MA in English Studies 2015/16

MA in English Studies 2015/16
School of English
MA in English Studies
Handbook
2015-16
www.le.ac.uk/english
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Table of Contents
Welcome/Introduction ...............................................................................................................................................4
Induction.....................................................................................................................................................................5
For International Students..........................................................................................................................................5
Department Details ....................................................................................................................................................5
School Communications .........................................................................................................................................5
Staff List and Key Contacts .....................................................................................................................................6
Student Communications and Personal Details .....................................................................................................6
Research Seminar Series.........................................................................................................................................6
Learn at Leicester .......................................................................................................................................................8
University Library....................................................................................................................................................8
IT Services ...............................................................................................................................................................8
Student Learning Development..............................................................................................................................9
Students’ Union Education Unit (ED)......................................................................................................................9
Learn a New Language with Languages at Leicester ..............................................................................................9
English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU) ..................................................................................................................9
Other University Facilities.........................................................................................................................................11
University Bookshop .............................................................................................................................................11
Brookfield House ..................................................................................................................................................11
University Regulations ..............................................................................................................................................12
Student Responsibilities .......................................................................................................................................12
Attendance and Engagement Requirements .......................................................................................................12
Neglect of Academic Obligations..........................................................................................................................12
Recording Lectures and Teaching Sessions ..........................................................................................................13
Course details ...........................................................................................................................................................13
Programme and Module Specifications ...............................................................................................................13
Attendance Requirements (if applicable) .............................................................................................................13
Teaching Timetable ..............................................................................................................................................13
Schedule of Year's Activities .................................................................................................................................13
Key Assessment Dates ..........................................................................................................................................15
Schedules and Reading Lists .................................................................................................................................15
Dissertation Preparation ......................................................................................................................................18
Coursework Submission .......................................................................................................................................21
Penalties for late submission of work ..................................................................................................................21
Change of Course/Module ...................................................................................................................................21
Marking and Assessment Practices ..........................................................................................................................22
Feedback and the Return of Work from Staff ......................................................................................................22
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Progression and Classification of Awards .............................................................................................................22
Referencing and Academic Integrity ........................................................................................................................23
Referencing style ..................................................................................................................................................23
Plagiarism and collusion .......................................................................................................................................26
Penalties ...............................................................................................................................................................26
Resources and advice to help you study with integrity and avoid committing plagiarism ..................................26
Notification of Ill Health and Other Mitigating Circumstances ................................................................................26
Ethical Approval of Student Projects ........................................................................................................................27
Personal Support for Students .................................................................................................................................27
Departmental Student Support Arrangements ....................................................................................................27
Equal Opportunities ..............................................................................................................................................28
University Student Support Arrangements ..........................................................................................................28
Health Care and Registering with a Doctor ..........................................................................................................29
Careers and Employability ........................................................................................................................................29
Career Development Service ................................................................................................................................29
Feedback from Students ...........................................................................................................................................31
Student Feedback Questionnaires .......................................................................................................................31
Student Staff Committees ....................................................................................................................................31
Societies ....................................................................................................................................................................31
Safety and Security ...................................................................................................................................................32
Personal Belongings..................................................................................................................................................32
Complaints and Academic Appeals Procedures .......................................................................................................32
Tutors........................................................................................................................................................................34
Marking Criteria ........................................................................................................................................................35
EN7001 Bibliography Presentation.......................................................................................................................35
EN7001 Written Exercise ......................................................................................................................................36
Marking Criteria for Coursework ..........................................................................................................................37
MA Oral Presentation Marking Criteria ..................................................................................................................2
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Welcome/Introduction
The MA English Studies offers students the opportunity to focus on the area of English literary studies that
interests them most, with modules covering literature and language from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early
twenty-first century. Students will also acquire advanced research skills to enable independent scholarly enquiry.
This Master's course offers the opportunity to write a dissertation of either 15,000 or 25,000 words and is suited
to those thinking of subsequent research to doctoral level as well as to those wishing to pursue careers in other
areas.
As well as the dissertation, the course consists of an assessed module in Bibliography and Research Methods and
either three or four specialist modules, depending on the dissertation length chosen. Students will be asked to
decide before the end of Semester 1 which dissertation they wish to take (at the start of the second year for
part-time students). Students may opt to take Creative Writing options. See Module Descriptions below for
further details.
The School of English hosts a number of seminar series including the English Research Seminars, the Leicester
Linguistics Seminars, the Medieval Research Centre Seminar Series, the Leicester Early Modern Seminar, the
Victorian Studies Seminar Series, and the Modern Literature Research Seminars. These offer students the
opportunity to hear talks by visiting speakers and by Leicester academics.
This Handbook contains important information about the course and University: the course structure, module
outlines, reading lists, marking criteria, staff details, facts about the library and computing facilities, and more.
Please read the Handbook carefully and keep it safe – you’ll need to refer to it throughout the course.
The MA tutors look forward to teaching you and wish you an enjoyable and successful year.
Dr Kate Loveman
Course Director
September 2015
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Induction
An induction session for new students will be held 11.00am to 1.00pm on Wednesday 30 September: this
session will include students in the School of English, the School of Modern Languages and the Department of
the History of Art and Film.
For International Students
International students are encouraged to attend the University's International Student Welcome Programme
(www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/welfare/international-student-support/iswp) prior to the beginning of term.
International Student Support also provide ongoing support and advice for International students
(www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/welfare/international-student-support).
Students who are non-native English speakers and/or who are not familiar with UK Higher Education are strongly
advised to attend the English Language Teaching Unit's in-sessional programme Academic English for
Postgraduates and Staff (www2.le.ac.uk/offices/eltu/insessional/el2000). These classes are provided free of
charge for postgraduates and are designed to develop students' English-language and study skills.
Department Details
A brief history of the School may be found here: www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/about
The School is located in the Attenborough Tower, primarily on floors 13, 14, and 15. The School Office is
Attenborough 1514. Campus maps are available at: www2.le.ac.uk/maps
Information on School research interests can be found via the staff list
at: www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people
School Communications
Pigeonholes for postgraduate students are located on the sixteenth floor. Noticeboards containing information
relevant to postgraduates are also located on the sixteenth floor. Staff pigeonholes are located on the fifteenth
floor, in Attenborough 1514.
Dr Kate Loveman, Director of the MA in English Studies, is available for consultation about matters academic and
pastoral at the times advertised on the door of her room. In emergencies, she can be contacted at other times.
In addition, all students are allocated a personal tutor, whom they are invited to consult about personal and
academic difficulties met during the course. Your personal tutor will offer confidential advice and support on a
range of matters, from official dealings with the University, College or School (this includes advice on issues
relating to modules on which your personal tutor also teaches; as personal tutor their role is to provide you with
support, not discipline) to guidance on how to proceed in the event of a failure. It is in your interests to ensure
that your personal tutor is kept informed about anything that might affect your ability to fulfil your assignment
and attendance obligations. Your personal tutor will be able to put you in touch with a range of specialist
advisers within the university, qualified to give financial, medical and welfare advice.
For administrative matters, the Programme Administration team are available in Attenborough 1514 from
9.00am to 5.00pm, Monday to Friday.
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Staff List and Key Contacts
The School’s complete staff list may be found online at: www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people
The following table provides key contact information:
Professor Philip Shaw
Dr Kate Loveman
Head of School
Course Director
+44 (0)116 252 5365
+44 (0)116 252 2627
Attenborough 1615
Attenborough 1407
[email protected]
[email protected]
Dr Julian North
Dr Jonathan Taylor
Senior Tutor for PGT
Careers Tutor
+44 (0)116 252 2776
+44 (0)116 252 2778
Attenborough 1308
Attenborough 1513
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr David Revill
Programme Administrator
+44 (0)116 252 2622
Attenborough 1514
[email protected]
Student Communications and Personal Details
The University keeps a record of your personal details such as your full name, addresses i.e. home address and
term-time address, telephone numbers, personal email address and your emergency contact details. It is
important to keep your details up to date as this will help you to receive information about your studies and
exams and also ensure that official documents are provided to you with the correct name details.
You can check and update your details by logging-in to MyStudentRecord http://mystudentrecord.le.ac.uk using
your University username and password. Click on the My Details tab and you will then be able to review and
change your personal details.
It is important that you check your University email account frequently to ensure that you do not miss any
important communication from the University.
Research Seminar Series
The School hosts a number of research seminar series during the year; postgraduate students are very welcome
to attend these seminars.
School of English Research Seminar
The School of English Research Seminar runs on Wednesdays 1.00-2.00pm throughout first and second
semesters. Members of staff will speak on their current research and invite questions and discussion. All are
welcome. Please see email and noticeboards for further details or contact Dr Mark Rawlinson on [email protected]
(Semester One) or Dr Emma Parker on [email protected] (Semester Two).
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Leicester Linguistics Seminar
The Leicester Linguistics Seminars are held on alternate Mondays from 5.15-6.15pm. The talks, many given by
scholars from outside the University of Leicester, cover a diverse range of topics in language and linguistics.
Victorian Studies Spring Seminar Series
The Victorian Studies Spring Seminar series takes place on Wednesday evenings in Attenborough 1315, the
Phillip Collins Seminar Room. The dates for 2015 are to be confirmed.
Early Modern Research Seminar
This seminar covers the period 1500-1800. It runs in the second semester, at 5.15pm on Mondays. Please
email [email protected] to be added to the seminar email list and receive further information.
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Learn at Leicester
Whatever your subject or level of study, there are many, many different ways in which you can access academic
advice and support. The Learn at Leicester webpage provides you with further details of this support, together
with direct links to a wide range of resources and services to help you:
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Make the most of the Library
Develop your IT skills
Manage your own learning
Improve your English language
Get independent advice about your course
Manage your student information
You can access all of this by visiting: www.le.ac.uk/learnatleicester
University Library
The Library is your gateway to high quality information relevant to your studies. Using it effectively contributes
directly to your success.
The Library provides you with:
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access to a huge range of specialist information resources including a print collection of over 1 million
items and a Digital Library of over 500,000 eBooks and 50,000 electronic journals which you can use
from anywhere on the Web;
help in finding and using information; online, face to face and by telephone;
individual and group study space, including the Graduate School Reading Room exclusively for
postgraduate students;
PCs, netbooks and wireless networking for your laptop;
services for distance learners and researchers.
The Library is a shared resource for all members of the University. Please respect it and observe the Library
regulations available at www.le.ac.uk/library/about.
To get started, visit www.le.ac.uk/library.
For information about your subject, please visit www2.le.ac.uk/library/find/subjects/english.
IT Services
Whilst studying at the University you will have a University IT account and email address. There are hundreds of
University PCs available with Office 2010 and many specialist programs to help you with your studies.
Visit www.le.ac.uk/it4students for more information about:
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Student email: access your email and calendar anywhere, including on your smartphone or other mobile
device;
Printing: print, copy or scan on campus; pay by topping up your print and copy account;
IT Help: visit the Help Zone in the Library, phone 0116 252 2253, email [email protected] or attend a
training course;
Wifi: free access to eduroam wifi on campus, in halls or at other universities;
PCs on campus: there are over 900 PCs available, with 350 located in the David Wilson Library (including
24/7 access during exam periods). Download the map to find a Student PC area on campus
from: www.le.ac.uk/pcareas;
Files: store files on your Personal Z: drive, which is backed up and available anywhere;
Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment: support and information for all your courses;
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Leicester Digital Library: access to journals, databases and electronic books online;
Mobile app: download the University mobile app to find a University PC available near you or access
Blackboard Mobile Learn.
More information can be found at www.le.ac.uk/it4students
Student Learning Development
Studying for a degree is a stimulating, challenging and rewarding experience. In order to make the most of this
experience, the University of Leicester provides a wide range of resources and services to support and enhance
your academic development in areas such as essay-writing, critical thinking, independent learning and timemanagement. The Student Learning Development Team is here to help you develop the skills and abilities you
need in order to succeed in your studies. To find out more about how we can help you develop your academic
skills and abilities, visit our website: www.le.ac.uk/succeedinyourstudies.
Students’ Union Education Unit (ED)
Education help and advice is provided by the Students’ Union for all students.
If you would find it helpful to talk to someone outside of your department, we offer a confidential and impartial
service to help and advise you about where to go and what to do. If you wish to come and talk to us about your
personal circumstances or academic worries, for example, exams or putting together an academic appeal, we
will provide a professional and friendly service.
You will find the Education Unit staff in the Students’ Union Building on the first floor within the West Wing.
Opening hours are 10.00 am to 4.00 pm, online chat facilities are available (visit our website for further details),
you can either pop in or book an appointment by contacting us on the details below:
Contact: Students’ Union Education Unit (ED), Students’ Union (First Floor)
+44 (0)116 223 1132/1228 | [email protected] | http://leicesterunion.com/support/education
Learn a New Language with Languages at Leicester
There are many benefits to learning a new language. Not only could you enhance your career prospects and
broaden your cultural horizons, but studies show that you could also improve your literacy skills, boost your
memory, increase your attention span, and even help to grow your brain!
Study with the Languages at Leicester Team on campus, and you will be taught by expert native tutors who are
based within our School of Modern Languages. We offer 16 different languages including Arabic, British Sign
Language, Chinese and Spanish to name just a few, six different levels of learning and two different course
lengths, so you can study in a way that suits you. Classes take place during evenings and Wednesday afternoons,
as well as intensive ‘fast track’ courses on Saturday mornings.
Find out more about Languages at Leicester, including fees and term dates at: www.le.ac.uk/ml/lal.
The successful completion of a Languages at Leicester course will appear on your Higher Education Achievement
Report (HEAR) when you graduate. For further details about the HEAR, please visit: www.le.ac.uk/hear.
Contact: Languages at Leicester:
+44(0)116 252 2662 | [email protected] | www.le.ac.uk/ml/lal
English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU)
The English Language Teaching Unit provides the following in-sessional courses for postgraduate students who
wish to improve their English language skills:
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EL7000 Academic English for Postgraduates and Staff
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EL7040 Academic Grammar
EL7050 Academic Listening
EL7060 Academic Speaking
If you are new to Higher Education in the UK, we would recommend EL7030 Academic Writing Lectures, a series
of four one-hour lectures in which the essentials of academic writing in a UK university are discussed.
Find out more at: www2.le.ac.uk/offices/eltu/insessional
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Other University Facilities
University Bookshop
The Bookshop is owned by the University and is located on the ground floor of the David Wilson Library.
All prescribed and recommended texts are stocked, so that students can rely on the Bookshop for the books that
they need in the course of their studies. We also sell a wide range of paperbacks and books of general interest.
Books not in stock can be quickly provided to order. The Bookshop has a range of deals in the Autumn term
which are exclusively for students.
Greetings cards, a wide range of stationery items and University of Leicester branded merchandise and clothing
are always available.
The opening hours are:
Monday to Friday
9.00 a.m. - 5.30 p.m. (5.00 p.m. in vacations)
Saturday
10.00 a.m. - 2.00 p.m.
Contact: University Bookshop, David Wilson Library
+44 (0)116 229 7440 | [email protected] | www.le.ac.uk/bookshop
Twitter: @LeicUniBookshop | Facebook: www.facebook.com/UoLBookshop
Brookfield House
Brookfield is the University of Leicester’s new Postgraduate Teaching Centre and is a modern academic and
social hub for all our Masters degree and taught postgraduate students and research students. Please
visit: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/gradschool/brookfield.
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University Regulations
Senate Regulations (www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations) contain rules and other important information about being
an undergraduate or taught postgraduate student at the University of Leicester. The Regulations are part of the
formal contract between you and the University; you will have confirmed when completing registration that you
will comply with procedures defined in the University’s Regulations.
The Quick Guide to Student Responsibilities (www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations/responsibilities) summarises some
of your most important responsibilities as a student at Leicester, as defined in detail in the Regulations. These
responsibilities relate to:
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attendance
submission of work by set deadlines
term time employment (full-time students – Home/EU and International)
illness or other circumstances impacting upon studies
maintaining your personal details
the additional responsibilities of international students
Failure to adhere to student responsibilities can have serious consequences and may lead to the termination of
your studies.
Student Responsibilities
The University expects its students to behave responsibly and with consideration to others at all times. The
University’s expectations about student behaviour are described in:
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the Student Charter
the Regulations governing Student Discipline
the Student Code of Social Responsibility
the Code of Practice governing Freedom of Speech
the University’s regulatory statement concerning Harassment and Discrimination
These can be found at www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulations
Attendance and Engagement Requirements
Attendance and engagement with your course is an essential requirement for success in your studies. The
University’s expectations about attendance are defined in Senate Regulation 4: governing student obligations
(see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation4). Full-time students must reside in Leicester, or within easy commuting
distance of the city, for the duration of each semester. You should attend all lectures, seminars, practical
sessions and other formal classes specified in your course timetable, unless you have been officially advised that
attendance at a particular session is not compulsory or you have received formal approval for absence. You are
also expected to undertake all assessments set for you.
The University operates a Student Attendance Monitoring procedure. Your attendance will be monitored
throughout the academic year and if sessions are missed without an acceptable explanation being provided to
your department then neglect of academic obligations procedures will be initiated. This may result in your
course of study being terminated.
If you are an international student and your course is terminated this will be reported to UK Visas and
Immigration (UKVI), in line with University sponsor obligations.
Neglect of Academic Obligations
You are expected to attend all learning and teaching events which are timetabled for you. These include
lectures, tutorials or practical classes. You are also expected to submit work within the deadlines notified to
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you. Persistent failure to attend taught sessions and/or to submit work, without good cause, will be considered
to be a neglect of academic obligations. Departmental procedures for dealing with neglect are set out within
the University’s regulations (see http://www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation4 ‘Neglect of academic obligations’). In
the most serious of cases of neglect the University has the right to terminate a student’s course.
Recording Lectures and Teaching Sessions
The University recognises that there are occasions when students may wish to record lectures to support their
learning. Where a student believes that there are good academic reasons to request permission to record a
lecture a University policy applies (see https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/quality/recordinglectures). The
policy seeks to protect the intellectual and privacy rights of both staff and students and take account of the
relevant legislation concerning data protection and copyright issues
Course details
For information on normal and maximum periods of registration, please see Senate Regulation 2, paragraphs
2.20 to 2.29.
Programme and Module Specifications
View the programme and module specifications for your course via www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses
In the programme specification you will find a summary of the aims of your course of study and its learning
outcomes, alongside details of its teaching and learning methods and means of assessment. The programme
specification also identifies the core modules that make up the course and any choice of optional modules. Each
module has its own specification that formally records that module’s aims, teaching and learning methods,
assessment components and their percentage weighting.
Attendance Requirements (if applicable)
Attendance is an essential requirement for success in your studies. The University’s expectations about
attendance are defined in Senate Regulation 4: governing student obligations (see www.le.ac.uk/senateregulation4). Full-time students must reside in Leicester, or within easy commuting distance of the city, for the
duration of each semester. You should attend all lectures, seminars, practical sessions and other formal classes
specified in your course timetable, unless you have been officially advised that attendance at a particular session
is not compulsory or you have received formal approval for absence.
In addition to other attendance monitoring practices, departments will monitor international student
attendance at two ‘checkpoints’ during each academic year, typically at a compulsory learning and teaching
session appearing in course or examination timetables. Students will not normally be notified of checkpoint
dates in advance. If you are an international student and you fail to meet attendance and/or checkpoint
requirements this may result in the termination of your course and the subsequent reporting of this to UK Visas
and Immigration (UKVI), in line with University sponsor obligations.
Tutors will keep a record of students' attendance at seminars; where modules are team-taught, module
convenors will monitor attendance across the semester.
Teaching Timetable
You will be notified of any timetable alterations by email/Blackboard; please check your University email
account frequently.
Schedule of Year's Activities
See www.le.ac.uk/av/avsrooms/index.html for help in locating venues.
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SEMESTER 1 (Autumn Term)
FOR WHOM
October
WHAT
WHEN
WHERE
Start of Semester I and Autumn Term–––Monday 28 September 2015
New students
Induction Event
Wednesday 30
September October,
11.00am-4.00pm
ATT UFT (11.00am)
BEN LT10 (2.00pm)
Att LG01 (3.00pm)
All students
English Postgraduate
Reception
Wednesday 30
September 5.00-6.30pm
Belvoir City Annexe, second floor of the
Charles Wilson Building
New students
Bibliography, Research
Methods & Writing
Skills course
Commencing Wednesday
7 October, weekly,
10.00am-12.00noon
See separate timetable for topics and
venues
FT / PT
students
Supervisors and
Personal Tutors to be
assigned
by end of October
For interest
Postgraduate StudentStaff Committee
Wednesday 28 October
1.00pm (student
representatives only)
December
Autumn Term ends–––Friday 11 December 2015
For interest
January 2015
Att 104
University closed
24 December 2015 to
3 January 2016 inclusive
Christmas and New Year break
Spring Term starts Monday 11 January 2016
Semester I ends Friday 22 January 2016
Semester II starts Monday 25 January 2016
All students
Autumn Term option
essays due
Wednesday 27 January,
12.00noon
1 copy electronically via Turnitin; 2
copies via postgraduate post box on Att
floor 16
February/March / April Spring Term ends Friday 18 March
For interest
Postgraduate StudentStaff Committee
Wednesday 10 February
1.00pm (student
representatives only)
TBC
For interest
University closed
25 March to 30 March
inclusive
Easter
May
Summer Term begins Monday 26 April
All students
University closed
Monday 2 May
May Day Bank Holiday
PT2 students
Dissertation
Presentations Practice
Thursday 5 May
TBC
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FT / PT2
students
Dissertation
Presentations
Thursday 12 May
TBC
For interest
Postgraduate StudentStaff Committee
Wednesday 25 May
1.00pm (student
representatives only)
TBC
June
End of Summer Term and Semester II Friday 24 June 2016
September
Completing
students
Dissertations due
Friday 30 September,
12.00noon
3 bound copies to be handed in to Att
1514 with a cover sheet; 1 copy
electronically via Turnitin
Key Assessment Dates
Module
Assessment Deadlines
Return-by Dates
Autumn-term option
4,000-word essay: Wednesday 27
January 2016
Wednesday 17 February 2016
Spring-term option
4,000-word essay: Wednesday 4 May
2016
Thursday 26 May 2016
Dissertation
15,000-/25,000-word dissertation:
Friday 30 September, 12.00noon
Following November Board of
Examiners’ meeting
Schedules and Reading Lists
EN7001 Bibliography, Research Methods, and Writing Skills for Postgraduates
The module is compulsory for all new postgraduates in the School of English and in the Victorian Studies Centre.
It meets on Wednesday mornings from 10.00am to 12.00noon, unless otherwise specified, beginning on 7
October 2015. See www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation for assessment details.
Wk
Date
Venue
Topic
Tutor
2
7 October
Special
Collections
Reading Room
(DW Library
basement)
INTRODUCTION and RESEARCH IN LEICESTER
Dr J North,
Introduction to the module and information about
the assessment; Research in the School of English
and the Leicester University Library Archive.
Dr Lucy Evans
DW IT R1
ELECTRONIC SOURCES OF INFORMATION I: Search
strategies and online catalogues
Ms Jackie Hanes
(Library)
3
14 October
10-11 Introduction to using electronic sources at
Leicester. This first hour is voluntary and is suitable
for those who are new to Leicester or want to
refresh their knowledge.
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11-12 Using electronic sources at MA level
This hour is not voluntary and everyone should
attend.
4
21 October
FJ L66
ACADEMIC WRITING AND REFERENCING
Dr J North
5
28 October
DW IT R1
USING SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES
Dr Simon Dixon, Ms
Caroline Sampson
(Library)
6
4 November
FJ L66
ENGAGING WITH CRITICS: Writing a critical review
Prof Gowan Dawson
7
11 November
SPECIALIST SESSIONS:
ATT219
AAH SR1
th
HISTORICAL SOURCES, 19 CENTURY
th
PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS AND 19 -CENTURY
PERIODICALS ONLINE
Ms Jackie Hanes
(Library),
CREATIVE WRITING
Mr Nick Everett
KE323
MODERN LITERATURE
8
18 November
DW IT R1
REFERENCING AND REFWORKS: Hands-on session
NB Attendance this week is voluntary
Dr J Moore
Dr Sarah Graham
Ms Jackie Hanes
(Library)
10-11.30 introduces managing your references and
citations though refworks.
1130-12 This is a 30 minute drop-in for anyone who
has questions about electronic searches. Can’t find
the articles/books you are looking for? Come along!
9
10
25 November
2 December
FJ L66
FJ L66
PRESENTATION SKILLS and PREPARING YOUR
BIBLIOGRAPHY PRESENTATION
Dr Ben Parsons
YOUR MA DISSERTATION
Dr Julian North
Dr K Loveman
(and an opportunity to ask any questions you have
about the assessments for EN7001)
11
9 December
STUDENT BIBLIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS:
FJ SW SR3
BENL LG85
II. MA Victorian Studies
Dr J North, and Prof.
Gail Marshall
III. MA Modern Literature
Dr Victoria Stewart and
Mr Nick Everett
EN7223 Editing and Textual Cultures
Module Convenor: Dr Kate Loveman
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This cross-period core module introduces students to the wide range of textual practices and cultures in English
literature. It examines how the interpretation of works is affected by editorial factors, as well as introducing
theories of textual editing, book history, and material culture. It will provide a sound understanding of past and
present editorial practices together with a critical appraisal of relevant methodologies and approaches.
EN7224 Cities of Words
Module convenor: Dr Corinne Fowler
You will take this module if you have chosen to submit a short (60-credit) dissertation.
In this module, you will read and analyse literary and linguistic representations of the city from the early modern
period to the present. Topics include crime, 18th century black Londoners, industrialisation, regionalism,
migration and creativity. You will be introduced to historical, geographical, cultural and theoretical concepts with
which changes in urban forms and meanings are explained and understood. Drawing on this knowledge, you will
practise contextualizing literary representations across a range of urban topographies. You will investigate
literary, linguistic and theoretical approaches which best facilitate analysis of problems concerning
representations of city life.
Option Modules
Preparatory reading lists for these option modules, along with brief module descriptions, were circulated during
the summer vacation period. Further details of these modules may be found
at www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation.
Semester One
Module
Tutor
EN7139 Literature and Cultural
Identity: Contemporary
Caribbean Writing
Dr Lucy Evans
EN7128: The Brontës
Dr Julian North
EN7133 Poetry Writing and
Contemporary Poetry
Nick Everett
EN7127 Literature and Culture in Prof. Gail Marshall
1859
EN7239 World Englishes
Dr Cathleen Waters
Semester Two
Module
Tutor
EN7126: Women in Literature,
Culture and Society, 1850-1900
Dr Claire Brock
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EN7135 Writing Fiction
Dr Harry Whitehead
EN7134 Literature and Gender:
Deviant Bodies and Dissident
Desires
Dr Emma Parker
EN7222 The English Country
House in Literature
Dr Julian North
MA IN ENGLISH STUDIES
EN7234 Narrative: Theories, Texts Dr Ruth Page
and Practices
EN7236 Sex and Sexuality
Dr David Clark
in Old English Literature
Dissertation Preparation
By the end of November, you will have chosen, in consultation with the Course Convenor, whether you wish to
take EN7227 (60-credit Dissertation) or EN7228 (90-credit dissertation).
If you are first-year part-time student, you need to make your decision on the 60- or 90-credit dissertation by
late November as this affects your module choice for semester 2 of your first year: so please consult with staff
about your ideas. However, work on the dissertation will not begin in earnest until your second year.
EN7227: 60-Credit Dissertation:
The 60-credit dissertation is 15,000 words long. If you decide to take this dissertation, you will also take EN7224
Cities of Words in Semester 2. Proposals for the dissertation are presented at a special seminar in the summer
term (see course timetable). All full-time students present dissertation proposals at this seminar. First-year
part-time students are strongly encouraged to present proposals too, even if they are still very provisional, to
assist them in preparing for the dissertation they will be writing next academic year. Second-year part-time
students may also find it useful to participate, though they will already have been allocated supervisors and will
have been working on their dissertations for several months.
Before the formal presentation session, students meet together without staff present (see course timetable).
This first meeting is informal but mandatory, and its purpose is to help students assess together the scope and
nature of each other’s chosen topic, as well as to begin planning the research necessary to complete their
dissertation. The second session is more formal, although not assessed. At this meeting, students present their
proposals to members of the MA staff, who will offer new perspectives on specific projects as well as advice on
more general issues.
The presentation should:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
not be any longer than five minutes
give a general outline of the topic and address two or three specific issues relating to it
comment on the appeal and potential of the project
include a list of key research questions
indicate methodology and, where appropriate, relevant theoretical frameworks
consider how the material in the dissertation might be best organised
identify gaps in knowledge and outline areas that require development
comment on any problems students envisage they may encounter
be of a professional standard (including, for instance, the use of a handout and /or audio-visual
equipment, such as PowerPoint)
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demonstrate that students have developed good presentation skills.
Please notify your Programme Administrator, David Revill, of any audio-visual equipment you will require for the
pre-presentation meeting and for the main presentation meeting. If you require a laptop computer for a
PowerPoint presentation, please also let David know on [email protected] the drive you require (CD or USB
port).
Students are required to submit a written proposal in typescript on the Dissertation Proposal form, available
electronically on Blackboard, to the School Office (Attenborough 1514 or [email protected]). The proposal
must include a proposed title, a brief outline of the subject and focus of the project (no more than 200 words),
an account of its aims and methods (no more than 400 words) and a short bibliography featuring key primary
and secondary sources.
The key questions a proposal should address are: what, why and how?
What is the topic? What questions will I be asking about this topic as I undertake research? (You may, if you
wish, include a list of research questions in your proposal.)
Why am I writing it? That is, why is this topic interesting and significant? What is the rationale? How will my
work challenge or extend existing scholarship?
How am I going to do it? Which texts will I use? How will it be structured?
What is my methodology and/or theoretical framework?
The deadlines for written proposals are:
•
•
for second-year part-time students, 12.00noon on Wednesday 3 February 2016,
and for full-time students, 12.00noon on Wednesday 25 May 2016.
Supervision
This is an independent project but at every stage, from conception through composition and revision to final
submission, academic staff are available to offer support and feedback. A dissertation supervisor will be
allocated soon after the formal proposal is submitted, but students are encouraged to seek the advice of
academic staff in the early stages of conceiving the project. With the help of the supervisor’s advice and
guidance, students plan, develop, revise and improve their work through a series of drafts. They will be
provided with up to five hours of one-to-one supervision and must meet with their supervisor on a formal basis
on at least three occasions during the process of writing the dissertation (between May and September). In
exceptional cases, students may make alternative arrangements for supervision (e.g. via email), but must then
keep a record of all communications with their supervisor. In addition, students are expected to spend 445
hours on private study during the course of the dissertation. Supervisors may read and offer feedback on all of
a dissertation in draft but must not be asked to look at multiple drafts of the same section/chapter. The final
date for the submission of draft work to supervisors is 1 September (except by special arrangement). After
supervisions, students are required to submit a short summary of the meeting (of no more than one page of
A4) to their supervisor as an aid to self-reflection and a record of progress.
EN7228: 90-Credit Dissertation
The 90-credit Dissertation is 25,000 words long. If you decide to take this dissertation, you will not be able to
take EN7224 Cities of Words. Full-time students will need to start planning their proposals towards the end of
Semester 1. In the first instance you should approach either your personal tutor or the course convenor, who
will discuss your topic with you to ensure that it is suitable; they may also advise you to talk to a member of
staff who has a research specialism in your proposed area of study. You are required to submit a 200-word
proposal, soon after which you will be allocated a supervisor. For full-time students the supervision process will
start early in Semester 2 and continue through the rest of the course; for part-time students, supervision
commences towards the end of their first year.
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The deadline for written proposals to David Revill ([email protected]) are:
•
•
for full time students, 12 noon on Wednesday 20 January 2016
for first year part-time students, 12 noon on Friday 24 June 2016
The key questions a proposal should address are what, why and how?
•
•
•
•
What is the topic? What questions will I be asking about this topic as I undertake research? (You may, if
you wish, include a list of research questions in your proposal.)
Why am I writing it? That is, why is this topic interesting and significant? What is the rationale? How will
my work challenge or extend existing scholarship?
How am I going to do it? Which texts will I use? How will it be structured?
What is my methodology and/or theoretical framework?
Supervision
This is an independent project but at every stage, from conception through composition and revision to final
submission, staff are available to offer support and feedback. A dissertation supervisor will be allocated soon
after the formal proposal is submitted, but students are encouraged to seek the advice of academic staff in the
early stages of conceiving the project. With the help of the supervisor’s advice and guidance, students plan,
develop, revise and improve their work through a series of drafts. They are provided with up to ten hours of
one-to-one supervision and must meet with their supervisor on a formal basis on at least five occasions during
the process of writing the dissertation (between January and September for full-time students). In exceptional
cases, students may make alternative arrangements for supervision (e.g. via email), but must then keep a record
of all communications with their supervisor. In addition, students are expected to spend 665 hours on private
study during the course of the dissertation. Supervisors may read and offer feedback on all of a dissertation in
draft but may only read one draft of each section/chapter. After supervisions, students are required to submit a
short summary of the meeting (of no more than one page of A4) to their supervisor as an aid to self-reflection
and a record of progress.
Presentation
In Semester 2 you will be required to deliver a 15-minute assessed presentation which will be examined by two
members of the School; the audience will consist of students and tutors from the MA programme. Before the
assessment, there will normally be the opportunity to practice your presentation at a student-only session; this
is intended to be a mutually supportive occasion, when you can offer feedback to your peers. Your presentation
should:
•
•
•
•
•
give an outline of your topic and address two or three issues relating to it
indicate your chosen methodology
identify research questions
be of a professional standard, including the use of PowerPoint or handouts as necessary
demonstrate that you have developed good presentation skills
There will be the opportunity for the audience to ask questions after your presentation. Please notify your
Programme Administrator of any audio-visual equipment you will require for the pre-presentation meeting and
the presentation.
Ten percent of the overall module mark for the 90-credit dissertation will depend on the presentation. However,
the module grade may not be lowered by the mark awarded for the oral presentation. An exception to this rule
is if a mark of 0% is awarded for the presentation, as a result of the student’s failure to attend the presentation,
and in the absence of mitigating circumstances. If a student misses the presentation but has mitigating
circumstances to explain their absence, the module grade will be that awarded for the dissertation (i.e. the
dissertation will count as 100%).
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Coursework Submission
Please see the Referencing and Academic Integrity section for details of coursework submission.
Penalties for late submission of work
You should make sure that you submit your assignments by their due date to avoid any marks being deducted
for lateness. Penalties for late submission of coursework follow the University scheme defined in Regulations
governing the assessment of taught programmes (see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation7
or www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/late-submission).
If you do need to submit a piece of work after the submission deadline, you will need to take it to the reception
desk in Attenborough 1514; you must complete and sign a ‘Late Submission of Assessed Work’ form to
accompany any late work.
Change of Course/Module
Discuss your options with your personal tutor, or another appropriate member of staff in your department, if
you are considering a change of course or module. Changes of course or module require approval by your
department and the University’s Registry and will only be allowed in certain circumstances.
See www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/transfercourse or www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/transfermodule for details of the
procedures involved and deadlines that apply.
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Marking and Assessment Practices
All work is marked by two markers. Please see the marking criteria at the end of this handbook.
Students will receive a written report and an agreed grade for each assessed essay and dissertation. Other
feedback will include verbal feedback from seminar tutors.
You are encouraged to discuss your assessment feedback with your personal tutor, if you have any questions or
concerns.
Student anonymity will be preserved during the marking of all formal examinations. Summative coursework (i.e.
coursework that contributes to your module mark or grade) will be marked anonymously unless there are sound
educational reasons for not doing so, or the type of assessment makes marking impractical.
The External Examiner for this programme is: Professor Helen Fulton, Professor of Medieval Literature,
University of York. Please note that students are not permitted to initiate direct contact with External Examiners
(see Regulation 7.36).
Feedback and the Return of Work from Staff
The Department complies with the University’s policy for the return of marked coursework
(see www.le.ac.uk/sas/quality/student-feedback/return-of-marked-work for details of the full policy:
General principles:
•
•
Feedback and provisional grading on coursework will be returned within 21 days of the submission date
for campus-based programmes; 28 days for distance learning and approved programmes.
In exceptional circumstances where this is not possible, you will be notified in advance of the expected
return date and the reasons for the longer turn-round time and where possible staff will provide some
interim feedback: for example in the form of generic feedback to the class regarding common errors and
potential areas for improvement
Progression and Classification of Awards
The University’s system for the classification of awards and the rules of progression are defined in the
Regulations governing taught postgraduate programmes of study
(https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/regulations/documents/sr6-taught-postgraduate). Alternatively, refer to
the Student and Academic Services website for information about degree classification and
progression: www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/pgt-progressionaward
Any specific progression requirements for your course are stated in its programme specification
(see http://www.le.ac.uk/sas/courses/documentation)
Should you fail to achieve a pass mark (50%) in a module, you will be entitled to re-sit or re-submit any of the
failed components of assessment associated with that module, on one occasion only. Please note, however,
that the number of credits of taught modules that you are entitled to re-sit or re-submit is half of the credit
value of the taught component of the programme (i.e. up to 60 taught credits if you are undertaking a short
dissertation or up to 45 taught credits if you are undertaking a long dissertation). One resubmission of the
dissertation will normally be allowed. For further details, please refer to Senate Regulation 6: Regulations
governing taught postgraduate programmes of study.
Please see also your Study Skills Guide.
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Referencing and Academic Integrity
Referencing style
You must use a consistent referencing style when referring to books and other publications that you have read
for your coursework. Most academic departments have a specific referencing style which you are required to
use. Please note that some of your modules may be taught by different departments. To find out which
referencing style each department uses, and for information and help on each referencing style, please
visit http://www.le.ac.uk/library/help/referencing
Requirements differ on how to arrange bibliographies (complete list of all reference and other sources at the
end of your coursework) and whether references are included within the word count for your coursework –
please refer to any separate guidance provided on these points.
Principles of academic integrity apply to the work of everyone at the University, staff and students alike, and
reflect the University’s commitment to maintaining the highest ethical and academic standards. A key part of
this is acknowledging where and when, in the process of producing your own work, you have drawn on the work
of others. In practice, this means that the ideas, data, information, quotations and illustrations you use in
assignments, presentations, reports, research projects etc. must be credited to their original author(s). This
process of crediting the work of others is achieved through referencing (see the section below on ‘Referencing
styles’). Failure to do this properly is to risk committing plagiarism: the repetition or paraphrasing of someone
else’s work without proper acknowledgement.
Your coursework must meet each of the following conditions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
You should agree your essay question with the module tutor before commencing to write.
The School of English recommends the MHRA referencing system (www.style.mhra.org.uk), but if you
are familiar with an alternative system, such as MLA or Harvard, you may use this instead. (Please note
on your work the name of the alternative referencing system.) Please consult an appropriate style guide
to ensure you are using your chosen system correctly.
Your essay should be within the stated word limit. Word limits include footnotes and appendices but
exclude bibliographies.
Your essay must be word-processed (or typed). If, exceptionally, you have been given permission to
submit it in hand-written form, you MUST write legibly.
Make sure that you put your student number and module title in the header of your essay, as well as on
the cover sheet. Do not put your name on either.
Your essay should be on one side of the paper only and in double-line spacing. There must be a wide
margin on the left-hand side of the page.
The pages must be numbered.
Two copies of assessed work should be submitted in hard copy with a cover sheet completed and fixed
to the front of each. Note that there are different cover sheets for essays, creative writing and reflective
commentaries for creative writing modules. Ensure that you attach the correct cover sheet to your
work. Cover sheets are available on Blackboard and in a box on top of the postgraduate pigeonholes on
Attenborough floor 16.
Firmly fasten the pages of each copy together. Please do not submit your work in folders.
It is ESSENTIAL for you to keep a copy of your work.
All submitted course work should be placed in the School’s postgraduate postbox on Attenborough floor
16 landing, except for dissertations which should be handed in to the School Office (Attenborough
1514).
You may submit coursework essays by post, as long as these are sent by Recorded Delivery and arrive in
the School Office by the stated deadline; you should allow 24 hours for mail to be forwarded by the
University’s central post room to the School.
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If your piece of work does not meet all the School’s requirements, it will not be accepted as examinable
material.
Work submitted for assessment which does not meet the requirements of the examiners in respect of
presentation (including grammar, spelling and punctuation) will be referred back for amendment.
Candidates who have not passed their coursework will not be permitted to proceed to the dissertation,
or, in the case of part-time students, will not be permitted to enter the second year of the course.
Essays and exercises are double marked. Work is usually marked within 21 days of submission. Work which is
submitted late, for any reason, falls outside of this schedule.
In addition, for dissertations:
•
•
•
•
Supervisors may read and offer feedback on all of a dissertation in draft but must not be asked to look at
multiple drafts of the same section/chapter.
Dissertations should not be more than 15,000 words in length (25,000 words for the MAES 90-credit
version) including notes, but excluding the bibliography. This limit may only be exceeded by prior
permission of the supervisor.
Put your student number, not your name, on the dissertation.
Front cover (cardboard) of dissertation should bear same details as title page, i.e.
DISSERTATION TITLE
MA in Modern Literature
University of Leicester
2015
CANDIDATE NUMBER (NOT NAME)
•
•
Students are required to submit three copies of their dissertation, word-processed and soft bound (also
called 'perfect bound'), by 30 September * of the year in which they submit their proposal, with a
completed Postgraduate Assessment Feedback: Written Work cover sheet placed in (but not bound into)
each copy.
• We recommend that dissertations be bound by the University’s Print Services
(website http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/printservices; drop-off and collection service via the
Bookshop), who require one day for binding or three days for printing/copying and binding.
Enquiries to 0116 252 2851 or [email protected] You are free to select your own choice of
colour for the cover.
Dissertations should be handed in at the School Office (Att.1514) and also submitted electronically on
Turnitin.
• It may not be possible for dissertations submitted after 30 September* to be considered by the next
Board of Examiners. Thus, failure to submit by the deadline may mean the award of the degree, and
the opportunity to graduate, will be delayed.
* Or by the following Tuesday, where 30 September falls on a weekend or a Monday.
Turnitin plagiarism software is used in the School of English. In addition to two paper copies, you are also
required to submit each essay electronically via the Turnitin plagiarism-detection database on Blackboard:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Log on to Blackboard
Click on to your course title
Click on 'Assignments'
Click on 'View/Complete' for the relevant assignment
Fill in your name and the title of the essay
Click on 'Browse' and select the essay as you would an attachment to an email (the software accepts the
following file types: Word, Text, Postscript, PDF, HTML, and RTF)
Click 'Open' (this will return you to the Turnitin page)
Click 'Submit'
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You will be sent an email to confirm that you have submitted your essay successfully. You will not be able to see
the originality report.
If you have any concerns about plagiarism you should talk to your supervisor, seminar tutor or personal tutor
about it.
The University views academic integrity as one of the foundations of academic development. A key part of this is
the acknowledgement of the work of others. You must always be sure that you credit ideas, data, information,
quotations and illustrations to their original author. Not to do so is plagiarism: the repetition or paraphrasing of
someone else’s work without proper acknowledgement.
The University expects students to conduct their studies with exemplary standards of academic honesty and will
penalise students who submit work, or parts of work, that have been:
•
•
•
•
•
plagiarised;
completed with others for individual assessment (collusion);
previously submitted for assessment, including self-plagiarism;
prepared by others;
supplied to another for copying
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Plagiarism and collusion
Plagiarism is used as a general term to describe taking and using another’s thoughts and writings as one’s own.
Examples of forms of plagiarism include:
•
•
•
•
•
the verbatim (word for word) copying of another’s work without appropriate and correctly presented
acknowledgement;
the close paraphrasing of another’s work by simply changing a few words or altering the order of
presentation, without appropriate and correctly presented acknowledgement;
unacknowledged quotation of phrases from another’s work;
the deliberate and detailed presentation of another’s concept as one’s own;
reproduction of a student’s own work when it has been previously submitted and marked but is
presented as original material (self-plagiarism).
Any student who prepares or produces work with others and then submits it for assessment as if it were the
product of his/her individual efforts (collusion) will be penalised. Unless specifically instructed otherwise, all
work you submit for assessment should be your own and should not have been previously submitted for
assessment either at Leicester or elsewhere.
See also www.le.ac.uk/sas/assessments/plagiarism
Penalties
The University regards plagiarism and collusion as very serious offences and so they are subject to strict
penalties. The penalties that departments are authorised to apply are defined in the Regulations governing
student discipline (see www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation11 , paragraphs 11.63 to 11.78).
Resources and advice to help you study with integrity and avoid committing
plagiarism
Negotiating these various rules, regulations and conventions can sometimes be a challenge, especially if they are
new or different from previous experiences of studying. Check the Student Learning Development website for
guidance on how to manage your studies so that you meet the required standards of critical scholarship and
academic integrity: www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/study/plagiarism-tutorial
If you are in any doubt about what constitutes good practice, ask your personal/academic tutors for advice or
make an appointment with Student Learning Development for individual advice. You can book an appointment
online by visiting: www.le.ac.uk/succeedinyourstudies.
One of the most important practices in ensuring the academic integrity of your work is proper referencing. The
following section contains details of how to ensure your work meets the specific referencing requirements for
the discipline(s) you are studying.
Notification of Ill Health and Other Mitigating Circumstances
The University recognises that students may suffer from a sudden illness or other serious event or set of
circumstances which adversely affects their ability to complete an assessment or the results they obtain for an
assessment. In such cases the mitigating circumstances regulations and procedures may be applied. These
regulations are designed to ensure the fair and consistent treatment of all students.
You must keep your department(s) informed at all times of any personal circumstances that may impact upon
your ability to study or undertake assessments. Tell your department(s) about any such circumstances at the
time they occur. You need to supply supporting documentation (e.g. a medical certificate) as soon as possible
and no later than the deadline relevant to the assessment(s) affected. Normally, the deadline for submission of a
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mitigating circumstances claim will be no later than five working days after the assessment deadline to which it
relates.
See www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations/mitigation for full details of the mitigating circumstances regulations and
procedures, including the University’s definition of a mitigating circumstance.
Students should submit evidence of mitigating circumstances within five working days of the relevant
assessment deadline. This should be submitted to the Programme Administrator either via the School Office
(Attenborough 1514) or by email.
Completed mitigating circumstances forms and supporting documentation will be considered by a Mitigating
Circumstances Panel. Mitigating Circumstances Panel meetings are held every week during term time, and you
can expect to receive a decision in relation to your form and evidence within ten working days of this having
been submitted.
The Mitigating Circumstances Panel membership comprises colleagues from the School of English, School of
Modern Languages, and the Department of History of Art and Film. This allows us to schedule regular Mitigating
Circumstances Panel meetings so as to present timely responses to our students. Please note that student
confidentiality is of utmost importance to the Mitigating Circumstances Panel, and specific information will
never be disclosed outside of the Mitigating Circumstances Panel.
If you have any questions about this, or if you would like to find out when the next Mitigating Circumstances
Panel meeting will be held, please contact the Programme Administrator for your degree.
Ethical Approval of Student Projects
Ethical approval is needed for all research and consultancy undertaken by University staff and students (both
undergraduate and postgraduate) wherever research and related activities involves human participants or raises
ethical issues. All research and related activities within the University which involves human participants, or
which raise ethical issues, require approval through the University's ethical review
system: http://www2.le.ac.uk/institution/ethics/approval.
Personal Support for Students
Departmental Student Support Arrangements
From discussion of academic progress, to friendly advice on personal matters; personal tutors are there to
provide support, advice and guidance on an individual level. Common topics for discussion may include course
changes, study progress, module choices, exam results, career opportunities or more personal problems such as
accommodation or financial difficulties. The Department’s personal tutor system operates in accordance with
the Code of Practice on Personal Support for Students: www.le.ac.uk/sas/quality/personaltutor
Your personal tutor will offer confidential advice and support on a range of matters, from official dealings with
the University, College or School (this includes advice on issues relating to modules on which your personal tutor
also teaches; as personal tutor their role is to provide you with support, not discipline) to guidance on how to
proceed in the event of a failure. It is in your interests to ensure that your personal tutor is kept informed about
anything that might affect your ability to fulfil your assignment and attendance obligations. Your personal tutor
will be able to put you in touch with a range of specialist advisers within the university, qualified to give
financial, medical and welfare advice.
The writing of references for potential employers is generally done by your personal tutor. Please do remember
to ask your personal tutor, though, before giving his or her name as a referee. It would also help your tutor if
you could provide an up-to-date curriculum vitae, and specific details about the position applied for.
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Equal Opportunities
The School Equal Opportunities Officer is Dr Jonathan Taylor.
The School AccessAbility officer is Mr David Revill.
If you have any concerns related to equal opportunities (ethnicity, gender, disability, etc.), these may be raised
at a regular Postgraduate Student-Staff Committee meeting.
University Student Support Arrangements
AccessAbility Centre
The Centre offers a range of services to all students who have specific learning difficulties, such as dyslexia,
disabilities or long-term conditions including mental health which have a substantial day to day impact on their
studies. Staff offer one to one support, the co-ordination of alternative examination arrangements and
assistance with applications for the Disabled Students' Allowance. It is possible to be screened for specific
learning difficulties and access to formal assessment is available. Students are means tested to see if they are
eligible for assistance with the cost of formal assessments. The open access Centre acts as a resource base for
students and staff and is a relaxed place for students to work. Its computers are equipped with specialised
software for screen enlargement. Essay planning and speech output software is on the University network. The
Centre has some specialised equipment (CCTV, enlarged keyboard, and chairs) and some for loan (chairs, writing
slopes and digital recorders).Low-level photocopying and printing facilities are also available. The Centre
welcomes self-referrals as well as referrals from academic staff.
Contact: AccessAbility Centre, David Wilson Library
Tel/minicom: +44 (0)116 252 5002 | Fax: +44 (0)116 252 5513 | [email protected] |
www.le.ac.uk/accessability
Student Welfare Centre
The Student Welfare Centre offers wide ranging practical support, advice, and information for students.
Financial advice is offered, with information on budgeting and funding. Specialised staff can advocate over late
loans and other financial issues. Students can apply for hardship grants and loans through the Service.
Information and guidance is available in relation to private rented accommodation.
For international students, the Student Welfare Service coordinates The International Welcome Week in
September and January. Expert immigration advice is available and students are strongly advised to renew their
visas through the scheme provided by Student Welfare. Specialised Officers also support students who
experience financial or personal problems.
Contact: Student Welfare Service, Percy Gee Building (First Floor).
Tel: +44 (0)116 223 1185 | Fax: 0116 223 1196 | [email protected] |www.le.ac.uk/welfare
Counselling and Wellbeing Service
This Service offers a range of expertise and support for the psychological aspects of health and wellbeing.
Services on offer include:
Student Counselling Support
Time-limited, free and confidential counselling on a one-to-one or group basis to help students find ways of
dealing with academic-related or personal issues that may be affecting ability to study or engage with student
life.
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For information see our website: www.le.ac.uk/counselling
Contact: Student Counselling Service
+44 (0)116 2231780 | [email protected]
Student Mental Wellbeing Support
Practical and emotional one-to-one and group support to students managing mental health issues whilst at the
University.
Contact: Student Support (mental wellbeing)
+44 (0)116 252 2283 | [email protected]
www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/student-support-mental-wellbeing
Student Healthy Living Service
The Student Healthy Living Service provides direction to health care and health related activity which will
contribute to wellbeing and help students to enjoy a balanced life. Students should register for health care local
to the University; The University works closely with the Victoria Park Health Centre where staff have expertise in
student health. More information can be found on the Healthy Living Service website.
Contact: Student Healthy Living Service
+(0)116 223 1268 | [email protected] |go.le.ac.uk/healthyliving
Health Care and Registering with a Doctor
Illness can affect any one of us at any time and for this reason the University strongly advises you to register
with a doctor in Leicester. The Victoria Park Health Centre (www.victoriaparkhealthcentre.co.uk) has expertise
in student health and has provided medical care to the University’s students for many years. The Health Centre
is located conveniently close to the main-campus and registration is free.
If when you come to University you are already under the care of a ‘specialised team’, have a known medical
condition including mental health or waiting for an appointment it is still advisable to register at the Victoria
Park Health Centre. Soon after arrival, make an appointment to discuss with one of the doctors who will then be
in a better position to communicate with the relevant doctors and help you to manage your condition to avoid
any unnecessary disruption to your studies. Please take with you information from your current doctor or
consultant which includes diagnosis, current management, including medication (provide a certified English
translation if the original is not in English). This is essential for international students as some conditions may be
managed differently in this country, particularly in relation to medication which may be licensed differently and
may need changing to something which is available to prescribe in this country. If you take medication for your
condition you must bring 12 weeks supply with you to ensure continuity until the registration process is
complete.
More information about registering with a doctor and other health and well-being services can be found
at: www2.le.ac.uk/students/info/new/postgrad/health
Careers and Employability
Career Development Service
You need a first-class education; that’s a given. But you also need an edge, an advantage, a head-start in the
competitive graduate recruitment world. Based in the Students’ Union, your award winning Career Development
Service is here to guide and support you from your arrival at Leicester through to graduation and beyond.
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Throughout your studies you will engage with the Career Development Journey which is your personal guide to
working out what you want to do after University and how to get there. Starting early is key, and completing the
first step of the journey is simply achieved by logging onto MyCareers with your university username and
password. You can access this through our homepage.
MyCareers is your gateway to:
•
Booking one-to-one appointments with our career consultants for support with career planning, job
hunting, CVs and applications, and mock interviews;
• Booking workshops, such as mock assessment centres and psychometric testing;
• Invitations to employer events;
• Finding all the opportunities available exclusively for Leicester students such as paid internships,
volunteering, and enterprise and business start-up activities.
Get involved by:
•
Signing up to Unitemps If you are looking for part time work whilst studying. We are based next to the
Career Development Service in the Students’ Union.
• Coming along to fantastic employer events throughout the year including the Festival of Careers. We are
one of the top 25 universities targeted by the largest number of top employers!
• Reflecting on your skill development throughout your academic studies and extra-curricular activities, as
you will need to show employers how you can communicate, work in a team and much more. For more
information on the Transferable Skills Framework go to our website.
Come and visit us in the Students’ Union and log onto your MyCareers account to get started. We’re here to
support you throughout your time at university so make the most of the services we offer, to make the most of
you.
Contact: Career Development Service, Level 0, Students’ Union, Percy Gee Building
0116 252 2004 | [email protected] |www.le.ac.uk/careers | @uolcds | fb.com/uolcds
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Feedback from Students
Student Feedback Questionnaires
Students are asked to complete a course questionnaire at the conclusion of the taught section of their course (at
the end of the spring term or beginning of the summer term).
The School uses questionnaire feedback within the process of reviewing individual modules and the course as a
whole.
The Course Convenor will respond to feedback verbally (where appropriate) at the end-of-course meeting and
will communicate actions taken via Blackboard.
Student Staff Committees
The School Postgraduate Student-Staff Committee meets three times each year.
Representatives are drawn from each of the School’s MA programmes and also from the English Research (PhD)
programme. Volunteers are sought at the beginning of each academic year; the Students’ Union will circulate
details about Course Rep elections.
In 2015/16, the Postgraduate Staff-Student Committee will meet:
1.00pm, Wednesday 28 October 2015, in TBA
1.00pm, Wednesday 10 February 2016, in TBA
1.00pm, Wednesday 18 May 2016, in TBA.
If you would like to raise an issue at a PGSSC meeting, please contact your course representative. (Details are
listed on Blackboard.)
Minutes of each meeting are posted on Blackboard; they are also forwarded to the School Meeting, the
Students’ Union Education Unit and to the College Academic Committee.
The University’s Code of Practice on the Work of Student-Staff Committees may be downloaded
here: www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/quality/codes/documents/sscommittees.pdf
Societies
SPELL is the social and academic society for postgraduates in the School of English. We exist to nurture a lively
postgraduate community within the department, acting as the social hub for both MA and PhD students. The
society aims to support postgraduate students throughout their studies, whether that’s simply by offering a
chance to make new friends and catch up with old ones, or through the development of research skills and
interests at a workshop or Postgraduate Forum. Throughout the year we coordinate formal and informal events
to bring postgraduates together, from casual socialising in the pub and/or afternoon tea to academic workshops.
Regular events include an annual welcome reception, the Postgraduate Forum, Café Spell and a theatre trip, in
addition to special events such as the Shakespeare workshop, creative writing workshop and the summer picnic
held over the past year. We also maintain links with other societies across the College, such as the New History
Lab.
The SPELL Committee is focused on reaching out to all postgraduates in the School of English and hope to run
activities that everyone can enjoy. Please get in touch with any member of the committee if you have any
suggestions/ ideas for the future. We look forward to meeting you in October.
The new membership year will begin at our welcome reception at the beginning of term.
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If you would like to join the Society, please see the SPELL web pages on the School of English site
(http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/studentresources/societiesandcommittees) or join our Facebook
Group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/208586385844425
Safety and Security
The School Safety Officer is Mrs Andrea Vear ([email protected], ext. 2662, Attenborough 1514).
Emergency Numbers
To summon the fire brigade, police, or ambulance from an internal phone:
dial 888
If there is no reply:
dial 9 then 999
From an external phone / payphone:
dial 999
Attenborough Building
The Attenborough Building is open from 8.00am to 6.00pm, Monday to Friday.
The fire alarm is tested once a week, usually on Thursday at 9.30am. If the alarm sounds at another time, please
exit the building via the stairs. Do not collect personal belongings. Follow any instructions issued by the fire
wardens. The assembly point is the area in front of the Mathematics Building.
Paternoster
In order to prevent the Paternoster from malfunctioning, students are asked to observe strictly the safety
instructions posted in each car.
Student IT Cards
If you need to order a replacement Student ID Card, please
visit http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/sas2/studentrecord/access.
Personal Belongings
Your personal belongings are not covered by the University’s insurance. You are therefore advised to check
whether your parents’ or family policies provide adequate protection. If not, private insurance arrangements
should be made.
A lost property service operates from the Security Lodge, which is situated at the far end of the Fielding Johnson
Building on Wyggeston Drive, University entrance No. 1.
Bicycles may be brought onto the main campus but must be placed in the cycle racks provided, and appropriate
security measures taken to help to prevent theft and damage. For advice on preventing cycle theft and details of
the University’s Coded Cycle Scheme
visit: www.le.ac.uk/estates/facilities_&_services/security/CodedCycleScheme.html
Complaints and Academic Appeals Procedures
The University has robust systems in place governing the quality and standards of its degree programmes and
your experience as a student here. We are confident that, like the vast majority of students here, you will enjoy
and be satisfied with your course. In most instances your department will be able to resolve any issues that do
occur but we recognise that this will not always be possible. For this reason, the University has official
procedures that allow eligible cases to be formally reviewed.
Information about these procedures, including the relevant forms, can be found on the Student and Academic
Services website: see www.le.ac.uk/sas/regulations/appeals-complaints. These pages should be read in
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conjunction with the University’s Regulations governing student appeals (www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation10)
and Regulations governing student complaints (www.le.ac.uk/senate-regulation12).
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Tutors
DAVID CLARK MSt MA DPhil (Oxford)
Room 1408, Attenborough Tower, 252 2636, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/davidclark
BARBARA COOKE BA MA (Warwick), PhD (University of East Anglia)
Room 1403, Attenborough Tower, 252 17568, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/dr-barbara-cooke
MARTIN DZELZAINIS BA PhD (Cambridge)
Room 1410, Attenborough Tower, 252 2628, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/martindzelzainis
CORINNE FOWLER BA MA (Leeds) PhD (Stirling)
Room 1513, Attenborough Tower, 252 1435, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/corinnefowler
FELICITY JAMES MA MSt DPhil (Oxford) FHEA
Room 1507, Attenborough Tower, 252 2199, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/felicityjames
TOM KEW BA (Liverpool) MA (Nottingham)
Room 1601, Attenborough Tower, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/tom-kew/tom-kew
SARAH KNIGHT BA (Oxford) MA (London) PhD (Yale)
Room 1402, Attenborough Tower, 252 2631, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/sarahknight
KATE LOVEMAN BA (Cambridge), MA (York), PhD (Cambridge)
Room 1407, Attenborough Tower, 252 2627, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/kateloveman/profile
MARY ANN LUND BA MPhil DPhil (Oxford)
Room 1312, Attenborough Tower, 252 5262, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/maryannlund/profile
JULIAN NORTH BA DPhil (Oxford)
Room 1308, Attenborough Tower, 252 2776, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/juliannorth
MARK RAWLINSON BA MPhil DPhil (Oxford)
Room 1306, Attenborough Tower, 252 2639, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/markrawlinson
PHILIP A. SHAW BA (Oxford) PhD (Leeds)
Room 1506; (0116) 252 5363; [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/drphilipashaw
MARTIN STANNARD BA (Warwick) MA (Sussex) DPhil (Oxford) FRSL FEA
Room 1309, Attenborough Tower, 252 2621, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/martinstannard
HARRY WHITEHEAD BA (Sussex), MSc MA (London), PhD (Lancaster)
Room 1604, Attenborough Tower, 252 3357, [email protected]
http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/english/people/harrywhitehead
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Marking Criteria
EN7001 Bibliography Presentation
Fail
Pass
Merit
Distinction
Use of academic
referencing
conventions
Minor errors in the
majority of entries/
major systematic
errors
Minor errors in the
minority of
entries/minor
systematic errors
Minor errors in a
small minority of
entries
Virtually faultless
Range of sources
Limited
Satisfactory
Evidence of breadth
Very wide
Relevance and
appropriateness of
sources
The minority of items The majority of items A very large majority All items very
of items relevant and relevant and
relevant and
relevant and
appropriate
appropriate
appropriate
appropriate
Rationale and
procedures for
selection
Unsatisfactory
rationale and
procedures
Clarity of
presentation
Lacking in coherence Satisfactory
SCHOOL OF ENGLISH
Satisfactory rationale Very good rationale, Sophisticated and
and procedures
thorough procedures clear rationale, very
thorough procedures
Coherent
Lucid
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EN7001 Written Exercise
Mark
Criteria
Distinction:
70+
Excellent coverage of relevant materials
Sophisticated analysis of concepts and arguments
Marked independence of thinking
Excellent organization and illustration of materials
Excellent range of reference to the appropriate materials
Clear academic writing in a discriminating register
Near-faultless presentation in accordance with the appropriate academic conventions.
Merit:
60–69
Thorough coverage of relevant materials
A very good standard of analysis of concepts and arguments
Substantial evidence of independent thinking
Very clear and effective organization and illustration of materials
Wide range of reference to the appropriate materials
Clear academic writing in an appropriate register
Very good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions with evidence of
careful proofreading and correction.
Pass:
50–59
Fair coverage of relevant materials, but with some gaps
Evidence of critical analysis of concepts and arguments
Some evidence of independent thinking
Sound organization and illustration of materials
A fair range of reference to the appropriate materials, but with some significant omissions
Writing in an academic register with satisfactory levels of precision and clarity
Good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions, but evidence of
insufficiently thorough proof-reading and of some shortcomings in referencing, bibliography,
citation and matters of style.
Fail:
below 50
Significant oversights in the coverage of relevant materials
Little critical analysis of concepts and arguments
Little evidence of independent thinking
Weakly conceived, with a lack of clarity and purpose in the organization and illustration of the
materials
Writing in an inappropriate register, with lack of clarity and precision
Inaccurate presentation, evidence of weak or inconsistent use of academic conventions, poor
proof-reading and serious problems with referencing, bibliography, citation, formatting or style.
N.B. Work of whatever level with this kind of inaccurate presentation will be referred for
correction.
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Marking Criteria for Coursework
Mark
Criteria
Distinction:
70+
Comprehensive coverage of relevant issues
Independent and effective research
Sophisticated analysis of texts and concepts
Marked independence of thinking
Excellent organization and illustration of arguments
Excellent range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources
Clear and lucid academic writing in a discriminating register
Near-faultless presentation in accordance with the appropriate academic conventions.
Merit:
60–69
Thorough coverage of relevant issues
Substantial evidence of effective research
A very good standard of analysis of texts and concepts
Substantial evidence of independent thinking
Very clear and effective organization and illustration of arguments
Wide range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources
Clear academic writing in an appropriate register
Very good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions with evidence of
careful proofreading and correction.
Pass:
50–59
Fair coverage of relevant issues, but with some gaps
Evidence of research
Evidence of critical analysis of texts and concepts
Some evidence of independent thinking
Sound organization and illustration of arguments
A fair range of reference to the appropriate primary and secondary sources, but with some
significant omissions
Writing in an academic register with satisfactory levels of precision and clarity
Good presentation in accordance with appropriate academic conventions, but evidence of
insufficiently thorough proof-reading and of some shortcomings in referencing, bibliography,
citation and matters of style.
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Fail:
below 50
38
MA IN ENGLISH STUDIES
Significant oversights in the coverage of relevant issues
Very little evidence of research
Little critical analysis of texts and concepts
Little evidence of independent thinking
Weakly conceived, with a lack of clarity and purpose in the organization and illustration of the
argument
A limited range of reference to primary and secondary sources
Writing in an inappropriate register, with lack of clarity and precision
Inaccurate presentation, evidence of weak or inconsistent use of academic conventions, poor
proof-reading and serious problems with referencing, bibliography, citation, formatting or style.
N.B. Work of whatever level with this kind of inaccurate presentation will be referred for
correction.
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MA Oral Presentation Marking Criteria
DISTINCTION
Knowledge, and
relevance of content
Evidence of systematic, independentlyminded reading and thought. Directly
relevant to the nuances of the topic
Organisation of material Remarkably meticulous and clear
structure. Skillful and subtle signposting
MERIT
PASS
FAIL
Evidence of careful and resourceful
reading and thought. Directly relevant
to the topic
Orderly and clear structure. Systematic
signposting
Evidence of some careful reading and Significant gaps in reading and thought. Of
thought. Mainly relevant to the topic irrelevant to the topic
Fairly clear structure. Substantial
effort made in signposting
Some evidence of structuring, but frequent
muddled. Inconsistent signposting.
Usually thorough analysis, going into
some detail. Some effort made to
weigh evidence
Limited or superficial analysis. Tendency to
describe rather than evaluate
Critical analysis and
evaluation of material
Subtle, detailed and independentDetailed and thorough analysis. Clear
minded analysis. Confident and balanced effort made to weigh up evidence
evaluation
carefully
Clarity and range of
expression
Highly articulate, fluent, wide-ranging
expression with strong command of
critical language and/or proper
terminology
Excellent time keeping and excellent
delivery pace
Clear expression, generally fluent, very Some minor losses of clarity. Largely Flaws in clarity at times. Limited expression
good command of critical language
accurate use of critical language
Problems with accurate use of critical
and/or proper terminology
and/or terminology
language and/or terminology
Engagement/ rapport
with audience
Excellent ability to establish eye-contact
(in-person) or tone of voice (prerecorded), to directly address and to
engage the audience
Very good ability to establish eyecontact (in-person) or tone of voice
(pre-recorded), to directly address and
to engage the audience
Good ability to establish eye-contact
(in-person) or tone of voice (prerecorded), to directly address and to
engage the audience
Use of handout, visual
and other aids
Highly confident use of aids, which are
fully integrated, thoroughly relevant to
the presentation, and entirely clear
Assured use of aids, which are well
integrated, directly relevant to the
presentation and very clear
Satisfactory use of aids, which are
Limited confidence in use of aids, which ar
largely well integrated, relevant to the not always well integrated, relevant to the
presentation and clear
presentation or clear
Response to Questions
(if applicable)
Direct and thoughtful responses,
revealing broader subject knowledge
and/or clear sense of potential
challenges for research
Direct responses, indicating good
knowledge of subject material and/or
awareness of potential challenges.
Satisfactory responses, indicating
questions and their implications for
work were understood
Pace and timing
An ability to keep to agreed time and Unable to keep to agreed time; issues with
an attempt to keep the delivery paced delivery pace severe enough to affect
audience’s comprehension.
Appropriateness to
Expertly adjusted to cater to all present, Well-adjusted to the needs of the
Attention given to explaining terms
Not adapted to the levels of knowledge of
audience (specialist/non- with well-judged levels of explanation. majority of the audience, with suitable and contexts likely to be unfamiliar to majority of the audience.
specialist)
levels of explanation.
the audience.
SCHOOL OF ENGLISH
Good time keeping and well paced
delivery
UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER
Limited ability to establish eye-contact (inperson) or tone of voice (pre-recorded), to
directly address and to engage the audienc
Responses indicate significant gaps in
understanding of subject / lack of
appreciation of challenges for research.
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