Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town, South Africa
STANFORD IN CAPE TOWN
2015 Safety, Security, and Fire Report
STANFORD IN CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA
Stanford Program in Cape Town: (Corner of Buitenkant and Albertus)
Building 11A
Waverley Business Park
Wycroft Road
7705 Mowbray
Republic of South Africa
Local Law Enforcement Agency:
Woodstock Police Station
Corner of Victoria and Church
Woodstock 7925
Phone: (27) (0) 021 442 3117
October 1, 2015
This report has been compiled in compliance with the US Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and
Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act.
Safety on the Stanford in Cape Town campus is a natural source of concern for students, parents and University
employees. Education - the business of Stanford University - can take place only in an environment in which each
student and employee feels safe and secure. Stanford recognizes this and employs a number of security measures to
protect the members of its community. The local police force, and the students and employees themselves all share in
the responsibility of making the Stanford in Cape Town program a safe place to study, work and live.
2
Requests for Safety and Security Report Data
Stanford in Cape Town program is under the jurisdiction of Woodstock Police Station. The Police Station is located at
the Corner of Victoria and Church, Woodstock, 7925. The phone number is (027) (0) 021 442 3117. All statistics at the
close of this document are supplied by the Director of Stanford in Cape Town program. Crime statistics for Cape Town
and surrounding area are available from the local police on an annual basis. The crime statistics are available to the
general public at a provincial level.
Branch and Overseas Campus Crime and Fire Statistics
Crime and fire statistics reported in this publication are for the Stanford University Cape Town campus. Crime
statistics for other Stanford separate campuses are available at police.stanford.edu.
Obtain a Copy of the Safety, Security, and Fire Report
You may request a paper copy of the Stanford Safety, Security & Fire Report through any of the following means:
► Contact SUDPS to request by mail at
711 Serra Street, Stanford, CA 94305, or call +1 650-723-9633
(Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.)
► Email [email protected]
► Visit police.stanford.edu.
Stanford University Department of Public Safety
711 Serra Street
Stanford, CA 94305
Phone: +1 650-723-9633
24-Hour non-emergency line: +1 650-329-2413
3
Stanford University reserves the right to update the information contained in this report as necessary. The most
current version of this report is at web.stanford.edu/group/SUDPS/forms.shtml.
Version 1.1
9/30/15
Revisions: Updated footnote 1 and page references for clery crime lists. Added definition for unfounded.
4
The Department of Public Safety
A Message from Chief Laura Wilson
I want to thank you for taking the time to read this annual report and encourage you to become involved with the
safety of the Stanford community. The Stanford University Department of Public Safety exists to provide a safe,
secure environment that respects and encourages freedom of expression, the safe movement of people, and the
protection of life and property while upholding the United States Constitution and federal, state, and local laws and
ordinances.
The members of the Stanford University Department of Public Safety are committed to providing high quality public
safety services with a strong emphasis on customer service.
To Accomplish This goal
● We pledge to honor the spirit and letter of the laws we are charged to uphold.
● We will dedicate our full attention to our duties in order to promote a safe environment while earning and
maintaining the public’s trust.
● We will endeavor to continually enhance our professional skills and knowledge.
● We will hold each other accountable for demonstrating professional and ethical behavior.
● We will actively identify and pursue opportunities to improve our department and the way we serve the
campus community.
The hallmarks of our service are a constant dedication to the principles of honesty, integrity, fairness, courage, and
courtesy.
Please let us know how we can best serve you.
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Campus Security Authorities
The function of a Campus Security Authority (CSA) is to report to the official or office designated by the institution to
collect crime report information any allegations of Clery Act crimes that he or she concludes were made in good faith.1
The person designated to collect Clery information at Stanford is:
Clery Compliance Coordinator
Annette Spicuzza
[email protected]
+1 650-723-8417
“Campus Security Authority” Defined
As defined by the Clery Act, a federal law codified at 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), a Campus Security Authority (CSA) is: (1) A
campus police department or a campus security department of an institution. (2) Any individual or individuals who
have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security
department under paragraph (1) of this definition, such as an individual who is responsible for monitoring entrances
into institutional property. (3) Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus
security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.
(4) An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but
not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial proceedings. If such an official is a pastoral
or professional counselor, the official is not considered a campus security authority when acting as a pastoral or
professional counselor.
If you have questions about whether your position or job duties meet the definition of a CSA, please contact the
University’s Clery Compliance Coordinator.
Stanford University CSA’s
Campus Security Authorities have legal obligations under state and federal laws. The actions required of CSA’s are
explained on the following pages.
The following list denotes the positions or organizations at Stanford that have been identified as meeting the
federal definition of a Campus Security Authority. The following list is intended to be comprehensive, but certain
positions may not have been specifically listed. See page 10 for a list of positions which are exempt from reporting
requirements.
•
•
•
•
Law enforcement and security officers, including contract security and access control monitors
The Vice Provost of Residential and Dining Enterprises
The Vice Provost for Student Affairs
The Dean of Students
1 See pages 27-28, 32-33 for Clery-reportable crimes.
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Campus Security Authorities cont’d
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Director of Vaden Health Center
Resident Deans
Resident Fellows
Residence Assistants and Community Assistants
Athletic Coaches
Title IX professional staff
Office of Community Standards staff
Study Abroad Directors
Department of Athletics Red Coat staff
Fraternity and sorority life professional staff
Community Center Directors
Student Activities & Leadership professional Staff
The Haas Center professional staff
The Office of Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse (SARA) Education & Response professional staff
Graduate Life Office professional staff
5-SURE safety escorts
CSA Responsibilities
Campus Security Authorities have responsibilities under both federal and state laws. The most significant differences
between the federal and state requirements is the time frame within which CSA’s must report crimes and the entity
to which a crime must be reported. The following sections provide greater detail about these legal obligations. If your
job function meets the definition of a CSA, you need to be aware of these legal obligations. See page 9 for additional
information.
State Law – California Education Code Sections 67380 and 67383
California Education Code sections 67380 and 67383 require CSA’s to immediately, or as soon as practically possible,
notify local law enforcement when they become aware of any violent crime, sexual assault, hate crime or any
attempt to commit one of these crimes.
In-progress crimes should be reported to 1-0-7
To report a violent crime, sexual assault, or hate crime that is not in progress, call +1 650-222-5147.
The Stanford University Department of Public Safety will receive crime reports from CSA’s — regardless of the location where
the crime occurred — and forward the information to the appropriate law enforcement agency.
This institutional procedure does not prohibit an individual, including the victim, from notifying local law enforcement on
their own about these or any crimes.
7
Campus Security Authorities cont’d
Federal Law – Clery Act (20 U.S.C. Section 1092(f))
Any CSA who becomes aware of a Clery-reportable crime2 must report the incident to the Clery Compliance
Coordinator.3 Unlike the state law that requires CSA’s to report specified crimes to the local law enforcement agency
as soon as possible, the federal Clery Act law does not mandate the time frame within which Clery-reportable crimes
must be reported to the Clery Compliance Coordinator; however, in order to ensure that the University complies with
the Timely Warning provision of the Clery Act (see pages 12), the University strongly encourages CSA’s to report Cleryreportable crimes to the Clery Compliance Coordinator as soon as practically possible after learning of the crime.
REMEMBER: State law requires CSA’s to immediately, or as soon as practicably possible report sexual assaults, violent
crimes, hate crimes, and any attempt of these, to the Clery Compliance Hotline at +1 650-222-5147.
Under federal law, the following information must be reported to the Clery Compliance Coordinator:
• The details of the incident(s) - sufficient to properly classify the type of crime
• The location of the incident
• The date and time the incident occurred
• The date and time the CSA was advised of the crime
CSA’s do not share legally-protected, confidential information with the Clery Compliance Coordinator, without the
permission of the involved parties, unless state or federal law mandates such notification (such as mandated child
abuse reporting laws).
In the event an incident involves an ongoing or imminent threat to the community that might require a Timely
Warning or Emergency Notification to be distributed, CSA’s should call the program administrator as soon as possible,
after calling the authorities.
Complying with Education Code Sections 67380 and 67383 - Frequently Asked
Questions
Who must report?
All university Campus Security Authorities. See pages 6-7 for the definition of a CSA and a list of representative
positions.
Which crimes must be reported immediately?
The crimes which must be reported are sex offenses, other violent crimes, any hate crime, and any attempt of these.
2 A list of Clery-reportable crimes can be found on pages 27-28, 32-33.
3 A crime is “reported” when it is brought to the attention of a campus security authority or local law enforcement personnel by a victim, witness, other
third party, or even the offender. It does not matter whether or not the individuals involved in the crime or reporting the crime are associated with the
institution. If a campus security authority receives the crime information and believes it was provided in good faith, he or she should document it as a
crime report. In “good faith” means there is a reasonable basis for believing that the information is not simply rumor or hearsay; that is to say that there is
little or no reason to doubt the validity of the information. What must be disclosed, therefore, are statistics from reports of alleged criminal incidents. It is
not necessary for the crime to have been investigated by the police or a campus security authority, nor must a finding of guilt or responsibility be made
to disclose the statistic. A campus security authority is neither responsible for determining authoritatively whether a crime took place, nor should he or
she try to apprehend the alleged perpetrator of the crime—those are the functions of law enforcement personnel. It is also not a CSA’s responsibility to
convince a victim to contact law enforcement if the victim chooses not to do so.
8
Campus Security Authorities cont’d
When must crimes be reported?
Education Code sections 67380 and 67383 require a CSA to immediately, or as soon as practically possible, report the
specified crimes to local law enforcement.
What information must be reported?
The details of the incident (sufficient to classify the type of the crime), the location, and the date and time of
occurrence are what must be reported to law enforcement.
Should a CSA provide the names of the victim and perpetrator when making a report?
The victim must be asked if he or she consents to being identified. When a victim consents to being identified, the CSA
shall provide the name of the victim and the name of the alleged perpetrator, if known. If the victim does not want to
share his or her identity with law enforcement, then the name of the alleged perpetrator is not to be provided. If there
is a concern for the immediate safety of the community, a CSA may provide the name of an alleged perpetrator to law
enforcement even when a victim declines to be identified. Consult with Stanford’s Office of the General Counsel at +1
+1 650-723-6611, if you have questions about this unique circumstance.
How to report?
For crimes in progress, call 1-0-7.
For other reports made for the purposes of complying with Education Code sections 67380 and 67383, call the SUDPS
non-emergency, Clery Compliance Hotline: +1 650-222-5147. The person who answers the phone will ask a series of
specific questions to assist with proper compliance reporting. Even if a crime did not occur at Stanford, SUDPS will
accept the information and will forward the information to the agency having jurisdictional responsibility.
May I report anonymously?
It is not uncommon for multiple sources, including CSA’s, to report the same incident to the Clery Compliance Coordinator.
To minimize the potential for counting an incident more than once and to ensure crimes and locations are properly
categorized, the university requires CSA’s and other persons wishing to make a Clery report for inclusion in the annual
disclosure of crime statistics to provide their name and contact information so that the Clery Compliance Coordinator can
follow up, if needed. A victim may request confidentiality when making a report.
What happens with the information provided to DPS?
Reports made to the non-emergency compliance hotline are primarily for notification purposes so that law
enforcement is aware of possible criminal activity. SUDPS will notify the law enforcement agency having jurisdictional
responsibility for investigating criminal activity where an incident is reported to have occurred, based upon
information received through this reporting mechanism. In most cases, police departments will not initiate a criminal
investigation based on third-hand information. Further, in order to conduct a criminal investigation, agencies will
typically want to obtain a statement made directly by a victim. Therefore, a victim who wants an incident investigated
by a police agency for purposes of criminal prosecution should notify the agency directly and file a police report.
If I report a sexual assault to Stanford DPS using the Clery Compliance Hotline, must I also report to Title IX?
Yes. SUDPS will contact the Stanford Title IX Office to provide information about reports received through the Clery
Compliance Hotline, including the name of the victim and the alleged assailant, if the victim has consented to being
identified. Nevertheless, an individual CSA reporting a sexual assault or other prohibited conduct should also contact
Stanford’s Title IX office to ensure all proper notifications have been made. The state and federal laws (the Clery Act
and Title IX) have differing reporting requirements and response obligations.
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Reporting Emergencies
and Crimes
Persons Exempt From Reporting Clery-Reportable Crimes
The Clery Act specifically excludes the following persons from Clery reporting requirements when the person is
operating in the course and scope of their license:
Pastoral Counselor- a person who is associated with a religious order or denomination and is recognized by that
religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling within the scope of their position
as a pastoral counselor.
Professional Counselor- a person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling
to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or
certification.
Stanford also has a Confidential Support Team of professionals specifically trained in sexual assault response.
University Ombuds have also been designated as exempt from Clery reporting obligations.
Pastoral and professional counselors who learn about Clery-reportable crimes in the performance of their official
duties are not required to report these crimes to the Clery Compliance Coordinator for inclusion in the annual security
report or for the purposes of a Timely Warning, nor are the counselors instructed to encourage such reporting.
Administrative Guide Policy 1.7.3 encourages persons being counseled to report crimes to the Clery Compliance
Coordinator on a voluntary, anonymous basis (no names will be requested) for inclusion in the annual crime statistics.
Reporting Crime
All students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to the
police in a timely manner. Anytime you need immediate police, fire, or medical response, dial 107 from any landline or 112 from any cell phone. For a non-emergency police response on the UCT campus, dial Telephone: 021 467
8000. The Stanford Program in Cape Town also has a 24 hour line for non-emergency response, direct to Stanford
staff; 071 087 8965.
Call 107 or 112 if you experience, hear, or observe any of the following:
• A whistle, scream, or call for help
• Any crime that is occurring or has occurred
• A strange car repeatedly driving up and down the street
• If you see someone suspicious entering your neighbor’s room or home, or entering an office or lab with no
apparent legitimate business purpose
• Seeing someone acting suspiciously in a parking area or at a bike rack near your home, dorm, or work
Remember that the police cannot be everywhere at once, and they depend on individuals in the community to assist
them in crime prevention by reporting suspicious activities.
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Reporting Emergencies
and Crimes cont’d
Members of the Stanford community are encouraged to immediately and accurately report any criminal offense, suspected criminal activity, or other emergency directly to the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction where the crime
occurred.
Emergencies from a telkom landline
107
Emergencies from a cell phone
112
Medical Emergencies
10177
Director, Trudy Meehan
[email protected]
073 650 0085
Student and Academic Administrator, Mariska April
[email protected]
071 413 6561
Student Advisor, Residence Assistant
[email protected]
For Immediate Police, Fire, or Medical Response
Provide the call-taker with a description of the incident type, location, time of occurrence, any injuries, weapons
involved, the suspect and the direction of travel.
How To: Report a crime to a dispatcher
Start with the what and where: "My bike was stolen from outside building 23."
Then get to the who:
-Gender, height, hair color/style, eye color, and other features:
"I saw a male with white hair in a flat top."
-Clothing (from top down) and any distinguishing characteristics:
"He was wearing a blue shirt with a heart on the sleeve, black pants, and wasn't wearing
any shoes."
-Mode & direction of travel, such as car color, make/model, and most importantly- license plate.
"He put my bike in the back of a white truck
and left West on Main Street. The license plate
is A123BCD." or
"He is westbound on Main on a red mountain bike with black wheels."
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Emergency Notification & TImely
Warning
Emergency Notifications and Timely Warnings
In the event of a significant emergency or dangerous situation on campus that involves an immediate threat to the
health or safety of the population, Stanford in Cape Town will initiate, without delay, use of the emergency contact list
upon confirmation by first responders of the significant emergency or dangerous situation.
Taking into account the safety of the community, the notification will be sent to everyone via telephone calls,
text messages and/or emails unless issuance of the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible
authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. The
content of the message will vary depending on the situation. The people who can initiate an emergency message
include the center Director.
Crime Prevention Education Programs
Crime prevention is a top priority. During orientation, issues of general safety and crime prevention, acceptable computer
use, student conduct, sexual harassment, and sexual abuse policies are reviewed.
Personal Accountability
Students, faculty, and staff are responsible for their individual safety and the security of their property. Acting
collectively, with others in mind, helps promote safety and security for the entire campus. EH&S provides resources for
preparing and responding to a variety of emergencies at ehs.stanford.edu.
Weapons on Campus
All weapons are prohibited on the Stanford and Stanford Branch Campuses except for local or government law
enforcement officers. In addition to firearms, most knives that are capable of inflicting death by stabbing and all
straight razors are prohibited. Weapons are also prohibited in student residences.
Violence on campus and in the workplace
Stanford University will not tolerate violence or threats of violence on campus or in connection with University events.
Employees who violate this policy (or who bring false charges) will be subject to corrective action, up to and including
termination. Persons who violate the law are subject to arrest.
Students who violate this policy could be in violation of the Fundamental Standard* and subject to disciplinary action
ranging from a formal warning and community service to expulsion. Additionally, students who violate the law are subject to
arrest.
AdminGuide 2.2.11
*The Fundamental Standard has set the standard of conduct for students at Stanford since it was articulated in 1896 by David Starr Jordan,
Stanford’s first president: Students at Stanford are expected to show both within and without the University such respect for order, morality, personal honor and the rights of others as is demanded of good citizens. Failure to do this will be sufficient cause for removal from the University.
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Personal Safety:
Responding to Threats of Violence
University judicial policy applies year-round to all on-campus activities, and to any acts that threaten the safety and
integrity of the University community regardless of where such acts occur.
Location of Registered Sex Offender Information
South Africa does maintain a Sex Offenses Registry. Information about an individual’s past criminal history is not
made available to the public in South Africa via the Department of Justice.
Responding to an Active Threat (such as an Active Shooter)
If an active threat is nearby ► Escape if it is safe to do so.
If escape is not an option:
●Lock and barricade doors.
●Turn off lights (to make the area appear unoccupied).
●Close blinds and/or block windows.
●Silence cell phones (turn off vibration as well) but do not turn them completely off. Turn off radios and
computer monitors.
●Keep other occupants calm, quiet, and out of sight.
●Seek cover and barricade yourself (with others, if possible) by placing as much material as possible between
you and the threat
●As soon as it is safe to do so, notify law enforcement.
●Do not approach emergency responders, let them come to you. Raise both your hands over your head.
Otherwise, emergency responders may not know the difference between you and the threat.
●Remain under cover until the threat has passed or you've been advised by law enforcement that you can exit.
●Do not sound the fire alarms unless there is a fire. Evacuation during an active threat event could place
people in harm’s way.
● Fight back as a last resort. Attack aggressively and in coordination with others, if possible. Throw objects or
improvise other weapons (fire extinguisher, office equipment).
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Personal Safety:
Responding to Threats of Violence cont’d
Responding to a Bomb Threat
If you receive a telephone bomb threat ► Try to stay calm and gather
information from the caller.
●Write down the apparent gender, age, and unique speech attributes of
the caller.
●Note if anything be heard in the background.
●If they do not tell you, ask the caller where the device is located and
when it is set to detonate.
●Call for help immediately and provide the details.
If you receive a suspicious package ► Call local law enforcement
immediately.
●Advise others to move away from the area.
● Follow the directions of law enforcement and first responder personnel.
If you receive an email bomb threat or other threatening email ► Call 1-1-0
Do not delete the message. Law enforcement personnel will need all the details of the message for the investigation.
14
Linda A. Cicero/University Communications
Emergency Evacuation Procedures
Familiarize yourself with the evacuation procedures for any building; locate the nearest exit and fire extinguishers.
Fire and General Evacuation Procedures
► Report a fire or smoke - even if the fire has been extinguished
● Use fire alarm pull boxes AND
● Call for emergency assistance.
► If it is not safe to evacuate
● Close the door to the corridor and seal up cracks with wet towels .
● Go to the window and open it a few inches.
●Hang out a bed sheet or other large item to signal for help.
► Evacuate - Leave the building as soon possible when you hear the sound of an alarm in a campus building (drills
are not an exception).
► Report to the Program Administrator - Account for yourself and notify the administrator if you know of anyone
who is missing.
► Choose a safe exit
● Before opening a door, check for warmth with the back of your hand:
— If warm, leave the door closed and stuff towels or clothes in the cracks and open a window.
— If not warm, open the door slowly (CAUTION: the doorknob may be hot) and be prepared to close it
quickly, if necessary.
● Close doors as you leave to confine the fire.
● If you see or smell smoke in a hall or stairway, use another exit.
● Never use elevators; always use the stairs.
► Help others evacuate
● Knock on doors and check bathrooms as you leave.
● Offer assistance to individuals with physical disabilities.
► Be alert of suspicious persons or activity - Immediately report any vandalism or tampering with an alarm.
15
Violence Prevention
Behavioral Expectations
The University's Administrative Guide sets forth expectations for the behavior of faculty and staff in the Code of
Conduct (Administrative Guide 1.1.1). The Fundamental Standard sets forth behavioral expectations for students.4
Additionally, the Violence in the Workplace policy further defines behaviors not sanctioned by the University on the
main campus as well as any of the branch campuses (Administrative Guide 2.2.11). The Threat Assessment Team uses
these policies in conjunction with professional training and experience to evaluate behaviors that have been brought
to the attention of the team.
Behaviors do not have to violate the law or university policies to be worrisome. Violence may be preceded by
behaviors that indicate an increasingly negative emotional state. The Threat Assessment Team uses University
policies in conjunction with professional training and experience to evaluate behaviors that have been brought to
the attention of the team. The behaviors listed on the right have been associated with a heightened risk for violence
or self-harm5 and should prompt a community member to notify a supervisor, a member of the Threat Assessment
Team, or law enforcement. These lists are not intended to be comprehensive.
Imminently Dangerous ► Call local law enforcement
● Statements (written or verbalized) about harming oneself or others, especially if specific plans are mentioned
● Acquisition of weapons in the context of concerning or alarming behaviors listed above
Alarming Behavior ► Notify a Supervisor or Contact the Threat Assessment Team +1 650-723-9633
● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Verbally abusive of peers; disruptive or bizarre behavior
Defiant of authority and believes rules do not or should not apply to them
Sense of victimization or paranoia
Change in appearance, declining hygiene
Sending disturbing messages (e.g., texts, e-mails, letters)
Coursework content that is disturbing
Statements supporting the use of violence to resolve issues or a general obsession with violence or guns
Distancing oneself from family, friends, or peers (suddenly or gradually)
Vandalism of property out of revenge
Stalking
Concerning Behavior ► Notify a Supervisor
● Consistent interpersonal conflict
● Irritability or moodiness
● An inability or unwillingness to abide by policies or rules
● Increase in alcohol or drug use
4 Stanford Administrative Guide policy 2.2.11 specifically addresses violence in the workplace and on campus.
5 These behaviors have been adapted from a variety of sources including:
Deisinger, G., et al. The Handbook for Campus Threat Assessment Teams. Stoneham: Applied Risk Management, LLC, 2008. Print.
Work Trauma Services, Inc. Warning Signs. Web. 2012. <http://wtsglobal.com/warning-signs>
Curiale Hirschfeld Kramer LLP. “Managing Within the Law Workshop for Stanford University.” Santa Monica. 2012. Print.
16
Violence Prevention cont’d
● Social isolation and unexplained absenteeism
● Anger, intimidation, and bullying, especially without personal accountability or remorse
The University Threat Assessment Team
The University’s Threat Assessment Team is comprised of faculty and professional staff members who meet
regularly to review best practices and current trends and to consult about matters of immediate concern. The Threat
Assessment Team is committed to maintaining an environment where people feel safe to carry out the University’s
mission. Education, communication, collaboration, coordination of resources, and early intervention are the
cornerstones of Stanford’s violence prevention efforts.
The University will not tolerate violence or threats of violence anywhere on campus or in connection with University
sponsored events. Persons who become aware of situations which pose an imminent threat to the safety of the
community or one of its members, including self-harm, should call law enforcement immediately. Persons who
become aware of situations which might pose a threat to the safety of the community or one of its members,
including self-harm, are encouraged to consult with a member of the threat assessment team or other appropriate
university official in a timely manner.
Team members include representatives from: Student Affairs, SUDPS, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS),
Faculty and Staff Help Center, Ombuds, Human Resources (University, Medical School, SLAC), General Counsel, Risk
Management, and other departments, depending on the situation.
The responsibilities of the Threat Assessment Team are the following:
● Proactively develop procedures for response to actual or potential violence.
● Serve as resources to develop appropriate response strategies for selected cases.
● Review and coordinate training materials and programs.
● Periodic review and updating of workplace violence policy.
● Develop contacts with outside threat assessment professionals.
● Keep current on legal issues related to workplace/academic safety and incident response.
● Stay abreast of developing trends both domestically and internationally.
● Deploy future forecasting models to anticipate developments.
17
Crime Prevention
In addition to the tips below, visit the BOSP Safety page at
undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/bosp/prepare/health-safety/safety
See Something, Say Something
Report crimes, suspicious activity or behavior to the police immediately, including:
● ANY activity or behavior that is threatening persons or property.
● Peeping or prowling.
Lock It or Lose It
● Lock your doors anytime you leave your office or residence or room.
● Never prop open a locked door.
● Don’t allow “piggybacking” (when someone unknown to you tries to enter a locked building behind you).
● Report broken or malfunctioning locks immediately to a building/facility manager.
● Secure all valuables out of sight.
● Avoid becoming a target of thieves by securing commonly stolen items:
- Secure laptops in a closet or drawer, or secure them to a fixed object with a cable lock. Never leave laptops
or other mobile devices unattended.
- Secure bicycles to a bicycle rack with a U-lock.
Prevent Identity Theft
● Protect your Passport and Social Security number.
● Inspect your credit report and financial statements regularly, and shred anything with your personal
information on it before disposal.
● Never click on links in unsolicited emails.
● Utilize Federal Trade Commission resources at ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/.
● If you are a victim of identity theft, report it to your local law enforcement agency and seek assistance at
identitytheftcouncil.org.
Online Security
Notify the police immediately if a computer containing any sensitive or confidential information has been lost or
stolen. Information and account security for Stanford University systems is also regulated by the Computer and
Network Usage Policy, Administrative Guide 6.2.1. Report policy violations to the Information Security Office at
+1 650-723-2911 during normal business hours or to the Office of General Counsel after-hours phone line +1 650-7367808 outside of business hours.
To help prevent hacking, learn more about best practices, such as strong passwords and security updates,
at stanford.edu/group/security/securecomputing.
18
Missing Student
Student Residences
Student residents share the responsibility for the security of residences. Residents are strongly encouraged to:
● Keep bedroom and apartment doors locked, at all times.
● Ensure doors lock securely when entering or leaving a residence.
● Do not allow unknown persons into locked student residences or academic facilities.
● Never prop doors open.
● Notify police immediately of any crimes or suspicious activity or behavior.
Missing Person Policy
If you believe someone might be missing, notify the Director and the Associate Director as soon as possible. Branch
staff in receipt of information that a student may be missing, should immediately report the matter to the local police
and call the Stanford Department of Public Safety and the Director of BOSP as soon as possible. The Department of
Public Safety can be reached 24-hours per day, seven days per week by calling +1-650-924-3209 or the Palo Alto/
Stanford Communications Dispatch Center at +1 650-329-2413. The Department of Public Safety will notify University
Officials.
US Federal law mandates that the University provide students with an option of specifying person(s) to contact in the
event that he or she has been determined by the police to be a missing person. An option will be given to students
to specify this person when they perform the Registrar’s annual online check-in procedure. Federal law also requires
the University to inform students that an emergency contact will be notified within (24) hours of the person being
reported as missing. For non-emancipated minors, a custodial parent or guardian will be notified in addition to any
listed emergency contact(s).
In addition to the minimum notifications that will be made under federal law, Stanford may make additional
notifications as necessary as provided by FERPA to resolve a safety emergency; this could include notifying parents or
guardians even when they were not specifically listed by a student as an emergency contact.
19
Controlled Substances and Alcohol
Controlled substances & alcohol
Stanford University maintains a drug-free workplace and campus. The unlawful manufacture, distribution,
dispensation, possession, and/or use of controlled substances or the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcoholic
beverages is prohibited on the Stanford campus, the workplace, or as part of any of the University’s activities.
AdminGuide 2.2.8
As stated in Administrative Guide 2.2.8, Controlled Substances and Alcohol, it is the policy of Stanford University
to maintain a drug-free workplace and campus. It is widely recognized that the misuse and abuse of controlled
substances, illegal drugs (collectively called controlled substances1) and alcohol are major contributors to serious
health problems and social and civic concerns. The health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse
of controlled substances and alcohol include various physical and mental consequences, including addiction, severe
disability, and death. Information concerning the effects of alcohol and specific drugs is available from the Office of
Alcohol Policy and Education at +1 (650) 725-5947.
When you are in a foreign country you are subject to its laws and not protected by U.S. laws. Ignorance of the law is
not an excuse. It is important that you learn about local laws and regulations and obey them. You are responsible for
obeying all host countries laws and regulations, which can be both different and stricter than in the United States. Do
not assume you will be treated gently because you are an American. If you become involved in a legal problem, please
contact center staff immediately. Please note, however, that it is unlikely that BOSP can intervene on your behalf if
you are arrested for an illegal violation.
Do not use illegal drugs while you are abroad. Most countries have very strict drug laws and enforcement can result in
prison sentences and even the death penalty. If you attend a party at which others are using drugs, leave immediately.
If you are arrested for drugs, the US Consular Officer cannot get you released from jail.
Stanford University does not tolerate reckless drinking — lawful or unlawful — and its consequent harmful
behaviors. As stated in the Student Alcohol Policy, members of the Stanford community are expected to abide by
all federal, state, and local laws, including those governing alcohol consumption and distribution. Additionally, all
members of the Stanford community are expected to make healthy choices concerning their personal use of alcohol,
including understanding the physical and behavioral effects of alcohol misuse and preventative measures to ensure
their own safety and that of their peers.
The Office of Alcohol Policy and Education (OAPE) oversees, manages, and holds authority for the application of
the University’s Student Alcohol Policy (studentaffairs.stanford.edu/alcohol/policy). It coordinates and implements
programs and activities for students who do not drink or drink lightly, provides party planning registration and
advising, and develops resources and services for students who need help for themselves or others related to alcohol
use in accordance with Section 120 A of the Higher Education Opportunity Act.
1 Controlled substances are those defined in 21 U.S.C.812 and include, but are not limited to, such substances as marijuana, heroin, cocaine and
amphetamines.
20
Controlled Substances and Alcohol
Authority, Application, and Enforcement
Separate from criminal sanctions, dangerous drinking and controlled substance behaviors may be subject to
University disciplinary sanctions up to, and including, termination of employment of staff or expulsion of students.
Violations may also be referred to the Office of Community Standards (for individual students) and the Organization
Conduct Board (for student groups). The Vice Provost of Student Affairs may also take action in certain circumstances.
21
Sexual Assault, Domestic and
Dating Violence and Stalking
Policy Statements
Acts of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking are unacceptable and will
not be tolerated at Stanford University (Administrative Guide 1.7.3 and 2.2.11). Under Title IX, sexual assault, sexual
misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking are severe forms of sexual harassment, which is also
prohibited (Administrative Guide 1.7.1). Hereafter, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic
violence and stalking will be referred to as “Prohibited Conduct”.
Additional Information on Annual Reporting
For additional policy information regarding university disciplinary processes, prevention and awareness
programs, and detailed information on the gathering of statistics, see the main campus annual security report at
http://www.stanford.edu/group/SUDPS/safety-report/Almanac.pdf
Student Conduct
While on an Overseas Studies Program, participants are still considered Stanford students. As such, they have many of
the same resources available to them while abroad that are available to students on the home campus. Participants
must also keep in mind that the same Stanford policies, such as the Honor Code and the Fundamental Standard,
apply while in your program at another location.
Definitions
Depending on where you are studying, the definition of sexual offenses and other criminal offenses may differ from those
applicable in the state of California. The definitions prescribed by the Clery Act, a federal law, are used by all institutions
in the United States to classify and report crimes under the Clery Act. The Violence Against Women Act of 2013 modified
the definitions of some of the sexual offenses, including the definition of rape. The definitions that were in effect in 2012
are listed on pages 27-28. The definitions that were in effect for 2013 and are in effect for 2014 are listed on pages 32-33.
It is important to note the definition changes in order to better understand how to interpret the statistical data.
State definitions are used by police and prosecutors to determine if a crime has been committed in California. Stanford
generally models its definitions from state law, but there are some differences in that Stanford has shortened some
definitions. University policy definitions are used to determine whether there has been the commission of an act of
Prohibited Conduct and these definitions control whether University remedies or discipline will be imposed.
22
Sexual Assault, Domestic and
Dating Violence and Stalking cont’d
What To Do If You Have Been Sexually Assaulted or You Are the Victim of
Prohibited Conduct - The First Three Steps
Address Individual and Community Safety / Seek Medical Attention
An individual’s immediate safety and the safety of the community are the highest priorities. If an individual needs
immediate medical attention or if there is an imminent threat to that person or others, call 1-0-7.
Seek Support and Explore Options
Students in overseas programs who experience Prohibited Conduct may seek confidential assistance from CAPS 24
hours assistance, +1 650-723-3785. CAPS provides confidential information regarding general options, although
CAPS counselors will not be experts regarding police investigations or medical options at overseas locations.
Program directors can assist with obtaining medical services and reporting incidents to local police authorities.
Program directors are also able to provide interim accommodations. Formal reports to the University will be
reported to the Title IX Coordinator. Under the Clery Act, the University must report crimes that occur at overseas
campuses, but the information is recorded without any identifying information of the parties. Additional resources
are available at notalone.stanford.edu.
Collect & Preserve Evidence / Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (SAFE)1
Individuals who have experienced a sexual assault are encouraged to seek out, if available, a Sexual Assault
Forensic Exam (SAFE) to be performed by a trained medical professional, as soon as possible after the assault. The
medical professional will address an individual’s medical needs related to the assault as well as collect evidence in
accordance with established protocols for evidence collection.
In order to preserve evidence, individuals are advised not to shower, wash, wipe, change clothes or brush their teeth
prior to the exam, if possible.
Even if an individual is uncertain about whether he or she wants to pursue criminal or other remedies, participating
in the exam allows for the collection and preservation of evidence that might be useful should the individual decide
he or she wants to pursue some type of action at a later date.
For assistance in receiving a Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (SAFE)2, contact:
Stanford University Confidential Support Team
YWCA Rape Crisis Hotline
Department of Public Safety
SCVMC Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Office
SCVMC Emergency Department
+1 650-725-9955
+1 650-493-7273
+1 650-723-9633
+1 408-885-6466
+1 408-885-5000
To collect and preserve evidence of Prohibited Conduct other than sexual assault, photograph injuries, retain emails,
text messages and phone records, and maintain a journal or other means to document incidents.
1 Sexual Assault Forensic Exam is also sometimes called a medical-legal exam, a Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) exam, or a Sexual Assault Nurse
Exam (SANE).
2 A Sexual Assault Forensic Exam is also sometimes referred to as a medical-legal exam, a Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) exam, or a Sexual
Assault Nurse Exam (SANE).
23
Sexual Assault, Domestic and
Dating Violence and Stalking cont’d
Resources
The University is committed to providing information regarding on- and off-campus services and resources to all
parties involved. A comprehensive website dedicated to sexual violence awareness, prevention and support can be
found at notalone.Stanford.edu.
Confidential Campus Resources
The following resources have the ability to keep a victim’s name confidential and anonymous. Reporting an incident
of Prohibited Conduct to one of these resources will not lead to a University or police investigation.3
• Stanford University Confidential Support Team
• YWCA Rape Crisis Hotline
+1 650-725-9955
+1 650-493-7273 or +1 800-572-2782
• Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) (student only)
+1 650-732-3682
• Faculty Staff Help Center +1 650-723-4577
• Office for Religious Life +1 650-723-1762
Medical Resources4
• Vaden Health Center
+1 650-723-4841
• Stanford Health Care Emergency Department +1 650-498-3333
• Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SAFE exam) + 1 408-885-5000
3 Pursuant to California Penal Code §§ 11165.7, 11166, and 11167, persons who meet the definition of a mandated reporter must report incidents of child
abuse and neglect. A person under the age of 18 years of age is considered to be a child.
4 Pursuant to California Penal Code §11160, medical clinicians are required to notify the police if they observe physical injuries they believe were caused
by assaultive conduct, including sexual assault.
24
Sexual Assault, Domestic and
Dating Violence and Stalking cont’d
Campus Resources:5
• SARA Office
+1 650-725-1056
sara.stanford.edu, [email protected]+1 650-725-9129
• Title IX Office/Title IX Coordinator
titleix.stanford.edu, [email protected]
+1 650-497-4955
• Residential Education/House Staff +1 650-725-2800
(Residence Deans, Resident Assistants, Peer Health Educators, Residence Fellows)
If there is no answer or if you have an urgent, after-hours issue, contact the campus operator at +1 650-723-2300
and ask to be connected to the Undergraduate Residence Dean on call.
• Graduate Life Office Deans
+1 650-736-7078
If there is no answer or if you have an urgent, after-hours issue, call the 24-hour pager: +1 650-723-8222, pager ID 25085
• OCS Alternate Review Process (ARP)
studentaffairs.stanford.edu/community standards/help/arp
+1 650-725-2485
• ASSU Legal Counseling Office
lco.stanford.edu
+1 650-375-2481
• Sexual Harassment Policy Office
harass.stanford.edu
+1 650-724-2120
• Human Resources
uhr.stanford.edu
+1 650-725-8356
• The Department of Public Safety+1 650-723-9633
police.stanford.edu
• University Ombuds
+1 650-723-3682
School of Medicine Ombuds+1 650-498-5744
Off-Campus Resources
• YWCA Rape Crisis Hotline +1 650-493-7273, +1 408-287-3000
• Planned Parenthood Mountain View
+1 650-948-0807
• Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence +1 408-279-2962
• Community Solutions +1 877-363-7238
• Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office Sexual Assault
Investigations Team
+1 408-792-2516
• Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office Domestic Violence
Investigations Team
+1 408-792-2551
• National Domestic Violence Hotline
+1-800-799-SAFE
• Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network Hotline
+1-800-656-HOPE
5 These resources are obligated to report Prohibited Conduct to the Title IX Office when the victim is a student.
25
Campus Crime Statistics
2012
The Jeanne Clery Act and Higher Education Act
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity
Act provide that campus communities receive an annual report containing crime statistics, fire incident statistics, and
safety policies. The statistical information in this report allows members of the campus community to be informed about
criminal activity occurring within and immediately surrounding the geographical boundaries of the campus and any related
buildings owned or operated by the University. Additionally, fire incident and safety systems information assists residents
in emergency planning. Of equal importance are the safety policies and guidance in this report, which allows individuals to
make informed decisions about their personal safety and enhance the safety of the community through their actions.
Gathering & Reporting Statistical Information
For each calendar year, SUDPS gathers statistical crime data from its own records and from information provided by
the Office of the Vice Provost for Student Affairs and other designated Campus Security Authorities (CSA’s). Fire incident
statistics are obtained from the Stanford University Fire Marshal’s Office. Because they have local police jurisdiction over
some locations where Stanford facilities are located, the Santa Clara County and San Mateo County Sheriff’s Offices, the
Palo Alto Police Department, and other law enforcement agencies are asked to provide Clery-reportable crime statistics for
the required geographical areas.
University officials at each of the separate campuses, including the overseas programs, gather the required crime statistics
from their own records and from local law enforcement agencies, when available. The statistics from foreign and branch
campuses are then forwarded to SUDPS.
It is not uncommon for multiple sources, including CSA’s, to report the same incident to the Clery Compliance Coordinator.
To minimize the potential for counting an incident more than once and to ensure crimes and locations are properly
categorized, the university requires CSA’s and other persons wishing to make a Clery report for inclusion in the annual
disclosure of crime statistics to provide their name and contact information so that the Clery Compliance Coordinator can
follow up, if needed. A victim may request confidentiality when making a report.
As required by federal law, SUDPS reports this information on an annual basis to the United States Department of Education
Office of Postsecondary Education.
Crime Statistics Definitions for 2012
Locations
Campus: “Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous
geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s
educational purposes, including residence halls; and
“Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to paragraph (1) of this definition, that is owned
by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional
purposes.” (34 CFR 668.46(a)) Clery-reported statistics include the academic and research areas, all student / staff
residences on campus, Stanford Health Care (formerly Stanford Hospital and Clinics), and the academic reserve
open space (“The Dish”).
Dorm: “Any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or is located on property that is
owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous geographic area that makes up the
26
Campus Crime Statistics
2012 cont’d
campus is considered an on-campus student housing facility.” (34 CFR 668.41(a)) Clery-reported statistics are from
all student residences, including fraternity, sorority, and other row houses as a subset of the campus statistics.
Non-campus: “Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized
by the institution; or any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of,
or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same
reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.” (34 CFR 668.46(a)) A Stanford example of a non-campus
area is the Hopkins Marine Station, located in Pacific Grove, CA.
Public property: “All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is
within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.” (34 CFR 668.46(a)) These statistics
were provided by the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction where the property is located and Campus
Security Authorities, where applicable.
Crimes
Crime statistics definitions below are from the Federal Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook and may differ from the
California Penal Code statutes.
Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
Murder / Non-negligent Manslaughter: The willful killing of one human being by another.
Forcible sex offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly or against that person’s will.
Includes forcible rape1, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.
Non-forcible sex offenses: Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse includes :
Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein
marriage is prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or
persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
Aggravated Assault: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or
aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to
produce death or great bodily harm. (The criminal act need not result in injury to be counted as aggravated assault
when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used in the commission of the crime.)
Burglary: The unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft.2
Theft- Motor Vehicles: The theft of a motor vehicle, including automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, golf carts, and
mopeds.
1 See UCR the definition of rape (new for 2013) on page 32.
2 Burglaries in individual student rooms: Because residents of rooms in student housing facilities are not considered transient, the Burglary of
each room is a separate offense. This means that if an offender unlawfully enters five dorm rooms on one floor of a student housing facility for
the purpose of taking something, this incident should count as five Burglaries. Similarly, if a burglar enters five separate bedrooms accessible from a
single point of entry, such as a suite, then this single incident should count as five burglaries.
27
Campus Crime Statistics
2012 cont’d
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling, house,
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal property of another.
Hate Crimes: Any of the previously listed crimes and any other crime involving bodily injury, theft, intimidation,
assault or destruction/damage/vandalism reported to the police or to a campus security authority in which
the victim is intentionally selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation,
ethnicity, or disability of the victim.
Arrest: A person (juveniles included) taken into custody (jail) or a citation issued for violation of liquor, drug, or
weapons laws (defined below).
Disciplinary Referral: The referral of any person to any campus official who institutes a disciplinary action of which
a record is kept and which may result in the imposition of a sanction.
Liquor Laws: The violation of laws prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use
of alcoholic beverages. Driving under the influence and drunkenness violations are excluded.
Drug Laws: Violations of laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making
of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives (Morphine, Heroin,
Codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, Methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates,
Benzedrine).
Weapons Laws: The violation of laws prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession,
concealment, or use of firearms, knives, explosives, or other deadly weapons.
28
Ian Terpin/University Communications
Campus Crime Statistics
2012 cont’d
Crimes Reported to the Police and Campus Security Authorities (2012)
Statistics on this page were gathered using the definitions in effect in 2012, prior to the reauthorization of the Higher
Education Opportunity Act and Violence Against Women Act of 2013.
Crime
Year
Student
Residences
Murder / Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
2012
0
0
2012
0
2012
Negligent Manslaughter
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Theft- Motor Vehicles and
Golf Carts
Arson
Domestic Violence
Stalking
Public
Property
Total*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
On-Campus Non-Campus
NOTES
*The “Total” column for each crime is the sum of the On-Campus, Non-Campus, and Public Property categories. Student Residence is a subset of the OnCampus category. A crime occurring in a student dorm would be counted once in the Student Residence category and once in the On-Campus category.
Every effort is made to appropriately count each crime only once in this report.
In situations in which more than one crime is committed, the hierarchy rule of the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting system requires only that the most serious
offense be recorded for a single incident. As an exception to this rule, a sexual assault will always be recorded into the institution’s annual statistics in
addition to any other crimes associated within the same single incident.
Domestic violence and stalking were voluntarily included in 2012 statistics using the California Penal Code statutes.
Crime statistics are requested annually from all jurisdictions in which Stanford University maintains property, whether it is owned, rented, or leased for
educational purposes.
29
Campus Crime Statistics
2012 cont’d
Forcible Sex Offenses (2012)
Crime
Forcible Rape
Forcble Fondling
Other Forcible Offenses
Total Forcible Sex
Offenses
Year
Student
Residences
Public
Property
Total*
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
Public
Property
Total*
On-Campus Non-Campus
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses (2012)
Crime
Statutory Rape
Incest
Total Non-Forcible Sex
Offenses
Year
Student
Residences
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
Year
Student
Residences
Public
Property
Total*
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
On-Campus Non-Campus
Arrests (2012)
Crime
Liquor Law
Drug Violations
Weapon Possession
On-Campus Non-Campus
30
Campus Crime Statistics
2012 cont’d
Disciplinary Actions (2012)
Violation
Liquor Law 0
Drug Violation
Weapon Possession
Year
Student
On-Campus
Residences
Public
Property
Total
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
2012
0
0
0
0
0
Hate Crimes (2012)
2012 - There were no hate crimes reported in 2012.
0
NonCampus
If both an arrest and disciplinary referral are made, only the arrest is counted.
31
Campus Crime Statistics
2013 - 2014
Clery Act Definitions - 2013-2014
Locations
The location definitions for calendar years 2013 and 2014 are the same as those for 2012 (see pages 27-28). For other
Clery-reportable crimes not listed on this page, the definitions have not changed. See pages 27-28 for the definitions
of Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter, Negligent Manslaughter, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, Motor Vehicle
Theft, and Arson.
Crime Statistics Definitions - 2013-2014
This Safety, Security, and Fire Report includes crime statistics using updated definitions and categories as provided by
the re-authorizations of the Violence Against Women Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act. Data reported for
calendar years 2013 and 2014 are based upon the definitions below. For other Clery-reportable crimes not listed on
this page, the definitions have not changed. See page 56 for the definitions of Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter,
Negligent Manslaughter, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, Motor Vehicle Theft, and Arson.
Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape.
Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person without the consent of the victim, including instances
where the victim is incapable of giving consent. These offenses are rape, fondling, incenst and statutory rape.
Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral
penetration by the sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
Fondling: The touching of private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the
consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or
because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity. Private body parts are generally considered to be
the genitals, breasts, and buttocks.
Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is
prohibited by law.
Statutory rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. In California, the
statutory age of consent is eighteen.
Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear
for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.
For the purposes of this definition—
Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly,
or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or
communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the
victim.
Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily,
require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate
32
Campus Crime Statistics
2013 - 2014 cont’d
nature with the victim; where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s
statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of
interaction between the persons involved in the relationship; Dating Violence is not limited to sexual or physical
abuse or the threat of such abuse. (If an act of violence meets the definition of domestic violence (below), then the
act is classified as Domestic Violence rather than dating violence).
Domestic Violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or
intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is
cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the
victim under the domestic or family violence laws of California, or by any other person against an adult or youth
victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of California.
Hate Crimes: Any of the previously listed crimes and any other crime involving bodily injury, theft, intimidation, assault,
or destruction/damage/vandalism, in which the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias
against the victim. For the purposes of the Clery Act, the categories of bias that may serve to determine that a
crime is a hate crime would include the victim’s actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual
orientation, ethnicity, national origin, and disability.
Unfounded: Any Clery-reportable crime that was reported in good faith and determined, by a law enforcement
investigation, to be false or baseless.
33
Campus Crime Statistics
2013 - 2014 cont’d
Crimes Reported to the Police and Campus Security Authorities (2013-2014)
Statistics recorded using revised Clery definitions contained in the reauthorizations of the Higher Education Opportunity
Act and Violence Against Women Act in 2013, as outlined on pages 32-33.
Crime
Year
Student
Residences
OnCampus
NonCampus
Public
Property
Total*
Unfounded
Murder / Non-Negligent
Manslaughter
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Negligent Manslaughter
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Robbery
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Aggravated Assault
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Burglary
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Theft- Motor Vehicles and
Golf Carts
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Arson
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Domestic Violence
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Stalking
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
*No crime information was returned in response to our request for statistics.
Hate Crimes (2013-2014)
2013-There were no hate crimes reported.
2014- No hate crime information was returned in response to our request for statistics.
NOTES
Student Residences is a subset of the On-Campus category. A crime occurring in a student dorm would be counted once in the Student Residence
category and once in the On-Campus category. The column totaling each crime is the sum of the On-Campus, Non-Campus, and Public Property
categories. Every effort is made to count each crime only once in this report.
34
Campus Crime Statistics
2013 - 2014 cont’d
Sex Offenses (2013-2014)
Year
Student
Residences
OnCampus
NonCampus
Public
Property
Total*
Unfounded
Rape
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Fondling
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Incest
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
Statutory Rape
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
N/A
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Student
On-Campus
Residences
NonCampus
Public
Property
Total
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
NonCampus
Public
Property
Total
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
Crime
Total Sex Offenses
Arrests (2013-2014)
Crime
Liquor Law△
Drug Violations
Weapon Possession
Year
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
Disciplinary Actions (2013-2014)
Violation
Liquor Law ❒
Drug Violation
Weapon Possession
Year
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
Student
On-Campus
Residences
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
0
*
*No crime information was returned in response to our request for statistics.
△ If both an arrest and disciplinary referral are made, only the arrest is counted.
35
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