Course Outline

Course Outline
OFFICE OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC COURSE OUTLINE
Department
English
Grade Level
12
Course Title
Course
Length
2 semesters
Prerequisites
English 5-6 & pass the CAHSEE
Co-requisites
None
5
Approved
for
Honors
No
1423
Course Code
RHETORIC COMP
Short Title
Credits
per
Semester
Rhetoric &
Composition
Yes
Grad Requirement
Required
Yes
Elective
Articulated with LBCC
No
Articulated with CSULB
No
Meets UC “a-g” Requirement
Yes (b)
Meets NCAA Requirement
Yes
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Early Assessment Program (EAP): Rhetoric & Composition
This one-year rhetoric and composition course is for college-bound seniors. Students will read and write
academic prose effectively and strategically and increase their mastery of academic language. This rigorous
course is built around in-depth studies of various expository, analytic, or argumentative writing of non-literary
topics and the rhetorical analysis of lengthier non-fiction and fiction genres. Pivotal to the curriculum is the
deepening of students’ critical reading, writing and thinking skills about both expository and literary prose with
an emphasis on fostering their ability to argue and extend their understanding of complex material in writing.
Students will be expected to engage in depth with diverse and challenging material in writing. In addition, they
will be expected to increase their awareness and application of the techniques employed by authors. They will
read closely to examine relationships between an author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and
purpose, to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies, and to examine the social, political, and
philosophical assumptions that underlie the text.
COURSE GOALS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CONTENT: Students will demonstrate the ability to read and comprehend a wide range of fiction and
non-fiction grade appropriate materials as represented in their textbooks.
LITERACY: Students will read and analyze literary, historical, and documentary texts demonstrating
their ability to infer meaning from thematic, structural, and rhetorical aspects of written
language.
LITERACY: Students will write in a wide variety of academic and professional formats demonstrating an
increased proficiency of the major forms of prose discourse as delineated in the content
standards.
SKILLS: Students will demonstrate clear and coherent written and oral communication within the
standard genres.
SKILLS: Students will demonstrate increased proficiency of the principles of grammar, syntax, spelling,
and punctuation through the use of all forms of writing and in the proficient completion of
quizzes and tests.
SKILLS: Students will demonstrate the ability to solve problems and think critically by effectively
completing challenging group and individual projects and assignments.
SKILLS: Students will demonstrate their ability to continue working on and mastering English-language
conventions when speaking and writing.
APPLICATIONS: Students will apply listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to everyday life,
develop advanced skills in post-secondary courses and apply these skills in the workplace.
Rhetoric & Composition p.2
COURSE PURPOSE: EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Students are expected to perform at a proficient level on a variety of tasks and assessments addressing both
the content and skills for English Language Arts. Levels of proficiency are defined near the end of this outline
under Performance Standards.
Rhetoric & Composition
From, The Reading/Language Arts Framework for California Public Schools, adopted by the California State
Board of Education in 2007.
1.0 Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary Development
• Students apply their knowledge of word origins to determine the meaning of new words encountered in
reading materials and use those words accurately.
2.0 Reading Comprehension (Focus on Informational Materials)
• Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They analyze the organizational
patterns, arguments, and positions advanced.
3.0 Literary Response and Analysis
• Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of literature that reflect and
enhance their studies of history and social science. They conduct in-depth analyses of recurrent
patterns and themes.
1.0 Written and Oral English Language Conventions
• Students write and speak with a command of standard English conventions.
1.0 Writing Strategies
• Students write coherent and focused essays that convey a well-defined perspective and tightlyreasoned argument. The writing demonstrates students’ awareness of the audience and purpose.
Students progress through the stages of the writing process as needed.
Rhetoric & Composition Power Standards
• Unit 1: Fast Food – Module 1
o Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2
o Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
o Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
o CTE Foundation Standard 3.6, 7.2, 9.3
• Unit 3: The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed Page: Ethos,
Pathos, Logos – Module 3
o Reading Comprehension 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
o Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
o Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
o CTE Foundation Standard 5.3, 8.3
•
Unit 5: Research Project (Bullying at School)
– Module 14
o
o
o
o
o
Reading Comprehension 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6,
1.7, 1.8, 1.9
Writing Applications 2.4
Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CTE Foundation Standard 4.2, 5.3, 8.3
•
•
Unit 2: Going for the Look – Module 2
o Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2
o Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
o Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
o CTE Foundation Standard 7.2, 9.3
Unit 4: Language, Gender & Culture – Module 10
o Reading Comprehension 2.2, 2.6
o Literary Response & Analysis 3.3
o Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
o Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
o CTE Foundation Standard 8.3
•
Unit 6: Into the Wild – Module 8
o
o
o
o
o
o
Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 2.4,
2.5, 2.6
Literary Response and Analysis 3.2, 3.3
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.7, 1.9
Writing Applications 2.2
Written
&
Oral
English
Language
Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CTE Foundation Standard 3.6, 7.2, 9.3
Rhetoric & Composition p.3
COURSE PURPOSE: INTEGRATED EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Students are also expected to proficiently apply common skills that are relevant across curriculum areas and
career pathways. The following are those skills most applicable to this English course.
The following are the Career Technology Education (CTE) Standards most applicable to the English Language
Arts Content Standards.
Foundation Standard 3: Career Planning and Management. Students understand how to make effective
decisions, use career information, and manage career plans.
3.6 Know important strategies for self-promotion in the hiring process, such as job applications, resume
writing, interviewing skills, and preparation of a portfolio.
Foundation Standard 4: Technology
Students know how to use contemporary and emerging technological resources in diverse and changing
personal, community, and workplace environments.
4.2 Understand the use of technological resources to gain access to, manipulate, and produce information,
products, and services.
Foundation Standard 5: Problem Solving and Critical Thinking
Students understand how to create alternative solutions by using critical and creative thinking skills, such as
logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem solving techniques.
5.2 Understand the systematic problem solving models that incorporate input, process, outcome, and
feedback components.
5.3 Use critical thinking skills to make informed decisions and solve problems.
Foundation Standard 7: Responsibility and Flexibility
Students know the behaviors associated with the demonstration of responsibility and flexibility in personal,
workplace, and community settings.
7.1 Understand the qualities and behaviors that constitute a positive and professional work demeanor.
7.2 Understand the importance of accountability and responsibility in fulfilling personal, community, and
workplace roles.
7.3 Understand the need to adapt to varied roles and responsibilities.
7.4 Understand that individual actions can affect the larger community.
Foundation Standard 8: Ethics and Legal Responsibilities
Students understand professional, ethical, and legal behavior consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and
organizational norms.
8.2 Understand the concept and application of ethical and legal behavior consistent with workplace
standards.
8.3 Understand the role of personal integrity and ethical behavior in the workplace.
Foundation Standard 9: Leadership and Teamwork
Students understand effective leadership styles, key concepts of group dynamics, team and individual decision
making, the benefits of workplace diversity, and conflict resolution.
9.1 Understand the characteristics and benefits of teamwork, leadership, and citizenship in the school,
community, and workplace setting.
9.3 Understand how to organize and structure work individually and in teams for effective performance and
the attainment of goals.
9.4 Know multiple approaches to conflict resolution and their appropriateness for a variety of situations in the
workplace.
9.5 Understand how to interact with others in ways that demonstrate respect for individual and cultural
differences and for the attitudes and feelings of others.
Rhetoric & Composition p.4
OUTLINE OF THE MINIMUM COURSE OF STUDY AND SUGGESTED TIME ALLOTMENT:
TBd = Teacher Binder
SV = Student Version
T&C = Text and Context
Career Technology Education Foundation Standards = FS
The Task Analysis and Key Vocabulary presented here are drawn from the English Language Arts Framework for California Public Schools, which
defines the intent and scope of the English Language Arts Content Standards. For additional information on the context and the benchmark standards
to assess, refer to the Blueprints for the English Language Arts Content Standards Test (CST) and the 10th Grade California High School Exit Exam
(CAHSEE). These Blueprints are available at the California Department of Education website (www.cde.ca.gov). Skill Standards designated FS
refers to the Foundation Standards of the CA Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards [pages 2 and 3]. Content sequencing,
resources, and time allocations are only suggestions and may be adjusted to suit school site curriculum plans, available materials, and student needs.
Unit: Fast Food: Who’s to Blame? – Module 1
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Features of public documents
• Create a year long portfolio of
module products reflective of each
Rhetorical devices
unit. (FS 3.6)
• Analyze both the features and the
rhetorical devices of different
types of public documents (RC 2.1
& FS 7.2)
Organizational patterns
• Analyze the way in which clarity
of meaning is affected by the
Hierarchical structures
patterns of organization,
Repetition
hierarchical structures, repetition
Main Ideas
of main ideas, syntax, and word
Syntax
choice in the text. (RC 2.2)
Diction
• Ideas
• Arguments
• Persuasion
• Rhetorical devices
a) Parallelism
b) Repetition
c) Analogy
• Visual aids
a) Graphs
b) Tables
c) Pictures
• Call for action
• Tone
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
Audience
Genre
• Demonstrate an understanding of
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
when completing narrative,
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
(WS 1.1)
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
• Enhance meaning by employing
rhetorical devices, including the
extended use of parallelism,
repetition, and analogy (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
incorporation of visual aids (e.g.,
graphs, tables, pictures) (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
issuance of a call for action. (WS
1.4)
• Use language in natural, fresh, and
vivid ways to establish a specific
tone. (WS 1.5)
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 10 – Considering the
Structure of the Text (SV p. 54)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 1-9, & 11-15 (SV pp.
49-54 & 55-58)
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
• Activities 15-23 – Weintraub
essay (SV pp. 58-67) [Rubric
found in TBd appendix G)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance
• Activities 19-23 (SV pp. 65-67)
Additional Assignments:
Can be completed if time permits after
completing Required Key Assignment:
• Collect nutritional guides from
restaurants
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
APPRX
TIME
Required Text:
• ERWC Course Binder, CSU
2008
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Informational Texts:
• Fast Food Nation by Eric
Schlosser
• Current events articles
(periodicals) about fast food,
health, food contamination
• “Super Size Me”
(Documentary – Educator’s
version)
Ancillary Materials:
• A Text-Based Grammar for
Expository Reading & Writing
– Chapter 1
Functional Documents:
• Nutritional guides
Website
• www.writing.csusuccess.org
Key Vocabulary:
• Content-specific vocabulary
from Activity 5 (SV pp. 51-52)
• Evaluate
• Analyze
• Critique
• Connotation
• Denotation
• Syntax
• Synthesize
• Diction
7 WEEKS
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Discourse
a) Purpose
b) Speaker
c) Audience
d) Form
• Genres of writing
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Rhetoric & Composition p.5
Unit: Fast Food: Who’s to Blame? – Module 1
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
Tone
Anecdote
Style
Analogies
Annotate
Inference
Hierarchical structures
Unit: Going for the Look – Module 2
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Features of public documents
• Analyze both the features and the
rhetorical devices of different
Rhetorical devices
types of public documents (RC 2.1
& FS 7.2)
Organizational patterns
• Analyze the way in which clarity
of meaning is affected by the
Hierarchical structures
patterns of organization,
Repetition
hierarchical structures, repetition
Main Ideas
of main ideas, syntax, and word
Syntax
choice in the text. (RC 2.2)
Diction
• Ideas
• Arguments
• Persuasion
• Rhetorical devices
a) Parallelism
b) Repetition
c) Analogy
• Visual aids
a) Graphs
b) Tables
c) Pictures
• Call for action
• Tone
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
• Demonstrate an understanding of
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
when completing narrative,
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
(WS 1.1)
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
• Enhance meaning by employing
rhetorical devices, including the
extended use of parallelism,
repetition, and analogy (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
incorporation of visual aids (e.g.,
graphs, tables, pictures) (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
issuance of a call for action. (WS
1.4)
• Use language in natural, fresh, and
vivid ways to establish a specific
tone. (WS 1.5)
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 9 – Considering the
structure of the text (SV pp. 4348)
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
Required Text:
• ERWC Course Binder, CSU
2008
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Portfolio Product:
• Activities 14-17 – Cohen
argument essay (SV pp. 53-58)
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Informational Texts:
• “Advertising’s Fifteen Basic
Appeals” by Jib Fowles (T&C
pp. 118-128)
• “What are TV Ads Selling to
Children?” by John J.
O’Connor (T&C pp. 81-83)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 18-22 (SV pp. 58 –
61)
Ancillary Materials:
• A Text-Based Grammar for
Expository Reading & Writing
– Chapter 2
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 1-8 & 10-14 (SV pp.
41-43 & 48-53)
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
APPRX
TIME
Website
• www.writing.csusuccess.org
Key Vocabulary:
• Purpose
• Speaker
• Audience
• Form
• Discourse
• Hypothesis
5 WEEKS
• Discourse
a) Purpose
b) Speaker
c) Audience
d) Form
• Genres of writing
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Rhetoric & Composition p.6
Unit: Going for the Look – Module 2
• Audience
• Genre
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
Unit: The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed Page: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos – Module 3
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Warrant
• Make warranted and reasonable
assertions about the author’s
Reason
arguments (RC 2.4)
Assertions
• Use elements of the text to defend
Author’s argument
and clarify interpretations (RC 2.4
Elements of the text
& FS 5.3)
Interpretation
Implicit vs. Explicit
• Analyze the author’s implicit and
explicit philosophical
Philosophical assumptions &
assumptions and beliefs about a
beliefs
subject (RC 2.5)
Power, validity and truthfulness
• Critique the power, validity, and
of arguments
truthfulness of arguments set forth
in public documents (RC 2.6 &
Public Documents
FS 8.3)
Friendly vs. Hostile audience
• Critique the appeal of public
Reader concerns and
documents to both friendly and
counterclaims
hostile audiences (RC 2.6 & FS
Appeal to reason (logos)
8.3)
Appeal to authority (ethos)
• Critique the extent to which the
Appeal to emotion (pathos)
arguments in public documents
anticipate and address reader
concerns and counterclaims (e.g.,
appeal to reason, to authority, to
pathos and emotion) (RC 2.6 &
FS 8.3)
Discourse
• Demonstrate an understanding of
a) Purpose
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
b) Speaker
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
c) Audience
when completing narrative,
d) Form
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
Genres of writing
(WS 1.1)
Ideas
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
Arguments
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
Persuasion
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 11 – Thinking
Critically (SV p. 43)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activity 1-10 & 12-13 (SV pp.
37 – 42 & 44-46)
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
Required Text:
• ERWC Course Binder, CSU
2008
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Informational Texts:
• Periodicals – especially op-ed
articles
• Political ad campaigns
• Editorials
Ancillary Materials:
• A Text-Based Grammar for
Expository Reading & Writing
– Chapter 3
• www.americanrhetoic.com –
clips from movies
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
• Activities 13-15 – Response
Letter/ Letter to the Editor about
Rifkin’s argument (SV pp. 4647)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 16-17 (SV pp. 48-52)
APPRX
TIME
Key Vocabulary:
• Rhetoric
• Ethos
• Pathos
• Logos
• Persuasion
• Editorial
• Direct quotation
• Summary
• Paraphrase
• Documentation
4 WEEKS
•
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CTE Foundation Standard 5.3, 8.3
Rhetoric & Composition p.7
Unit: The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed Page: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos – Module 3
• MLA
• Quote
• Text
• Rhetorical devices
a) Parallelism
b) Repetition
c) Analogy
• Visual aids
a) Graphs
b) Tables
c) Pictures
• Call for action
• Tone
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
Audience
Genre
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
• Enhance meaning by employing
rhetorical devices, including the
extended use of parallelism,
repetition, and analogy (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
incorporation of visual aids (e.g.,
graphs, tables, pictures) (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
issuance of a call for action. (WS
1.4)
• Use language in natural, fresh, and
vivid ways to establish a specific
tone. (WS 1.5)
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
*** CONTINUE TO THE NEXT PAGE FOR THE NEXT UNIT ***
•
•
•
•
•
Audience
Speaker
Context
Argument
Cause/ Effect
Rhetoric & Composition p.8
Unit: Language, Gender & Culture – Module 10
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.2, 2.6
Literary Response & Analysis 3.3
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.9
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CTE Foundation Standard 8.3
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Organizational patterns
• Analyze the way in which clarity
of meaning is affected by the
Hierarchical structures
patterns of organization,
Repetition
hierarchical structures, repetition
Main Ideas
of main ideas, syntax, and word
Syntax
choice in the text. (RC 2.2)
Diction
• Power, validity and truthfulness
of arguments
• Public Documents
• Friendly vs. Hostile audience
• Reader concerns and
counterclaims
• Appeal to reason (logos)
• Appeal to authority (ethos)
• Appeal to emotion (pathos)
Irony
Tone
Mood
Author’s Style
“Sound” of language
Rhetorical purposes
Aesthetic purposes
Discourse
a) Purpose
b) Speaker
c) Audience
d) Form
• Genres of writing
• Ideas
• Arguments
• Persuasion
• Rhetorical devices
a) Parallelism
b) Repetition
c) Analogy
• Visual aids
a) Graphs
b) Tables
c) Pictures
• Call for action
• Tone
• Demonstrate an understanding of
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
when completing narrative,
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
(WS 1.1)
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
• Enhance meaning by employing
rhetorical devices, including the
extended use of parallelism,
repetition, and analogy (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
incorporation of visual aids (e.g.,
graphs, tables, pictures) (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
issuance of a call for action. (WS
1.4)
• Use language in natural, fresh, and
vivid ways to establish a specific
tone. (WS 1.5)
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 14 – The Woman
Warrior – Rereading the Text
and Analyzing Stylistic Choices
(SV pp. 52-53)
• Activity 20 – “About Men” –
Rereading the Text and
Analyzing Stylistic Choices (SV
p. 54)
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
APPRX
TIME
Required Text:
• ERWC Course Binder, CSU
2008
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Current Periodicals
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 1-13, 15-19 & 21-22
(SV pp. 45-52, 53-54 & 55)
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activities 22-24 – Literary
Analysis Essay (SV pp. 55-56)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 25-29 (SV pp. 56-60)
Key Vocabulary:
• Gender
• Culture
• Gender Roles
• Social Norms
• Cultural Norms
• Stereotypes
• Minorities
• Civil Rights Movements
• Feminism
• Irony
• Tone
• Mood
• Rhetorical purposes
• Aesthetic purposes
5 WEEKS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Critique the power, validity, and
truthfulness of arguments set forth
in public documents (RC 2.6 &
FS 8.3)
• Critique the appeal of public
documents to both friendly and
hostile audiences (RC 2.6 & FS
8.3)
• Critique the extent to which the
arguments in public documents
anticipate and address reader
concerns and counterclaims (e.g.,
appeal to reason, to authority, to
pathos and emotion) (RC 2.6 &
FS 8.3)
• Analyze the ways in which irony,
tone, mood, and author’s style,
and the “sound” of language
achieve specific rhetorical or
aesthetic purpose or both (LRA
3.3)
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Rhetoric & Composition p.9
Unit: Language, Gender & Culture – Module 10
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
Audience
Genre
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
Unit: Research Project (Bullying at School) – Module 14
Essential Question:
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Warrant
• Make warranted and reasonable
assertions about the author’s
Reason
arguments (RC 2.4)
Assertions
• Use elements of the text to defend
Author’s argument
and clarify interpretations (RC 2.4
Elements of the text
& FS 5.3)
Interpretation
Implicit vs. Explicit
• Analyze the author’s implicit and
explicit philosophical
Philosophical assumptions &
assumptions and beliefs about a
beliefs
subject (RC 2.5)
Power, validity and truthfulness
• Critique the power, validity, and
of arguments
truthfulness of arguments set forth
in public documents (RC 2.6 &
Public Documents
FS 8.3)
Friendly vs. Hostile audience
• Critique the appeal of public
Reader concerns and
documents to both friendly and
counterclaims
hostile audiences (RC 2.6 & FS
Appeal to reason (logos)
8.3)
Appeal to authority (ethos)
• Critique the extent to which the
Appeal to emotion (pathos)
arguments in public documents
anticipate and address reader
concerns and counterclaims (e.g.,
appeal to reason, to authority, to
pathos and emotion) (RC 2.6 &
FS 8.3)
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 13 – Thinking
Critically (SV pp. 131-132) or
content appropriate for you SLC
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 1-12 & 14-15 (SV pp.
119-130 & 133-156)
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
APPRX
TIME
Required Text:
• ERWC Course Binder, CSU
2008
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Informational Texts:
• Current periodicals
Website:
• www.writing.csusuccess.org
Key Vocabulary:
• MLA
• Direct quotation
• Paraphrase
• Summary
• Plagiarism
• Synthesis
• Respond
7 WEEKS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9
Writing Applications 2.4
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
CTE Foundation Standard 4.2, 5.3, 8.3
Rhetoric & Composition p.10
Unit: Research Project (Bullying at School) – Module 14
Essential Question:
• Primary vs. Secondary sources
• Rhetorical strategies
•
•
•
•
Rhetorical strategies
Proposition
Primary vs. Secondary sources
Validity and reliability of sources
• Discourse
a) Purpose
b) Speaker
c) Audience
d) Form
• Genres of writing
• Ideas
• Arguments
• Persuasion
• Rhetorical devices
a) Parallelism
b) Repetition
c) Analogy
• Visual aids
a) Graphs
b) Tables
c) Pictures
• Call for action
• Tone
• Research Questions
• Creative & Critical Research
Strategies
• Organization strategies
• Information Recording strategies
• Databases
• Graphics
• Spreadsheets
• Write historical investigation
reports: (WAp 2.4)
a) Use exposition, narration,
description, argumentation, or
some combination of
rhetorical strategies to
support the main proposition.
(WAp 2.4)
b) Analyze several historical
records of a single event,
examining critical
relationships between
elements of the research topic
(WAp 2.4 & FS 5.3)
c) Explain the perceived reason
or reasons for the similarities
and differences in historical
records with information
derived from primary and
secondary sources to support
or enhance the presentation.
(WAp 2.4)
d) Include information from all
relevant perspectives and take
into consideration the validity
and reliability of sources.
(WAp 2.4 & FS 8.3)
• Demonstrate an understanding of
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
when completing narrative,
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
(WS 1.1)
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
• Enhance meaning by employing
rhetorical devices, including the
extended use of parallelism,
repetition, and analogy (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
incorporation of visual aids (e.g.,
graphs, tables, pictures) (WS 1.4)
• Enhance meaning through the
issuance of a call for action. (WS
1.4)
• Use language in natural, fresh, and
vivid ways to establish a specific
tone. (WS 1.5)
• Develop presentation s by using
clear research questions and
creative and critical research
strategies (e.g., field studies, oral
histories, interviews, experiments,
electronic sources) (WS 1.6)
• Use systematic strategies to
organize and record information
(e.g., anecdotal, scripting,
annotated bibliographies) (WS
1.7)
• Integrate databases, graphics, and
spreadsheets into word-processed
documents (WS 1.8 & FS 4.2)
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 16-20 – Research
project or topic appropriate for
SLC (SV pp. 137-140)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 21-26 (SV pp. 140143)
Rhetoric & Composition p.11
Unit: Research Project (Bullying at School) – Module 14
Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
Audience
Genre
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
Unit: Novel : Into the Wild - Module 8
Standards of Focus:
o
o
o
o
•
•
•
•
CONTENT STANDARDS
(CONTENT)
(SKILL)
“Students know…”
“Students are able to…”
Features of nonfiction / biography
• Create a year long portfolio of
module products reflective of each
Rhetorical devices
unit. (FS 3.6)
• Analyze both the features and the
rhetorical devices of different
types of public documents (RC 2.1
& FS 7.2)
Organizational patterns
• Analyze the way in which clarity
of meaning is affected by the
Hierarchical structures
patterns of organization,
Repetition
hierarchical structures, repetition
Main Ideas
of main ideas, syntax, and word
Syntax
choice in the text. (RC 2.2)
Diction
• Analyze the way in which the
Irony
theme or meaning of a selection
Tone
represents a view or comment on
Mood
life, using textual evidence to
Author’s style
support the claim. (LRA 3.2)
• Analyze the ways in which irony,
tone, mood, the author’s style, and
the “sound” of language achieve
specific rheetorical or aesthetic
purposes or both. (LRA 3.3)
Discourse
• Demonstrate an understanding of
a) Purpose
the elements of discourse (e.g.,
b) Speaker
purpose, speaker, audience, form)
c) Audience
when completing narrative,
d) Form
expository, persuasive, or
descriptive writing assignments
Genres of writing
(WS 1.1)
PERF. STD. MEASURES
How students DEMONSTRATE
KNOWLEDGE and SKILL
Reading Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
Portfolio Product:
• Activity 6 – First Reading (SV
p. 52)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance:
• Activities 1-5, & 7-13 (SV pp.
49-52 & 54-66)
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT
Required Text:
• Into the Wild – Krakauer
(1996)
Supplemental Texts:
• Write for College
Resources/Materials Menu:
*** Choose from the following
list of texts based on curricular
decisions, students’ needs,
and/or resource availability***
Informational Texts:
Current Periodicals
Ancillary Materials:
• A Text-Based Grammar for
Expository Reading & Writing
Writing Task:
Key Assignments/Assessments:
• Activities 14-20 – Prewriting
and Writing (SV pp. 64-67)
APPRX
TIME
Website
• www.writing.csusuccess.org
Key Vocabulary:
• Content-specific vocabulary
from Activity 7 (TV pp. 13,14)
• Author’s Note (TV p. 7)
8 WEEKS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading Comprehension 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
Literary Response and Analysis 3.2, 3.3
Writing Strategies 1.1, 1.3, 1.7, 1.9
Written & Oral English Language Conventions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3
Rhetoric & Composition p.12
Unit: Novel : Into the Wild - Module 8
•
•
•
•
Ideas
Arguments
Response to Literature
Anecdotal information
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tone
Voice
Sentence Variety
Style
Subtlety of meaning
Tone
Purpose
Audience
Genre
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grammar
Diction
Paragraph structure
Sentence Structure
Usage
Spelling
Punctuation
Capitalization
• Manuscript requirements
• Structure ideas and arguments in
sustained, persuasive, and
sophisticated way(WS 1.3)
• Support the ideas and arguments
with precise and relevant examples
• Use systematic strategies to
organize and record information
(e.g., anecdotal scripting,
annotated bibliographies (WS 1.7)
Classroom Instruction &
Performance
• Activities 21-23 (SV pp. 68-69)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Transcendent
Alaska taiga
Peregrinations
Impartial biographer
Dispassionate
Authorial presence
Oblique light
Emulating
Moral rigor
Shards
Fulminated
Narcissist
• Revise text to highlight the
individual voice (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to improve sentence
variety and style (WS 1.9 & FS
9.3)
• Revise text to enhance subtlety of
meaning and tone in ways that are
consistent with the purpose,
audience, and genre. (WS 1.9 &
FS 9.3)
• Demonstrate control of grammar,
diction, and paragraph and
sentence structure and an
understanding of English usage
(WC 1.1)
• Produce legible work that shows
accurate spelling and correct
punctuation and capitalization
(WC 1.2)
• Reflect appropriate manuscript
requirements in writing (WC 1.3)
KEY ASSIGNMENTS/ASSESSMENTS:
Reading Tasks
Writing Tasks
Quizzes & Tests
Projects – especially
Quadrant D and
Service Learning
Students will be required to complete classroom performance activities that lead
them to the creation of the portfolio product (See the specific Classroom Instruction
& Performance Activities described below)
Students will be required to complete five writing tasks that created their portfolio
products. These products are to be developed based on the analytical classroom
performance activities that were executed. (See the specific Portfolio Product
descriptions below)
Selection and/or content quizzes and tests will be given, as needed.
Service Learning activities involve research, preparation, action/demonstration, and
reflection of experiential applications of the content and will be credited toward the
district’s high school Service Learning requirement.. The learning (any products
developed, reflection on the service) will be graded by the instructor as one of the
performance based assessments; the service itself will not be graded or judged.
Rhetoric & Composition p.13
Content-Specific Assignments:
Throughout the modules, students participate in a variety of prereading, during reading, and postreading
activities that assist students in successfully completing the portfolio products.
Unit: Fast Food – Who’s to Blame? (Module 1)
•
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-9 & 11-15 (Student Version [SV] pp. 49-54 & 5558)
o Portfolio Product = Activity 10 (SV p. 54)
ƒ Students will graphically represent various aspects of a text so they can gain a
clearer understanding of the writer’s approach to the content of the essay.
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 19-23 (SV pp. 65-67)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 15-23 (58-67)
ƒ Students will be required to explain a writer’s argument, take a position on the
writer’s conclusion to the argument, a construct an argument in response.
ƒ Students will formulate a working thesis and begin a first draft of an essay including
a convincing argument.
ƒ Students will organize their essay, develop the content, revise and edit their drafts,
and reflect on their writing.
Unit: Going for the Look (Module 2)
•
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-8 & 10-14 (SV pp. 41-43 & 48-53)
o Portfolio Product = Activity 9 (SV pp. 43-48)
ƒ Students will describe the content and rhetorical purpose of a selection and determine
whether they think the text’s argument is explicit or implicit. They will also identify where
the argument is stated.
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 18-22 (SV pp. 58-61)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 14-17 (SV p. 53 - 58)
ƒ Students will explain a writer’s argument and decide if the argument the writer makes is
convincing and if the conclusion is justified.
ƒ Student will take a position on the writer’s conclusion to the argument and construct an
argument in response.
ƒ Students will consider their audience for their essay, formulate a working thesis, and
create a draft essay under timed conditions.
Unit: The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed Page: Ethos, Logos, Pathos (Module 3)
•
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-10 & 12-13 (SV pp. 37-43 & 44-46)
o Portfolio Product = Activity 11 (SV p. 43)
ƒ Students will analyze the logic and support of an argument, the character and
intentions of the author, and the emotional effects on the reader of the language
used and the details provided.
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 13-15 (SV pp. 46 - 47)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 16-17 (SV pp. 48 – 52)
Rhetoric & Composition p.14
ƒ
ƒ
Students will work on the organization and development of their written drafts to
make sure their letters are as effective as possible and meet the needs of the reader
as they respond to the text.
Students will edit their drafts to make sure their essays conform to the guidelines of
standard written English.
Unit: Language, Gender & Culture (Module 10)
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-13, 15-19 & 21-22 (SV pp. 45-52, 53-54 & 55)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 14 & 20 (SV pp. 52-53 & 54)
ƒ Students reread a text and analyze it for stylistic choices.
•
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 25-29 (SV pp. 56-60)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 22-24 (SV pp. 55-56)
ƒ Students practice answering questions that will help them understand writing
prompts.
ƒ Students will work to include some of the quotes they gathered from various texts
they have read as they write the first draft of their essay.
Unit: Research Project/ SLC Integrated Project (Bullying at School – Module 14)
•
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-12 & 14-15 (SV pp. 119-130 & 133-136)
o Portfolio Product = Activity 13 (SV pp. 131-132)
ƒ Students will move through the traditional rhetorical appeals, from a literal to an
analytical understanding of their reading.
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 16-20 (SV pp. 137-140)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 21-26 (SV pp. 140-143)
ƒ Students produce a coherent, organized, and persuasive proposal.
ƒ Students develop the content of the proposal, revise the draft, edit it to conform
to the guidelines of standard written English, reflect on their writing, and prepare
it for submission.
Unit: Into the Wild (Module 8)
•
•
Reading Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 1-5 &7-13 (SV pp. 49-52 & 54 – 66)
o Portfolio Product = Activity 6 (SV p. 52)
ƒ Students participate in a “first reading” of a core novel, participating in various
reading strategies as directed by focused questions.
Writing Task:
o Classroom Performance = Activities 21-23 (SV 68-69)
o Portfolio Product = Activities 14 – 20 (SV pp. 64 – 67)
ƒ Students select a writing prompt tied to the novel.
ƒ Students practice writing a draft essay in a time-pressure situation.
ƒ Students then develop a response to literature essay, using revision and editing
strategies to conform to the guidelines of standard written English, reflect on their
writing, and prepare it for submission.
Rhetoric & Composition p.15
PORTFOLIO PRODUCT CHECKLIST OF KEY ASSIGNMENTS
Rhetoric & Composition
Tasks
UNIT: Fast Food – Module 1
• Reading Product: Activity 10
• Writing Product: Activities 15-18
UNIT: Going for the Look – Module 2
• Reading Product: Activity 9
• Writing Product: Activities 14-17
UNIT: The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed – Module 3
• Reading Product: Activity 11
• Writing Product: Activities 13-15
UNIT: Language, Gender & Culture – Module 10
• Reading Product: Activities 14 & 20
• Writing Product: Activities 22-24
UNIT: Bullying at School – Module 14 (Research Unit)
• Reading Product: Activity 13
• Writing Product: Activities 16-20
UNIT: Into the Wild – Module 8
• Reading Product: Activity 6
• Writing Product: Activities 14 - 20
Date
Number
Completed of Drafts
Final
Score
Rhetoric & Composition p.16
Instructional Method and/or Strategies:
A variety of instructional strategies will be utilized to accommodate all learning styles:
English-specific Methods:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lecture
Reading from a variety of texts (fiction, non-fiction, functional documents, etc.)
Writing assignments (essays, research reports, journals, summaries)
Analytical assignments (graphic organizers, dialectical journals)
Student presentations
Whole-class discussion
Small group activities
Lesson Design & Delivery: Teachers will incorporate these components of lesson design during direct
instruction and inquiry activities. The order of components is flexible, depending on the teacher’s vision for the
individual lesson. For instance, the objective and purpose, while present in the teacher’s lesson plan, are not made
known to the students at the beginning of an inquiry lesson.
Anticipatory Set
Objective
Essential
Standard Reference
Elements of
Purpose
Input
Effective
Modeling
Instruction
Check for Understanding
Model for Lesson Design Guided Practice
Using Task Analysis
Closure
Independent Practice
Some components may occur once in a lesson, but others will recur many times. Checking for understanding occurs
continually; input, modeling, guided practice and closure may occur several times. There may even be more than one
anticipatory set when more than one content piece is introduced.
Active Participation: Teachers will incorporate the principles of active participation and specific strategies to
ensure consistent, simultaneous involvement of the minds of all learners in the classroom. Teachers should include
both covert and overt active participation strategies, incorporating cooperative learning structures and brain research.
Some of the possible active participation strategies include:
OVERT
(Oral)
COVERT
•
•
•
•
Recall
Imagine
Observe
Consider
•
•
•
•
•
•
Think (Write)/Pair/Share
Idea Wave
Choral Response
Give One, Get One
Socratic Seminar
Cooperative Discussion
Groups
OVERT
(Written)
•
•
•
•
•
Restate in Notes
Response Boards
Graphic Organizers
Folded Paper
Ticket Out of Class
OVERT
(Gestures)
•
•
•
•
Hand Signals
Model with Hand Motions
Stand up/ Sit down
Point to Examples
Baldrige Quality Tools: Students can become more positively involved in their education through goal setting,
self-assessment, and data tracking and analysis by making use of the following strategies:
BALDRIGE TOOL
Affinity Diagram
Flowchart
Force Field Diagram
Issues / Ideas Bin
Data Folder
Plus / Delta
Class Data Graphs
PURPOSES
– finding consensus, organizing complex information
– describing a process, planning a project, identifying problem steps in a process
– identifying obstacles, finding causes and solutions to problems
– handling individual questions/requests without stopping a group activity, providing
anonymous input, obtaining diverse input in specific areas.
– tracking goals and actual results
– tracking improvement efforts, identifying opportunities for change, finding out what’s
working and what’s not working in a process, procedure, activity, etc.
– displaying trends for goal setting
Rhetoric & Composition p.17
Diverse learning styles may be addressed by implementing combinations of the following:
Significant, Proven Strategies for ALL Students
‰ Hands-On Lab’s
‰ Student Presentations
‰ Inquiry Activities
‰ Peer Teaching
‰ Short/Long-term
‰ Summarization
projects
Literacy Strategies in
English
‰ Learning Logs
‰ Frayer Model
‰ Vocabulary Cards
‰ Linear Array
‰ Word Sorts
‰ Summary Writing
‰ Paraphrase Writing
‰ Precis
‰ Reciprocal Teaching
‰ List-Group-Label
‰ Anticipation guides
‰ Chunking the text
‰ Close reading
‰ Dialectical Journals
‰ GIST
‰ Literature Circles
‰ Marking the Text
‰ SOAPSTONE
‰ TP-CASTT
‰ What does it
say/mean/matter?
SDAIE Strategies for
English Learners
‰ Lower the Affective
Filter (including
Processing Time)
‰ Tapping/Building Prior
Knowledge (Graphic
Organizers, Schema)
‰ Acquisition Levels
‰ Language Sensitivity
‰ Grouping Strategies
‰ Multiple Intelligences
‰ Adapt the Text
‰ Interactive Learning
(Manipulatives &
Visuals)
‰ Home/School
Connection (including
Cultural Aspects)
‰ Essential Questions
‰ Thematic Units
‰ Field Experiences
‰ Current Events
‰ Career Choices
‰ Guest Speakers
Strategies for Students
with Disabilities
‰ IEP Accommodations
(refer to student’s IEP
document or IEP
summary sheet)
‰ Curricular Adaptations
(e.g., quantity, input,
participation, time,
level of difficulty, level
of support, output,
substitute curriculum,
alternate goals)
‰ Think Alouds
‰ Small Group
Instruction
‰ Learning Centers
‰ Manipulatives &
Visuals
‰ Peer Assisted Learning
Differentiation for
Advanced Learners
‰ Curriculum
Compacting
‰ Depth and Complexity
‰ Flexible Grouping
‰ Acceleration
‰ Tiered Assignments
‰ Independent Study
Please note that these strategies often overlap and should not be limited to specifically defined courses or student populations.
TEXTBOOKS:
Basic Textbook:
Read in entirety
Read in entirety
Supplemental Textbook:
Excerpts used ERWC Course Binder, CSU 2008
Excerpts used Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer, 1996
Read in entirety
Excerpts used
Write for College : A Student Handbook ; 1996, 2003, 2011
SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:
In addition to the basic text, a variety of instructional tools will be used to meet the needs of all students
Teacher Resources
•
•
•
•
•
Reading, Writing Handbook, a district resource with rubrics and scoring guides
A Text-Based Grammar for Expository Reading and Writing (Ching) 2008
Reading Rhetorically (Bean, Chappell, Gillam) 2004, 2007, 2011
They Say, I Say (Graff, Birkenstein) 2010
Academic Literacy (Intersegmental Committee of the Academic Senates of the California Community
Colleges, the California State University, and the University of California ) 2002
• Focus on English (Harrington) 2002
As well, teachers can select additional titles from the following grade lists. Consult with department chairs
and/or small learning community teachers before using titles from another grade-level.
Rhetoric & Composition p.18
9th Grade
Supplemental Texts
(Only to be used AFTER completing Core Texts)
CORE Texts
Homer
Harper Lee
William Shakespeare
Charles Dickens
The Odyssey
To Kill a Mockingbird
Romeo and Juliet
Great Expectations
(ACC)
Bless Me, Ultima
House on Mango Street
White Fang
Let the Circle Be Unbroken
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Tex, The Outsiders
Rudolfo Anaya
Sandra Cisneros
Jack London
Mildred Taylor
Mark Twain
S. E. Hinton
10th Grade (NOT TO BE USED IN 9th GRADE)
Supplemental Texts
(Only to be used AFTER completing Core Texts)
CORE Texts
Julius Caesar or Othello
Night
William
Shakespeare
Elie Wiesel
AND IN ADDITION, each site
MUST choose TWO of the
following:
• Animal Farm
• Things Fall Apart
• Lord of the Flies
• Fahrenheit 451
George Orwell
Chinua Achebé
William Golding
Ray Bradbury
Twelve Angry Men
The Good Earth
Siddhartha
A Separate Peace(ACC)
Life of Pi
Cry, the Beloved Country
(ACC)
The Pearl
Reginald Rose
Pearl S. Buck
Herman Hesse
John Knowles
Yann Martel
Alan Paton
John Steinbeck
11th Grade (NOT TO BE USED IN 9th OR 10th GRADES)
CORE Texts
Of Mice and Men
The Crucible (Drama)
Catcher in the Rye
The Great Gatsby (H)
The Scarlet Letter (H)
Huckleberry Finn (H)
Grapes of Wrath (H)
John Steinbeck
Arthur Miller
J. D. Salinger
F. Scott Fitsgerald
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Mark Twain
John Steinbeck
Supplemental Texts
(Only to be used AFTER completing Core Texts)
A Farewell to Arms
Animal Dreams
Bean Trees
Glass Menagerie
Native Son
Our Town (Drama)
The Sun Also Rises
Their Eyes Were Watching
God
Joy Luck Club
Sound and Fury
Narrative of Frederic Douglas
As I Lay Dying
My California (Non-Fiction)
Inherit the Wind
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Black Boy
Raisin in the Sun (Drama)
Ernest Hemingway
Barbara Kingsolver
Barbara Kingsolver
Tennessee Williams
Richard Wright
Thorton Wilder
Ernest Hemingway
Zora Neale Hurston
Amy Tan
William Faulkner
Frederick Douglas
William Faulkner
Various authors
Jerome Lawrence &
Robert E. Lee
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Richard Wright
Lorraine Hansbury
12th Grade Rhetoric & Composition (NOT TO BE USED IN 9th, 10th, or 11th grades)
Supplemental Texts
CORE Texts
(Only to be used AFTER completing Core Texts)
Fast Food – Module 1
All of these
Going for the Look – Module 2
Modules can be
Any other Modules in the Binders
The Rhetoric of the Op-Ed – Module 3 located in the
Language Gender & Culture – Module ERWC Course
10
Binders
Bullying at School – Module 14
Into the Wild – Module 8
Rhetoric & Composition p.19
RESOURCES:
Documents
‰ Reading, Writing Handbook ( 2003): LBUSD Language Arts Intranet (Instructional Tools)
‰ Writing Prompts (1995):
LBUSD Language Arts Intranet (Instructional Tools)
‰ Scoring Rubrics 6-point (2007):
LBUSD Language Arts Intranet (Instructional Tools)
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND/OR TOOLS:
Student achievement in this course will be measured using multiple assessment tools including but not limited to:
Suggested Evaluation Tools:
Source
Diagnostic
(Diagnose)
• Writing Folder
District Developed
Assessments
Teacher/Department
Developed
Assessments
• On demand /timed
writing
• Journal writing
• Quick writes
• Summaries
• Paraphrases
• Work samples
• Interviews
• Learning Logs/Writer’s
Notebook
Other Informal
Assessments
Formative
(Monitor)
Summative
(Evaluate)
• Writing Portfolio/Writing • Mock CAHSEE
Folders
• Six (6) on demand
essays
• Semester Test (TBD)
• Five (5) process
essays
• One (1) Presentation
• EOC Exam (TBD)
• Four (4) multiple
• On demand/timed
choice assessments
writing
• Daily Written
Responses , i.e.
journals, quick writes,
summaries,
paraphrases, poetry,
short answers quizzes,
unpacking a prompt,
comprehension quizzes
• Reading Logs
• Academic
notebooks/Writer’s
Notebooks.
• Response journal
• Response journal
• Reading log
• Reading log
• Learning Logs/Writer’s
• Interviews
Notebook
• Learning Logs/Writer’s
• Student self-evaluation
Notebook
• Student self-evaluation • Reading portfolio
selection
• Records of independent
• Records of independent
reading
reading
• “Kid watching”
• Poetry
• Short stories
• Collected Vignettes
Rhetoric & Composition p.20
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS CRITERIA
Defines how good is good enough on which measures to demonstrate achievement of content
standards.
State Standards:
The California State Board of Education has identified the following performance levels for the California
Content Standards Test in English/Language Arts. The objective of Long Beach Unified School District is to
have all students achieve at or above the Proficient Performance Standard (Level). The table below indicates
the number correct, the estimated percent correct (based on 2009 data) and the Reported Scaled Score (SS)
on the Content Standards Test.
CST
Proficiency
Levels
Far Below
Basic
(FBB)
Below Basic
(BB)
Basic
(B)
Proficient
(P)
Advanced
Proficient
(AP)
Raw Score
(# of items
correct /
75 items)
~ % correct
Scale score
0-21
22-31
32-46
47-58
59-75
Less than 31%
Less than 265
32% - 43%
265-299
44% - 63%
300-349
64% - 79%
350-396
More than 79%
More than 397
District Performance Standards:
The Long Beach Unified School District has common assessments and key assignments that are required for Rhetoric & Composition.
The Performance Standard Criteria for district-wide and classroom setting are shown in the table below.
Key Assignments
Not Proficient
Partial Proficient
Proficient
Advanced
Proficient
Less than 60%
60-69%
70-84%
85-100%
Classroom Performance Standards:
The objective of instruction is to help all students achieve at or above the Proficient Level and receive a C or better in the course.
Performance level is determined by the average of the assessments or assignments.
Graded Student
Work
Writing or projects
or performances
scored on a 6 point
rubric
Writing projects or
performances
scored on a 4 point
rubric
Not Proficient
Partial Proficient
Proficient
Advanced
Proficient
rubric score of
1 or 2
rubric score of
3
rubric score of
4
rubric score of
5 or 6
rubric score of
1
rubric score of
2
rubric score of
3
rubric score of
4
Rhetoric & Composition p.21
STANDARD GRADING SCALE:
A 90 – 100%
Advanced Proficient
B 80 – 89%
Proficient
C 70 – 79%
Partial Proficient
D 60 – 69%
0 – 59%
F
Not Proficient
.................................................................................................................................................................
..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
.................................................................................................................................................................
Suggested Grade Weighting:
1. Reading Tasks
o
~ 25%
Using a piece of text (literature, expository, poetry/songs, functional text, etc.), students will create a representation that
demonstrates competency in description, comprehension, analysis, reflection, etc. according to a predetermined
rubric/scoring guide. ALL STUDENTS NEED TO COMPLETE THE PORTFOLIO PRODUCTS. Additional tasks could
include literature circle responses, short story or novel question responses, story frames/maps, posters/brochures,
graphic organizers, Cornell notes, double entry journals/reading response logs, vocabulary study.
2. Writing Tasks
o
~ 25%
This writing can be casual, informal, or process writing (formal). ALL STUDENTS NEED TO COMPLETE THE
PORTFOLIO PRODUCTS. Tasks include: journal quick writes, one-pagers, short paragraph responses, pre-writes, drafts,
peer feedback, graphic organizers, grammar practice, character sketches, paragraph summaries, process analytical
essays, etc.
3. Homework
o
not more than 10%
This practice reinforces the learning done in class. The work should be checked for completion but not graded. It is
practice in a skill. Homework could be: spelling, reading logs, SSR, vocabulary study, grammar practice, rough draft
revision, text annotation, journal writing, note taking, long term project work, etc.
4. Listening & Speaking (Participation)
o
~ 20%
These skills are the cornerstones of classroom management, discussions, oral presentations, and active class
participation. Examples include: Literature circles, Socratic Seminars, peer feedback and critiques, everyday reader’s
theatre, choral response, informal presentations, recitations, think-pair-share, classroom participation, etc.
5. Tests, Quizzes, Quarter Exams & End-of-Course Exam
o
~ 20%
These can be the Holt assessments and the “chunked” quick assessments to check understanding of the content taught
so far. Teachers can use these to determine if students are ready to move on and to determine mastery. The miniassessments can be oral, multiple-choice, short answer, essay format, or even a poster. Examples include: spelling
quizzes, vocabulary checks, short story checks, genre terms, quizzes, 1st quarter, mid-year, 3rd quarter, end-of-year, etc.
The End-of-Course exam should be included in this category.
Submitted by:
Shelley Gustafson
Submission Date:
June 2011
School/Office:
K-12 Language Arts Office
Curriculum Writing Team Members:
Sondra McNair (Jordan), James Hutchinson (Millikan), Myron Nickerson
(Renaissance), and Wendy Orkin (Lakewood)
Original Board Approval Date:
7/18/11
Revised Board Approval Date:
History/data/common/shelley/courseoutlines revised 05/2011
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