Student Teaching in Deaf Education

Student Teaching in Deaf Education
Classroom and Itinerant
STUDENT TEACHING
MANUAL
74.570 Student Teaching: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Department of Exceptionality Programs
College of Education
Dr. Deborah S. Stryker
Adapted from Special Education Manual and Updated October 2013
1
Table of Contents
The Student Teacher Contract ......................................................................... 4
• Notebook ........................................................................................... 4
• The Resume........................................................................................ 4
• Class Schedule/School Calendar ........................................................... 4
• Classroom Overview ............................................................................ 4
• Induction Information .......................................................................... 4
• The IEP .............................................................................................. 4
• Unit .................................................................................................... 5
• Teaching Devices/Adaptations .............................................................. 5
• Bulletin Boards/Learning Stations ......................................................... 5
• Observations ....................................................................................... 5
• Anecdotal Records ............................................................................... 6
• Lesson Plans ....................................................................................... 6
• Video Self-Evaluation Form (forms T & U) ............................................. 6
• Assistive Listening Devices (ALDS)……………………………………………………..6
Evaluation Criteria .......................................................................................... 7
• Guidelines for Student Teacher Evaluation............................................. 7
• Classroom Observation Form for College Supervisors ............................. 7
General Information ....................................................................................... 8
• Elements of Performance Objectives ..................................................... 8
• General Guidelines for Student Teachers and Supervising
Classroom Teachers ............................................................................ 8
Additional Information .................................................................................... 8
• Absences/Tardiness ............................................................................. 8
• Emergency Substitute Teaching ............................................................ 8
Appendices .................................................................................................... 9
• Appendix A – Code of Ethics for Student Teachers ............................... 10
• Appendix B – Student Teacher Regulations in Special Education ........... 11
• Appendix C – The Student Teacher Contract ....................................... 12
• Appendix D – Daily Schedule Model .................................................... 13
• Appendix E – The IEP (accessed ONLINE) ........................................... 14
• Appendix F – Unit Plan Format ........................................................... 15
• Appendix G – Teaching Device/Adaptation .......................................... 16
• Appendix H – Bulletin Board/Learning Station ...................................... 17
• Appendix I (1) – Anecdotal Record Form ............................................. 18
• Appendix I (2) – ABC Analysis Format ................................................. 19
• Appendix J – Induction Information .................................................... 21
• Appendix K – Deaf/HH Evaluation Form .............................................. 23
• Appendix L – Classroom Overview ...................................................... 24
• Appendix M (1) – Observation ........................................................... 25
2
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•
•
•
•
•
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Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
M (2) – Observation Format ................................................. 26
N – Lesson Plan Format ....................................................... 27
O – Elements of a Performance Objective ............................. 33
P – Elements of a Performance Objective.............................. 34
Q – Action Verbs Useful in Specifying Student Outcomes ....... 35
R – Classification of Educational Objectives And
Illustrative Behavioral Terms ......................................... 39
Appendix S – Guidelines for Student Teacher Evaluation ...................... 41
Appendix T – Classroom Observation Form ......................................... 45
Appendix U - Instructional Procedures Refinement Form For
Video Self-Evaluations .................................................... 46
Appendix V – Weekly Suggested Student Teacher/Supervising
Classroom Teacher Activities .......................................... 47
Appendix W – Resources.................................................................... 53
FORM: Cooperating Teacher Personal Record……….……………………………55
FORM: Videotape Self-Evaluation Critique Permission to Video…………….56
GUIDELINES FOR RECORDING VIDEO ………………………………………………57
3
The Student Teacher Contract
The Student Teacher Contract is divided into first and second placements. This
contract lists recommended assignments, which total 100 points. The college supervisor (CS)
will discuss this contract with the cooperating teacher (CT) so a mutual agreement can be
reached. Alternative assignments may be substituted for some recommended assignments.
This is dependent upon the nature of the classroom, student needs, and cooperating teacher
recommendations.
Notebook
Each ST should purchase two large, three-ring notebooks or binders for the purpose
of holding the material needed for each student teaching. These notebooks are to be organized
into sections, as outlined in this manual. Each section will have an introductory paragraph page,
stating/outlining what that section includes. The notebooks are to be made available to the CT
and CS at all times. It should be remembered that for the CT and CS to lend support, they
need to know how the ST organizes and retrieves materials, develops concepts, teaches, and
evaluates the lessons. Little help can be provided if only the finished product is seen. The first
notebooks is due week 9 and the second notebook is due week 15 (will not include the last
week’s lesson plans).
The Resume
The Resume is to be completed with a copy provided to the CS and one copy to each
CT. Resume models from past student teachers may be available for student teacher (ST)
review.
Class Schedule/School Calendar
The Class Schedule/School Calendar should include the following: class periods,
time subjects taught, and grouping. Appendix D is a model of a daily schedule for a learning
support classroom. The Class Schedule and a School Calendar should be given to the CS the
first week of each placement.
Classroom Overview
The classroom overview provides the ST with a general description of the type of
classroom/educational setting where their student teaching placement will occur. Information
included in the classroom overview will also assist the CS in completing the ST’s final letter of
recommendation.
Induction Information
Included in Appendix J is an Induction Information Form. The ST is to inventory all
applicable components at each assignment. This form is to assist the ST in becoming aware of
a school’s environment/policies as well as facilitate communication between the CT and ST.
The IEP
The Individualized Education Program (IEP) is a requirement for all student
teachers. A minimum of one IEP is required, if appropriate. A student should be chosen by the
third week of the placement. If possible, students should be selected on the basis of IEP
revision due date, or the arrival of a new student. The ST is responsible, when warranted, for
4
testing the student, either with formal or informal measures used by the CT or selected by the
ST. The IEP format followed by the CT is acceptable.
The IEP format, as required by IDEIA-P.L. 108-466, is found online at the PaTTAN
website. Specific attention should be given to “Present Levels of Educational Performance”.
Annual goals and objectives (when required) should be based on the student’s strengths and
needs as required by Pennsylvania regulations. For students with a hearing loss it is also
necessary to complete the Communication Plan. It is also suggested that the ST consult
curricular material. It is not advisable for the ST to attempt to write a sequence of goals and
objectives without reviewing PA academic standards and/or assessment anchors.
Unit
If applicable and timely, an instructional unit should be developed, taught and
evaluated. It should be kept in mind that a student teaching placement lasts only eight weeks,
requiring a short or mini unit. The ST should choose a unit topic based on the academic and/or
social needs of the students in their classroom. Because of the short length of time, the unit
topic should be chosen early. It is suggested that the ST not choose a general topic, but a
specific one. An example of a general topic would be “measurements”. A specific unit would
be “linear measurements”. The nature of itinerant teacher does not always lend itself to a unit
plan and thus it would only be required during a classroom placement. A unit format is outlined
in Appendix F. The grading rubric is helpful to follow.
Teaching Devices/Adaptations
During both placements of student teaching several teaching devices/adaptations
(Appendix G) are constructed and implemented during each student teaching assignment. The
objective is for the ST to make a device to support a concept being taught. It should be kept in
mind that this device may be very simple, requiring little time to prepare, or it may be complex.
The device will be evaluated on its impact in the teaching process, not by the time it took to
construct it. These teaching devices and lesson adaptations must be maintained in your 3-ring
binder to show your CT and your CS.
Bulletin Boards/Learning Stations
Bulletin board/learning station development will vary according to the ST’s
placement. Bulletin boards should be viewed from a broad perspective in that they may be
decorative, seasonal, informative or educational. A learning station is usually devised to
support some instructional format requiring student participation without continuous teacher
assistance. The bulletin board may be constructed by the ST or students. The learning station
must be designed, implemented, and evaluated by the ST. The CS’s first preference in
evaluating bulletin boards is to see it on site. The ST must do a write-up for all bulletin boards
or learning stations (Appendix H). The format for the bulletin board can also be modified to be
used for a learning station. The ST should take a picture or somehow document this
assignment in your notebook.
Observations
Observations by the ST are to be scheduled at least two days ahead of time.
Traditionally, the ST observes other classes. A priority list, which may vary according to
placement, is as follows: 1) a pupil in an inclusive class, 2) a parent conference, 3) a student
with disabilities the ST may not yet know, or 4) a related service such as a speech or
5
occupational therapy session. These and all documents should be maintained in your Student
Teaching Notebook.
Anecdotal Records
Anecdotal Records/ABC Analysis (Appendix I) should be maintained for any student
whose behaviors merit such attention and housed in your student teaching notebook. If an
anecdotal record is maintained for a given pupil, it is suggested that the ST directly observe the pupil
several times. Entries should be made at least daily. Please remember that anecdotal records should not
include subjective interpretation, just objective documentation of the student’s behavior.
Lesson Plans
The structure of the daily lesson plan format to be utilized by the ST will be dictated
by a variety of factors. These factors include the type of classroom, student needs, CT
preferences/expectations, district/building policy, and the ST’s level of advanced planning,
preparation, and instructional effectiveness. Regardless of the style of lesson plans
created by your CT, it is a ST’s responsibility to plan and thus create a complete
lesson plan for each lesson he/she teaches for a CT, CS, and videotaped lesson. You
must update and maintain these in your notebook.
Appendix N includes the Lesson Plan Format and a helpful rubric your CS will use for
grading purposes. Appendices O, P, Q and R provide information and examples to assist with
the process of writing lesson plan objectives.
Student Teacher Self-Evaluation through Videotape Critique and Reflection
During Student Teaching you are required to video yourself teaching lessons or
providing instruction. These videotapes allow you to self-evaluate your instructional strategies
and effectiveness and provide YOURSELF your own feedback, which your CS will review/grade
your ability to effectively provide yourself feedback. You can also have your CT view your
videos and provide you feedback, this is optional. To evaluate yourself/video you will use both
the Classroom Observation Form T and U. Although it can be intimidating to be videotaped, the
information obtained from this exercise will be invaluable in your development as a teacher.
These 5 video sessions must be planned in advance. Equipment failure or student absence will
not be an acceptable late excuse, hence the planning well in advance of the due dates to assure
your student is not absent and that your equipment works!
Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)
During student teaching you have the opportunity to learn about many different types of
listening/hearing devices that students who are Deaf/HH utilize. This section you will describe
the different types of hearing aid and ALDs you have the opportunity to become familiar with.
6
Evaluation Criteria
Guidelines for Student Teacher Evaluation
This is a criterion-referenced format used to identify strengths and weaknesses of STs
as they develop. This form consists of competencies which are generic to all education majors
(Items #1-33) and those identified as critical skills needed by special education majors (Items
#34-60) by the Department of Exceptionality Programs. Each time the student teacher is
evaluated and given feedback by the CT, she/he should be able to formulate a profile of
strengths and weaknesses. Timelines are suggested for evaluation on its cover sheet.
Appendix T contains this evaluation form.
The first two evaluations are done for the purpose of identifying specific strengths and
areas that need improvement. The third and final evaluations are transferred onto a final form
with identical content, but it also lists the first and second assignments. This form becomes
part of the ST’s credentials. The final evaluation is converted into a letter grade.
The letter grade is computed as follows:
50 x 3’s = 150
5 x 2’s = 10
5 x 1’s = 5
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
D
E
Total:
60 into 165 = 2.75
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
3.00
2.79
2.69
2.61
2.49
2.39
2.29
2.09
1.79
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2.80
2.70
2.62
2.50
2.40
2.30
2.10
1.80
0
In the example, 60 is the total of numbers (threes through zeros) checked in the
evaluation. 165 is the total of the numbers (threes through zeros) times the frequency they
were checked in the rating scale. The final score, 2.75, was a result of dividing 165 by 60. The
grading scale used in student teaching is to the right of the example. As can be seen, 2.75
would be an “A-”.
Note- Items scored “NA” are not factored into the final grade computation.
Classroom Observation Form for College Supervisors
One instrument is used in classroom observations (Appendix T). This is used during the
CS’s observations of the ST.
7
General Information
Elements of Performance Objectives
STs are required to formulate specific objectives that will then be incorporated into the
planning process. Appendix O – Elements of a Performance Objective and Appendix R –
Classification of Educational Objectives and Illustrative Behavioral Terms assist the ST in this
task. The ST should eventually be able to assess students’ needs and identify their present
levels of educational performance. Annual goals and specific objectives should be formulated
which reflect the school’s course of study, student’s present educational levels, PA academic
standards and/or assessment anchors.
General Guidelines for Student Teachers and Supervising Classroom Teachers
The General Guidelines for Weekly Activities is found in Appendix W. This has been
included since ST’s progress at different rates and need a reference that will act as a personal
timeline. It is impossible to construct a single prototype that will apply to the diversity of
classroom instruction found in special education. The General Guide for Weekly Activities is to
serve as a basic reference for STs and CTs. The progression of any ST is determined by the
type of placement, the strengths of the ST, the CT, and often the CS.
Additional Information
Absences/Tardiness
The ST is to follow the guidelines established by the local education agency for absences
or tardiness. If sickness or an emergency occurs that requires an absence, the ST is to notify
the CS and CT. In cases of absence, the ST is held responsible for getting lesson plans to the
CT. There are NO EXCEPTIONS to this expectation and failure to do so may result in a lowered
grade for student teaching.
Excluding absences because of the course, Student Teaching Seminar, the ST is allowed
two days for job interviews pending graduation at the end of the present semester. It is
advisable not to use these two days consecutively. Do not take an entire day unless the
distance of the interview requires this. However, it is suggested that the ST leave for the
interview in plenty of time to arrive refreshed. The ST is to inform the CT and CS well in
advance of the interview date.
Neither tardiness nor early departure from school is permissible. If car pooling, it should
be understood that arrival and departure times may differ, but the ST is responsible for a full
day. In some cases the CT may wish to consult with the ST immediately after school if the
daily schedule does not allow appropriate time. This will be left to the discretion of the CT.
Emergency Substitute Teaching
It is highly recommended that student teachers NOT BE utilized as substitute teachers for the
following reasons:
1.
Student teachers are not district, intermediate unit or agency employees.
2.
Student teachers may not receive compensation in any form for substitute teaching
service.
3.
Student teachers have not obtained a valid Pennsylvania certificate in their field of
study.
Additionally, student teachers serving in such a capacity increases the potential liability
issue for all parties involved.
8
Appendices
9
Appendix A
Code of Ethics for Student Teachers
The assumption that student teachers desire to do the right thing in their student teaching relationships, that
student teaching is a privilege which should be denied to those who do not adhere to a high ethical standard, and that a
statement of a code of ethics will help those whose judgments might be faulty has resulted in the following proposed code
of ethics:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Schools are an agent of society for promoting the welfare of children and youth. I shall, therefore, never divulge information
about children except in those professional relationships designed for the welfare of children, and I shall act only after having
received the approval of my Cooperating Teacher (CT).
Since I am directly responsible to the CT, I shall discuss with him/her any problem before presenting it to another.
I shall be loyal to the school in which I am privileged to do my student teaching, reserving criticism until I am fully aware of
all factors. I shall present my ideas and questions only to those responsible for the school.
My loyalty to the school shall continue after my student teaching is completed.
Since I am jointly responsible with the CT and the school for what happens to the children during my student teaching
assignment, I shall exert myself to the fullest.
I shall receive constructive criticism and suggestions in a professional manner, making every effort to implement these
suggestions.
I shall abide by the rules and regulations governing the faculty and the staff during my placement in a school.
I shall be friendly and sympathetic with the children, but I shall in no way “curry favor” with the children or interfere between
the teacher and pupils.
I shall go the extra mile to make myself a useful, contributing member of the school staff.
I shall discharge to the fullest every responsibility which I accept and shall honestly evaluate the effectiveness of my
performance.
I shall strive for a fuller mastery of subject matter, a clearer concept of successful teaching, and a keener understanding of
children.
I enter the teaching profession with a determination to continue to grow and to make it a finer profession because of my part
in it. Only those who love children and enjoy teaching can hope to become real teachers.
I will inform myself about the correct professional and ethical procedures to follow in securing a position or in changing from
one position to another. I shall adhere to these procedures. I shall regard any contract I sign as binding until it is dissolved
by mutual consent of my employer and myself.
Acknowledgement is made to the College of Education, University of Kentucky,
for this Code of Ethics.
10
Appendix B
Student Teacher Regulations in Special Education
The Student Teacher Must:
1.
Have evidence of a current Act 34 (Criminal), Act 151 (Child Abuse) and Act 114 (FBI) clearances to present to the
appropriate school district/intermediate unit representative on or before the first day of each assignment.
2.
Have evidence of a TB test to present to the school nurse or building principal on or before the first day of each assignment.
3.
Have evidence of membership in a professional organization which assures liability, or be covered under liability.
4.
Attend all in-service and teacher meetings unless specified otherwise by the cooperating teacher (CT) and college supervisor
(CS).
5.
Report to school on time and remain until the school day is terminated, or after the CT gives permission if a conference is
scheduled.
6.
Follow school regulations and policy handbook. If illness or an emergency occurs contact the CT and CS immediately.
7.
Present resume to CT during first week of each assignment.
8.
Present copies of lesson plans, IEP’s, units, or special projects to the CT prior to instruction. With permission from the CT,
materials may be entered in the student teaching notebook and made available to the CT and CS.
9.
Attend all scheduled meetings for Student Teaching Seminar.
10.
Assume responsibilities of pupils outside of classroom, i.e., hallway, cafeteria, playground, especially if danger exists.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Follow all regulations regarding confidentiality of pupils’ records as specified in Pennsylvania Special Education Regulations,
P.L. 108-446, and school district policy.
Dress appropriately for school environment.
Gradually assume teaching responsibilities as outlined in Weekly Recommended Activities (Appendix X).
Attempt to first resolve any classroom problems with the CT; if not successful, discuss them with the CS.
15.
Return all materials borrowed from the CT, CS, school district or I.U., college library, etc. prior to the last week of class.
11
Appendix C
The Student Teacher Contract
In your two 3-ring binders, one for each placement, each of the sections below should be tabbed and you need to provide documentation of completion of this activity. This
contract and notebook are critical to your success in these two student teaching placements. Each section of your notebook, as outlined below, will begin with a short paragraph
description of what this section includes and, when applicable, what you did to complete this section.
Name
Semester
First Assignment
Required Activity
Information
Resume
Class Schedule
Class Overview
Induction Information
IEP/Mgmt Program
Unit Plan
Teaching Devices (3)
Learning Strategy/BB
Observe other class (2)
Lesson Plans
Due Date
Via email for
first 3 listed
Fri Wk 1
Fr Wk 1
Second Assignment
TPts
Fri Wk 2
Wk 1 Mon,
TBA
Seminars
EPts
Required Activity
1
1
1
1
*
*
6
5
1
8
Class Schedule
Class Overview
Induction Information
IEP/Mgmt Program
UNIT Plan
Teaching Devices (3)
Learning Strategy/BB
Observe other class (2)
Lesson Plans
3
ALDs
Seminars
Information
Due Date
Via email
for first 3
Fri Wk 1
Fri Wk 2
Wk 9 & 15,
Fri
TPts
1
1
1
*
*
6
5
2
8
5
2
ALDs
1
Video Self-Eval (3)
Postmarked
Fri wk 11,14
10
Video Self-Eval (3)
Postmarked
Fri Wk 4, 6, 8
15
NOTEBOOK DUE
Fri Week 9
2
NOTEBOOK DUE
Fri Week 15
4
(Late Assignments will be discounted for each day late, this mainly concerns the Video Self-evals and due date of Notebook)
45
45
*IEP…………………………………5
___
___
*UNIT Plan…………………………5
___
___
Total Points 1st Assignment
`````````````````````````````````````50
____
Total Points 2nd Assignment
50
A
AB+
B
BC+
C-
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
95-100
90-94
87-89
83-86
80-82
77-79, C =
70-72, D+ =
73-76
67-69
Total Points Earned
__________
Grade
__________
D = 60-66, E = <60
12
EPts
____
Appendix D
Daily Schedule Model
(Name & Address of School)
20 __ __ - 20 __ __ School Term
Type/Level of Class
Secondary Learning Support
Rm # 000
Teacher
Ms. Pick
REGULAR DAILY SCHEDULE
EXAMPLE A
Time
Period 1:
8:38-9:23
Period 2:
9:26-10:08
Period 3:
10:11-10:53
LUNCH
10:56-11:23
Period 4:
11:26-12:08
Period 5:
12:11-12:53
Period 6:
12:56-1:38
Period 7:
1:41-2:23
Period 8:
2:26-3:11
EXAMPLE B
Time
Period 1:
8:13-8:55
Period 2:
8:58-9:40
Period 3:
9:43-10:25
Period 4:
10:28-11:10
Period 5:
11:13-12:40
Period 6:
12:43-1:25
Period 7:
1:28-2:10
Period 8:
2:13-2:55
Physical Science
11th Grade
Applied Science
12th Grade
Physical Science
11th Grade
Applied Science
12th Grade
PLANNING
Biology
10th Grade
Environmental Science
9th Grade
Biology
10th Grade
Study Skills
Room 6
Algebra I
Room 8
Algebra I
Room 3
Algebra I
Room 3
PREP
Biology
Room 30
21st Skills/Algebra I
Day 1/Day 2
Algebra I
Room 6
The above schedules are for two different types of secondary learning support service
delivery models. Example A is a content area resource room. Example B is a co-teaching
inclusionary model.
13
Appendix E
See Appendix E Pages.docx for blank pages to insert – no inserts, the
official IEP document is found on the PaTTAN website as well as the
Communication Plan.
14
Appendix F
Unit Plan Format
1. Introduction/General Information
•
•
•
Unit title/theme
Areas of interdisciplinary integration
Grade level(s)
•
Introduction/unit summary and rationale
2. Academic Standards/Assessment Anchors
3. Unit Goals
4. Pre-Assessment - Provides data for evaluating degree of student learning after unit is taught.
5. Motivational Device for the Unit
6. Content
- Daily lesson plans (Use the prescribed lesson plan format.)
7. Differentiated Learning Activities
Include context of the learners as a rationale for differentiation:
• Describe important characteristics of the learners in your classroom: number of learners and
gender, race/ethnicity, school socio-economic status, special needs, and language proficiency.
•
Explain the strategies utilized to maximize success for diverse learners.
8. Instructional Resources and Technology (i.e., multimedia, technology, lab equipment,
outside expert) - If technology is excluded, provide an instructionally sound rationale for its absence.
9. Summative Assessment/Post-Assessment - Relates directly to pre-assessment to evaluate degree
of student learning after unit is taught.
************************************************************************************* 10. Reflection - Completed after implementation of unit plan
•
Analyze assessment data and explain to what degree instructional decisions made an impact on
student learning and achievement of unit goals and lesson objectives.
•
Describe modifications for redesigning your unit plan that would improve student learning
outcomes.
(7/29/09)
15
Student Name: ___________________________________
Student ID: ___________________________________
Scoring Rubric for Unit Plans
Elements
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Basic (1)
Unsatisfactory (0)
Introduction/
General Information
Complete title page; rationale for teacher
and importance to the learners; provides
areas of integration.
Partially complete title page; rationale or
importance; integration areas proposed, but not
detailed.
Minimal title page lacking at least three (3)
critical parts with rationale and/or importance
that miss the mark; no evidence of integration.
Minimal title page lacking at least three (3)
critical parts with rationale and/or
importance that miss the mark; no evidence
of integration.
Academic
Standards/Assessment
Anchors
Relevant Standards and Anchors are
listed by number and letter, written out,
and have a direct correlation to
individual lesson plan objectives.
Relevant Standards and Anchors are listed by
number and letter and are written out.
Relevant Standards and Anchors are listed by
number and letter.
Relevant Standards and Anchors are not
specifically identified and listed.
Unit Goals
Performance-based; written with general
condition and performance (learning
outcome).
Performance-based; lacks condition, but
provides learning outcome.
Condition or criterion missing; performance is
not assessable or unclear.
No unit goals provided.
Pre-assessment
Pre-assessment aligned with lesson
objectives and adapted, as needed.
Pre-assessment marginally aligned and
adapted, as needed.
Pre-assessment unclear and not adapted for all
learners.
No evidence of pre-assessment.
Motivational Device
Unit-specific; clearly described;
appropriate for the purpose of the lesson;
linked to learners’ interests.
Unit-specific; described; appropriate for the
purpose of the lesson.
Motivational device is indicated but not
described.
Motivational device is missing.
Lesson Plans (Content)
Contains at least three (3) lesson plans
that follow all elements contained in the
lesson plan rubric; use diverse
instructional methods/strategies; progress
in a logical order.
Contains at least three (3) moderately diverse
lesson plans with all elements or three diverse
lessons with one or two elements missing;
progress in a logical order.
Contains at least three (3) minimally diverse
lesson plans with all elements or three (3)
moderately diverse lessons with one (1) or two
(2) elements missing; lack logical progression.
No lesson diversity (all three [3] are lectures
or all three [3] are discussion, etc.); lack
logical progression.
Differentiated Learning
Activities
Based on context of the learners
(characteristics and diversity of
students); summarizes strategies
contained in lesson plans that are
specific, appropriate for diverse learners;
based on current research.
Generalized statements of learners’ diversity;
summarizes strategies contained in lesson plans
that are appropriate for some diverse learners;
based on current research.
Minimal statements of learners’ diversity;
summarizes strategies contained in lesson plans
that support at least one (1) type of diverse
learner.
No summary of differentiated learning
activities is provided.
Integration of Resources
and Technology
Detailed overview of resources and
technology integrated into lessons;
appropriate for the learners and the
school resources.
Use of resources and technology is evident, but
integration into lessons is not specific;
technology use appropriate for lessons
presented.
Resources and technology used are listed, but
explanation of how they fit the lessons is
missing.
No evidence of appropriate and available
resources used.
Summative Assessment
Assessment matches lesson objectives;
higher-thinking skills tied to preassessment; answers provided.
Assessment matches lesson objectives; limited
higher-thinking skills tied to pre-assessment;
answers provided.
Assessment matches lesson objectives, but
only includes knowledge and comprehension
items; answers not included.
No evidence of assessment.
Reflection
Accurately explains effectiveness of
lesson activities to achieve objectives
and impact learners; describes relevant
modifications.
Few examples to explain effectiveness of
lesson activities to achieve objectives and
impact learners; provides relevant
modifications.
A general explanation of effectiveness of
lesson activities and impact on learners;
modifications identified.
No reflection or rationale for why some
learning activities were more successful
than others; modifications missing.
(7/29/09)
16
Appendix G
TEACHING DEVICE/ADAPTATION
I.
Title
II.
Explanation/Rationale – (target group, subject, students’
needs, etc.)
III. Evaluation – (effectiveness, students’ reaction, future
changes, etc.)
17
Appendix H
BULLETIN BOARD/LEARNING STATION
I.
Title
II.
Picture
III. Explanation/Rationale – (target group, subject students’
needs, etc.)
IV. Evaluation – (effectiveness, students’ reaction, future
changes, etc.)
18
APPENDIX I (1)
ANECDOTAL RECORD FORM
Date
Time
Student Behavior
Teacher Reaction
19
Student Reaction
Appendix I (2)
ABC Analysis Format
Antecedent
(if observable)
Behavior
1. (list separately)
2. (etc.)
20
Consequences
A.
B.
C.
Appendix J
Induction Information
(This should be completed no later than the 2nd week of each assignment.)
One of the first problems encountered by the student teacher or a teacher who is new to a particular school is that of
becoming acquainted with school policy. Once situations involving policy are mastered and become automatic, the teacher can put
efforts where they belong – his/her students and teaching.
Are you familiar with/responsible for:
First
Second
Assign Assign
___
___
morning arrival time?
___
___
departure time?
___
___
responsibility on the playground?
___
___
hall duty?
___
___
schedules of specialists?
___
___
lunch orders and schedules?
___
___
fire drill procedure?
___
___
civil defense procedure?
___
___
procedure for purchasing and serving milk?
___
___
method of checking daily attendance?
___
___
handling of attendance reports?
___
___
procedures for excusing children to leave building?
___
___
schedule of subjects and activities?
___
___
staff meeting procedures?
___
___
responsibility in the lunch room?
___
___
accident reports?
___
___
ventilation, lighting and clean-up practices?
___
___
rules governing discipline?
___
___
bus regulations?
___
___
Can you locate:
First
Second
Assign Assign
___
___
general care of classroom?
the central office?
___
___
the supply rooms?
___
___
the library?
___
___
the cafeteria?
___
___
the playground areas?
___
___
the duplicating facilities?
___
___
the technology aids?
___
___
the professional library?
21
Do you have:
First
Second
Assign Assign
___
___
a desk of your own?
___
___
a definite conference time with your CT?
___
___
a teacher’s copy of texts?
___
___
a copy of the teacher’s school policy handbook?
___
___
a procedure for requisitioning supplies?
___
___
a school calendar of activities?
___
___
a copy of planned courses (if accessible)
Do you know about:
First
Second
Assign Assign
___
___
nurse’s program?
___
___
guidance services?
___
___
speech therapist?
___
___
psychologist?
___
___
social worker?
___
___
field trip procedures?
___
___
reading specialist?
___
___
testing program?
___
___
use of library facilities by the children?
___
___
instructional materials available?
___
___
philosophy of the school system
Have you met or conferred with:
First
Second
Assign Assign
___
___
the principal/local education authority?
___
___
other classroom teachers?
___
___
the custodians?
___
___
the secretaries?
___
___
any parents?
___
___
support staff?
Name: _____________________________
(Student Teacher)
22
Appendix K
Bloomsburg University School of Education
FINAL EVALUATION FORM – EDUCATION OF THE DEAF/HH
The University Supervisor or the Cooperating Teacher named below completed this FINAL EVALUATION FORM for the student teacher. The narrative assessment
and the rating are a measure of student teaching competencies and are not intended to be a measure in comparison to experienced classroom teachers.
Student Teacher ________________________________ Date_______Fall/Spring 1st/2nd Placement Major ________________________
Last,
First,
Middle
Name of School ________________________________ Grade Level(s)________________
Performance Evaluation Scale: 3=Distinguished, 2- Proficient, 1-Basic, 0-Unsatisfactory
Domain 1: Planning & Preparation
______A. Demonstrates Knowledge Content and the Structure of the Discipline
______B. Demonstrates Knowledge of Prerequisite Relationships
______C. Demonstrates Knowledge of Content-Related Pedagogy
______D. Demonstrates Knowledge of Child and Adolescent
Development
______E. Demonstrates Knowledge of the Learning Process
______F. Demonstrates Knowledge of Students’ Skills, Knowledge
& Language Proficiency
______G. Demonstrates Knowledge of Students’ Interests and
Cultural Heritage
______H. Demonstrates Knowledge of Students’ Special Needs
______I. Values and Designs Sequential Instruction Aligned with
the Discipline
______J. Communicates Instructional Outcomes with Clarity
______K. Designs Balanced Instructional Outcomes
______L. Designs Instructional Outcomes Suitable for Diverse
Learners
______M. Demonstrates Knowledge of Resources for Classroom
Use
______N. Demonstrates Knowledge of Resources to Extend
Content Knowledge and Pedagogy
______O. Demonstrates Knowledge of Resources for Students
______P. Designs Coherent Learning Activities
______Q. Designs Coherent Instructional Materials and Resources
______ R. Designs Coherent Instructional Groups
______ S. Designs Coherent Lesson and Unit Structure
______ T. Designs Instruction Congruent with Instructional
Outcomes
______U. Designs Assessment with Clear Criteria and Standards
______V. Designs Formative Assessments
______W. Uses Assessment Results to Plan Instruction for
Students
Domain 3: Instruction
______ A. Communicates Expectations for Learning to Students
______ B. Communicates Directions and Procedures
______ C. Provides Explanations of Content
______ D. Uses Correct Oral and Written Language
______ E. Asks Questions of High Quality with Adequate Student
Response Time
______ F. Generates Discussions among Students
______ G. Engages All Students in Class Discussions
______ H. Engages Students in Activities and Assignments
______ I. Arranges Productive Grouping of Students
______ J. Utilizes Suitable Instructional Materials and Resources
______ K. Designs Lessons with Coherent Structure and Pacing
______ L. Uses Assessment Criteria in Instruction
______ M. Uses Assessment to Monitor Student Learning
______ N. Provides Assessment Feedback to Students
______ O. Incorporates Student Self-assessment and Monitoring of
Progress
______ P. Demonstrates Flexibility through Lesson Adjustment
______ Q. Responds to Students’ Learning Needs and Interests
______ R. Persists in Seeking Effective Approaches
______ S. Uses Clear and Appropriate Sign Language
______ T. Uses Clear and Appropriate Oral Language for
Deaf/HH Students.
_______ TOTAL DOMAIN 3
Domain 4: Professional Responsibility
______A. Assesses Accurately Lesson’s Effectiveness
______B. Uses Self-reflections in Future Teaching
______C. Maintains Accurate Records of Student Assignments
______D. Maintains Accurate Records of Student Progress and
Learning
______E. Maintains Accurate Noninstructional Records
______F. Communicates with Families about Instructional Programs
______G. Communicates with Families about Individual Students
______H. Engages Family in the Instructional Program
______I. Establishes a Positive Relationship with Colleagues
______J. Demonstrates Involvement in a Culture of Professional
Inquiry
______K. Volunteers Services to the School
______L. Participates in School and District Projects
______M. Seeks Opportunities to Enhance Content Knowledge and
Pedagogical Skills
______N. Welcomes and Seeks out Feedback from Colleagues
______O. Initiates and/or Participates in Important Activities to
Contribute to the Profession
______P. Demonstrates Professional Integrity and Ethical Conduct
______Q. Provides Proactive Services to Students
______R. Advocates to Ensure Fair Treatment of All Students
______S. Demonstrates Decision Making Based on Professional
Standards
______T. Complies Fully with the School and District Regulations
______ X. Develops Materials Appropriate for Deaf/HH Learners
_______ TOTAL DOMAIN 1
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
______A. Interacts Respectfully and Genuinely with Students
______B. Designs an Environment for Respectful Student-toStudent Interactions
______C. Communicates the Importance of Content
______D. Communicates Expectations for Learning and
Achievement
______E. Designs an Environment Motivating Students’ Pride in
Work
______F. Manages Instructional Groups
______G. Manages Transitions Seamlessly and Efficiently
______H. Designs Routines for the Management of Materials and
Supplies
______I. Designs Efficient Systems for Performing Non-instructional
Duties
______J. Supervises Volunteers and Paraprofessionals
______K. Communicates Clear Student Behavior Expectations
______L. Monitors Student Behavior
______M. Manages Response to Student Misbehavior
______N. Organizes a Safe and Accessible Physical Space
______O. Arranges Furniture and Physical Resources
______U. Demonstrates Familiarity with Assistive Listening and
Communication Devices (e.g. Hearing Aids, FM units).
______V. Manages and Maintains Assistive Listening and
Communication Devices Appropriately
_______ TOTAL DOMAIN 4
________ TOTAL POINTS
______ P. Uses Class Time Effectively and Paces Lessons
To Keep Deaf/HH Students’ Attending Behavior
______ TOTAL DOMAIN 2
NARRATIVE EVALUATION/LETTER OF RECOMMENDATION IS
REQUIRED
Name: ___________________________________________________________
Position & School: _________________________________________________
School Phone: _____________________________________________________
Recommended Grade ___________ (3, 2, 1, or 0)
23
Appendix L
Classroom Overview
1.
Type of class: i.e. full-time, part-time, inclusionary, mixed category (specify the
mix).
2.
Size of class: number of pupils listed on roster
3.
Subject areas taught: academic and non-academic
4.
Outline of takeover schedule.
24
Appendix M (1)
Observation
STUDENT:
CLASS:
PERIOD:
TIME:
General Student Behavior:
Student/Student Interactions:
Teacher/Student Interactions:
Time Spent on Task:
Other:
25
Appendix M (2)
Observation Format
I.
Purpose -
1. Date –
2. Time –
3. Subject/Activity –
II.
What Observed –
III.
Personal Reaction -
26
Appendix N
Lesson Plan Format
Name:
Date:
I.
LESSON FOUNDATION
Lesson Title:
Unit Title:
Grade Level(s):
Subject Area(s)/Subject Content Explanation:
Lesson Number w/in Unit:
Time Allotted:
Standard(s)/Anchors: PA Academic Standards/Anchors describe what students should demonstrate and be
able to do as a result of instruction. Common Core Standards may be used by school districts to
represent a set of expectations for student knowledge and skills that high school graduates need to
master to succeed in college and careers.
Essential Question(s): An essential question establishes content knowledge and connects that knowledge to
the topic at hand and to the student’s prior knowledge. Essential questions should be embedded
throughout the introduction, procedures, and closure of a lesson or unit of study.
Instructional Objective(s): A clearly delineated statement of what a student will demonstrate or do after
instruction has occurred. This should specify the condition, performance, and criterion.
Formative Assessment: The assessment process that occurs during instruction and learning activities.
Summative Assessment: The assessment process that occurs after instruction and learning activities. If the
lesson is a component of a unit of study, describe how students will demonstrate mastery of material and how it will
be measured.
II. LESSON BODY
INTRODUCTION: A process to engage/activate student learning, interest and prior knowledge. This activity
and instruction relate the experiences of the students to the objectives of the lesson. An “Instructional
Set” may include a motivational device, connection to prior learning and real life experiences,
relevance to future learning, stated connection to instructional objective and academic standards or the
essential questions to be addressed in lesson.
TEACHING PROCEDURES: The step-by-step process/procedure for teaching information, concepts and
skills identified in the instructional objectives.
Must include:
*Description of Method(s) Used to Present Subject Matter - Explicitly and sequentially describe
how you will teach/present the lesson's concepts to your students and the multiple approaches
you will use. Include the learning activities, processes, procedures and or strategies that
support the lesson.
*Guided Practice - Explicitly and sequentially describe the opportunities provided to students for
practice and application of skills under direct teacher supervision. This may involve
modeling, use of prompt hierarchies and use of key discussion questions to stimulate thought
and provoke inquiry.
*Independent Practice - Explicitly and sequentially describe the opportunities provided to students
to practice and apply skills independently. This provides a platform for formative assessment
practices and connection to lesson objectives.
CLOSURE: A process designed to bring a lesson presentation to an appropriate conclusion. Used to help
students bring things together in their own minds, to use, apply and extend what has just been taught.
The lesson summary includes a review of central lesson concepts and/or essential questions, a preview
of future learning, an application to daily living or an expansion/extension of concept.
27
III. LESSON ESSENTIALS
DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING ACTIVITIES: Specific activities designed to provide for the
instructional needs of ALL students (e.g., learning profile, ethnicity, ability, gender). Learning profiles
can include student interests, readiness, and learning styles.
Instruction should be differentiated through: 1) content, 2) process, 3) product, and/or 4) learning
environment. Describe how differentiation meets the learning needs of students in your classroom and
research-based strategies utilized to optimize learning.
Additional individualized strategies as mandated by IEPs and 504 plans include:
INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES, MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY: List all materials, resources
and technology utilized in the instruction of a lesson.
IV. POST-LESSON REFLECTION:
ANALYSIS OF STUDENT LEARNING: Review of data and documented evidence of lesson results as
related to
instructional objectives or standards.
ANALYSIS OF TEACHING: Include modifications/recommendations of current instruction for future
application on 1) planning and preparation, 2) classroom environment, 3) instruction, and 4) professional
responsibilities as related to instructional objectives or standards.
*Approved by COE Assessment Committee 5-8-13
28
29
Student Name: ________________________________
___________________________
Student ID:
Scoring Rubric for Lesson Plans
Elements
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Basic (1)
Unsatisfactory (0)
Standard(s)/
Anchors
PA and Common Core Standards are
listed and fully reflect a direct
correlation to lesson objectives.
PA and Common Core Standards are
listed and partially correlate to
lesson objectives.
PA and Common Core Standards
are listed with little or no
correlation to objectives.
PA and Common Core Standards
are not specifically identified and
listed.
Instructional
Objectives
Lesson plan identifies specific
performance-based objectives, written
with three (3) components (condition,
performance, criterion/criteria).
Objectives are distinct from one another
and function as the clear purpose and
focus of instruction and assessment.
Objectives measure various levels of
skill, differentiating from concrete skills
to higher-level thinking.
Lesson plan identifies specific
performance-based objectives,
written with three (3) components
(condition, performance,
criterion/criteria). Objectives are
distinct from one another and
function as the clear purpose and
focus of instruction and assessment.
Objectives measure various levels of
skill.
Lesson plan identifies specific
performance-based objectives,
written with three (3) components
(condition, performance,
criterion/criteria); one of the
components is inappropriate. The
objectives function as a partial focus
for instruction and assessment. Few,
if any, differentiated objectives.
Lesson plan fails to contain
specific performance-based
objectives and/or objectives are
not written with required
components (condition,
performance, criterion/criteria).
Objectives are so broad and vague
that the focus for instruction and
assessment is unclear.
Essential Questions
(EQs)
EQ(s) is open-ended and encourages
higher order thinking. EQ(s) help
students conceptualize the theme of the
lesson and challenge students to think
critically. EQ(s)also prompt students to
develop a plan of action and require
them to construct their knowledge by
connecting the topic to what they've
learned previously.
EQ(s) is open-ended and encourages
higher order thinking. EQ(s) help
students conceptualize the theme of
the lesson and challenge students to
think critically.
EQ(s) is open-ended and
encourages some higher order
thought.
The EQ(s) is too simple will not
help students think critically.
Formative and
Summative
Assessment
Methods of formative and/or summative
assessment are established; a rationale
for their implementation is provided;
implementation is described in detail and
aligned with instructional objectives.
Methods of formative and
summative assessment are
established and aligned with
objectives.
Methods of formative and
summative assessment are
established.
Limited or no evidence of
formative and summative
assessment is established.
30
Elements
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Basic (1)
Unsatisfactory (0)
Introduction
An engaging process for lesson
introduction is specifically described,
including a strong motivational device,
connection to prior learning, and/or
connection to objectives, standards and
essential questions.
A lesson introduction is specifically
described, including a motivational
device, connection to prior learning,
or connection to objectives,
standards and essential questions.
The lesson was introduced by
stating the instructional objective or
focus.
A process for lesson introduction
is limited or missing.
Teaching Procedures
Lesson plan contains all elements within
the Lesson Body; learning activities
support objectives and provide for
optimal instruction; transitions between
activities are seamless; and assessment
practices are integrated within the lesson
to measure progress. Planning for
student learning is evident.
Lesson plan contains all elements
within the Lesson Body; learning
activities support objectives and
progress in a logical order; and
assessment practices are evident.
Student learning is evident.
Lesson plan contains all elements
within the Lesson Body; learning
activities support objectives and
progress in a logical order. Student
learning is evident.
Lesson plan elements are absent
or incomplete within the Lesson
Body; learning activities do not
support objectives and/or lack
logical progression.
Closure
A student-led engaging process for
closing the lesson is specifically
described, including a review of lesson
concepts and/or essential questions,
preview of future learning, application
or extension of lesson concepts.
Lesson closure is specifically
described, including a review of
lesson concepts and/or essential
questions, preview of future
learning, application or expansion of
lesson concepts.
The lesson was closed by restating
the instructional objective and
focus.
A process for lesson closure is
inappropriate or missing.
Differentiated
Learning Activities
Specific activities that differentiate the
content, process, product, and/or
learning environment are designed to
provide advanced achievement for all
learners. Research-based strategies are
effectively described to challenge all
learners.
Specific activities that differentiate
the content, process, product, and/or
learning environment are designed
to improve achievement for all
learners. Research-based strategies
are described to meet the needs of
all learners.
General activities that differentiate
the content, process, product, and/or
learning environment are identified.
Detail is lacking in one or more of
the critical areas.
Activities that differentiate the
content, process, product and/or
learning environment are not
identified.
Instructional
Resources, Materials
& Technology
A range of resources, materials and
technology are effectively integrated
into the context of the lesson, engaging
to learners and provide for optimal
student learning. Additional resources
are listed for extended learning
activities.
Resources, materials and technology
are utilized, appropriate for the
learners and provide for optimal
student learning.
Resources, materials and
technology are utilized to support
instruction.
Use of resources, materials and
technology is limited or absent.
Materials fail to fully fit the
context of the lesson and needs of
the students.
(Direct Instruction of
Subject Content, Guided
Practice, Independent
Practice)
31
Post-lesson
Reflection/Analysis
Thoroughly analyzes evidence of student
learning. A reflection of teacher
performance encompasses the domains
of planning, instruction, environment
and professionalism. All areas of
performance receive in-depth objective
reflection. Data or products are utilized.
Analyzes evidence of student
learning and teacher performance in
planning, instruction, environment
and professionalism. All areas of
performance receive objective
reflection.
32
Partially analyzes student learning
and teacher performance in
planning, instruction, environment
and professionalism. Some
reflection is evident.
Inaccurate, limited or no evidence
related to an analysis of student
learning and teacher performance
in planning, instruction,
environment and professionalism.
Appendix O
Elements of a Performance Objective
A performance objective includes:
1.
2.
3.
the conditions under which measurement will occur
the actual behavior
the measurement standard or criterion
The conditions element lists the specific circumstance(s) or situation(s) in which the student will
perform. Examples of condition categories include time, materials, environmental setting, manner of
assistance, etc.
The behavioral element is usually an action word which delineates what the target is expected to do.
The clarity of the objective is to a great degree dependent upon the specificity of this word. Verbs which
precisely define the expected performance will be employed in well-stated objectives.
The criterion element indicates the acceptable level or standard for performance. This part of the
objective clearly states the level of performance which the teacher expects. This is an important part of the
objective because it defines the minimum expected achievement. The learning objective now has magnitude,
in addition to directionality.
Table I provides explicit illustrations of each element.
33
Appendix P
Table I
ELEMENTS OF A PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE
Conditions
(Givens)
Actual Behavior
(Action Verb)
Measurement
Standard
One-hour exam
In front of class
Without reference
When presented with a typed list
Given a slide rule
Random sample
W/o dictionary
Using three sounds
10-minute quiz
using a 10-key adding machine
given a blueprint
without a scale drawing
using a shop manual
without calipers
To Write
Point
Touch
Underline
Distinguish
Identify
Construct
Answer
Name
Order
Describe
State
Apply rule
Demonstrate
Interpret
Compile
Discriminate
Compute
Etc.
90 percent correct
four out of five
list four steps
10 words correctly
distinguish 3 main ideas
nearest percent
nearest tenth
100 percent accuracy
in alphabetical order
50 wpm for 5 minutes
nearest thousandth
Suggestion:
Suggestion:
Suggestion:
What are the givens, the limitations, the
restrictions which are imposed on the
pupil when demonstrating the terminal
behavior? They might include information,
tools, equipment, source, materials to be
or not to be used.
Use clear action verbs which are
observable.
How effectively is the behavior performed?
What is the minimum acceptable level of
performance required to indicate mastery
of the objective?
34
Appendix Q
Action Verbs Useful in Specifying Student Outcomes
GENERAL AREAS OF BEHAVIOR
General Discriminative Behaviors
choose
collect
define
describe
detect
differentiate
discriminate
distinguish
identify
indicate
isolate
list
match
omit
order
place
point
select
Social Behaviors
accept
agree
aid
allow
answer
argue
communicate
compliment
contribute
cooperate
dance
disagree
discuss
excuse
express
follow
forgive
greet
help
interact
invite
join
laugh
meet
participate
permit
play
praise
react
remain
smile
talk
thank
volunteer
wait
Language Behaviors
abbreviate
accent
alphabetize
articulate
associate
call
capitalize
demonstrate
edit
hyphenate
identify
indent
look to
outline
print
pronounce
punctuate
read
recite
repeat
say
sign
select
speak
spell
state
summarize
syllabicate
tell
turn to
translate
use
verbalize
whisper
write
35
Motor Behaviors
balance
build
catch
copy
crawl
cut
fold
gallop
grasp
hold
jump
kick
kneel
lift
paste
print
roll
sit
stack
thread
throw
track
walk
Study Behaviors
arrange
categorize
chart
cite
circle
classify
compile
copy
diagram
find
follow
gather
itemize
label
locate
look
map
mark
mate
name
organize
quote
record
reproduce
search
sort
underline
Self-Care Behaviors
bite
brush
clean
close
drink
dry
eat
fasten
feed
hold
open
put on
reach
replace
retain
scoop
secure
sit
snap
swallow
take off
wash
zip
ATTITUDES AND VALUES
Responding
answers
attempts
begins
notes
participates in
responds to
clarifies
Preferring
advocates
asks for
avoids
challenges
chooses
defends
describes
displays
identifies
initiates
invites
justifies
offers
praises
presents
promotes
proposes
recommends
seeks
states
takes
undertakes
volunteers
36
Complying
Carries out
Completes
Accepting
articulates
carries out
chooses
completes
contributes
describes
does
follows
meets
submits
does
identifies
offers
selects
states
submits
supports
undertakes
volunteers
BEHAVIORS LISTED ACCORDING TO BLOOM’S TAXONOMY
Observing
cites
describes
expresses
indicates
lists
names
points out
points to
records
relates
reports
shares
states
identifies
Remembering
chooses
cites
describes
lists
matches
names
points out
relates
repeats
reports
reproduces
restates
states
tells
writes
Interpreting
demonstrates
depicts
dramatizes
draws
enacts
explains
expresses
graphs
illustrates
pantomimes
paraphrases
presents
renders
rephrases
restates
retells
role plays
simulates
sketches
states in own words
Comparing
cites
describes
explains
expresses
lists
names
outlines
points out
reports
states
Classifying
arranges
catalogs
graphs
labels
names
outlines
places
rearranges
sorts
tabulates
37
Generalizing
abstracts
expresses
groups
identifies
presents
proposes
relates
Inferring
expresses
formulates
identifies
presents
proposes
relates
states
Analyzing
cites
describes
expresses
illustrates
lists
outlines
points out
relates
Synthesizing
assembles
constructs
depicts
explains
expresses
illustrates
makes
presents
produces
proposes
puts together
relates
Hypothesizing
expresses
identifies
invents
guesses
proposes
presents
speculates
relates
states
Predicting
estimates
expresses
identifies
presents
proposes
relates
speculates
states
Evaluating
argues
classifies
compares
criticizes
describes
equates
explains
justifies
supports
These listings were provided by two sources from Allegheny Intermediate Unit. Verbs
relating to Attitude and Bloom’s Taxonomy appeared in Planned Course Development –
Workshop Series, Instructional Support Division. The remainder were from I.U. #3’s Central
Support Project.
38
Appendix R
Classification of Educational Objectives And Illustrative Behavioral Terms
_____________________________________________________________________________
COGNITIVE DOMAIN
VERBS
Know
(Remember)
define, describe, identify, label,
list, locate, match, name,
outline, reproduce, select
Comprehend
(Interpret)
convert, defend, distinguish,
estimate, explain, give examples,
infer, paraphrase, predict,
rewrite, summarize, translate
Apply
(Use)
change, compute, construct,
demonstrate, manipulate, modify,
operate, predict, prepare,
produce, relate, show, solve, use
Analyze
(Break down)
diagram, differentiate,
discriminate, identify,
illustrate, infer, outline, point
out, relate, select, separate,
subdivide
Synthesize
(Put together in new form)
categorize, combine, compile,
compose, create, devise, design
explain, formulate, generate,
integrate, modify, organize, plan,
rearrange, reconstruct, relate,
reorganize, revise, rewrite,
summarize, write
Evaluate
(Judge value)
appraise, compare, conclude,
contrast, criticize, describe,
discriminate, explain, justify,
interpret, relate, summarize,
support
39
AFFECTIVE DOMAIN
VERBS
Receive
(Attending)
ask, choose, describe, follow,
give, hold, locate, name, select,
sit erect, reply
Respond
(React)
answer, assist, comply, conform,
discuss, greet, help, label,
perform, practice, present, read,
recite, report, select, tell,
write
Value
(Internalization)
complete, describe, differentiate,
explain, follow, form, initiate,
invite, join, justify, propose,
read, report, select, share,
study, work
Organize
(Building a value system)
adhere, alter, arrange, combine,
compare, complete, defend,
explain, generalize, identify,
integrate, modify, order,
organize, prepare, relate,
synthesize
Characterization
(Philosophy of life)
act, discriminate, display,
influence, listen, modify,
perform, practice, propose,
qualify, question, revise, serve,
solve, use, verify
PSYCHOMOTOR DOMAIN
VERBS
To date, a classification system
for this domain has not been completed.
assemble, build, calibrate,
change, clean, compose, connect,
construct, correct, create,
design, dismantle, drill, fasten,
fix, follow, grind, grip, hammer,
heat, hook, identify, locate,
make, manipulate, mend, mix, nail,
paint, sand, saw, sharpen, set,
sew, sketch, start, stir, use,
weigh, wrap.
Reference: Readings in Mental Retardation
40
Appendix S
Guidelines for Student Teacher Evaluation
_________________________________________________
Name of Cooperating Teacher
_____________________________________________
Name of Student/Semester
The purpose of this evaluation form is to help guide the student teacher in understanding his/her specific strengths and weaknesses. If
completed with this objective in mind, the student teacher, cooperating teacher, and college supervisor should be able to plan sequential steps
that guide the student teacher in continuous professional growth throughout the experience. A special time should be set aside, at the discretion
of the cooperating teacher, at the conclusion of the third week, sixth week, and prior to the termination of each student teaching assignment.
During these conferences, the student teacher should have access to the completed evaluation form as the cooperating teacher discusses various
competency areas. The cooperating teacher should keep in mind the importance of evaluation of each item in specific terms rather than using
broad generalizations. By following this procedure, the cooperating teacher can give specific suggestions for improvement; consequently, the
student teacher will also know exactly what is expected related to his/her future performance. Student teacher evaluation, however, should be
continuous and should not be exclusive to these conferences.
It is understood that a student teacher may not have had the opportunity to develop certain competencies during the first or second
evaluation periods. Furthermore, a few competencies may not be measurable in a given classroom. If either situation should occur, please
indicate by placing N/A (not applicable) in the appropriate category. The student teacher is not penalized for areas not scored.
Each competency should be evaluated with the following criteria in mind:
3.
Distinguished - Performs task with a high degree of effectiveness; requires little or no supervision.
2.
Proficient -
Performance is continually improving; still requires general direction in this area to maintain effectiveness.
1.
Basic -
Requires direction and/or demonstration from co-op and supervisor to maintain effectiveness.
0.
Unsatisfactory - Specific direction and supervision does not alter unsatisfactory performance and ability to make changes;
performance is inadequate to recommend for teaching.
N/A Not Applicable
41
EVALUATION
1st
PLANNING AND PREPARATION
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Lesson plan is appropriate to age group and subject
Demonstrates knowledge of students’ needs/interests
Demonstrates knowledge of content & pedagogy
Demonstrates knowledge of classroom resources
Designs lessons for students with special needs
CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT
Creates a safe, engaging learning environment
Interacts respectfully/genuinely with students
Manages transitions smoothly and efficiently
Monitors and responds to student behavior
Arranges and oversees student work groups
Demonstrates classroom management strategies
INSTRUCTION
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Communicates clear learning expectations
Voice is loud, clear and pleasant
Introduction (set) is made to the lesson
Communicates importance/relevance of content
Asks key questions allowing adequate response time
Content/ideas communicated clearly and accurately
Technology is effectively utilized
Motivates students with positive reinforcement
Uses variety of materials, activities and methods
Assesses students for understanding during the lesson
Appropriate summary/conclusion evidenced
Assessment is made at the conclusion of a lesson
Lesson plan is followed and adjusted when necessary
Uses correct oral and written language
42
2nd
3rd
EVALUATION
1
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
Professional in appearance and demeanor
Assignments are neat and timely
Follows rules and policies of the institution
Uses self-reflection for future teaching
Welcomes and seeks out feedback for improvement
Works effectively with cooperating teacher
Communicates well with university supervisor
Connects with students’ families
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM ADDENDUM OF COMPETENCIES
The Student Teacher:
34. handles information about children, peers, colleagues and supervisors ethically.
35. demonstrates flexibility by adapting readily to changes and emergency situations.
36. displays initiative, punctuality and accountability on a consistent basis.
37. develops an I.E.P. consistent with the standards of the school district or I.U. (including
assessment by student teacher).
38. submits and discusses lesson plans with cooperating teacher and/or paraprofessional in
advance of teaching.
39. demonstrates flexibility in planning and scheduling.
40. writes objectives indicating measurable and/or observable performance.
41. plans a project (unit, I.E.P., or other appropriate project) that considers specific functional
and/or developmental levels of students.
42. utilizes Pennsylvania K-12 Academic Standards in planning instruction.
43. demonstrates effective prevention by anticipating potential problem areas and takes
precautions to eliminate them.
44. takes care to establish accuracy, objectivity and confidentiality of reports.
45. consistently reinforces appropriate behavior and enforces class rules.
46. manages more than one group (subject/program/activity) simultaneously.
43
st
2nd
3rd
EVALUATION
1
SPECIAL AND DEAF EDUCATION PROGRAM ADDENDUM OF COMPETENCIES (cont’d)
The Student Teacher:
47. provides equitable learning opportunities for all students.
48. effectively works with and/or directs paraprofessionals and/or other support staff.
49. experiments with alternative and innovative devices and techniques.
50. gives concrete examples and takes advantage of real-life situations.
51. effectively works with other teachers in the school.
52. effectively works with multiple groups.
53. paces lesson to ensure appropriate length and sequence.
54. understands and supports what the regular class teacher is teaching.
55. focuses on other groups during direct instruction with one or two other groups.
56. uses a method of record keeping that precisely indicates the growth and accomplishments
of each child (progress monitoring).
57. records the extent to which objectives were achieved.
58. re-teaches or adjusts objectives which are not achieved.
59. effectively links assessment(s) with intervention approach(es) delineated in I.E.P.
60. completes all clerical responsibilities in a timely manner (grading assignments, attendance
reports, progress reports, etc.).
61. manages and maintains Assistive Listening and Communication Devices (ALDs)
Rev. 12/11
44
st
2nd
3rd
College of Education – CS & ST for Video-Self Eval
Bloomsburg University
Student Teacher ______________________________________
Appendix T
Activity ________________________________
PLANNING & PREPARATION:
Classroom Observation Form
Time________________
Date __________________
demonstrates knowledge of content/pedagogy/standards
OBJECTIVES
uses available resources, materials, or technology
Lesson Plans: collects background info
uses appropriate methods/materials/activities
______________________________________________________________________________________________
detail
blocked
easy to follow
difficult to follow
assessments aligned to goals/student needs
Goals/Objectives:
criterion
terminal behavior
conditions
sequenced
______________________________________________________________________________________________
adapted to student needs based upon previous evaluation
reflect PA standards
Organization: notebook _________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
INSTRUCTION:
Set: beginning
throughout
Type – stated objective
model
______________________________________________________________________________________________
background information
alerted students to important parts of lessons
other ___________________________________________________
Reinforcement:
none
single word
repetitive
varied
specific
______________________________________________________________________________________________
Motivation: promise of success
provides feedback on progress
______________________________________________________________________________________________
animation
importance of topic communicated
no identifiable technique employed
voice
Presentation: small steps
focus upon single concept
use of new knowledge
______________________________________________________________________________________________
pace (Fast, Slow, Appropriate) detailed directions examples (Many-Few)
variety of approaches (1, 2, 3, 4)
teaches to objective
vocabulary level ___________________________________
Independent Practice: directed
non-directed
circulates
______________________________________________________________________________________________
checks work
corrects and reinforces
checks for student understanding
other _______________
Closure:
used
not used
throughout lesson
conclusion only
______________________________________________________________________________________________
Type – summarizes
student involvement
students summarize
indicates completion of task
connection to future learning
Other:
use of past knowledge
identifies similarities between ideas
______________________________________________________________________________________________
identifies how skill will be used in different situations (future)
insures task mastery before new concept is introduced
feeling tone (Neutral-Positive-Negative) uses student ideas
______________________________________________________________________________________________
considers degree of original learning (identifies gaps)
clear/accurate explanations
evidence of student growth
flexibility
responsive to student needs
engages students in learning process: questioning/discussion
assesses student learning: formal/informal
integrates various disciplines within curriculum
CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT: clear expectations for student achievement/work quality
equitable learning opportunities for all students
establishes rules-clearly communicates rules prepares for and minimizes transitions
______________________________________________________________________________________________
appropriate interactions: teacher and students/students and students
assertive
consistent
provides meaningful consequences
establishes and maintains student support/rapport
employs plans
establishes routine
considers physical/safety factors
cues
On Task Behavior of Student: most of the time mostly off task varies
TEACHER PROFESSIONALISM: follows rules and policies of institution (punctuality, attendance)
cultivates professional relationships: Co-op teacher, other school staff,
students, university supervisor
self-evaluation
presence
accurate records
attire accepts/acts on feedback
______________________________________________________________________________________________
contributes to school and/or community effective communication: oral/written
OTHER: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
45
Appendix U
Instructional Procedures Refinement Form
For the Self-Evaluation Program
Subject ______________________________
Date _______ Time________
Step 1: View video or listen to audio cassette of your lesson.
A.
Perceived Strengths:
B.
Concerns:
C.
My immediate objective(s) for my next few lessons will be:
46
Appendix V
Weekly Suggested Student Teacher/Supervising Classroom Teacher Activities
Activities for First Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
First day – report to the principal’s office –
introduce self.
Orient student teacher to school and introduce
to staff.
Meet class – join in group activities.
Familiarize student teacher with supply
sources and procedures for obtaining them.
Observe class routine and procedures.
Prepare copies of class roll and daily schedule.
Provide class roll – program schedule – school
rules and regulations.
Explore room to become familiar with
materials and resources, and their locations.
Provide student teacher with desk or similar
work area.
Begin to help individual children with teacher’s
permission.
Supply student teacher with a School Policy
Handbook.
Associate with children during recess, or other
informal periods.
Introduce student teacher to class.
Observe standards of behavior for different
activities.
Discuss student teacher schedule plan for
beginning of participation in classroom
activities.
Begin to conduct total group activities for a
period not to exceed a class period each day –
such as games, roll call, discussions.
Discuss student teacher responsibilities such
as lesson plans, arrival time, duties, absence
procedures, etc.
Require student teacher to observe teaching.
Become familiar with basic texts used for skill
areas.
Observe and give suggestions to student
teacher for any activities in which he/she is
engaged.
Become familiar with school rules and
regulations by reading School Policy
Handbook.
Provide basic skill area texts for student
teacher.
Select pupil for assessment and IEP
development with CT help.
Prepare a list of suggestions for directed
observations – i.e. routine procedures, child
behavior, discipline options, special teacher
techniques for handling groups.
47
Activities for Second Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
Teach total group activity for at least one class
period daily.
Make comments on student teacher’s lesson
plans.
Make written lesson plans for lessons taught.
Evaluate student teacher performance; discuss
strengths and weaknesses with student
teacher.
Submit plans in advance to supervising
teacher for corrective feedback.
Encourage self-evaluation by student.
Continue to observe classroom instruction,
especially the teaching of skill subjects.
Provide samples of types of seatwork activities
suitable for class.
Share playground, lunchroom, or similar
responsibilities.
Discuss activities which student teacher might
use with individual child.
Observe and note teacher’s methods and
techniques for handling group, special
discipline problems.
Help student teacher plan appropriate goals,
content, and seatwork for lessons to be
presented.
Prepare a list of ways supervising teacher
handles classroom routines and management.
Share your planning with the student teacher;
emphasize the importance of planning ahead.
Teach reading and arithmetic lesson to small
group.
Demonstrate a specific teaching technique or
skill – discuss and evaluate the lesson with the
student teacher.
Become involved in classroom activities, give
help and assistance when needed.
Provide children’s cumulative records.
Visit other special education or regular
education classes in building.
Begin list of materials, texts, etc. loaned to
student teacher.
Ask questions about observations, teaching
skills, materials, etc.
Remind student to list in priority classes to be
taken over (a take over schedule).
Identify and consult with support personnel
(speech clinician, physical therapist, etc.)
Confirm pupil for assessment and IEP
development that the two of you will
collaborate on or that the ST will lead, and
collaboratively with CT.
Confirm pupil for assessment and IEP
development.
Outline a take over schedule.
48
Activities for the Third Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
Assist in preparing materials.
Include student teacher in parent conferences
if scheduled.
Teach about two periods of the day including
total group activities and two small groups.
Emphasize growth and learning aspect of
student teaching experiences.
Plan bulletin board displayor learning center
activity.
Explain reasons for techniques and approaches
used in your teaching.
Assist children in changing classes, going to
special rooms, dismissal, etc.
Make available resources and materials for
teaching.
Be responsible for managing behavior of
children while in charge of a group.
Give student teacher opportunities to feel
independent.
Practice self-evaluation of teaching
experiences.
Discuss list of observed classroom routines
and management with the student teacher.
Familiarize yourself with children’s papers and
work.
** Complete first evaluation on overall
performance of student teacher (same as final
evaluation).
Continue to observe classroom instructions –
planned observations.
Continue to submit teaching plans to
supervising teacher.
Test pupil chosen for IEP (if appropriate).
List any additional activities you were able to
experience above.
49
Activities for Fourth Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
Increase teaching time to about one-half of
the day, or three instructional periods.
Be sure that student teacher has access to
teaching materials.
In teaching and classroom responsibilities,
include academic and non-academic areas.
Continue to support and encourage efforts of
student teacher through written and oral
comments.
Help keep records of children’s progress.
Plan second bulletin board.
Begin to leave room for short periods of time
while student teacher is teaching.
Be involved with children at individual, small
group, and total group levels.
Help student teacher in proper use of
instructional technology (if necessary).
Try many ways and approaches to teaching
lessons.
Discuss evaluation with student teacher.
Require plans only for new activities –
discontinue plans for routines such as opening
exercises, etc.
Be prompt in returning borrowed materials,
equipment, etc.
Be considerate and neat in using materials and
resources.
List any additional activities you were able to
experience above.
50
Activities for Fifth Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
Increase teaching responsibilities to about
three-fourths of the day or four instructional
periods.
Include student teacher in meetings that may
arise (faculty, parents).
Continue observation and evaluation of
student teacher lessons.
Assume all routine management of children.
Submit plans for intensive teaching
experience.
Take advantage of opportunities to work with
individual children, administer progress tests,
special help, etc.
Prepare for unit work during intensive teaching
period.
Help children adjust to the increasing role of
the student teacher in the classroom.
Be aware of mechanics and housekeeping
needs of the classroom.
Continue to submit lesson plans and selfevaluations.
Prepare materials needed for teaching.
Complete IEP.
List any additional activities you were able to
experience above.
51
Activities for Sixth and Seventh Weeks
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
If practical, assume full day teaching
responsibility.
**Complete second evaluation on overall
performance of student teacher after week six
(same as final evaluation).
Prepare all needed materials for teaching.
Discuss evaluation with student teacher.
Initiate instructional unit if not already in
progress.
Observe areas of teaching not already
observed.
Know where supervising teacher can be
reached if necessary.
Spot check areas of weakness.
Plan with student teacher for intensive
teaching. Explain and make necessary
suggestions to avoid disaster.
Be independent in handling group, but don’t
be ashamed to ask for help.
Share day’s experiences with supervising
teacher, especially if she has been out of the
room.
Leave room to allow student teacher freedom
for teaching.
Be available if student teacher needs help.
List any additional activities you were able to
experience above.
Activities for Eighth Week
Student Teacher
Supervising Classroom Teacher
Perform classroom routine non-academic
activities.
Help children plan farewell for student teacher.
Return all materials and resources borrowed.
Check list of borrowed materials; are all
returned?
Be responsible for physical condition of room.
Begin taking over teaching skill subjects.
Express appreciation to principal and other
staff for their help.
Complete final overall evaluation form.
Discuss with student teacher the final
evaluation (strengths and areas that need
development for future growth).
Complete unfinished units, projects, etc., if not
finished during intensive teaching.
Begin turning responsibilities back to
supervising classroom teacher.
Adapted from Mays
52
Appendix W
74.570 – Student Teaching Seminar: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
RESOURCES
Bodner-Johnson, B., & Sass-Lehrer, M. (2003). The young Deaf or hard of hearing child: A familycentered approach to early education. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.
Bullard, C. (2003). The itinerant teacher’s handbook. Hillsboro, OR: Butte.
Chute, P., & Nevins, M. (2006). School professionals working with children with cochlear implants. San
Diego, CA: Plural.
Easterbrooks, S., & Beal-Avarez, J. (2013). Literacy instruction for students who are Deaf and hard of hearing:
Professional perspectives on deafness: Evidence and applications. New York City, NY: Oxford University
Press.
*Easterbrooks, S., & Baker, S. (2002). Language learning in children who are Deaf and hard of hearing:
Multiple pathways. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
*Marschark, M., Langu, H., & Albertini, J. (2002). Educating Deaf students: From research to practice.
New York: Oxford University Press.
Moog, J., Stein, K., Biedenstein, J., & Gustus, C. H. (2003). Teaching activities for children who are Deaf and
hard of hearing. St. Louis, MO: The Moog Center for Deaf Education.
*Moores, D., & Martin, D. (2006). Deaf learners: Development in curriculum and instruction.
Washington,D.C.: Gallaudet University Press.Paul, P. V. (2009) Language and deafness. Sunbury, MA.: Jones and Bartlett.
Seaver, L. (2009). The book of choice: Support for parenting a child who is Deaf or hard of hearing. Hands &
Voices Press.
*Spencer, P. & Marschark, M. (2010). Evidence-based practice in educating the Deaf and hard-of-hearing students.
New
York, NY: Oxford University Press.
PEER REVIEWED JOURNALS: Appleman, K. I., Callahan, J., O. Mayer, M.H., Luetke, B., & Stryker, D. S. (2012). Education, employment, and independent living
of young adults who are Deaf and hard of hearing. American Annals of the Deaf, 157, 264-275.
Bouton, S., Bertoncini, J., Serniclaes, W., & Colé, P. (2011). Reading and reading-related skills in children using cochlear implants:
Prospects for the influence of cued speech. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 16, 458-473.
SUGGESTED WEBSITES:
Deaf Education. (n.d.). Educational enhancement for the field of Deaf education. Retrieved
53
from http://www.deafed.net
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.clarkeschools.org
Deaf Life. (n.d.). Deaf view: Reader’s viewpoint. Retrieved from http://www.deafview.com/
Education of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing Program, (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.bloomu.edu/deaf_education
Gallaudet University, (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/
Help Kids Hear. (n.d.). Resources for parents of Deaf and hard of hearing children. Retrieved
from http://www.helpkidshear.org
Listen-Up. (n.d.). Teaching and education resources. Retrieved from http://www.listen-up.org/edu/teach.htm
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), (2004). Retrieved from http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard.
Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.psd.org/
Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.wpsd.org
16. PROTOTYPE TEXT:
Anderson, K., & Arnoldi, K. (2011). Building skills for success in the fast-paced classroom: Optimizing
achievement for students
with hearing loss. Hillsboro, OR: Butte.
*Spencer, P., & Marschark, M. (2010). Evidence-based practice in educating the Deaf hard-of-hearing students.
New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
54
Bloomsburg University
Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania 17815
Dept. of Exceptionality Programs
Cooperating Teacher Personal Record
Please submit to Crystal Andrezze (Dept. Secretary) ([email protected])
Social Security No. __________________
Mrs.
Mr.
Ms. __________________________________
Maiden Name __________________________
Home Address ____________________________________________________________
Street or R.D.
City
State
Zip
Home Phone _________________________ (optional)
Email Address
Employer ____________________________________________ School District / IU
Address __________________________________________________________________
Street or R.D.
City
State
Zip
Name of School where you teach ________________________________
Yrs. Employed ________
Address __________________________________________________________________
Street or R.D.
City
State
Zip
Type/Level Class ______________
School Phone (
) ______________
Names of ALL Student Teachers this Semester:
___________________________________________________________________________
Have you had other student teachers from Bloomsburg University? __________
Have you participated as a cooperating teacher through other colleges? _____Yes _____No
If yes, _______________________________________________________________
Where
When
Degrees Held –
Bachelors _______ Major _____________________ Year of Graduation __________
College/University ____________________________________
Masters ________
Major _____________________
Year of Graduation __________
College/University ____________________________________
Type of Certification(s) held _____________________________________________________
State(s) in which you are certified - Pennsylvania ________________
Other (list) _____________________________________________
_______________________________________
Signature
_______________
Date
Note: Stipend for cooperating teacher services should be made payable to:
Individual ______
Site ______
If site – Make check payable to: ___________________________________________________ and mail to the attention of:
_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
55
Video Self-Evaluation Critique Permission to Video:
•
The student teacher will videotape five, 20 to 30 minute lessons and critique him/herself by viewing
each videotape and evaluating yourself using the Classroom Observation form in Appendix T.
Instructions: You must obtain permission from the students that you will be videotaping. Below is a
draft of a permission form. You must a) view each entire video, b) evaluate/self-critique of your
teaching and include constructive suggestions for improvements in future lessons, c) package each in a
manilla envelope with: 1-your lesson plan, 2-any supplemental materials you used in this lesson, 3Appendix T form with constructive suggestions for improvements. Submit each on the date specified in
your syllabus.
Sample Letter:
Date
Dear Parents/Caregivers,
My name is ___________, and I am a graduate student at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.
I am studying to become a teacher of children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. This semester, I
have been assigned as a student teacher to work with _____________, your child’s Teacher of the
Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing.
I am looking forward to working with your child and his/her
teachers. If you have any questions for me, please contact me through my cooperating teacher.
Sincerely,
__________________________________________________
_______________________________________
Permission Form
Please read, sign, and return the following. Thank you!
I, the parent or guardian of _________________________, give my permission for ___________
to videotape my child. My child may appear on these videotapes for the purpose of evaluating
____________’s teaching and the creation of a teaching portfolio. I understand that my child will
not be named at any time. I understand that I can withdraw my permission at any time.
________________________________________
Parent’s signature
Date
_________________________________________
Intern’s signature
Date
_________________________________________
Teacher’s signature
Date
56
GUIDELINES FOR RECORDING VIDEO
The following guidelines should be considered when recording video:
1.
To honor students’ rights to confidentiality most schools require parents to give written permission for students to
be videotaped or photographed. Many schools have a blanket permission form completed at the beginning of each
year that allows videotaping, but some do not and will require that you obtain parental permission prior to
recording. It is essential that you discuss permission procedures with your cooperating teacher well in advance of
any schedule recording to have sufficient time for this process if it is necessary to obtain permissions.
2.
If certain parents refuse permission, or you do not receive permission, talk with the cooperating teacher about the
acceptability of positioning the camera in a way that this child(ren) does not appear on the tape.
3.
You are responsible for providing your own videos and video camera. Practice with the camera prior to making
your tape as all cameras operate differently. You should plan on the taping NOT working, and thus plan ahead.
4.
Plan videotaping sessions well in advance. Taping should not be during the University Supervisor’s observation
time. It is helpful to have someone in the room operating the video camera for you. If you do not have another
person available, consider whether you will need a tripod, and how you will position the camera. Other
considerations are: student response to having a camera in the room, length of time/length of the lesson,
environmental noise levels, desired audio level, need to change camera angles if you move around, and room
lighting. DO NOT TAKE UP INSTRUCTIONAL TIME setting up your equipment. Do this in advance. You
might want to make a practice tape or two so the students become used to having the camera in the room.
5.
Focus on yourself rather than on the students, but remember it is helpful to see the reaction of the students to your
instruction, especially if the person viewing the videotape is supposed to follow the conversation. You can
evaluate your teaching effectiveness best if you are able to see yourself giving instructions and/or interacting with
students.
6.
Plan to record a complete lesson within a 20 to 30 minute timeframe, this will allow you to evaluate your
introduction, body and conclusion.
7.
If you are recording without the assistance of a helper, it is helpful to record lessons that entail limited
teacher/student movement.
8.
Avoid placing the camera in high traffic areas where it might be bumped or knocked over. Avoid: doors (in front
of, or behind), bathrooms, hallways, positioning near pencil sharpeners or water fountains.
9.
Be conscious of the lighting in the room. Shooting footage with a window in the background creates a “backlight”
and darkens everything in the foreground, including you and the students. It is your responsibility to check that
what you are videotaping is clear and able to be critiqued by you and others.
10.
Be conscious of the noise level in the classroom. Background noise from other groups working, or heavy traffic in
the hallway will drown out your voice, or the responses of the students. All cameras have built in microphones,
but many also have a jack to take an external microphone.
11.
Consider the instructions you will give your students about the recording process. Students may find initial
recording distracting, so determine how to address this. Be sure to emphasize that the camera is fragile and
expensive, and determine who may touch the camera and for what reason.
12.
LAST BUT NOT LEAST.... Be sure to turn the camera ON and confirm that it is recording prior to beginning
your lesson. Oh, and the main purpose of these videotaped sessions is for you to: view your own video, after
teaching the lesson, and submit your self-critique using forms T and U both.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------VIDEO DUE DATES: - Please plan in advance!!!
1st-Friday of week 4
2nd-Friday of week 6
3rd-Friday of week 8
4th-Friday of week 11
5th-Friday of week 14
The dates are scheduled now because it is important that you plan ahead. If equipment does not work, it is your responsibility to have
allowed enough days/time to be able to reschedule that session for videotaping or choose a different student/video session.
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