Family Partnership Charter School

Family Partnership Charter School
General
Climate and Connectedness Survey Results 2015
Family Partnership Charter School
Abbott Loop Elementary School
MOCLK DAA
The Climate and Connectedness Survey provides the Anchorage School District with information about perceptions and experiences related to
school climate, for use in setting goals and redirecting resources. The survey is administered in the spring of each year to students in grades 3-4
and 5-12, all school staff, and parents/guardians of students in grades K-12. The survey was designed by the American Institutes for Research (AIR)
in conjunction with the Alaska Association of School Boards (AASB).
Family
Staff
Grades 5-12
Grades 3-4
Participants were asked to respond to a series of statements related to school climate (atmosphere and attitudes about school) and school
connectedness (feelings about school). The statements are grouped into factors. For more information on the factors included in this survey report,
please see the appendix at the end of this report.
Responses
Grade 3-4 Survey
Grade 5-12, Staff and Parent Survey
Yes
Strongly Agree
Sometimes
Agree
No
Agree Some/Disagree Some
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
School climate has been shown through
research to be highly associated with student
achievement and school performance.
Family Partnership Charter School
Grades 3-4
General
Climate and Connectedness Survey Results 2015
Family
Staff
Grades 5-12
The response rates were not high enough to provide statistically reliable results for the grade 3-4 student survey.
Family Partnership did not participate in the Grade 3-4 Climate and Connectedness Survey for the 2014 -15 school year.
Family Partnership Charter School
Family
Staff
Grades 5-12
Grades 3-4
General
Climate and Connectedness Survey Results 2015
The response rates for 2012-13 and 2013-14 were not high enough to provide statistically reliable results for the grade 5-12 student survey.
Family Partnership did not participate in the Grade 5-12 Climate and Connectedness Survey for the 2014-15 school year.
Family Partnership Charter School
Family
Staff
Grades 5-12
Grades 3-4
General
Climate and Connectedness Survey Results 2015
The response rate was not high enough to provide statistically reliable results for the staff survey.
Family Partnership Charter School
Family
Staff
Grades 5-12
Grades 3-4
General
Climate and Connectedness Survey Results 2015
The response rates were not high enough to provide statistically reliable results for the family survey.
Appendix
School Climate and Connectedness Survey (SCCS) Grades 3‐4, 5‐12, and Staff Factor Descriptions ‐Designed by the American Institutes for Research‐ Grades 3‐4 Each statement in the survey related to a factor or concept, and a score is calculated based on the mean response for the statements related to each factor. The factors measured in the survey were:  Caring Others: This factor reflects students’ feelings about interactions among students and between students and adults in the school. For example, students are asked whether they are treated with respect by other students, whether adults at school believe that all students can do good work, and whether adults at school besides their own teacher know their name. Students selected responses between one and three where one indicates a lack of caring relationships and three indicates strong caring relationships at the school. Factor 1: Caring Others (α =.68)  Students in this school help each other, even if they are not friends.  Students here treat me with respect.  When students see another student being picked on, they try to stop it.  At this school, students are encouraged to do their very best.  The adults at this school believe that all students can do good work.  Adults in my community let me know that school is important.  There is an adult at this school who I can talk to about things that are bothering me.  At school, there is a teacher or some other adult who will miss me when I’m absent.  There are lots of chances for students in my school to talk with teachers one‐on‐one.  I can name at least five adults who really care about me.  At school, other adults besides my teachers know my name. Appendix

Social and Emotional Learning: This factor reflects students’ thoughts about their own capacities across the four areas covered by ASD’s social emotional learning standards: self awareness, self management, social awareness, and social skills. Items include whether students can identify their own feelings, whether they can control themselves when they are frustrated or disappointed, whether they respect people even if they are different, and whether they know how to make friends with new people. Students selected responses between one and three where one indicates that students at the school perceive themselves as having poorer social and emotional learning, and three indicates higher levels of social and emotional learning. Factor 2: Social and Emotional Learning (α =.78)  I try hard to do well in school.  If someone asks me I can tell them how I am feeling.  I know what kinds of work I need help with to be successful.  I ask for help from my teachers or others when I need it.  I am careful when I use something that belongs to someone else.  I can control myself when I am frustrated, or disappointed.  I can explain why it is important to tell the truth.  If something is bothering me, I think of different ways I can react.  I set goals and then work to reach them.  I care about other peoples’ feelings and what they think.  It is important for me to help others in my school.  I respect people even if they are different.  I can tell when someone is getting angry or upset before they say anything.  I know how to disagree without starting a fight or an argument.  I get along well with other students.  I know how to make friends with new people. Appendix
Grades 5‐12 Each statement in the survey related to a factor or concept, and a score was calculated based on the mean response for the statements related to each factor. The factors measured in the survey were:  School Leadership and Student Involvement: This factor reflects students’ feelings about the decision making of school leaders as well as student participation in the school governance. Items include whether students believe that decisions are made based on what is best for students, whether students are given a chance to help make decisions, and whether the principal asks students about their ideas. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of school leadership and student involvement and five indicates a high level of school leadership and student involvement. Factor 3: School Leadership and Student Involvement (α = .80)  At school, decisions are made based on what is best for students  The principal and other leaders in this school make good decisions  In my school, students are given a chance to help make decisions  Students are involved in helping to solve school problems  The principal asks students about their ideas  Respectful Climate: This factor reflects students’ feelings about whether they are treated respectfully by teachers, whether teachers are “nice people,” whether the rules at school are fair, whether students are treated fairly if they break rules, and whether it pays to follow the rules at school. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a lack of a respectful climate and five indicates a highly respectful climate for students. Factor 4: Respectful Climate (α = .78)  Teachers here are nice people  My teachers treat me with respect  When students break rules, they are treated fairly  My teachers are fair  Our school rules are fair  It pays to follow the rules at my school Appendix


High Expectations: This factor reflects students’ feelings about their own expectations as well as those of adults in their school and community. Students are asked if they’ve given up at school, whether they try hard to do well, and whether they want to get more education after high school. Students are also asked whether students are encouraged to work to the best of their abilities, whether teachers believe all students can do good work, and whether adults in the community encourage them to take school seriously. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a lack of high expectations and five indicates a high level of high expectations. Factor 1: High Expectations (α = .72)  I have given up on school (reverse scored)  At this school, students are encouraged to work to the best of their abilities  I try hard to do well in school  I want very much to get more education after high school  Adults in my community encourage me to take school seriously  Teachers and other adults in this school believe that all students can do good work School Safety: This factor reflects whether students feel safe at school, whether the school is troubled by bullies or gangs, whether crime and violence are major concerns at school, and whether the school is affected by crime and violence in the community. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of school safety and five indicates a high level of school safety. Factor 2: School Safety (α = .75)  I am safe at school  This school is being ruined by bullies (reverse scored)  This school is badly affected by crime and violence in the community (reverse scored)  Gang members make this school dangerous (reverse scored)  Crime and violence are major concerns at school (reverse scored) Appendix


Peer Climate: This factor reflects students’ feelings about whether they are treated with respect by other students, whether students are helpful towards one another, whether students would try to intervene if they saw another student being picked on, whether students are often teased, and whether students like to put others down. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a more negative peer climate and five indicates a very positive peer climate at the school. Factor 5: Peer Climate (α = .75)  Students in this school help each other, even if they are not friends  Students here treat me with respect  When students see another student being picked on, they try to stop it  Students at this school are often teased or picked on (reverse scored)  Most students in this school like to put others down (reverse scored) Caring Adults: This factor reflects students’ feelings about how close they feel to adults in the school. For example, students are asked if there is at least one adult they could talk to if something were bothering them, whether a teacher would miss them if they were absent, whether there are enough chances for students to talk to teachers one‐on‐one, whether other adults besides their own teachers know their name, and whether there are at least five adults who really care about them. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a lack of caring adult relationships and five indicates strong caring adult relationships at the school. Factor 6: Caring Adults (α = .71)  There is at least one adult at this school whom I feel comfortable talking to about things that are bothering me  At school, there is a teacher or some other adult who will miss me when I’m absent  There are a lot of chances for students in my school to talk with teachers one on one  I can name at least five adults who really care about me  Other adults at school besides my teachers know my name Appendix


Community Involvement: This factor reflects students’ feelings about how supportive and welcoming the school is with parents and the community. Students are asked whether adults in the community know what goes on inside schools and support the school, whether parents come to events at the school, whether the school involves parents, and whether most students talk with their parents about their homework and what they’re studying. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates a less supportive and welcoming environment and five indicates a more supportive and welcoming environment. Factor 7: Parent and Community Involvement (α = .73)  This school is a welcoming place for families like mine  Adults in my community know what goes on inside of schools  Adults in my community support this school  Lots of parents come to events at my school  Most students in this school talk with their parents about what they are studying in class  This school does not involve parents in most school events or activities (reverse scored) Social and Emotional Learning: This factor reflects students’ thoughts about their own capacities across the four areas covered by ASD’s social emotional learning standards: self awareness, self management, social awareness, and social skills. Items include whether students can identify their own feelings, whether they can control themselves when they are frustrated or disappointed, whether they respect people even if they are different, and whether they know how to make friends with new people. Students selected responses between one and five where one indicates that students at the school perceive themselves as having poorer social and emotional learning, and five indicates higher levels of social and emotional learning. Factor 8: Social and Emotional Learning (α = .86)  If someone asks me right now, I can describe how I am feeling  I know what I do well and what areas I need to work on  I ask for help from my teachers or others when I need it  I feel bad if my chores, homework, or other responsibilities are not done well or on time  I control myself when I am frustrated, angry, or disappointed  I am honest, even when telling the truth might get me in trouble  When I make a decision, I think about what might happen afterwards  I set goals and then work to achieve them  It is important for me to help others in my school  I respect the ways in which people are different  I can tell when someone is getting angry or upset before they say anything  I know how to disagree without starting a fight or argument Appendix



I get along well with other students I work on having positive relationships with friends, family members, and others Student Risk Behaviors: This scale reports the number of times students reported observing other students’ drug and alcohol use as well as delinquent acts, such as vandalism. The items in the Risk Behaviors section are broken out into two separate scales: Student Delinquent Behaviors and Student Drug and Alcohol Use. Student Delinquent Behaviors (α = .83)  Destroy things (such as school property, or other people’s personal items)  Get into fights with other students  Steal things (such as taking things from the school or other people)  Threaten or bully other students  Carry weapons (such as knives or guns) Student Drug and Alcohol Use (α =.72)  Under the influence of drugs (such as marijuana, coke or crack)  Under the influence of alcohol (such as beer, wine, wine coolers, liquor such as vodka or whisky)  Under the influence of inhalants (such as sniffing glue, paints, or aerosol sprays) 

Overall Climate: The overall climate score was computed as the mean of three scales: school leadership, high expectations and school safety. Overall Connectedness: Overall connectedness score was computed as a mean of four scales: respectful climate, peer climate, caring adults and community involvement. Appendix
Staff Each statement in the survey related to a factor or concept, and a score was calculated based on the mean response for the statements related to each factor. The factors were:  School Leadership: This factor reflects staff members’ feelings about the decision making of school leaders as well as the fairness of school rules. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of school leadership and five indicates a high level of school leadership.  Factor 1: School Leadership and Involvement (α =.93)  At school, decisions are made based on what is best for students  I trust the principal will keep his or her word  The principal and other leaders in this school make good decisions  The principal looks out for the personal welfare of school staff members  I am satisfied with my involvement with decision‐making at this school  When students break rules, they are treated fairly  School staff members have a lot of informal opportunities to influence what happens here  The work rules at this school are fair  Respectful Climate: This factor reflects staff members’ feelings about how students treat each other and how well students and staff members treat one another. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of respect and five indicates a high level.  Factor 4: Respectful Climate (α =.85)  At this school, students and teachers get along really well  Students in this school help each other, even if they are not friends  Teachers and students treat each other with respect in this school  Students in this school treat each other with respect  The students in this school don’t really care about each other (reverse scored)  Staff Attitudes: This scale reflects staff members’ feelings about the competence of teachers as well as how positive their attitudes are towards their jobs. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates more negative staff attitudes and five indicates highly positive staff attitudes.  Factor 2: Staff Attitudes (α =.87)  The teachers at this school are good at their jobs  Teachers here set high standards for themselves  In this school, staff members have a “can do” attitude Appendix





Teachers and staff believe that all students can do good work Teachers here are nice people Parent and Community Involvement: This factor reflects staff members’ feelings about how accessible the school is for parents as well as how connected adults in the community are to the school. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of parent and community involvement and five indicates a high level of parent and community involvement.  Factor 6: Parent and Community Involvement (α =.84)  This school fails to involve parents in most school events or activities (reverse scored)  At this school, it is difficult to overcome the cultural barriers between teachers and parents (reverse scored)  The school is a welcoming and inviting place for parents  Adults in the community support this school  Lots of parents come to events at this school  Adults in the community encourage youth to take school seriously  Adults in the community know what goes on inside schools Student Involvement: This factor reflects staff members’ feeling about how involved students are in the decision making process. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of student involvement and five indicates a high level of student involvement.  Factor 3: Student Involvement (α =.85)  In this school, students are given a chance to help make decisions  Students are involved in helping to solve school problems  The principal asks students about their ideas School Safety: This factor reflects staff members’ feelings about the impact of gangs and bullies as well as general crime and violence in the community. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level school safety and five indicates a high level of school safety.  Factor 5: School Safety (α =.72)  I feel safe at my school  This school is being ruined by bullies (reverse scored)  This school is badly affected by crime and violence in the community (reverse scored)  Gang members make this school dangerous (reverse scored)  Crime and violence are or should be major concerns at this school (reverse scored) Appendix



Student Delinquency: This factor uses staff members’ reports of observing students getting into fights, stealing and bullying. The student delinquency and student drug and alcohol scales differ from the other factors since the higher the score is the more negative the response. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of student delinquency and five indicates a high level of student delinquency. Student Delinquent Behaviors (α = .81)  Destroy things (such as school property, or other people’s personal items)  Get into fights with other students  Steal things (such as taking things from the school or other people)  Threaten or bully other students  Carry weapons (such as knives or guns) Student Drug and Alcohol Use: This factor uses staff members’ reports of observing students under the influence of drugs or alcohol. The student delinquency and student drug and alcohol use scales differ from the other factors since the higher the score is the more negative the response. Staff members selected responses between one and five where one indicates a low level of student drug and alcohol use and five indicates a high level of student drug and alcohol use. Student Drug and Alcohol Use (α = .69)  Under the influence of drugs (such as marijuana, coke or crack)  Under the influence of alcohol (such as beer, wine, wine coolers, liquor such as vodka or whisky)  Under the influence of inhalants (such as sniffing glue, paints, or aerosol sprays) Overall Climate: Computed as the mean of eight scales: school leadership, respectful climate, staff attitudes, parent and community involvement, student involvement, school safety, student delinquency, and drug and alcohol use scores. 
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement