Practicum and Clinical Field Handbook for Site Supervisors

Practicum and Clinical Field Handbook for Site Supervisors
PRACTICUM AND CLINICAL FIELD
HANDBOOK
For Site Supervisors and Faculty
Department of Counselor Education
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419-1394
Phone: (724) 938-4123
Fax: (724) 938-4314
Fall 2014
1
Welcome to the Practicum and Clinical Field Experiences
of the Counselor Education & Services Program
This handbook has been prepared to assist supervisors in the delivery of
information directly related to the practicum (CED 711) and clinical field (CED 712 &
713) courses within the Department of Counselor Education. It has been designed to give
the agency and school supervisors, and the faculty supervisor a better understanding of
their roles and expectations.
Comments about this handbook are encouraged so that this handbook can become
more valuable to site supervisors and supporting schools and agencies. Please send your
comments to:
Department of Counselor Education
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue Box 13
California, PA 15419-1394
(724) 938-4123
(724) 938-4314 (Fax)
Department Faculty
Dr. Jacqueline Walsh
Chairperson
Professor
[email protected]
Dr. John Patrick
Professor
[email protected]
Dr. Jeff Samide
Professor
[email protected]
Dr. Gloria Brusoski
Professor
[email protected]
Dr. Taunya Tinsley
Associate Professor
[email protected]
Dr. Grafton Eliason
Professor
[email protected]
Dr. Elizabeth Gruber
Professor
[email protected]
Note: Departmental faculty reserves the right to change any of the terms of the handbook
in any section at any time.
Practicum and Clinical field Handbook revised Summer 2014
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Mission Statement. .
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Purpose of Clinical Experiences.
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Clinical Objectives.
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Preparation for Clinical Experience .
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Expectations of University Supervisors.
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Requirements for Practicum Students.
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Practicum (CED 711) .
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Supervisor Qualifications.
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Expectations of Site Supervisors.
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Requirements for Clinical Field Students.
Direct Hours
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Liability Insurance.
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Criminal Record History and Child Abuse clearance .
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Act 114 Fingerprinting.
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Professional Considerations .
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Personal Challenges. .
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Assessing Guidance Effectiveness
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Supervision and Feedback.
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Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.
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LIST OF APPENDIXES
Appendix A: Site Development Form.
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Appendix B: Practicum/ Clinical field Placement Agreement.
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Appendix C: Practicum Log .
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Appendix D: Site Supervisor’s Midterm Evaluation .
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Appendix E: Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Supervisee’s
Performance (Clinical Mental Health Agency) Final .
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Appendix F: Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Supervisee’s
Performance (School Counseling) Final
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Appendix G: Student Practicum/Clinical field Site Evaluation
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Appendix H: Permission to Audio/Video Tape (Minor)
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Appendix I: Permission to Audio/Video Tape
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Appendix J: Clinical field Log
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Appendix K: Site Summary Form
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Appendix L: Field Experience Competencies Form .
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Appendix M: Standards for Counseling Supervisors
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Appendix N: ACES Best Practices in Clinical Supervision .
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To: Site Supervisors
From: Faculty of the Department of Counselor Education
The Department of Counselor Education would like to take this opportunity to thank you for
taking the time and dedication to supervise students from California University of PA. Your
commitment to the profession is evident by the guidance you give to the students. The students’
clinical experiences are essential in their growth as a counselor. Without your willingness to
supervise, they would not be able to receive this vital experience.
Cal U’s Department of Counselor Education is CACREP accredited and responsible for meeting
their requirements to assure a quality education in the competencies of counselors. Our
curriculum is also aligned with PA Department of Education (PDE) and NCATE. We continue
to review and revise the program. Many of our changes have been a result of dialogue with site
supervisors in the field.
We hope this manual will help you when supervising our students. Again, thank you for working
with us to continue to educate and graduate quality counselors.
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Mission Statement
The mission of the Department of Counselor Education is to prepare students, primarily
from Southwestern Pennsylvania, with appropriate academic preparation and personal growth
opportunities to serve as professional Master’s degree level counselors in their chosen specialty
area. Graduate students are expected to develop a high level of self-awareness, a strong
knowledge base, and competent counseling skills in order to practice ethically and professionally
within a diverse society. Consistent with these expectations is the emphasis placed upon student
growth in exhibiting the dimensions of warmth, empathy, unconditional positive regard,
genuineness, and congruence, as well as the values of civility, integrity and responsibility.
Faculty are expected to facilitate students’ development and model appropriate professional
behavior.
Accreditation and Certification
Both the Clinical Mental Health and School Counseling Programs are accredited by the
Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
Through the University, the Middle States Association of Colleges and Post-Secondary Schools
accredits the Department of Counselor Education. Courses offered by the Department have been
approved by both the National Board for Certified Counselors and by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education (Act 48) for continuing education credits. The National Council for the
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accredits the School Counseling programs
(Elementary and Secondary School Guidance). The Counselor Education Department is
authorized by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education to offer certification
programs in Elementary and Secondary School Guidance.
Purpose of Clinical Experiences
The purpose of the clinical field experiences is to help Counseling graduate students
develop effective counseling skills that will serve them well in working with a variety of clients.
In addition, students will learn to present cases to peers and to offer constructive criticism and
ideas in a “treatment team” or “case conference” format. Class sessions will involve experiential
exercises; discussions of theories, techniques, common problems, ideas, and analyses of case
presentations. Specific counseling issues as addressed in recent professional literature will be
reviewed.
Clinical Objectives
The practica and clinical fields provide for the development of counseling skills under
supervision. The student’s practicum and/or clinical field include all of the following:
•
•
Direct service with clients, including experience in individual counseling and group
work;
Supervision which occurs regularly over a minimum of one academic term by a program
faculty member;
6
•
•
Supervision which occurs weekly over a minimum of one academic term by an on-site
supervisor; and
Evaluation of the student’s performance throughout the practicum/clinical field including
a formal evaluation at the end of the practicum/clinical field.
Students will continue to gain further understanding of:
•
Advocacy processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede
access, equity, and success for clients;
•
Ethical standards of ACA and related entities, and applications of ethical and legal
considerations in professional counseling;
•
Professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service providers;
•
Attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, including specific
experiential learning activities;
•
Individual, couple, family, group, and Clinical Mental Health strategies for working with
diverse populations and ethnic groups;
•
Counselors' roles in social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, cultural selfawareness, the nature of biases, prejudices, processes of intentional and unintentional
oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are
detrimental to the growth of the human spirit, mind, or body;
•
Counselor and consultant characteristics and behaviors that influence helping processes
including age, gender, and ethnic differences, verbal and nonverbal behaviors and
personal characteristics, orientations, and skills;
•
Essential interviewing and counseling skills so that the student is able to develop a
therapeutic relationship, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention
strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client
relationship;
•
An understanding of general principles and methods of case conceptualization,
assessment, and/or diagnoses of mental and emotional status.
•
The knowledge of prevention and crisis intervention strategies.
School Counselors will also gain further understanding of:
•
•
•
•
Ethical and legal considerations related specifically to the practice of school counseling
(e.g., the ACA Code of Ethics and the ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors).
The knowledge of the school setting, environment, and pre-K-12 curriculum.
Use of technology in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of a
comprehensive school counseling program.
Individual and small-group counseling approaches that promote school success, through
academic, career, and personal/social development for all.
7
Additionally, students will:
•
•
•
Increase self-awareness so that the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and the
counselor maintains appropriate professional boundaries;
Begin to develop a personal model of counseling; and will
Integrate ethical and legal considerations into their counseling practice.
Counselors-in-training
The basic knowledge and core skills required are substantially the same for both Clinical Mental
Health and school counselors. The programs differ in some coursework requirements appropriate to
the student's specialty. The primary focus of all programs in the Department is to develop Clinical
Mental Health and school counselors in the following areas:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Social and Cultural Diversity
Professional Identity
Human Growth and Development
Career Development
Helping Relationships
Group work
Assessment
Research and Program Evaluation
Supervisor Qualifications
Clinical Mental Health Agency-A site supervisor must have a minimum of a master’s
degree in counseling or a related profession with equivalent qualifications, including appropriate
certifications and/or licenses, and a minimum of two years of pertinent professional experience
in the program area in which the student is completing clinical experience.
School Counseling-Site supervisor must have two years experience as a school
counselor, minimum of a master’s degree in counseling or a related profession with equivalent
qualifications and current school certification.
Expectations of Site Supervisors
It is expected that site supervisors have basic knowledge of the program’s expectations,
requirements, and evaluation procedures for students. It is also expected that the on-site
supervisor will provide the following services and supervision:
• An orientation to the agency and definition of specific intern duties.
• Written evaluations (mid-semester and end-of-semester) of the intern’s performance
(Forms provided).
• At least one hour each week of one-to-one supervision.
Expectations of University Supervisors
University supervisors are expected to:
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•
•
•
•
Assist in planning in the practicum or clinical field when needed.
Advise students regarding the types of agencies available for placement, various
client groups served and the responsibilities of the students in the practicum or
clinical field experience;
Advise students as to the requirements involved in the practicum and/or clinical field
(seminars, reports, evaluations); and
Maintain periodic contacts with the agency supervisor and the student to discuss the
student’s progress. In instances of logistical problems, either telephone contacts or
written correspondence will be used.
University supervisors will contact the site where the practicum or clinical field student is placed
at least once a semester. This contact will focus on the progress and areas in need of
improvement of the student.
Requirements for Practicum Students
Practicum students should be at the school/agency for a minimum of 150 hours (with 50
hours being in direct student/client services). The practicum experience at the school/agency is
required to last the entire semester. The practicum site must allow you to audio or videotape
your counseling sessions with students or clients. This is required for each three-credit
practicum course taken. Additional requirements include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Attend weekly practicum group supervision for 1½ hours with faculty supervisor.
Each student will be required to meet weekly with a faculty supervisor for one hour
of individual or triadic supervision.
Keep a weekly log of activity in the agency or school.
All students are required to turn in the following paperwork: evidence of liability
insurance, site agreement form, supervisor’s evaluation of performance, evaluation of
practicum site, log of practicum hours, site development form, site supervisor resume,
and practicum summary form. Other forms may be required, as necessary.
You will be required to prepare a minimum of 5 audiotapes (5 in-class presentations)
for presentation. The format for the presentation will be provided in class.
Complete an evaluation of the practicum student’s experience in the agency/school to
be submitted to the University supervisor at the end of the practicum.
Any additional syllabus requirements.
Requirements for Clinical Field Students
Clinical field is a 6 credit, 600 hour experience and can be completed in one semester or
over two semesters for 300 hours each. Forty percent or 240 hours MUST be direct hours
working with clients in counseling. The clinical field experience at the school/agency is expected
to last the entire semester. The clinical field site must allow you to audio or videotape your
counseling sessions with students or clients. This is required for each clinical field course
taken. Additional requirements include:
•
Attend weekly group supervision sessions for 1 ½ hours (CED 712 & 713).
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•
•
•
•
•
Keep a daily or weekly log of activity in the agency or school. This is a tabulation of
how each hour is spent in the clinical field. The log is to be handed in to the faculty
supervisor regularly and at the end of the semester.
Students seeking dual certification need to keep separate logs for elementary and
secondary hours. A minimum is 300 hours must be completed in each area of
certification.
All students are required to turn in the following paperwork: evidence of liability
insurance, site agreement form, supervisor’s evaluation of performance, evaluation of
practicum site, log of practicum hours, site development form, site supervisor resume,
and field experience summary form. Other forms may be required, as necessary.
Complete an evaluation of the intern’s experience in the agency to be submitted to the
clinical field instructor at the end of the clinical field.
Any additional syllabus requirements.
Direct Hours
Direct hours are the interaction with clients. This includes face to face individual
counseling and group counseling. Classroom guidance lessons, human development skills, and
consultation. Consultation with other counselors, parents, and teachers regarding interventions
for client success may also direct hours (as approved by supervisors). Please see your faculty
supervisor for clarification on direct hours. What is NOT direct hours: phone contacts and
consultation, workshop presentation or training, casual conversation with clients or potential
clients, and observing counseling.
Liability Insurance & Clearances
All students are required to have proof of current liability insurance; School counseling
students are required to turn in Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance, Criminal Record
Check, and Act 114 fingerprinting. These are on located in the student’s file at Cal U. If the site
requires a copy, the student is responsible for delivering the copies.
CED statement on clearance requirements
State law and in particular field education (practicum/clinical field) sites may require
some or all of the following: 1) criminal background check 2) child abuse clearance 3) FBI
background checks 4) health related clearances 5)drug testing and other such clearances.
Certain types of criminal convictions and/or health related issues may affect the student’s ability
to complete the master's degree and/or certification program. In addition, a number of employers,
statewide licensing boards, state and national certifying organizations, etc. have policies
regarding criminal histories which may limit employment and licensing options.
Therefore, the Department of Counselor Education strongly recommends that all Counselor
Education students request clearances proactively prior to, or early, in their program.
Clinical Mental Health Counseling MS program/Post-master's Counselor Education program
The student is responsible for supplying clearances to practicum/clinical field sites, as
required by the site. In addition, while not required, the California University of PA Department
of Counselor Education recommends clearances to be turned in to the field coordinator before
10
beginning practicum. Pennsylvania Criminal (Act 151) and Child Abuse (Act 34) clearances and
fingerprinting (Act 114) may be obtained online, from the State Police or from the College of
Education office in Keystone Education Center.
School Counseling MEd program/School Counseling Certification-Only program
Pennsylvania Criminal (Act 151) and Child Abuse (Act 34) clearances and fingerprinting
(Act 114) are required to be turned in to the field coordinator before beginning practicum.
Clearances must be kept current during the field experiences. Forms may be obtained online,
from the State Police or from the College of Education office in Keystone Education Center
Assessing Guidance Lesson Effectiveness
School counselors strive to practice in a competent and ethical manner. Crucial to those efforts is
assessing their effectiveness as counselors in the many roles and functions they engage in on a
regular basis.
An important function of school counselors is delivering developmentally pertinent
psychoeducational, social and career information to students through teaching guidance lessons in
small group settings and classrooms. The goals, objectives and techniques of guidance lesson
planning, provision and evaluation are taught in CED 700, Foundations of School Counseling, and
later reinforced in CED 785, Research Methods in Counseling.
School counseling students in field experience settings employ the following process to evaluate
their teaching effectiveness and resultant student learning:
1. Administer a brief pre-test that measures student understanding of the key content of the
guidance lesson.
2. Teach the guidance lesson.
3. Administer a post-test that measures student-learning resulting from the guidance lesson.
4. Review the data collected with their site supervisor, and identify the strengths and
weaknesses of the guidance lesson and ways to improve the student counselor’s
effectiveness. This information can be included in the ASCA model needs assessment and
evaluation of the program.
Guidance lesson pre/post-tests are also included in the student’s electronic portfolio and assessed
by the Counselor Education faculty during the portfolio review process.
Supervision and Feedback
During the clinical experiences the supervisor is expected to give the student extensive
supervision and feedback. The student as a person greatly influences their effectiveness as a
counselor. Therefore, there will be times when the supervision and feedback will address
personal qualities as well as use of counseling skills. To take full advantage of supervision, it is
critical that the supervisor and student prepare for the supervision session. The following
sections provide information about these important areas: scheduling your time, receiving
feedback, giving feedback, and preparing for supervision.
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Scheduling your Time: Extensive supervision is required for Practicum and Clinical
Field. Please schedule regular weekly meetings.
Giving Feedback and Supervision: The Clinical experience is an important time for the
student to grow as a counselor. Supervision is for the supervisor to give feedback on the
student’s work and skills. This is an important opportunity for you to demonstrate the ability to
give honest concrete and specific feedback in a tactful sensitive manner. It is often tempting to
give non-specific feedback such as, “You were wonderful with her” or “I thought you were a
little off base.” However, such vague statements do not provide useful information to the others
in training with you.
Preparing For Supervision: Being prepared for supervision sessions, will enable you and
the student to take maximum advantage of this component of this clinical experience. Minimum
preparation by the student includes:
• Paperwork
Completing all required paperwork before supervision.
•
Supervision Questions
Writing down specific questions you have for the supervisor.
Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice
The Counselor Education Department expect and require supervisors, faculty and students
to adhere to the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice. The counselors-in-training, are required to meet the professional obligations regarding
ethical practice. Therefore, without exception, students are expected to meet the minimum
responsibilities outlined below:
•
Obtain a copy of the ACA Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice (can be
obtained at the ACA website: www.counseling.org ) and become familiar with
the contents of this document.
•
Abide by the ethical behavior and standards of practice endorsed by ACA.
•
Bring your general, non-emergency ethical questions to supervision.
•
Immediately consult with site supervisor and/or faculty supervisor when
emergency or ethical dilemmas arise (i.e., suicide, homicide, child/ elder abuse,
etc.). The student may also consult your faculty supervisor.
•
Become familiar with and abide by policies and procedures established by the
Practicum or Clinical field site.
•
Abide by the laws of the state in which the student conducts their Practicum or
Clinical field.
Students also are required to become familiar with and abide by the policies and procedures
established by the agency/institution in which they are conducting their Practicum and/or
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Clinical field course requirements. Please give students any policies and procedures handbooks
they will need to be successful at their site. Failure to adhere to appropriate professional codes
of ethics, standards of practice, and state laws governing the professional behavior and
activities of counselors may result in disciplinary action and/or dismissal from the Department
of Counselor Education.
Recommendations
Pre- field experience
A pre meeting or interview is recommended prior to the field experience. The student is
responsible for providing the supervisor with field requirements and personal expectations. The
supervisor is responsible for discussing her/his supervision style and expectations of the student
during this experience. Clear expectations from the student and supervisor before the beginning
of field usually results in a better experience.
During field
A minimum of one hour per week of supervision is required during the experience. This is
a time you can review the work of the student and discuss their challenges and successes. This is
the first time many of the students are working in a counseling relationship. It is important to
keep informed of their skill development, organization, paper work, and how
Closing the field experience
It is important to bring closure to the supervisor-supervisee relationship. The final
evaluation is a good tool to review during one of the final supervision session. It is
recommended to discuss the growth of the supervisee and the supervision relationship over the
semester. The supervisor should give suggestions for how the supervisee can be successful in
the field.
Forms
Forms required during the clinical experience are located in the appendices. The site supervisors
are expected to review the midterm and final evaluations with the students prior to turning them
into the faculty supervisor.
Site Visits and Contacts
Faculty supervisors and or the field coordinator will contact the supervisors at least once by
phone or during a site visit each semester to discuss the progress of the student. The site
supervisor may request an additional visit or phone consultation as needed. The student is
responsible for supplying their site supervisor with the contact information of their faculty
supervisor. If there is a concern or problem with the student, please contact the faculty
supervisor or field coordinator as soon as possible so we can work together to resolve the issue.
Workshops, Act 48, and Continuing Education
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Workshops will be offered to site supervisors one or two times an academic year. The
workshops will be relevant topics to the counseling field. ACT 48 and NCC credits will be
available for the workshops.
Taping requirement
All students are required to tape at their sites. Tapes are a CACREP requirement and helps in the
evaluation of counseling skills. During tape review, the focus is on the counselor not the client.
All tapes are required to be destroyed at the end of the semester. All clients agreeing to tape
must sign a permission form. Tapes will be reviewed by the faculty supervisors. The site
supervisors may review tapes with the students for skill development. Practicum requires more
tapes and students are expected to have tapes weekly.
Questions:
What if there is:
A change in site supervisor during the experience?
Check with your site to see if there is another person there with the appropriate qualifications to
supervise you. Notify your faculty supervisor and field coordinator immediately to discuss your
options. A change in site may be necessary.
A request to begin field experience prior to start of the semester?
It is essential that a student is in supervision and completes the field experience during the
semester. There are times a site requires a student to begin prior to the semester. A student may
not begin at a site unless it is approved in writing by the field coordinator or department chair. A
student must e-mail the field coordinator the request on the dates and number of hours requested
prior to the semester. Only INDIRECT hours will be approved.
A student does not get in all the direct or total hours required during the semester?
If a student does not complete all the hours before the end of the semester (direct and indirect),
the student will receive an incomplete for the semester and continue at the site and under
supervision from the faculty supervisor until hours are complete.
A problem with the work of the student?
If a student does not meet the standards of the site or the field experience, the site supervisor
needs to contact the faculty supervisor and/or field coordinator ASAP to resolve the issue. There
may be a meeting scheduled with the faculty supervisor, site supervisor and the student to
develop a plan for remediation. If the issue cannot be resolved, the student may be removed
from the site and need to repeat the field experience.
A need for the student to dismissed from their site?
If a student does not make the appropriate changes to meet the requirements of the site, the site
supervisor, faculty supervisor, and field coordinator may determine a need for the student to be
dismissed from the site. Depending on the circumstances, the student may receive and “I”
incomplete or “F” fail for the course and repeat it at a different site.
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Practicum Forms
Appendix A:
Site Development Form
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SITE DEVELOPMENT FORM
Agency/School: __________________________________________________________
Address: ____________________________________________________
Contact Person: _______________________________Phone:________________
E-Mail:_____________________________________
School (check all that apply)
______Elementary
______Middle
______High School
Clinical Mental Health Agency Services Available to Practicum Student: (Check all that
apply)
_____Inpatient _____Outpatient _____Family Therapy ____ Marital Therapy
_____Individual Therapy _____Group Therapy _____After Care
_____Occupational Therapy ____ Addictions Counseling ____Other______________
Primary Clientele Profile: (Check all that apply)
Sex: ______Male
______Female
Ethnicity: _____African American _____ Hispanic
_____Caucasian
_____Asian American _____American Indian ________________Other
Age: _____Child _____Teen _____Young Adult ______Adult _____Senior
Disabilities: _____Physical
_____ Developmental
_____Emotional
Administrative Experience Available: (Check all that apply)
_____Intake Interviewing _____Testing ____Interviewing ____ Report Writing
_____Record Keeping _____Treatment Plan Development ____Consultation _____Case
Summary Development ______Staff Meetings
_____Referral Opportunities
____Other_______________________
Continuing Education Opportunities:
_____Professional Seminars _____In-service Meetings _____Research Possibilities
_____Other___________________________________________
Special Considerations:
Is stipend money available?
Yes No
Are there opportunities available for evening/weekend hours?
Yes No
Has the agency had other practicum/clinical field students?
Yes No
How many practicum students are on sight during a semester?
____
Is there any possibility of audio taping of clients?
Yes No
Additional comments about your site or expectations of practicum/clinical field students:
Please attach RESUME of site supervisor(s)
17
Practicum Forms
Appendix B: Practicum/Clinical field
Placement Agreement Form
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California University of Pennsylvania
Department of Counselor Education
Telephone: (724) 938-4123
Practicum I or Clinical field (CED 711, 712, 713)
Placement Agreement
_____Clinical Mental Health Agency
_____School Counseling
A. The Department of Counselor Education and Services at California University of
Pennsylvania and__________________________________________ agree that
_______________________________ will serve as a Practicum/Clinical field student
for the period ____________________ to _____________________.
Site Address:
_____________________________________________ Zip Code: _________________
Phone Number: ________________________________ e-mail_____________________
B. Supervision Requirements: Both parties agree that _________________________
will serve as practicum/clinical field instructor and ____________________________
will serve as on-site supervisor. A site supervisor must have:
• A minimum of a master’s degree in counseling or a related profession with equivalent
qualifications, including appropriate certifications and/or licenses;
• A minimum of two (2) years of pertinent professional experience in the program area in
which the student is completing clinical instruction; and
• Knowledge of the program’s expectations, requirements, and evaluation procedures for
students.
It is also expected that the on-site supervisor will provide the following services and supervision:
•
•
•
•
•
Provide an orientation to the school/agency and definition of specific practicum duties.
Written evaluations (mid-semester and end-of-semester) of the student’s performance
(Forms provided).
Review and sign student logs of the field experience.
At least one hour each week set aside for one-to-one supervision, with periodic reviews
of work sample.
Provide a resume and complete a site development form
B. Student Requirements:
•
•
Attend weekly supervision sessions
Be at the school/agency on the agreed days and times. A total of 150 hours (with 50
hours being in direct client services) is required for each three-credit practicum. 300
or 600 hours (40% in direct services) are required for clinical field.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Each student will be required to meet weekly outside of class with a faculty
supervisor for one hour.
Keep up to date logs of activity in the agency. The log is to be handed in to the
practicum instructor as required and at the end of the semester.
All students are required to turn in the following paperwork: evidence of liability
insurance, site agreement form, supervisor’s evaluation of performance, evaluation of
practicum site, log of practicum hours, and practicum summary form. Other forms
may be required, as necessary.
Audio Taping of direct care sessions is required for supervision.
Complete an evaluation of the intern’s experience in the agency to be submitted to the
practicum instructor at midterm and the end of the practicum/clinical field.
Complete all requirements on the syllabus.
Individual and Group Counseling are required.
C. University Supervision Requirements:
•
•
•
•
Assist in planning in the practicum/clinical field when needed.
Advise students as to the requirements involved in the practicum (seminars, reports,
evaluations)
Maintain periodic contacts with the agency supervisor and the student to discuss the
student’s progress.
University supervisors will contact the site where the practicum student is placed at
least once a semester. This contact will focus on the progress and areas in need of
improvement of the student. The practicum site supervisor and the intern should be
present.
D. ____________________________ understands that a grade will be earned on the basis of:
Attendance and satisfactory participation in practicum/clinical field class.
Successful counseling performance done at the practicum/clinical field site.
Approved documentation of counseling, such as: video tapes, audio tapes, case reports,
journal, work, logs, and workbook sheet.
The following signatures verify agreement to the above stated conditions:
•
•
•
SITE _______________________________
School/Agency Supervisor
___________
Date
California University of Pennsylvania
_________________________________
Faculty Member
Student
_________________________________
Student
20
____________
Date
___________
Date
Practicum Forms
Appendix C: Practicum Log Form
21
California University of PA
School Of Education
Department of Counseling Education
Practicum Log
Name of Student: _____________________________
Semester/ Year: ___________
Name of Site: ________________________________________
Log#: ___________
Activity Summary:
Direct Services:
Individual Counseling:
______ hours
Group Counseling:
______ hours
Indirect (all other activity):
______hours
Supervision:
______ hours
Multicultural/diverse learning
Reflections:
Counseling Hours
Direct Hours
Indirect Hours
Intern Supervision
This Entry
______
______
______
Total hours
______
Previous Log
______
______
______
______
Cumulative Hours
______
______
______
______
Date of Log Entry ____________________
Student Signature _______________________________________________________
Site Supervisor Signature _________________________________________________
22
Practicum/ Clinical field Forms
Appendix D: Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Supervisee’s
Performance Form
School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Agency
Midterm
23
California University of Pennsylvania Department of Counselor Education Practicum and Field Experience Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Student Counselor’s Performance MIDTERM This form is to be used to check performance in counseling practicum or internship. Name of Student _____________________________________ Date of Evaluation _____________________________________ Name of Supervisor _____________________________________ Agency or school _____________________________________ Phone Number _____________________________________ Please rate each item using the following scale:
1- Far below expectation, needs close supervision, a concern
2- Below expectations
3- Acceptable, meets standards for interns
4- Above expectations for the average intern
5- Exceeds expectations, works well beyond average level for interns
Professional Behavior:
1. ____ Arrives on time and completes hours and days on site.
2. ____Appropriate dress and behavior
3. ____Completes paperwork, case notes, and assigned tasks on time.
4. ____Communicates written information clearly and effectively.
5. ____Communicates orally clearly and effectively.
6. ____Demonstrates respectful behavior toward peers and clients.
Ethical Awareness:
7. ____Demonstrates knowledge and awareness of ethical and legal standards.
8. ____Personal behavior consistent with ethical guidelines.
9. ____Consults with supervisor about ethical issues as needed.
Skill Development:
10. ____Listens to verbal and nonverbal communication.
11. ____Assists clients in goal setting.
12. ____Communicates empathy, acceptance, and genuineness with clients.
13. ____Understands resistance to assist clients.
14. ____Uses silence as an effective intervention technique.
15. ____Uses basic skills as paraphrasing, reflections, questions, and summaries effectively.
16. ____Identifies client themes and patterns,
17. ____Uses client cultural background in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment.
18. ____Works effectively with clients who are culturally different. (ex. race, ethnicity,
gender, religion, etc.)
19. ____Sets and maintains personal boundaries.
20. ____Understands differences between self and client.
24
Please rate each item using the following scale:
1- Far below expectation, needs close supervision, a concern
2- Below expectations
3- Acceptable, meets standards for interns
4- Above expectations for the average intern
5- Exceeds expectations, works well beyond average level for interns
Interaction with clients/students:
21. ____Initiates interaction with clients.
22. ____Builds rapport and respect with clients.
23. ____Sensitive to client’s needs.
24. ____Sensitive to gender and cultural differences; ex. race, ethnicity, gender, religion, etc.
25. ____Understands and addresses transference and countertransference.
Supervision:
26. ____Initiates supervision when necessary.
27. ____Prepared at supervision sessions.
28. ____Shows interest in learning.
29. ____Receptive to encouragement, feedback and constructive criticism from supervisor.
30. ____Willingness to explore personal strengths and weaknesses.
Strengths:
Challenges:
Additional Comments:
Signature of site supervisor________________________________ date: ______________
Signature of intern_______________________________________ date: ______________
25
Practicum/ Clinical field Forms
Appendix E: Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Supervisee’s
Performance Form
Clinical Mental Health Agency
Final 26
Department of Counselor Education California University of PA Clinical Mental Heath FINAL This form is to be used to evaluate performance in counseling practicum or clinical field. This form must be completed at the end of the semester. This form is appropriate for individual or group counseling. Name of Student _____________________________________ Date of Supervision /Semester _____________________________________ Name of Supervisor _____________________________________ Agency _____________________________________ Phone Number _____________________________________ Directions: The supervisor is to circle a number which best evaluates the student counselor on each performance at that point in time. A) General Supervision Comments:
Poor
Average
Good
1. Demonstrates a personal commitment in
developing professional competencies.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
2. Accepts and uses constructive feedback and
criticism to enhance self development and
counseling skills.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
3. Engages in open, comfortable, and clear
communication with peers and supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
4. Recognizes own competencies and skills
and shares these with peers and supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
5. Recognizes own deficiencies and actively
works to overcome them with peers and
supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
6. Completes case reports and charts punctually
and conscientiously.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
7. Keeps appointments on time.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
8. Seems to be relaxed and comfortable
in the interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
9. Communicates interest in and acceptance
of the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
27
Poor
Average
Good
10. Communicates orally clearly and effectively
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
11. Able to build appropriate relationships
With coworkers, etc.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
12. Recognizes and resists manipulation by
the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
13. Dresses appropriately for the work setting
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
14. Uses silence effectively in the interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
15. Is aware of own feelings in the counseling
interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
16. Facilitates realistic goal-setting with the
client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
17. Encourages appropriate action-step
planning with the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
18. Employs judgment in the timing and use
of different techniques and strategies.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
19. understands counselors’ roles and
responsibilities as members of an
interdisciplinary emergency management
response team during a local, regional, or
national crisis, disaster or other trauma-causing
event;
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
20. Understands counseling supervision
models, practices, and processes
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
21. Understands the effects of crises,
disasters, and other trauma-causing events
on persons of all ages.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
22. Demonstrates the ability to apply and
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
adhere to ethical and legal standards in
clinical mental health counseling.
23. Uses the principles and practices of
diagnosis, treatment, referral, and
prevention of mental and emotional
disorders to initiate, maintain, and
terminate counseling.
28
Poor
1
2
Average
3
4
5
N/A
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
26. Demonstrates appropriate use of culturally
1
responsive individual, couple, family, group,
and systems modalities for initiating, maintaining,
and terminating counseling.
2
3
4
5
N/A
27. Demonstrates the ability to recognize his or
her own limitations as a clinical mental health
counselor and to seek supervision or refer
clients when appropriate.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
28. Applies the assessment of a client’s stage of
dependence, change, or recovery to determine
the appropriate treatment modality and placement
criteria within the continuum of care.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
29. Develops measurable outcomes for clinical
mental health counseling programs,
interventions, and treatments.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
30. Analyzes and uses data to increase the
effectiveness of clinical mental health counseling
interventions and programs.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
31. Applies knowledge of public mental health
1
policy, financing, and regulatory processes to
improve service delivery opportunities in clinical
mental health counseling (CACREP Clinical B.2).
2
3
4
5
N/A
24. Promotes optimal human development,
wellness, and mental health through
prevention, education, and advocacy activities.
25. Applies effective strategies to promote
client understanding of and access to a variety
of Clinical Mental Health resources.
Good
Educational Attainment: 32. Is able to professionally identify with the counseling profession. 33. Demonstrates an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 29
34. Shows the ability to incorporate the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels into the counseling process. 35. Has a working knowledge of career development and related life factors. 36. Demonstrates knowledge of counseling and consultation processes. 37. Knows both the theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, and other group approaches. 38. Understands individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation. 39. Has an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation as it relates to the counseling process. 40. Demonstrates ongoing development of counseling skills. 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Additional comments and/or suggestions: ______________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Date_______________ Signature of Supervisor _________________________________ Student Counselor comments and/or suggestions: _______________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ My signature indicates that I have read the above report and have discussed the content with my supervisor. It does not necessarily indicate that I agree with the report in part or in whole. Date_______________ Signature of Student Counselor _________________________ 30
Practicum/ Clinical field Forms
Appendix F: Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Supervisee’s
Performance Form
School Counseling
Final 31
Department of Counselor Education California University of PA School Counseling FINAL This form is to be used to evaluate performance in counseling practicum or clinical field. This form must be completed at the end of the semester. This form is appropriate for individual or group counseling. Name of Student _____________________________________ Date of Supervision /Semester _____________________________________ Name of Supervisor _____________________________________ Agency _____________________________________ Phone Number _____________________________________ Directions: The supervisor is to circle a number which best evaluates the student counselor on each performance at that point in time. A) General Supervision Comments:
Poor
Average
Good
1. Demonstrates a personal commitment in
developing professional competencies.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
2. Accepts and uses constructive feedback and
criticism to enhance self development and
counseling skills.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
3. Engages in open, comfortable, and clear
communication with peers and supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
4. Recognizes own competencies and skills
and shares these with peers and supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
5. Recognizes own deficiencies and actively
works to overcome them with peers and
supervisors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
6. Completes case reports and charts punctually 1
and conscientiously.
2
3
4
5
N/A
7. Keeps appointments on time.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
8. Seems to be relaxed and comfortable
in the interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
9. Communicates interest in and acceptance
of the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
32
Poor
Average
Good
10. Communicates orally clearly and effectively 1
2
3
4
5
N/A
11. Able to build appropriate relationships
With coworkers, etc.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
12. Recognizes and resists manipulation by
the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
13. Dresses appropriately for the work setting
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
14. Uses silence effectively in the interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
15. Is aware of own feelings in the counseling
interview.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
16. Facilitates realistic goal-setting with the
client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
17. Encourages appropriate action-step
planning with the client.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
18. Employs judgment in the timing and use
of different techniques and strategies.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
19. understands counselors’ roles and
1
responsibilities as members of an
interdisciplinary emergency management
response team during a local, regional, or
national crisis, disaster or other trauma-causing
event;
2
3
4
5
N/A
20. Understands counseling supervision
models, practices, and processes
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
21. Understands the effects of crises,
disasters, and other trauma-causing events
on persons of all ages
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
22. Demonstrates the ability to apply and
adhere to ethical and legal standards in
school counseling.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
23. Demonstrates the ability to articulate,
model, and advocate for an appropriate
school counselor identity and program.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
33
Poor
1
2
Average
3
4
5
N/A
25. Demonstrates the ability to recognize his
or her limitations as a school counselor and
to seek supervision or refer clients when
appropriate.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
26. Advocates for the learning and academic
experiences necessary to promote the
academic, career, and personal/social
development of students.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
27. Advocates for school policies, programs,
and services that enhance a positive school
climate and are equitable and responsive to
multicultural student populations.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
28. Engages parents, guardians, and families
to promote the academic, career, and
personal/social development of students.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
29. Assesses and interprets students’ strengths
and needs, recognizing uniqueness in cultures,
languages, values, backgrounds, and abilities.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
30. Selects and implements appropriate
assessment strategies that can be used
to evaluate a student’s academic, career,
and personal/social development.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
31. Analyzes assessment information in a
manner that produces valid inferences
when evaluating the needs of individual
students and assessing the effectiveness
of educational programs.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
32. Makes appropriate referrals to school
and/or Clinical Mental Health resources.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
33. Assesses barriers that impede students’
academic, career, and personal/social
development.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
34. Conducts programs designed to enhance
student academic development.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
24. Provides individual and group counseling
and classroom guidance to promote the
academic, career, and personal/social
development of students.
34
Good
Poor
Average
Good
35. Implements strategies and activities
to prepare students for a full range of
postsecondary options and opportunities.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
36. Implements differentiated instructional
strategies that draw on subject matter and
pedagogical content knowledge and skills
to promote student achievement.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
37. Works with parents, guardians, and
families to act on behalf of their children
to address problems that affect student
success in school.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
38. Locates resources in the community
that can be used in the school to improve
student achievement and success.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
39. Consults with teachers, staff, and
community-based organizations to promote
student academic, career, and personal/social
development.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
40. Uses peer helping strategies in the school
counseling program.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
41. Uses referral procedures with helping agents1
in the community (e.g., mental health centers,
businesses, service groups) to secure assistance
for students and their families.
2
3
4
5
N/A
42. Participates in the design, implementation, 1
management, and evaluation of a comprehensive
developmental school counseling program.
2
3
4
5
N/A
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
Educational Attainment:
43. Is able to professionally identify with
the counseling profession.
44. Demonstrates an understanding of the
cultural context of relationships, issues
and trends in a multicultural and diverse
society.
35
Poor
Average
Good
45. Shows the ability to incorporate the nature
and needs of individuals at all developmental
levels into the counseling process.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
46. Has a working knowledge of career
development and related life factors.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
47. Demonstrates knowledge of counseling
and consultation processes.
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
48. Knows both the theoretical and experiential 1
understandings of group purpose,
development, dynamics, and other group
approaches.
2
3
4
5
N/A
49. Understands individual and group approaches 1
to assessment and evaluation.
2
3
4
5
N/A
50. Has an understanding of research methods, 1
statistical analysis, needs assessment, and
program evaluation as it relates to the
counseling process.
2
3
4
5
N/A
51. Demonstrates ongoing development of
counseling skills.
2
3
4
5
N/A
1
Additional comments and/or suggestions: ______________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Date_______________ Signature of Supervisor _________________________________
Student Counselor comments and/or suggestions: _______________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
My signature indicates that I have read the above report and have discussed the content with my
supervisor. It does not necessarily indicate that I agree with the report in part or in whole.
Date_______________ Signature of Student Counselor _________________________
36
Practicum Forms
Appendix G: Student Practicum/ Clinical Field
Site Evaluation Form
37
STUDENT PRACTICUM/ CLINICAL FIELD SITE EVALUATION FORM Name:____________________________ Date:____________________ Agency:___________________________ Campus:_____________________________ Would you be willing to be contacted regarding this practicum/ clinical field experience? _____ If so, please provide either a telephone number or e-­‐mail address. ___________________ Respond to each of the following questions by giving a rating based on the following scale: 0 1 2 3 4 5 Not applicable Not at all A little Sometimes Usually Very much 1. Practicum Experience: a. Were you involved in professional activities? ______ b. Were your counseling experiences appropriate for your skill level? ______ 2. Client Treatment Standards: a. Is the agency responsive to client needs? ______ b. Is the agency sensitive to multi-­‐cultural diversity? ______ 3. Supervision: a. Did you meet with your supervisor weekly? ______ b. Did your supervisor display good supervision skills? ______ c. Was your supervisor appropriately confrontational? ______ d. Were your mistakes welcomed as a learning experience? ______ e. Were practical skills taught? ______ f. During supervisory sessions, were the sessions free of distractions and interruptions? ______ g. Was your supervisor open to feedback and different points of view? ______ 4. Training Component: a. Were you oriented to the agency’s policies and procedures? ______ b. Were you provided with enrichment in the form of books, videos, and special training skills? ______ c. Did you attend in-­‐service training programs? ____ 5. Would you recommend this site as a future practicum site? ______ Comments: _________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
38
Optional Practicum Forms
Appendix H: Parental Permission to Audio/Video Tape
(Minor) Form
39
Parental Permission to Audiotape/Videotape Department of Counselor Education Graduate Program California University of Pennsylvania Parent/Legal Guardian’s Name: ____________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________________________________________________________________ The Counselor Education & Services Department at California University of Pennsylvania conducts a Counseling Practicum/Clinical field course each semester at the University. This course is an advanced course in counseling required of all Degree Candidates in the Counseling Program. Students are required to audio and/or video tape counseling sessions as part of their course and degree requirements at their school or agency. Student’s Name: _______________________________ would like to work with your son/daughter, a student at ____________________________________________School/Agency. The counseling sessions conducted with your child will be audio and/or video taped and will be reviewed by the Student’s Supervisor (Name) _________________, and Faculty Supervisor (Name)_______________________. Brief segments without any identifying information may be presented in the practicum/clinical field course. All audio and/or video tapes made will be destroyed at the completion semester. The taping is for purpose of supervision of the practicum/clinical field student. This consent may be revoked by notifying _______________________ and will be considered revoked no earlier than the date of request. This consent will expire automatically after 120 days from the date on which it is signed, or upon fulfillment of the above purposes. If you have any questions regarding this form, please call __________________________________ at _________________. We hope you will take the opportunity to have your child become involved in the Counseling Program. If you approve of having your child participate, please sign the form where indicated. Thank you for your cooperation. Parent/Legal Guardian’s Signature: _________________________ Site Address:___________ Counselor Signature: ____________________________________ ______________________ Counselor Trainee Signature: ____________________________________________________ Date: _______________________
40
Optional Forms
Appendix I: Permission to Audio/Video Tape Form
41
Client Permission to Audio or Video Tape Department of Counselor Education Graduate Program California University of Pennsylvania I __________________________________________ agree to be counseled at site by a practicum/intern student in the Counselor Education Program at California University of Pennsylvania and who has completed advanced coursework in counseling/therapy. I further understand that I will participate in counseling interviews that may be audio taped or video taped and that these tapes may be viewed by students participating in my practicum/clinical field class for this semester. Brief segments without any identifying information may be presented in the practicum/clinical field course. All audio and/or video tapes made will be erased at the completion of your involvement in counseling. I understand that the counselor will be supervised by a faculty supervisor___________________ and a site supervisor _____________________.The purpose of the tape is for supervision. All audio and/or video tapes made will be erased and destroyed at the completion of the semester. This consent may be revoked by notifying _______________________ and will be considered revoked no earlier than the date of request. This consent will expire automatically after 120 days from the date on which it is signed, or upon fulfillment of the above purposes. If you have any questions regarding this form, please call ____________________________________ at __________________. We hope you will take the opportunity to have you become involved in the Counseling Program. If you approve of participating, please sign the form where indicated. Thank you for your cooperation. Client’s Signature: ______________________________________ Site Address:____________ Counselor Signature: __________________________________________________________ Counselor Trainee Signature: ____________________________________________________ Date: _____________________________________________________________________ 42
Clinical field Forms Appendix J: Clinical Field Log Sheet Form
43
California University of PA
School Of Education
Department of Counseling Education
Clinical Field Log
Name of Student: _____________________________
Semester/ Year: ___________
Name of Site: ________________________________________
Log#: ___________
Activity Summary:
Direct Services:
Individual Counseling:
______ hours
Group Counseling:
______ hours
Indirect (all other activity):
______hours
Supervision:
______ hours
Multicultural/diverse learning
Reflections:
Counseling Hours
Direct Hours
Indirect Hours
Intern Supervision
Total Hours
This Entry
______
______
______
Previous Log
______
______
______
______
______
Cumulative Hours
______
______
______
______
Date of Log Entry ____________________
Student Signature _______________________________________________________
Site Supervisor Signature _________________________________________________
44
Practicum/ Clinical field Forms
Appendix K: Site Summary form
45
California University of PA
Practicum/Clinical field Site Summary Form
The Site Summary Form is to be signed by your Site and Faculty Supervisors.
Practicum______
Clinical field______ Semester/Year _____________
Name of Student: _____________________________ Date____________________________
Address:_____________________________________ Zip:_____________________________
Home Phone: (
_) _______________________
Work Phone :( __ )________________
Name of Site: _____________________________________________________________
Address: _________________________________________________________________
Site Phone: ______________________________________________________________
Hours completed:
_______Direct Hours _______Indirect Hours
_______Supervision Hours
TOTAL HOURS: _______
Summary of practicum/clinical field experience and self evaluation:
Student Signature: ________________________________________ Date: _____________
Signature of Field Site Supervisor:____________________________ Date:___________
Print/Type Site Supervisor Name: _____________________________________________
Faculty Supervisor: _________________________________ Date:____________________
46
Clinical field Forms
Appendix L: Field Experience Competencies Form
47
Student Counselor Field Experience Competencies Form
The Cal U Department of Counselor Education continually seeks to upgrade our curriculum
to ensure that we consistently graduate new counselors of the highest quality. The Field
Experience that you supervise is one of the most important aspects of a student counselor’s
training and you play a very important role in this process.
About a month prior to the end of the semester, you will receive via email the Student
Counselor Field Experience Competencies Form. The survey measures specific aspects of our
clinical field student’s performance at your site. This rating form helps to fulfill a requirement of
PDE that we thoroughly assess field experience competencies.
Within a week of receiving this survey our student will approach you and request that you
schedule a meeting with them to review your responses. To facilitate the discussion, the student
will have previously conducted a self-rating using the same survey. In order to minimize your
work, we have instructed our student to return both forms to us following your meeting.
Both the student’s and your survey will be included in the student’s electronic portfolio and
reviewed by the Counselor Education faculty prior to the student’s graduation.
48
California University of Pennsylvania Site Supervisor’s Evaluation of Student School Counselor’s Field Experience Competencies Department of Counselor Education California University of PA This form is to be used to evaluate the field experience competencies of the school counselor trainee that you are supervising this semester. Please complete this form at the end of the semester. Name of Student _____________________________________ Date of Supervision /Semester _____________________________________ Name of Supervisor _____________________________________ School _____________________________________ Phone Number _____________________________________ Directions: The supervisor is to circle a number (1=Poor to 5=Excellent) which best evaluates the student counselor on each competency. Assessment and Evaluation 1. Demonstrates the appropriate use of data in forming decisions, utilizing resources, setting targets and interpreting results aimed at continuous improvement in curriculum, personnel and/or programs. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 2. Accesses and interprets data from available technologies and resources to address long-­‐
term and strategic planning needs of the school in areas of personnel, fiscal operations, facilities, technology and/or other school district initiatives. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 3. Examines data from local, state and national sources to monitor and enhance student achievement. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 4. Determines the type of data that is communicated to each group of stakeholders, how data is presented and the implications of information dissemination. 49
1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe Curriculum and Instruction 5. Demonstrates clear connections between theory and practice in curricular and instructional leadership. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 6. Participates in the process of development, assessment and/or refinement of standards-­‐
based curriculum. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 7. Demonstrates knowledge, skills and dispositions related to one’s leadership responsibility to support curricular and instructional excellence. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 8. Articulates a vision for student success and a positive school climate that supports equal access to curricular and instructional excellence. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe Professional Development 9. Fosters relationships with stakeholders and acts with integrity, fairness and in an ethical manner as stated in the “PA Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators.” 10. Evaluates the effectiveness of his/her actions and interactions with all stakeholders via verbal and non-­‐verbal communication. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 11. Actively seeks current information to support their on-­‐going short-­‐ and long-­‐term professional development goals. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 50
12. Maintains a current level of knowledge of school district, state and federal regulations, policies and professional practices. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe Statutory and Regulatory Compliance 13. Reports on examples of field-­‐based federal, state and local legislation, regulations, mandates, policies, and procedures that impact school district operations at macro and micro levels. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 14. Determines specific roles and responsibilities for adherence/compliance with federal, state and local legislation, regulations, mandates, policies and procedures. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 15. Assists with the completion of all compliance documentation. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 16. Reports on how the school district disseminates information on regulatory changes to appropriate stakeholders 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 17. Identifies example(s) of compliance problems and assists with alternative actions to resolve targeted compliance issues. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe Organizational Leadership 18. Describes the working relationships within the school district’s organizational-­‐chart including external partnerships. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 19. Demonstrates knowledge of functional relationships in the organizational chart to systemic functions. 51
1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 20. Identifies the role of their certification area within the organization to include responsibilities, relationships, constraints, opportunities and resources. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 21. Identifies a problem within the scope of their certification area and creates a visionary action plan, consistent with the organization and sensitive to the change process; including resolution of conflicts, communication, collaboration, needs assessment and advocacy. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe Diverse Learners 22. Reports on current policies and practices designed to support children, caregivers and families from diverse backgrounds. 23. Analyzes current efforts to support diverse learners and how the broader community views learning differences. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 24. Fosters communication with families of English language learners (ELL) to ensure that learners and their families have access to communication in the native language. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 25. Identifies the use of strategies and resources for students with diverse needs including, but not limited to, gifted, ELL and students with disabilities. 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 1 2 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 26. Advises and supports educators in modifications to the learning environment that are evidence-­‐based practices that do not compromise curricular intent and rigor. 52
27. Demonstrates positive and appropriate interactions with all stakeholders in the school environment and community at large. 3 4 5 Did Not Observe 1 2 3 Additional comments and/or suggestions: 4 5 Did Not Observe 1 2 28. Participates with educators and social agencies working with diverse learners to create learning opportunities. _____________________________________________________________________________________
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_____________________________________________________________________________________ Date_______________ Signature of Supervisor _________________________________ Student School Counselor comments and/or suggestions: _____________________________________________________________________________________
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_____________________________________________________________________________________ My signature indicates that I have read the above report and have discussed the content with my supervisor. It does not necessarily indicate that I agree with the report in part or in whole. Date_______________ Signature of Student Counselor __________________________ 53
54
Best Practices in Clinical Supervision
Adopted by the ACES Executive Council
April 22, 2011
Preamble
The Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) is composed of
individuals engaged in the professional preparation of counselors and those responsible for the
ongoing supervision of post-degree counselors. ACES is a founding division of the American
Counseling Association (ACA). The ultimate mission of ACES, in accordance with the purpose
of ACA, is to advance counselor education and supervision in order to improve the provision of
counseling services in all settings of society.
ACES leadership believes that counseling supervisors in all settings carry responsibilities
unique to their job roles. Such responsibilities may include administrative supervision, clinical
supervision, or both. In some settings (e.g., schools), counseling supervisors also may have
responsibility for program supervision. Administrative supervision refers to those supervisory
activities which increase the efficiency of the delivery of counseling services, whereas clinical
supervision includes the supportive and educative activities of the supervisor designed to
improve the application of counseling theory and technique directly with clients. Program
supervision is generally defined as having a systems focus with program improvement and
counselors' professional development as its purpose.
As a division of ACA, ACES members are expected to adhere to the ACA Code of
Ethics, which offers guidance regarding the practice of counseling supervision. Counseling
supervisors, however, may encounter situations that are not adequately addressed by the Code of
Ethics. Results of a 2002 survey of ACES members conducted by the ACES Ethics Interest
Network strongly indicated that members wanted more specific guidance for their everyday
supervisory practice than can be included appropriately in a code of ethics. The ACES Best
Practices in Clinical Supervision Taskforce was formed to create a document that could offer
more specific suggestions for supervisors.
The broad charge for the Task Force was to formulate a relevant and useful set of best
practice guidelines for clinical supervisors, regardless of work setting. The Best Practices in
Clinical Supervision guidelines were constructed in the following manner. The scope of the
guidelines was determined by a consensus of Task Force members. Members were responsible
for researching and drafting specific sections of the guidelines. In drafting each section, Task
Force members began by conducting a comprehensive review of qualitative and quantitative
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research findings to serve as the foundation of the guidelines. There are, however, many aspects
of supervision that have not been investigated or investigated adequately. For these areas, Task
Force members integrated the best available research combined with guidance provided through
codes of ethics and other relevant documents (e.g., accreditation standards) adopted by
professional organizations, as well as policies, procedures, and interventions that were most
commonly espoused as best practices or best judgment across applicable professional literature.
Task Force members then reviewed every section in the document several times and provided
extensive feedback and edits. This Best Practices document, then, reflects both an extensive
review of the research, expert consensus in the professional literature, and consensus of Task
Force members.
In addition, the Task Force held open meetings at the ACES conference in October 2009
and at the Southern ACES conference in October 2010 to discuss the most recent drafts of the
guidelines for best practices. Feedback from those discussions has been incorporated into this
final draft. In addition, Task Force members also elicited comments from supervisors who work
in different settings, including community agencies and schools. After receiving comments, they
revised the best practices guidelines as appropriate and now present the document to the ACES
Executive Council for endorsement.
It is important to note that these are best practices rather than minimal acceptable
practices. The best practices guidelines are intended to support supervisors in their work. They
are intended to be relevant and practical, and are offered to augment the judgment of supervisors
as they strive to do the following: (a) offer ethical and legal protection of the rights of
supervisors, supervisees, and clients; and (b) meet the professional development needs of
supervisees while protecting client welfare. The guidelines also provide a framework for those
seeking to develop supervisor training programs. Importantly, the guidelines are meant to
supplement, not replace, the ACA Code of Ethics. In fact, ACES is not in a position to hear
complaints about alleged non-compliance with these guidelines. Any complaints about the
ethical behavior of any ACA member should be lodged with ACA in accordance with its
procedures for doing so. Finally, this is meant to be a living document and as such will require
review and revision approximately every 8-10 years.
Supervision Best Practices Guidelines
1. Initiating Supervision
a. The supervisor engages in sound informed consent practices in the initial supervision
session.
i. The supervisor verbally describes and provides the supervisee with a written
contract (or syllabus) that outlines expectations of the supervisor and supervisee;
criteria for evaluation; consequences of underperformance; tasks, functions, and
goals of supervision; and ethical and legal considerations (e.g., confidentiality in
counseling and supervision sessions).
ii. As appropriate, the specifics in the contract (or syllabus) are negotiated to meet the
needs of the particular supervisee.
iii. In academic settings, the supervisor employs written contracts specifying and
differentiating the responsibilities of university and site supervisors.
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iv. The supervisor provides the supervisee with a professional disclosure statement
regarding his/her academic background in both counseling and supervision,
experience as a counselor and supervisor, and supervision style. Limits of
confidentiality also are explicitly delineated.
v. If the supervisor is a supervisor-in-training, that status is made clear in the
professional disclosure document and the name and contact information of the
supervisor-in-training’s supervisor is included.
vi. The supervisor emphasizes that these documents (e.g., contract/syllabus,
professional disclosure statement) will be discussed throughout supervision as
needed.
vii. The supervisor clearly delineates his/her responsibility and authority to ensure client
safety and effective treatment.
b. The supervisor explicitly states clear parameters for conducting supervision.
i. The supervisor and supervisee agree on time, place, and duration of supervision
sessions.
ii. The supervisor and supervisee discuss how the supervisee will prepare for each
supervision session relevant to the supervision format (e.g., individual, triadic,
group).
iii. The supervisor clearly delineates supervisor and supervisee responsibilities
regarding the preparation for and conduct of supervision.
iv. The supervisor and supervisee agree on cancellation and rescheduling procedures
for supervision sessions.
v. The supervisor and supervisee agree on payment for supervision (as appropriate and
permitted by state law).
vi. The supervisor provides the supervisee with his/her emergency contact information,
parameters for contacting the supervisor in emergency situations, and specific
instructions for emergency protocols.
vii. The supervisor provides necessary forms and other documents to be completed by
the supervisor, supervisees, and others as appropriate to the particular supervisee,
setting, and/or credentialing body.
c. The supervisor facilitates a discussion about the supervision process to foster the
supervisory working alliance.
i. The supervisor establishes the beginning of a supervisory working alliance that is
collaborative and egalitarian to assist in lessening supervisee anxiety about the
supervision process.
ii. The supervisor describes his/her role as supervisor, including teacher, counselor,
consultant, mentor, and evaluator.
iii. The supervisor describes the structure, process, and content of all relevant formats
of supervision sessions (e.g., individual, triadic, peer, group supervision).
iv. The supervisor and supervisee discuss the supervisee’s past experiences with
supervision as well as preferred supervision styles and supervision interventions.
v. The supervisor initiates a conversation about multicultural considerations and how
they may affect both counseling and supervision relationships, indicating that such
multicultural considerations will be an expected part of supervision conversations.
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2. Goal-Setting
a. To the extent possible, the supervisor co-develops specific goals for supervision with the
supervisee.
i. The supervisor and supervisee renegotiate the supervisory contract and supervisee’s goals as
needed over the course of supervision.
ii. The supervisor helps the supervisee develop goals that are realistic, measurable, and
attainable within the context of the particular academic, field placement, or postdegree practice setting.
b. The supervisor emphasizes goals that directly benefit the therapeutic alliance between the
supervisee and client and the effectiveness of services provided.
i. The supervisor helps the supervisee create goals that include the core areas of
counselor competence (e.g., relationship building, cultural competencies,
professionalism) and/or addresses the traditional foci of supervision (e.g.,
counseling performance skills, cognitive counseling skills and case
conceptualization, diagnosis and treatment planning, self-awareness, and
professional behaviors).
ii. The supervisor helps the supervisee develop goals that are based on the supervisee’s
area(s) of need and learning priorities, feedback from previous supervisors, the
supervisee’s developmental level, and the academic, field placement, or post-degree
practice setting.
iii. The supervisor ensures that the supervisee chooses goals that fit within the
supervisor’s areas of competence.
c. The supervisor is intentional about addressing and evaluating goals in each supervision
session.
i. The supervisor conducts his/her own initial and ongoing assessment of the
supervisee’s skills and, in conjunction with the supervisee’s stated goals, creates a
prioritized list of skills and issues to address in supervision.
ii. The supervisor gives attention to one or more of the agreed upon goal(s) during each
supervision session.
iii. The supervisor identifies or creates opportunities for the supervisee to display
progress on goals.
iv. The supervisor and supervisee review progress toward the stated goals on a regular
basis.
v. The agreed upon goals become one basis for evaluating the supervisee’s progress
and development.
3. Giving Feedback
a. The supervisor provides regular and ongoing feedback.
i. The supervisor provides a manageable amount of feedback in each session, typically
addressing no more than three skills or issues.
ii. The supervisor provides a balance of challenging and supportive feedback
appropriate to the counselor’s developmental level, experience, and client needs.
iii. The supervisor provides feedback as close to the counseling session being reviewed
as possible.
iv. The supervisor helps the supervisee process feedback.
v. The supervisor’s feedback is based on direct observation of the client and the
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counseling session (e.g., live observation, audio or video recording) as well as the
supervisee’s self-report and analysis of the session.
b. The supervisor provides direct feedback as needed.
i. The supervisor focuses on supervisee behaviors that can be changed.
ii. The supervisor provides constructive feedback that is specific, concrete, and
descriptive.
iii. As appropriate, the supervisor offers alternatives for supervisee’s behaviors that
need to be changed, or provides directives as needed to ensure client needs are met.
c. The supervisor pays attention to the multiple sources of feedback available to the
supervisee.
i. The supervisor helps the supervisee gather performance feedback from multiple
sources (e.g., clients, peers, supervisors) using both informal methods (e.g.,
observation of clients’ non-verbal responses) and formal methods (e.g., standardized
assessments completed by clients on a regular basis).
ii. The supervisor is aware that he/she is constantly providing feedback through his/her
in-session behavior, including verbal and nonverbal behaviors, as well as by what
he/she does and does not address.
4. Conducting Supervision
a. The supervisor adheres to appropriate professional standards (e.g., accreditation,
certification, and licensure regulations) in establishing the frequency and modality of
supervision sessions.
i. The supervisor meets with the supervisee on a regular basis as required by the
appropriate standards (e.g., weekly individual, triadic, and/or group supervision
sessions).
ii. The supervisor conducts supervision sessions in a professional setting.
iii. The supervisor meets face-to-face with the supervisee(s) for individual, triadic,
and/or group supervision.
iv. The supervisor uses technology that clearly approximates face-to-face synchronous
contact, as permitted by relevant standards. (See also point f. below.)
v. The supervisor adheres to appropriate standards in ways that meet the needs of the
supervisee.
b. The supervisor provides a safe, supportive, and structured supervision climate.
i. The supervisor plans for supervision so that sessions (individual, triadic, and group)
are structured, purposeful, and goal-oriented.
ii. The supervisor gives attention to both the personal and professional learning curves
of the supervisee.
iii. The supervisor modifies his/her style of and approach to supervision (both within a
session and across sessions) based on his/her assessment of client welfare,
supervisee characteristics, supervisee’s immediate needs, supervisee’s
developmental level, supervisee’s supervision goals, environmental demands, as
well as the supervision context.
c. The supervisor uses a variety of supervisory interventions.
i. The supervisor uses methods of direct observation (e.g., recordings of counseling
sessions, live observation, live supervision).
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ii. The supervisor uses interventions that address a range of supervision foci, including
counseling performance skills, cognitive counseling skills, case conceptualization,
self-awareness, and professional behaviors.
iii. The supervisor selects interventions intentionally, based on an assessment of the
supervisee’s developmental level, confidence, self-efficacy, and learning style; the
clinical and supervision contexts; and the needs of the client.
iv. The supervisor chooses interventions that will help the supervisee work toward
his/her learning goals.
d. The supervisor chooses a group supervision format for multiple reasons; time efficiency
is not a primary rationale.
i. The supervisor is intentional about structure and goals, with particular attention to
what is developmentally appropriate, when conducting group supervision.
ii. The supervisor differentiates between group, individual, and triadic supervision,
understands their complimentary nature, and shares this information with
supervisees.
iii. The supervisor assists group members in establishing ground rules for the conduct
of the supervision group.
iv. The supervisor uses group facilitations skills designed to enhance the working of the
group.
v. The group supervisor fosters meaningful and productive feedback among the
supervisees.
vi. The group supervisor does not allow dominance by one or more members in the
group.
vii. The supervisor encourages and allows increasing autonomy, leadership, and
responsibility among group members over time and in line with supervisees’
developmental levels (i.e., helps the group move from supervision in a group to
supervision by the group).
viii. The supervisor assists supervisees in generalizing learning from the group
supervision experience and applying (transferring) what they learned to their own
work with clients.
e. The supervisor chooses a triadic supervision format for multiple reasons; time efficiency
is not a primary rationale.
i. The supervisor is intentional about structure and goals, with particular attention to
what is developmentally appropriate, when conducting triadic supervision.
ii. The supervisor differentiates between triadic, individual, and group supervision,
understands their complimentary nature, and shares this information with
supervisees.
iii. The supervisor conducts triadic supervision so that the needs of both supervisees are
addressed in each session.
iv. The supervisor facilitates peer feedback effectively and maintains involvement of
both supervisees during the session.
v. The supervisor guides peer feedback in ways that help the supervisees learn how to
give balanced and constructive feedback.
vi. The supervisor facilitates peer feedback in ways that help supervisees accept
feedback they may perceive as challenging.
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vii. The supervisor conducts triadic supervision in ways that deal with supervisees’
sensitive issues appropriately.
viii. The supervisor seeks to make effective supervisee matches (e.g., skill level,
personality) that enhance the work of both supervisees.
ix. When triadic supervision involves one peer’s review of the other peer’s counseling
session before the supervision session, the supervisor provides a structure or format
for the review that facilitates balanced and constructive feedback (e.g., What did the
peer do well? What could the peer have done differently? What did you learn from
reviewing your peer’s counseling session?).
f. The supervisor employs technology in ways that enhance the supervisory process and the
development of the supervisee.
i. In using technology for distance supervision, the supervisor clearly approximates
face-to-face synchronous contact (e.g., formats that allow supervisors and
supervisees to attend to non-verbal as well as verbal behavior).
ii. The supervisor ensures that client and supervisee confidentiality are protected when
using technology in supervision (e.g., takes precautions such as password protection
and encryption) that are compliant with HIPPA guidelines.
iii. The supervisor ensures that any technology employed in supervision is in
compliance with ethical guidelines and regulations promulgated by accreditation,
certification, and licensure bodies.
iv. The supervisor is competent in the use of the technology employed in supervision.
g. In both academic and post-degree supervision, the supervisor actively evaluates the
course of supervision on an ongoing basis.
i. The supervisor regularly employs methods (appropriate to the supervision context)
of gathering data on the effectiveness of supervision, in terms of both supervisee
and client outcomes.
ii. For academic settings, the university supervisor ensures that there is mutual
agreement among the university supervisor, site supervisor, and supervisee about
the expectations of each person involved in the supervision.
iii. For field-based practicum and internship students, the supervisor provides a
procedure by which the supervisee can provide feedback about the site that does not
result in negative consequences for the supervisee.
5. The Supervisory Relationship
a. The supervisor operates with an awareness that the supervisory relationship is key to the
effectiveness of supervision as well as the growth and development of the supervisee.
i. The supervisor operates within the supervisory relationship with emotional
intelligence, maturity, flexibility, humility, and transparency.
ii. Within appropriate professional boundaries, the supervisor is accessible to the
supervisee.
iii. The supervisor continually seeks to enhance his/her self-awareness around
supervisor traits/characteristics/factors that influence the supervisory relationship
(e.g., cultural sensitivity, attachment style), based on current literature.
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b. The supervisor intentionally engages with the supervisee to facilitate development of a
productive supervisory relationship and working alliance.
i. The supervisor gives deliberate attention to creating a safe environment that fosters
mutual trust.
ii. The supervisor views supervisee resistance as a normal response to challenge,
growth, and change.
iii. The supervisor deals with supervisee resistance in productive ways, using culturally
appropriate strategies to guide, challenge, and encourage supervisees.
iv. The supervisor seeks to lessen supervisee anxiety that is detrimental to supervision
while recognizing that some anxiety is inevitable, normal, and positively related to
supervisee growth. At the same time, the supervisor does not take responsibility for
supervisee anxiety that is based in the supervisee’s personality (e.g., perfectionism),
but helps the supervisee take ownership of that anxiety and find ways to manage it
productively in counseling and supervision sessions.
v. The supervisor encourages the supervisee to work outside her/his comfort zone by
taking clinically appropriate risks and expanding his/her counseling approaches.
vi. The supervisor encourages the supervisee to be aware of her/his comfort level
regarding working with clients from various populations, to challenge perceived
limitations, and expand his/her comfort zone.
vii. The supervisor recognizes that some level of conflict is inevitable in the supervisory
relationship and helps the supervisee understand this as well; the supervisor deals
with conflict in productive ways.
viii. The supervisor attends to strains, gaps, and/or ruptures to the working alliance
and/or conflicts in the supervisor relationship in ways that create an opportunity for
learning and growth for both the supervisor and supervisee. Importantly, the
supervisor takes responsibility for his/her own contribution to the rupture or
conflict.
ix. The supervisor elicits and is open to candid and ongoing feedback from the
supervisee.
x. The supervisor addresses parallel process issues and transference and
countertransference issues in ways that are developmentally appropriate and
productive for supervisee learning and growth.
c. The supervisor attends to ethical and cultural concerns that impact the supervisory
relationship. (See also Diversity Considerations and Ethical Considerations sections.)
i. The supervisor promotes contextual sensitivity around factors such as race,
ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, privilege, ability status,
family characteristics and dynamics, country of origin, language, historical
processes (e.g., history, migration), worldview, spirituality and religion, and values.
ii. The supervisor is aware of the power differential inherent in the supervisory
relationship and is transparent about this with the supervisee. The supervisor works
to minimize the power differential while at the same time maintaining appropriate
authority.
iii. The supervisor clearly defines the boundaries of the supervisory relationship and
avoids multiple roles or dual relationships with the supervisee that may negatively
influence the supervisee or the supervisory relationship. When this is not possible,
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the supervisor actively manages the multiplicity of roles to prevent harm to the
supervisee and maintain objectivity in working with and evaluating the supervisee.
iv. The supervisor avoids imposing his/her own meanings, interpretations, values, and beliefs on
the supervisee and/or the supervisee’s work with clients.
v. The supervisor seeks to recognize and identify his/her own transference and
countertransference issues in supervision, and seeks avenues to addressing these in
ways that minimize their deleterious effects in supervision (e.g., consultation, peer
supervision).
6. Diversity and Advocacy Considerations
a. The supervisor recognizes that all supervision is multicultural supervision and infuses
multicultural considerations into his/her approach to supervision.
i. In an initial supervision session, the supervisor introduces issues of culture,
diversity, power, and privilege within the supervisory and counseling relationships,
indicating these are important issues to be aware of and discuss openly.
ii. The supervisor includes cultural and advocacy competences in the supervisory
contract, and intentionally addresses these topics throughout the supervisory
process.
iii. The supervisor attends to the full range of cultural factors, including race, ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, privilege, ability status, family
characteristics and dynamics, country of origin, language, historical processes (e.g.,
history, migration), worldview, spirituality and religion, and values.
iv. The supervisor uses culturally sensitive interventions and aims to facilitate
supervisee multicultural counseling competence and cultural identity development.
v. The supervisor is aware of issues of privilege and oppression and how they affect
the supervision process with each supervisee, with particular attention to
supervisees and clients with minority statuses.
vi. The supervisor helps the supervisee broach difficult topics in supervision, such as
issues pertaining to social justice, and is open to discussing these in supervision.
vii. The supervisor engages in ongoing assessment of his/her own multicultural
awareness, knowledge, and skills, in counseling and supervision.
b. The supervisor encourages supervisees to infuse diversity and advocacy considerations in
their work with clients.
i. The supervisor requires the supervisee to include considerations of culture, power,
and privilege in client case conceptualization and, where appropriate, diagnosis aplanning.
ii. The supervisor encourages the supervisee to seek opportunities to work with a
diverse client population.
iii. The supervisor encourages the supervisee to be aware of and address issues of
culture, power, and privilege that may serve as barriers to clients from diverse
populations seeking or receiving services.
iv. The supervisor works with supervisees to help them develop the knowledge and
skills necessary for advocating with and, as appropriate, on behalf of their clients.
v. The supervisor provides the supervisee with reading and continuing education
opportunities regarding multiculturalism and advocacy as needed.
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7. Ethical Considerations
a. The supervisor conveys to the supervisee that both the supervisor and supervisee are
expected to adhere to the ethical codes and guidelines endorsed by the American
Counseling Association, the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision and
other ACA divisions, relevant credentialing bodies, and models of ethical behavior.
i. The supervisor provides the supervisee with a professional disclosure statement and
written informed consent as needed or relevant.
ii. The supervisor advises the supervisee of the parameters of confidentiality in
supervision and acts accordingly. This includes how evaluations of the supervisee may be shared
with concurrent and/or future supervisors.
iii. The supervisor infuses ethical discussions throughout supervision sessions.
iv. The supervisor requires the supervisee to address ethical considerations as part of
treatment planning and to document this in casenotes.
v. The supervisor guides the supervisee’s critical thinking process about various
ethical issues that arise in clinical work.
vi. The supervisor provides the supervisee with policies and procedures related to the
supervisee’s due process rights and acts accordingly.
vii. The supervisor is knowledgeable of prevalent ethical violations and works toward
minimizing them in supervision.
viii. The supervisor and supervisee maintain liability/malpractice insurance that covers
all facets of their supervisory/clinical work.
ix. The supervisor avoids behaviors that might lead to direct liability (e.g., failure to
meet with the supervisee as scheduled and/or as needed, neglecting important client
information that the supervisee shares, assigning clients to supervisees who are
inadequately trained to deal with those clients’ concerns) and indirect (vicarious)
liability.
x. The supervisor addresses ethical issues as needed and, when necessary, reports
ethical breaches to relevant constituents (e.g., university, agency, certification
and/or licensure board) in a timely manner.
b. The supervisor continually monitors his/her own level of competence in providing
supervision and acts accordingly.
i. The supervisor provides supervision only for those supervisees and clients for
whom the supervisor has adequate training and experience.
ii. The supervisor limits the number of supervisees he/she supervises at any one time
so that adequate and effective supervision can be provided. At a minimum, the
supervisor adheres to limits set in accreditation standards and licensure regulations,
but chooses to supervise fewer supervisees as needed based on factors such as the
needs of the supervisees and clients, as well as personal and contextual
considerations.
iii. The supervisor regularly seeks consultation and/or peer supervision of his/her
supervision.
iv. The supervisor is engaged in ongoing continuing education in supervision and other
professional development activities, including reading current literature on the
conduct of supervision.
v. The supervisor conducts supervision in a manner that prioritizes supervisees’ and
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clients’ needs and interests rather than the supervisor’s needs.
vi. The supervisor appropriately engages in and models self-care.
c. The supervisor understands that client welfare is his/her first and highest responsibility
and acts accordingly.
i. The supervisor assigns the supervisee clients who are appropriate to the supervisee’s
experience, developmental level, etc., and/or adjusts supervision (e.g., frequency,
closeness) as needed. If clients are assigned by others, the supervisor provides input
regarding appropriate clients (e.g., number, severity of client issues).
ii. The supervisor ensures that supervisees provide clients with professional disclosure
statements and written informed consent documents that specify that the supervisee
is under supervision and is not licensed or certified, if this is the case, and includes
the name and contact information of the supervisor.
d. The supervisor does not compromise the supervisory relationship by engaging in
relationships with supervisees that are considered inappropriate.
i. The supervisor does not engage in multiple relationships with supervisees nor with
supervisees’ significant others.
ii. The supervisor attends to power issues with the supervisee to prevent harmful nonsexual and sexual relationships.
iii. The supervisor explains to the supervisee the appropriate parameters of addressing
the supervisee’s personal issues in supervision (identifies the issue, helps the
supervisee see the clinical implications, works to minimize the detrimental effects in
the supervisee’s clinical work, contributes to a plan for resolution that does not
directly involve the supervisor) and acts accordingly.
iv. If the supervisor is a doctoral student, the doctoral student’s supervisor avoids
pairings of supervisor-supervisee that would pose a conflict of interest.
v. If the supervisor is a doctoral student, the doctoral student’s supervisor is sensitive
to potential conflicts due to the supervisor’s multiple roles with the doctoral student.
e. The supervisor provides ongoing performance assessment and evaluation of the
supervisee, including the supervisee’s strengths and limitations. (See also Evaluation
section.)
i. Early in the relationship, the supervisor outlines how the supervisee will be
evaluated, by what standards, and how and when this information will be given to
the supervisee as well as to third parties.
ii. The supervisor employs methods of direct observation of the supervisee’s work with
clients.
iii. The supervisor provides the supervisee with fair and ongoing performance
assessments and evaluations, including the supervisee’s strengths and limitations.
iv. The supervisor assesses the supervisee for impairment, blind spots, and other
limitations.
v. The supervisor does not include the supervisee’s personal disclosures in written
evaluations.
8. Documentation
a. The supervisor maintains documentation that provides a system of supervisor
accountability.
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i. The supervisor maintains documentation that, at a minimum, includes the
supervision contract (signed by supervisor, supervisee, and, as appropriate, the site
supervisor or others involved in the supervisory experience), supervision session
case notes, and formative and summative evaluations of the supervisee.
ii. The supervisor includes the following information in supervision session case notes:
supervisee and client informed consent, content of what was discussed (e.g.,
counseling session reviewed, client updates provided, site issues), review method
used (e.g., recorded session, live observation), goals developed for counseling
sessions, and recommendations and/or directives regarding counseling session
and/or client care. As needed, the supervisor also includes decision processes,
problems and remediation efforts.
iii. The supervisor does not include unprofessional remarks about the supervisee or
client, sensitive supervisee personal history information, or unsupported opinions in
his/her case notes.
iv. The supervisor documents supervision sessions so as to protect client welfare,
record supervisee development, provide guidance for preparing for and managing
future supervision sessions, and serve as a basis for accurate supervisee evaluations.
v. The supervisor maintains documents related to supervision sessions so that they
protect the privacy and confidentiality of the supervisee (e.g., in a locked file
cabinet or on a secure server) and are separate from any client files.
vi. The supervisor maintains documentation according to the policies of his/her
employing institution, ethical codes, and other relevant guidelines (e.g., licensure
regulations). When providing supervision for certification or licensure, the
supervisor maintains documentation until the supervisee submits such
documentation for credentialing.
9. Evaluation
a. The supervisor understands that evaluation is fundamental to supervision and accepts
his/her evaluation responsibilities.
i. The supervisor provides both formative and summative evaluations on a regular
basis. In general, formative evaluation occurs in every supervision session and
informs the supervisee of his/her incremental progress or lack of progress.
Summative evaluation occurs at regular, stated intervals (e.g., mid-term and end of
semester; every three months), and includes a written statement of supervisee
performance.
ii. The supervisor highlights supervisee strengths and clearly indicates areas of growth
in evaluations.
iii. The supervisor provides the supervisee regular opportunities to offer verbal and
written feedback about the supervisory process, including anonymous feedback
when possible.
iv. The supervisor regularly employs methods of direct observation of the supervisee’s
work with clients, including review of entire counseling sessions to ensure that all
phases of a session are reviewed. When a supervisee is working with more than one
supervisor (multiple supervisors, layers of supervision), at least one supervisor
regularly reviews entire sessions.
v. The supervisor bases evaluations on direct observation of counselor performance
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(e.g., recorded counseling sessions, live observation).
vi. The supervisor uses information from a variety of sources in addition to the
supervisor’s own observations (e.g., clients, peers) to evaluate supervisee
performance.
vii. The supervisor reviews a representative sample of the range of the supervisee’s
work (e.g., individual counseling, group counseling, play therapy, family
counseling), range of clients (e.g., adults, adolescents, children, families), and range
of clinical issues (e.g., grief and loss, depression, self-injury, career development).
viii. The supervisor attempts to mitigate supervisee anxiety about evaluation by
establishing evaluation norms early and exploring supervisee reactions to
evaluation.
b. The supervisor clearly communicates the evaluation plan to the supervisee.
i. The supervisor presents, in writing, the evaluation plan (including the
document/rating form and the timeline for providing formal, written evaluations) to
be used, criteria for success, and consequences of underperformance to the
supervisee prior to beginning supervision. These also are discussed with the
supervisee, who is provided the opportunity to ask questions.
ii. The supervisor includes core components of counselor competence in the evaluation
plan, including relationship building, multicultural and advocacy competences,
professionalism, and/or items that address the traditional range foci in supervision
(e.g., counseling performance skills, cognitive counseling skills and case
conceptualization, self-awareness, and professional behaviors).
iii. The supervisor incorporates the supervisee’s individualized learning goals for
supervision in the evaluation plan.
c. The supervisor encourages ongoing supervisee self-evaluation.
i. The supervisor requires supervisees to complete self-evaluations, formative and
summative, as part of the evaluation process.
ii. The supervisor helps the supervisee develop self-reflection and self-evaluation
skills, and fosters an expectation of regular, ongoing self-reflection over the
supervisee’s professional lifespan.
d. The supervisor takes appropriate steps when remediation is necessary.
i. The supervisor normalizes developmental challenges while also providing feedback
in clear and constructive language about skills and behaviors that need to be
remediated.
ii. When remediation is necessary, the supervisor notifies the supervisee promptly.
The supervisor recommends specific interventions relevant to the area of deficit.
The supervisor prepares a written remediation plan that includes clear objectives,
requirements, a timeline, and consequences of compliance and noncompliance.
iii. If the remediation plan includes personal counseling, the supervisor avoids dual
relationships and invasion of supervisee privacy.
10. Supervision Format
a. The supervisor employs various supervision formats (e.g., individual, triadic,
peer/colleague review, group supervision) in ways that adhere to accreditation standards
and regulations of credentialing bodies (e.g., frequency of individual and group
supervision) and that meet the needs of the supervisee, is appropriate to the site, and
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adequately addresses the needs of clients.
b. The supervisor does not choose a format based on what may be convenient for the
supervisor (e.g., saves time).
i. When more than one supervisee is involved, the supervisor chooses or creates a
structure and process that maximizes supervisee involvement and constructive peer
feedback.
ii. The supervisor addresses the parameters of confidentiality in supervision formats
with multiple supervisees (i.e., triadic, peer, group), including information shared
about clients and supervision group members.
iii. Whenever possible, the supervisor is intentional in pairing supervisees for peer,
triadic, and group supervision.
iv. The supervisor ensures that, during triadic, peer, and group supervision, constructive
feedback is provided and the process is not detrimental to the supervisees involved.
11. The Supervisor
a. The supervisor is competent in providing clinical supervision.
i. The supervisor is a competent and experienced practitioner who has knowledge of a
range of theoretical orientations and techniques and experience with diverse client
populations, as relevant to their counseling setting.
ii. The supervisor is highly competent, morally sensitive, and ethical in the practices of
counseling and supervision.
iii. The supervisor has formal training in clinical supervision.
iv. The supervisor possesses a strong professional identity as a counselor and
supervisor.
v. The supervisor is knowledgeable about required and recommended experiences that
promote self-efficacy, development, and competence in supervisees (e.g., practicum
and internship students as well as post-degree counselors).
vi. The supervisor is competent in multicultural counseling and supervision.
vii. The supervisor is competent in implementing advocacy competencies in counseling
and supervision.
viii. The supervisor abides by his/her state counselor and supervisor licensing
requirements as well as national counselor and supervisor credentialing
requirements.
ix. The supervisor employs an appropriate ethical decision making model in responding
to ethical challenges and issues and in determining courses of action and behavior
for self and supervisee.
x. The supervisor possesses a range of knowledge and skills in working with diverse
supervisees.
xi. The supervisor individualizes supervision based on the specific needs of the
supervisee (e.g., learning goals, developmental level, learning style).
xii. The supervisor incorporates elements of other supervisory styles if his/her preferred
style of supervision does not enhance or challenge the supervisee’s professional
development and growth to the fullest.
xiii. The supervisor maintains regular and accurate supervision records.
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b. The supervisor can clearly describe the purpose of clinical supervision and distinguish it
from the counseling process as well as from administrative and program supervision.
i. The supervisor views supervision as an educational and developmental process.
ii. The supervisor is intentional and proactive.
iii. The supervisor is able to make the cognitive shift from thinking like a counselor to
thinking like a supervisor.
iv. The supervisor avoids acting as the supervisee’s counselor.
v. The supervisor is aware of the power differential that exists between supervisor and
supervisee, does not let it threaten supervisory trust, and makes power issues
transparent.
vi. The supervisor understands, accepts, and acts on her/his role as an evaluator and
professional gatekeeper, continually monitoring and evaluating the supervisee’s
practice of counseling to protect and safeguard the well-being of clients.
vii. The supervisor encourages supervisee autonomy as appropriate.
viii. The supervisor can clearly articulate her/his role as supervisor, including teacher,
counselor, consultant, mentor, and evaluator.
ix. The supervisor practices and promotes professional boundaries in supervision,
thereby acting as a role model to the supervisee.
x. The supervisor demonstrates professionalism in an effort to encourage the
supervisee to exhibit similar behavior.
c. The supervisor has a collaborative relationship with additional supervisors with whom
the supervisee may be working (e.g., clinical, administrative, and/or program supervisor
at the university, practicum or internship site, and/or work setting).
i. The supervisor works to differentiate roles and responsibilities of each supervisor.
ii. The supervisor establishes a communication method with other supervisors that
enhances each supervisor’s work with the supervisee.
iii. The supervisor manages any conflict with other supervisors respectfully and
responsibly.
d. The supervisor engages in self-reflection and other avenues of personal professional
development.
i. The supervisor explores his/her own cultural identity, including issues of power and
privilege, as well as how these affect his/her values and beliefs about counseling and
supervision.
ii. The supervisor integrates his/her own cultural self-awareness (see 11.d.i. above)
into the supervisor role.
iii. The supervisor is actively interested in other cultures and values ecosystemic
differences.
iv. The supervisor continually seeks and accepts new perspectives from the supervisee
and others.
v. The supervisor seeks active membership in relevant professional organizations,
pursues counseling and supervision credentials, and is involved in ongoing
professional development activities regarding supervision.
vi. The supervisor regularly reads research and other scholarly literature about
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supervision, and bases his/her supervision practice on current knowledge of best
practices in supervision.
vii. The supervisor solicits effectiveness feedback from the supervisee and responds to
feedback by paying attention to what can/needs to be changed in the supervisory
relationship or the supervisory context.
viii. The supervisor is aware of, explores, and monitors his/her own strengths,
limitations, abilities, and resources.
ix. The supervisor is open to ambiguity and the absence of knowledge, and does not
pretend to have all the answers.
x. The supervisor has the courage to be imperfect and not expect perfection from self,
the supervisee, and others.
xi. The supervisor challenges him/her self to take appropriate risks in supervision
practices and acts out of his/her comfort zone.
xii. The supervisor views errors in supervision as learning opportunities.
xiii. The supervisor engages in critical self-reflection and self-care, and avoids
professional stagnation and burnout.
xiv. The supervisor is self-evaluative and regularly seeks out supervision or peer
consultation of supervision practices.
e. The supervisor manages supervisory relationship dynamics competently and
appropriately.
i. The supervisor bases assessments, evaluations, and developmental feedback on
supervisee behavior rather than supervisee personality traits.
ii. The supervisor understands supervisee resistance and manages it effectively.
iii. The supervisor emphasizes the supervisee’s intrinsic motivation rather than extrinsic
motivation.
12. Supervisor Preparation: Supervision Training and Supervision of Supervision
a. The supervisor has received didactic instruction and experiential training in clinical
supervision (concurrent and/or sequential).
b. The supervisor’s training is based in a developmental perspective and approach.
c. The supervisor’s didactic instruction includes all the topics identified in guidelines
published by relevant professional organizations (e.g., ACES) and credentialing bodies
(e.g., NBCC, CRC). At a minimum, this didactic instruction includes the following:
models of supervision; models of counselor development; formats of supervision;
supervisory relationship dynamics; supervision methods and techniques; multicultural
considerations; counselor assessment, feedback and evaluation; executive/administrative
skills; ethical, legal, and professional regulatory issues; and research on these topics.
d. The supervisor’s training emphasizes theoretical and conceptual knowledge, skills and
techniques, and self-awareness.
e. The supervisor’s training includes appropriate application of teaching, counseling, and
consulting skills in supervision.
f. The supervisor’s training emphasizes the role modeling that the supervisor provides in all
his/her interactions with the supervisee.
g. The supervisor’s training emphasizes the supervisory relationship as the primary vehicle
for learning in supervision.
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h. The supervisor’s training includes an emphasis on managing the delicate balance of
challenge and support of the supervisee.
i. The supervisor’s training includes instruction in relevant learning theories, principles, and
research.
j. The supervisor is trained to understand that his/her focus includes both the clinical and
the professional development of the supervisee.
k. The supervisor’s training includes recognition of the need for different approaches,
formats, structures, and types of supervision for different supervision settings (e.g.,
universities, agencies, schools, privately contracted).
l. The supervisor articulates a personal philosophy of supervision as a result of training and
supervised experience as a supervisor.
m. The supervisor’s training includes supervision of supervision based in some form of
direct observation of his/her work with supervisees.
i. Supervision of supervision follows the guidelines of relevant accreditation standards
and credentialing bodies.
ii. Supervision of supervision adheres to all relevant “best practices” identified in this
document.
Task Force Members
L. DiAnne Borders, Chair
Lorraine DeKruyf
Delini M. Fernando
Harriet L. Glosoff
Danica G. Hays
Betsy Page
Laura E. Welfare
January 18, 2011
Appreciation is extended to external reviewers, Drs. Lori Brown, Keith Mobley, and Leslie
Rainey.
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