RBNs/track, 51 sectors/track,

51 XBNs/track, 408 XBNs/cylinder,

400 LBNs/cylinder, 8 RBNs/cylinder

Group Offset: 17 (LBN), 0 (XBN)

LBNs:

RBNs:

744400 (host), 745416 (total)

14888

XBNs:

DBNs:

PBNs:

RCT:

2040

1632 (read/write), 408 (read only)

838032

127 (size), 8 (copies)

FCT: 127 (size), 8 (copies)

Retry Limits: 8 (retry), 3 (badblk)

ECC Threshold:3/2 (normal), 0/0 (format)

Revision:

Drive ID:

4 (hardware), 32 (firmware)

124923040310000

Local Programs 4–31

DUMP

DUMP Syntax

The DUMP command displays the contents of a sector on the disk or the contents of the current buffer. The amount of information displayed can be controlled with modifiers.

There are five basic variations of the DUMP command:

• DUMP BUFFER

This dumps the contents of the current buffer.

• DUMP {DBN,LBN,RBN,XBN} block#

This dumps the contents of the specified block#. The LBN space extends into the RCT, and the XBN space spans all copies of the FCT. These methods of reading the RCT and

FCT allow a specific copy to be read.

• DUMP {RCT,FCT} block#

This dumps the contents of the specified block#. The block is read using the multiread algorithm. This command also shows you which copy was used to obtain the information.

• DUMP PBN head#:track#:sector#

This dumps the contents of the specified block by giving the physical location of the sector not adjusted by LTN0. This variation of the DUMP command is not supported on the

RF36 or RF74.

• DUMP PBD head#:track#:sector#

This dumps the contents of the specified block. This variation of the DUMP command is supported only on the RF36 and

RF74.

4–32 Local Programs

DUMP

Modifiers

The following describes modifiers used with DUMP.

Modifier

HEADER

EDC

DATA

ECC

ALL

RAW

NZ

Default

/HEADER

/EDC

/DATA

/NOECC

/NOALL

/NORAW

/NONZ

Function

Display header. If this modifier is specified, the block type and LTN0 fields of the block are displayed.

Display the EDC. If this modifier is specified, the EDC and the expected

EDC of the block are displayed.

Display data. If this modifier is specified, the data in the block is displayed.

Display ECC. If this modifier is specified, the ECC residue of the block is displayed.

Display all fields. Use of this modifier is equivalent to specifying the modifiers /HEADER/EDC/DATA

/ECC.

Display the raw LBN. If this modifier is specified, the original

LBN that was replaced is used instead of the RBN. This modifier affects only the replaced LBNs.

Display nonzero data. If this modifier is specified, the data field is displayed if it contains all nonzero data. This modifier has no effect if

/NODATA is also specified.

Local Programs 4–33

DUMP Example

The following example shows how the DUMP command displays the contents of a block of the RCT.

Note that the first copy of this RCT block was used. Also note that LBN 0 is replaced by RBN 0.

DKUTIL> DUMP RCT 2

*** Buffer for RCT block 2 (LBN 744402 used), MSCP Status: 0000

LTN 0 = 90

EDC = 032F(X)

Type = 47 (X)

Calculated EDC Difference = 14B3(X)

Data = 3000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 16 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 32 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 48 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 64 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 80 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+ 96 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+112 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+128 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+144 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+160 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+176 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+192 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+208 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+224 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+240 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+256 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+272 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+288 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+304 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+320 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+336 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+352 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+368 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+384 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+400 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+416 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+432 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+448 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+464 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+480 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

+496 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

4–34 Local Programs

EXIT

EXIT Syntax

EXIT Example

The EXIT command stops the DKUTIL utility. If the ISE unit was acquired, the unit is released to the MSCP server.

The syntax for this command is:

EXIT

The following is an example of what appears on the screen when you EXIT DKUTIL.

DKUTIL> EXIT

%HSCPAD-S-REMPGMEND, Remote program terminated - message code 3.

%HSCPAD-S-END, Control returned to node ISMINE

Local Programs 4–35

GET

GET Syntax

GET Modifiers

GET Example

The GET command acquires the ISE unit from the MSCP server

(if possible). Most DKUTIL commands work only after the GET command succeeds. The GET command cannot succeed if the

ISE unit is on line to any host.

The syntax for the GET command is:

GET [modifier]

The specified modifier controls how the unit is acquired.

The following table describes the modifiers used with the GET command.

Modifier

IMF

WP

Default

/NOIMF

/WP

Function

Ignore media format. If this modifier is specified, the unit is acquired for physical (PBN) access only.

Write protect. If this modifier is specified, the media is write protected. This inhibits replacements.

The following example shows the outcome of a successful GET command. The unit is acquired from the MSCP server and the unit FCT status is displayed. In this example, /NOWP was previously set by the DEFAULT command and /NOIMF was the default upon entry to DKUTIL.

DKUTIL> GET

Serial Number:

Mode:

First Formatted:

Date Formatted:

Format Instance:

FCT:

0000000000000000

ADDE(X)

9-AUG-1989 13:25:10

9-AUG-1989 13:25:10

1

VALID

4–36 Local Programs

HELP

HELP Syntax

HELP Example

The HELP command displays information on how to use the

DKUTIL commands.

The syntax for the HELP command is:

HELP

Typing HELP produces the following display.

DKUTIL> HELP

DEFAULT [/qualifiers]

DISPLAY [/qualifiers] {ALL|FCT|RCT|CHAR DISK}

/FULL /ITEMS

DUMP [/qualifiers] {BUFFER|type n|PBN h:t:s}

/HEADER /EDC /DATA

/NZ

/RAW

/ECC /ALL

EXIT

GET [/qualifiers]

/IMF /WP

HELP

POP

PUSH

REPLACE lbn

SET SIZE 512

DKUTIL>

Local Programs 4–37

POP

POP Syntax

POP Example

The POP command restores the save buffer to the current buffer.

DKUTIL maintains two I/O buffers while it runs: the current buffer and the save buffer. The DUMP command always uses the current buffer. Use the PUSH command to save data before subsequent DUMPs. Use the POP command, followed by the

DUMP BUFFER command, to view the saved data.

The syntax for this command is:

POP

In this example, the contents of the buffer saved by the most recent PUSH command is restored to the current buffer.

DKUTIL> POP

4–38 Local Programs

PUSH

PUSH Syntax

PUSH Example

The PUSH command stores the current buffer in the save buffer.

DKUTIL maintains two I/O buffers while it runs: the current buffer and the save buffer. The DUMP command always uses the current buffer. Use the PUSH command to save data before subsequent DUMPs. Use the POP command, followed by the

DUMP BUFFER command, to view the saved data.

The syntax for this command is:

PUSH

In this example, the contents of the buffer loaded by the most recent DUMP command are stored in the save buffer.

DKUTIL> PUSH

Local Programs 4–39

REPLACE

REPLACE

Syntax

REPLACE

Example

The REPLACE command replaces a specified LBN. The results of the REPLACE command are displayed. The display contains the last few longwords of a Bad Block Replacement Summary error log packet.

REPLACE cannot succeed if the unit is write protected (GET

/WP), or if the unit was acquired for physical (PBN) access only

(GET/IMF).

The syntax for the REPLACE command is:

REPLACE lbn#

The specified lbn# is replaced.

In the following example, LBN0 is replaced.

DKUTIL> REPLACE 0

Replace summary log packet:

Flags: 60(X)

Event: 0014(X)

Rep flags: 8000(X)

LBN: 0

Old RBN: 0

New RBN: 0

4–40 Local Programs

SET SIZE

SET SIZE

Syntax

SET SIZE

Example

The SET SIZE command changes the block size of the ISE unit.

Only 512-byte block sizes are supported. This command is for compatibility with the HSC implementation of DKUTIL.

The syntax for the SET SIZE command is:

SET SIZE blocksize#

Currently, the only acceptable blocksize# is 512.

This example shows the block size of the unit set to 512 bytes.

DKUTIL> S S 512

Local Programs 4–41

PARAMS

Description

Accessing

PARAMS

PARAMS

Process

Stopping

PARAMS

PARAMS is a utility that allows you to examine and change internal ISE parameters such as node name, allocation class, and MSCP unit number. PARAMS is also used to display the state of the ISE and performance statistics maintained by the

ISE.

You access PARAMS the same way you access other local programs. Once a connection is established, all interaction occurs through the use of commands and responses. PARAMS has its own command line interpreter. It has a command syntax similar to the VMS SYSGEN utility.

• PARAMS prompts the user for a command with the

PARAMS> prompt.

• Once a command is entered, PARAMS executes it and then prompts for another command.

To stop PARAMS, press

Ctrl/C

,

Ctrl/Y

,

Ctrl/Z

, or type EXIT at the

PARAMS> prompt.

4–42 Local Programs

PARAMS

Commands

Command

ENable mscp

Exit

Help

Locate

SEt

SHow

STatus

Write

Zero

The following table lists the available PARAMS commands. You do not need to type the entire command because the program is set up to recognize the matching command from the abbreviated command. The abbreviated command is shown in uppercase bold letters.

Definition

Enables MSCP server.

Stops the PARAMS utility.

Displays information on how to use PARAMS commands.

Causes a soft fault in the ISE. (Red LED on to help locate it.)

Changes internal ISE parameters.

Displays the setting of a parameter or a class of parameters.

Displays module configuration, history, performance counters, and so on.

Records the device parameter changes you make using the SET command in nonvolatile RAM.

Clears a block of counters or all known blocks of counters.

Local Programs 4–43

EXIT

EXIT Syntax

EXIT Example

The EXIT command stops the PARAMS utility.

The syntax for the EXIT command is:

EXIT

The following is an example of what appears on the screen when you EXIT PARAMS.

PARAMS> EXIT

Exiting ...

%HSCPAD-S-REMPGMEND, Remote program terminated

%HSCPAD-S-END, Control returned to node ISMINE

4–44 Local Programs

HELP

HELP Syntax

HELP Example

The HELP command displays information on how to use

PARAMS commands. It is not a substitute for this document, but is useful as a quick reference.

The syntax for the HELP command is:

HELP

The following is what appears on the screen when you type

HELP.

PARAMS> help

ENABLE MSCP

EXIT

HELP

LOCATE

SET {parameter | .} value

SHOW {parameter | . | /class}

/ALL /CONST /DRIVE

/SERVO /SCS /MSCP

/DUP

STATUS [type]

CONFIG LOGS DATALINK

PATHS SYSTEM SEEKS

MSCP

WRITE

THREADS

ZERO counter

ALL MSCP SEEKS

PARAMS>

Local Programs 4–45

LOCATE

LOCATE Syntax

LOCATE

Example

The LOCATE command causes a soft fault in the ISE to help you locate it. The soft fault does not affect its current operation or state. The Fault LED on the drive module and the Fault LED on the operator control panel turn on and stay on until you press

Return at the PARAMS> prompt.

The syntax for the LOCATE command is:

LOCATE

The following is what appears on the screen when you type

LOCATE.

PARAMS> LOCATE

Drive has been soft faulted to help locate it

Press RETURN to continue:

PARAMS>

4–46 Local Programs

SET

SET Syntax

SET Example

The SET command changes internal ISE parameters. The changes are made to a working copy of the ISE parameters and do not take effect until a WRITE command is successful.

The syntax for the SET command is:

SET parameter value

The parameter is the name of the parameter to be set, or the special symbol . (period), which means the last SET or SHOWn parameter. The value is the new value you want to assign to the parameter.

The available parameters are listed on the following page. If the parameter name is abbreviated, the first matching parameter is used without regard to uniqueness. We recommend that you use

SHOW before you use SET.

The following example changes the node name from the default

(R1EJAA) to the new string "SUSAN". When entering ASCII strings, you may use single quotes, double quotes, or no quotes at all.

PARAMS> SHOW NODE

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

------------------------------------------

NODENAME R1EJAA RF31 String Ascii B

PARAMS> SET . "SUSAN"

PARAMS> SHOW .

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

------------------------------------------

NODENAME SUSAN RF31 String Ascii B

PARAMS>

Local Programs 4–47

SET and SHOW

Parameters

The following tables describe the SET and SHOW command parameters and their functions.

MSCP Parameter

ALLCLASS

UNITNUM

FORCEUNI

HISPEED

SEEKALG

1

FIVEDIME

Function

Sets or shows the allocation class of the disk

MSCP server.

Sets or shows the MSCP unit number.

Determines whether the parameter UNITNUM or the DSSI node ID is used as the MSCP unit number. The factory setting for this parameter is 1 (true), and the DSSI node ID is used. Until set to 0 (false), the UNITNUM parameter is ignored.

The factory setting for this parameter is 0

(false). If set to 1 (true), only half of the ISE capacity is presented to hosts. This reduces the stroke of the seek, and thus improves performance at the expense of capacity. Average seek time is reduced by approximately 3 ms.

Selects one of three seek algorithms. The factory setting is the C-scan algorithm (2). You can also select the shortest distance algorithm (0), or the elevator algorithm (1).

Determines whether the MSCP server supports five concurrent connections (the factory default of 1, true) or seven connections with reduced resources allocated to each (0, false).

1

This option is available only on the RF31.

DRIVE Parameter

VOLSERNO

Function

Shows the volume serial number of the HDA.

4–48 Local Programs

DUP Parameter

ADD_CR

ADD_LF

Function

Appends a

Return character after each message.

The factory setting is 0 (false).

Appends a

Line Feed to each message. The factory setting is 0 (false).

SHOW

SHOW Syntax

SCS Parameter

SYSTEMID

NODENAME

FORCENAM

Function

Sets or shows the 48-bit Systems

Communication Services (SCS) system ID of the ISE.

Sets or shows the SCS node name of the ISE.

Determines whether the value set by the

NODENAME parameter or the string RFYYx

1 is returned as the SCS node name. The letter x corresponds to the DSSI node ID (A = 0, B = 1, and so on). The factory setting is 0 (false), and the value set by NODENAME is used.

1

RFYYx is returned as the SCS nodename, where: YY represents the ISE type, either 31, 35, 36, 72, 73, or 74; and x corresponds to the DSSI node ID (A = 0, B

= 1, and so on).

Displays the setting of a parameter or a class of parameters.

The full name of the parameter, its current value, default value, radix and type, and any flags associated with the parameter are displayed.

The syntax for the SHOW command is:

SHOW parameter_or_class

The parameter_or_class is a parameter name, the special symbol

. (period), which means the last SET or SHOWn parameter, or a

SHOW class preceded by a / (slash).

If an abbreviation is used, the first matching parameter or class is displayed.

Local Programs 4–49

SHOW Classes

The following table describes the available SHOW classes.

Class

/ALL

/CONST

/DRIVE

/SERVO

/SCS

/MSCP

/DUP

Description

All SHOW classes are displayed.

ISE constants are grouped in this class.

Drive parameters, typically those governing drive calibrations, thresholds, and retries, are grouped in this class.

Servo parameters, typically the results of drive calibrations, are grouped in this class.

SCS parameters are grouped in this class. The node name and system ID are in this class.

MSCP parameters are grouped in this class. The parameters that control the unit number are in this class.

DUP parameters are grouped in this class.

4–50 Local Programs

SHOW Example

The following example shows various forms of the SHOW command and how they are used to change the MSCP unit number from the default (DSSI bus ID) to a new value of 8402.

$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=PARAMS R1EJAA

%HSCPAD-I-LOCPROGEXE, Local program executing

Copyright © 1989 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS> SHOW FORCEUNI

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

-----------------------------------------------

FORCUNI 1 1 Boolean 0/1 U

PARAMS> SET . 0

PARAMS> SHOW UNITN

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

-----------------------------------------------

UNITNUM 0 0 Boolean Dec U

PARAMS> SET . 8402

PARAMS> SHOW /MSCP

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

-----------------------------------------------

MSCPNVR 2020202020202020 2020202020202020

2020202020202020 2020202020202020

WRTLOGSZ

UNITID

ALLCLASS

MEDIAID

HISPEED

UNITNUM

FORCEUNI

2020202020202020 2020202020202020

2020202020202020 2020202020202020 String

2

1B02403192300124

2 Word

Hex RO

Dec RO

0000000000000 Quadword Hex RO

0

2264601F

0

8402

0

0

2264601F Longword

0 Boolean

0

1

Byte

Word

Boolean

Dec

Hex

B

RO U

0/1 U

Dec U

0/1 U

FORCEID

FIVEDIME

SEEKALG

CNT_TMO

2

60

1

1

2

60

1 Boolean

1 Boolean

Byte

Word

0/1 RO

0/1 B

Dec

Dec RO

PARAMS>

Local Programs 4–51

STATUS

STATUS Syntax

STATUS Types

The STATUS command displays a variety of information including module configuration, transient and unit error history, performance counters, and so on. The STATUS type you select determines the type of information displayed.

The syntax for the STATUS command is:

STATUS [type]

The type is an option that corresponds to a type of information.

If omitted, all available types of status information are displayed.

If the type is abbreviated, all matching types are displayed.

The following table describes the available STATUS types.

Type

CONFIG

LOGS

DATALINK

PATHS

SYSTEM

SEEKS

MSCP

THREADS

Function

Displays module configuration information and some system information such as power-on hours and the system time.

Displays the last 11 transient errors recorded in nonvolatile RAM. In VMS terms, these are the last

11 machine checks and bug checks known to the controller.

Displays the DSSI data link counters. These include the number of packets received and transmitted, the number of NAKs sent and received, and so on.

Displays the topology of the DSSI bus on which this

ISE resides by displaying open virtual circuits to other nodes on the bus and related packet counters.

Displays system statistics and counters.

Displays seek statistics such as average seek times and a seek length histogram.

Displays MSCP statistics such as the number and type of I/O commands and various histograms.

Displays the known programs in the system, the amount of CPU time consumed, and other information.

4–52 Local Programs

STATUS

Examples

The following examples show the use of three STATUS commands.

PARAMS> STAT CONFIG

Configuration:

Node R1EJAA is an RF31 controller

Software RFX V200 built on 22-AUG-1989 13:39:09

Electronics module name is EN92300124

In 26 power-on hours, power has cycled 45 times

System up time is 1 01:25:07.90

System time is 26-AUG-1989 15:00:12

PARAMS> STATUS DATALINK

Datalink Counters:

Interval: 91593 seconds

Pkts Rcv’d:

Pkts Xmt’d:

Naks Rcv’d:

Nakd Xmt’d:

121535:*******************************

121536:*******************************

23665:**********

0:

Resets Rcv’d:

Resets Xmt’d:

No response:

Duplicates:

Unrecogs:

45713:******************

21369:*********

2290:*

0:

0:

PARAMS> STATUS PATHS

ID Path Block Remote Node DG_S DG_S MSGS_S MSGS_S

-- ----------- ---------------- ----- ----- ------- -------

1 PB FF84517A Internal Path 0 0 0 0

0 PB FF8452A6 R3QZTI RFX V103

3 PB FF8453D2 R7ZIAA RFX V103

4 PB FF8454FE R7ZJBA RFX V103

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5 PB FF84562A R7ULBA RFX V103

6 PB FF845756 LEDS13 VMS V5.2

7 PB FF845882 ISMINE VMS V5.2

0

0

0

0 0 0

0 27497 27497

0 32636 32636

PARAMS>

Local Programs 4–53

WRITE

Reasons for

Failure

The WRITE command records the device parameter changes you make using the SET command in nonvolatile memory.

The WRITE command is similar to the VMS SYSGEN WRITE command, although no parameters are available.

When using the WRITE command, you must be aware of system and/or ISE requirements and use the command accordingly.

Otherwise, it may not succeed. The WRITE command may fail for one of the following reasons:

Unit not Acquired

You altered a parameter that required the unit, and the unit could not be acquired (it was not in the available state with respect to all hosts). Changing the unit number is an example of a parameter that requires the unit.

A parameter requires the unit if the flag U appears at the right of the SHOW display (refer to the SHOW example).

Unit not Initialized

You altered a parameter that required controller initialization, and you replied negatively to the request for reboot. Changing the node name or the allocation class are examples of parameters that require controller initialization.

A parameter requires controller initialization if the flag

B appears at the right of the SHOW display (refer to the

SHOW example).

Calibrations in Progress

Initial drive calibrations were in progress on the unit.

The use of the WRITE command is inhibited while these calibrations are running. In this case, the message "Drive calibration in progress, please try later" is displayed.

4–54 Local Programs

WRITE Syntax

WRITE Example

The syntax for the WRITE command is:

WRITE

The following is an example of how you use the WRITE command to change the allocation class from 0 to 4.

PARAMS> SHOW ALL

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

-----------------------------------------------

ALLCLASS 0 0 Byte Dec B

PARAMS> SET . 4

PARAMS> WRITE

Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y

Initializing...

Note

It takes about 1 minute before the following message is printed.

%HSCPAD-S-REMPGMEND, Remote program terminated - message number 3.

%HSCPAD-S-END, Control returned to node R1EJAA

Local Programs 4–55

ZERO

ZERO Syntax

Counter Types

The ZERO command clears a block of counters or all known blocks of counters.

The syntax for the ZERO command is:

ZERO counter

The counter is a block of performance counters or all known counters.

The following table describes the available counter values.

Counter

ALL

MSCP

SEEKS

Function

Clears all performance counter blocks.

Clears the MSCP performance counters and histograms.

Clears the seek performance counters and histograms.

4–56 Local Programs

ZERO Example

The following example of the ZERO command clears the MSCP performance counters and histograms.

PARAMS> STATUS MSCP

MSCP statistics:

Interval: 92715 seconds

I/O Commands: 0

Max Queue Depth: 0

Queue Depth Histogram:

Commands Processed Histogram:

GetUnit 1546:************************************

SetCon: 2:*

Blocks Accessed Histogram (cylinder ranges):

Read Lengths Histogram (block count ranges):

Write Lengths Histogram (block count ranges):

PARAMS> ZERO MSCP

PARAMS> STATUS MSCP

MSCP statistics:

Interval: 2 seconds

I/O Commands: 0

Max Queue Depth: 0

Queue Depth Histogram:

Commands Processed Histogram:

Blocks Accessed Histogram (cylinder ranges):

Read Lengths Histogram (block count ranges):

Write Lengths Histogram (block count ranges):

PARAMS>

Local Programs 4–57

5

Troubleshooting Procedures

Performing Troubleshooting Procedures

In this Chapter

Introduction

This chapter covers the following topics:

• What to do if the ISE operates incorrectly

• Failure indications

• Internal self-tests

This chapter describes what you should do if your ISE operates incorrectly. Also described in this chapter are failure indications and internal self-tests.

Note

Remember that repairs to the ISE should be attempted only by qualified Digital Customer Services engineers.

Troubleshooting Procedures 5–1

Self-Tests

POST

The ISE automatically performs a self-test whenever power is applied. This power-on self-test (POST) is designed to detect most faults that occur in the ISE. More information on POST is found in Chapter 2.

Internal Tests and Calibrations

Periodic internal tests and calibrations are performed as a normal part of the operation of the ISE. These tests are run automatically on a periodic basis and cause the device to appear active (although there may be no system activity at the time).

This is normal, and does not indicate a problem.

5–2 Troubleshooting Procedures

Failure

Indications

An ISE may fail during initial power-up or during normal operation. The following table describes the states of the LEDs, what these states mean, and what actions you should take.

When . . .

The Ready LED is on and the Fault LED is off

The Fault and Ready

LEDs turn on and stay on

Neither LED turns on

The Fault LED turns on and stays on

It means . . .

the operating condition is normal the ISE is unable to execute the POST the correct amount of power may not be getting to the ISE a fault condition exists

And you . . .

may use the ISE.

power down the system, check the DSSI cable, and try again. If failure persists, call

Digital Customer

Services.

check the power supply cable and the DSSI cable. If failure persists, call

Digital Customer

Services.

run local programs, as described in

Chapter 4, to isolate failure.

If unable to access local programs, check the DSSI node

ID. If failure persists, call

Digital Services.

Troubleshooting Procedures 5–3

Before

Calling Digital

Customer

Services

If a failure occurs with the ISE, make sure:

• The ISE has the correct DSSI node ID

• No other device on the DSSI bus has the same node ID

Refer to Chapter 3 to make sure the DSSI node ID is set correctly. If the ID is set correctly and the ISE still fails, call

Digital Customer Services.

5–4 Troubleshooting Procedures

6

Digital Customer Services

Types of Service Plans

In this Chapter

On-Site Service

BASIC Service

This chapter describes a range of flexible services offered by

Digital Customer Services.

On-site service offers the convenience of service at your site and insurance against unplanned repair bills. For a monthly fee, you receive personal service from our service specialists.

Within a few hours, the specialist is dispatched to your site with equipment and parts to give you fast and dependable maintenance.

BASIC service offers full coverage from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Options are available to extend your coverage to

12-, 16-, or 24-hour periods, and to include Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. Under the basic service plan all parts, materials, and labor are covered in full.

Digital Customer Services 6–1

DECservice

Carry-In service

DECmailer

DECservice offers a premium, on-site service providing committed response to remedial service requests made during contracted hours of coverage. Remedial maintenance will be performed continuously until the problem is resolved, which makes this service ideal for customers requiring maximum service performance. Under DECservice all parts, materials, and labor are covered in full.

Carry-in service offers fast, personalized response, and the ability to plan your maintenance costs for a smaller monthly fee than On-Site Service. When you bring your unit to one of the many Digital SERVICenters worldwide, factory-trained personnel repair your unit within 2 days. This service is available on selected terminals and systems. Contact your local

Digital Customer Services office to see if this service is available for your unit.

Digital SERVICenters are open during normal business hours,

Monday through Friday.

DECmailer offers expert repair at a per use charge. This service is designed for users who have the technical resources to troubleshoot, identify, and isolate the module causing the problem. Mail the faulty module to our Customer Returns

Center where the module is repaired and mailed back to you within 5 days.

6–2 Digital Customer Services

Per Call Service

For More

Information

Per call service offers a maintenance program on a noncontractual, time-and-materials-cost basis. This service is appropriate for customers who have the expertise to perform first-line maintenance, but may occasionally need in-depth support from Digital Services.

Per call service is available as a supplement to three of our service plans, as shown in the table below.

Service Plan

BASIC

On-Site

Carry-In

Turnaround Time Coverage is Available . . .

ASAP

2 to 3 days

2 to 3 days

12-, 16-, or 24-hours a day including weekends and holidays, depending on option chosen

24 hours a day, 7 days a week

During normal business hours

For more information on these service plans, prices, and special rates for volume customers, call the Digital Customer Services office nearest you.

Digital Customer Services 6–3

A

Accessing local programs, 4–1 using console commands, 4–4 using MDM, 4–6 using VMS, 4–2

B

BBR, 1–6

C

Calibrations, 2–18, 2–29, 5–2

Command flow, 2–15

Command protection, 2–16

D

Data flow, 2–13

Data protection, 2–14

Diagnostics, 2–28

Diagnostics and utilities, 2–28, 2–31

DIRECT, 2–32, 4–7

Disk sector format, 2–23

DKUTIL, 2–32, 4–25 command modifiers, 4–27

DKUTIL commands, 4–26

DEFAULT, 4–29

DISPLAY, 4–30

DUMP, 4–32

EXIT, 4–35

GET, 4–36

HELP, 4–37

POP, 4–38

Index

DKUTIL commands (cont’d)

PUSH, 4–39

REPLACE, 4–40

SET SIZE, 4–41

Drive module, 2–1, 2–33 block diagram, 2–12 controls and indicators, 3–16

DSSI node ID switches, 3–19 electronics, 2–9 interfaces, 2–5

LEDs, 3–20

DRVEXR, 2–32, 4–8 dialogue, 4–9 modes, 4–10

DRVTST, 2–32, 4–11 dialogue, 4–11 error messages, 4–12

DSA, 1–1

DSSI bus, 1–2

DSSI node ID plug, 3–3, 3–5, 3–15

DUP server, 2–19, 2–28, 2–29

E

ECC, 1–6, 2–23, 2–37

ERASE, 2–32, 4–15 dialogue, 4–17

Error codes, 2–34

Error detection, 2–34

Error handling, 2–23

Error history, 2–35

Error logs, 2–36

Index–1

F

Failure indications, 5–3

Fault LED, 2–33, 3–1, 3–4, 3–6, 3–16, 5–3

Firmware structure, 2–17

H

HDA, 2–1, 2–3

HISTRY, 2–32, 4–14

I

ISE, 1–2

M

MSCP error logs, 2–36

Bad Block Replacement Summary, 2–36

Read/Write Error Log, 2–36

Servo Performance Warning, 2–36

MSCP server, 1–2, 2–19

Multihost, 1–6, 2–20, 2–29

O

OCP, 3–1 for BA200 series enclosure, 3–2 for BA400 series enclosure, 3–5

Operator control panel, 2–33, 3–1

P

PARAMS, 2–18, 2–32, 2–34, 4–42

PARAMS commands, 4–43

EXIT, 4–43, 4–44

HELP, 4–43, 4–45

LOCATE, 4–43, 4–46

SET, 4–43, 4–47

SET and SHOW parameters, 4–48

SHOW, 4–43, 4–49

SHOW classes, 4–50

STATUS, 4–43, 4–52

WRITE, 4–43, 4–54

ZERO, 4–43, 4–56

Periodic tests, 2–18, 2–29, 5–2

POST, 2–28, 5–2

PRFMON, 2–32

R

RBN, 2–22

RCT cache, 1–6

RCT caching, 2–22

Read cache, 2–22

Ready LED, 3–4, 3–6, 3–16, 5–3

Request fragmentation, 1–6, 2–21

RF31 ISE description, 1–3 specifications, 1–7

RF31F, 1–1

RF31F ISE specifications, 1–7

RF31T, 1–1

RF35/RF31T ISE description, 1–4 specifications, 1–10

RF36 ISE description, 1–4 specifications, 1–14

RF72 ISE description, 1–5 specifications, 1–18

RF73 ISE description, 1–5 specifications, 1–21

RF74 ISE description, 1–5 specifications, 1–24

S

SCA, 1–2

Sector format, 2–23

Sector header process, 2–24

Seek ordering, 1–6, 2–21

Service plans

BASIC service, 6–1

Carry-in service, 6–2

DECmailer, 6–2

Index–2

Service plans (cont’d)

DECservice, 6–2

On-site service, 6–1

Per call service, 6–3

Soft errors, 2–36

Specifications

RF31 current and power, 1–8

RF31 environmental, 1–9

RF31 media, 1–8

RF31 performance, 1–7, 1–10

RF31F current and power, 1–8

RF31F environmental, 1–9

RF31F media, 1–8

RF31F performance, 1–7, 1–10

RF35/RF31T current and power, 1–11

RF35/RF31T environmental, 1–12

RF35/RF31T media, 1–11

RF35/RF31T performance, 1–10

RF36 current and power, 1–15

RF36 environmental, 1–16

RF36 media, 1–15

RF36 performance, 1–14

RF72 current and power, 1–19

RF72 environmental, 1–20

RF72 media, 1–19

RF72 performance, 1–18

RF73 current and power, 1–22

RF73 environmental, 1–23

RF73 media, 1–22

RF73 performance, 1–21

RF74 current and power, 1–25

RF74 environmental, 1–26

RF74 media, 1–25

RF74 performance, 1–24

STATUS THREADS, 2–18

T

Transient errors, 2–35

V

VERIFY, 2–32, 4–19 dialogue, 4–19 error messages, 4–23 warning messages, 4–24

W

Write-enabling a storage element, 3–7 an RF35/RF31T storage element, 3–7 to

3–12 an RF36 storage element, 3–7 to 3–12

Write-protecting a storage element, 3–7 an RF35/RF31T storage element, 3–7 to

3–12 an RF36 storage element, 3–7 to 3–12

Index–3

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