ASD Safety Handbook

ASD Safety Handbook
Anchorage School District
A Safety Handbook for Employees of the Anchorage School District
Revised 7/2014
ASD Non Discrimination
It is the policy of the Anchorage School District to provide equal educational and employment
opportunities, and to provide services and benefits to all students and employees without regard
to race, color, religion, disability, national origin, gender, marital status, change in marital status,
pregnancy, parenthood or other prohibitions.
This policy of the Anchorage School District is consistent with numerous laws, regulations, and
executive orders enforced by various federal, state, and municipal agencies, including but not
limited to Executive Order 11246, Title 41, part 60-1, 60-2, 60-3, 60-20, Title VI and VII of the
1964 Civil Rights Act, and Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972. Inquiries or
complaints may be addressed to the School District Equal Employment Opportunity Office, the
Alaska State Commission for Human Rights, the Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, or the
Director of the Office for Civil Rights, the Department of Education or the Department of Health
and Human Services.
A Safety Handbook for Employees of the Anchorage School District
Revised 7/2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS................................................................................................................. i A PERSONAL SAFETY WORD FROM SUPERINTENDENT GRAFF ................................... iii FOREWORDS ............................................................................................................................... iv APPLICABILITY ........................................................................................................................... 1 APPLICABLE LAWS AND REGULATIONS ............................................................................. 1 GUIDING PRINCIPLES ................................................................................................................ 1 SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................................................................... 2 GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES ............................................................................................. 3 EMPLOYEE RIGHTS .................................................................................................................... 4 SAFETY AWARDS PROGRAM .................................................................................................. 5 INCIDENT REPORTING AND PROCEDURES.......................................................................... 7 OCCUPATIONAL/EMPLOYEE INCIDENT REPORTING........................................................ 8 STUDENT/VISITOR INCIDENT REPORTING ........................................................................ 12 VEHICULAR INCIDENTS ......................................................................................................... 12 PROPERTY LOSS, THEFT AND VANDALISM INCIDENTS ............................................... 12 OCCUPATIONAL INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING ........................................... 15 EMERGENCY PLANNING ........................................................................................................ 17 SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMITTEES ................................................... 18 UNIT SAFETY REPORT............................................................................................................. 21 INFECTIOUS DISEASE CONTROL .......................................................................................... 25 ALLERGIES ................................................................................................................................. 25 ANIMALS/PETS IN THE SCHOOLS......................................................................................... 25 WILDLIFE SAFETY.................................................................................................................... 26 ERGONOMICS ............................................................................................................................ 27 HAZARD COMMUNICATION .................................................................................................. 31 HEARING CONSERVATION .................................................................................................... 32 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ................................................................................ 33 FIRE PROTECTION .................................................................................................................... 35 RED TAG PERMIT SYSTEM ..................................................................................................... 38 PRESCHOOL HEALTH & SAFETY .......................................................................................... 39 STUDENT SAFETY .................................................................................................................... 43 THEATRE SAFETY .................................................................................................................... 45 COMPRESSED GASES............................................................................................................... 47 WELDING, CUTTING & BRAZING (WCB) ............................................................................. 50 FALL PROTECTION ................................................................................................................... 53 CONFINED SPACE ENTRY....................................................................................................... 53 ENERGY ISOLATION (Lock-Out/Tag-Out) .............................................................................. 63 LEAD PAINT ............................................................................................................................... 76 FORMS ......................................................................................................................................... 78 Rev. 5
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A PERSONAL SAFETY WORD FROM SUPERINTENDENT GRAFF
As we begin another school year, it is important that all of us are reminded
that the Anchorage School District is a place where all students learn and
prepare for a successful future. As an employee of the District, student
success is our first priority. Whether you work in the classroom, the
warehouse, an office or any other location, you play an important role in
creating and maintaining a safe supportive environment where students can
learn. Ensuring the safety and comfort of our students, staff and visitors is
critical.
With your active participation, we can maintain a safe and healthy environment at every school,
office and facility. You must know and follow the safety rules that relate to your job; if you
supervise children or adults, it’s your responsibility to make sure they use safe practices
also. This is the only way to reduce accidents and injuries and create a healthy, productive
workplace.
Please take the time to learn and communicate the safety expectations outlined in this handbook.
You can and should be a role model for our students. Your involvement is essential to our
success and the success of our students. Together, we can make a difference.
Sincerely,
Ed Graff
Superintendent
P.S. If you have specific safety questions or concerns, please contact the Risk Management &
Emergency Preparedness Department at 742-4371. They will be happy to help.
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FOREWORDS
Dear Employee,
Welcome to the Anchorage School District. Your safety and well-being
are essential to the District because employees are our most valuable
assets. The School Board, Superintendent, and administration are
dedicated to providing you with safe and healthful working conditions
and in making your work environment as safe as possible.
This handbook has been developed to provide you with some general
guidelines regarding District safety policies and procedures. Your
immediate supervisor will also supplement these policies and procedures. Please familiarize
yourself with this material and take an active part in accident prevention and disaster
preparedness efforts in the District.
REMEMBER: SAFETY IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY
If you have any questions or need additional information, please feel free to call Risk
Management & Emergency Preparedness, 742-4371.
Sincerely,
Mary Susan Lee, Director, Risk Management and Emergency Preparedness
[email protected]
Fellow Employees,
This safety handbook has only one purpose and that is preserving the
health and safety of every district employee, visitor and student. The
procedures and guidelines contained in this handbook are based on
law, regulation and common practices. There is nothing in this
handbook that is written or required “just because.”
Every
requirement is based on some employee’s blood, pain and tears. My
desire is that no one working in the Anchorage School District should
have to repeat a lesson already learned at a great personal cost by
someone else.
This is your handbook. You have a say in what is in it just as much as
any other employee of the District. Please contact me if you have any suggestion on how to
improve this handbook, as I will always be looking for ways to make it a better.
David Sharrow, ASD Safety and Training Specialist, [email protected]
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APPLICABILITY
The guidelines and procedures contained in this handbook apply to all employees of the
Anchorage School District and all contractors, subcontractors, consultants and volunteers.
APPLICABLE LAWS AND REGULATIONS
The following laws and regulations, applicable to the District, form the basis of Anchorage
School Board Policies and the requirements contained in this handbook:
UNITED STATES
 29 USC 654 Sec. 5(a) – “Each employer shall furnish each employee with
employment and a place of employment free from recognized hazards that are
causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm; shall comply with
occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act.”
 29 USC 654 Sec. 5(b) – “Each employee shall comply with occupational safety
and health standards and all rules, regulations and orders issued pursuant to this
Act which are applicable to his own actions and conduct.”
 29 CFR 1904 – Recordkeeping
 29 CFR 1910 – General Industry Occupational Safety Regulation
 29 CFR 1926 – Construction Industry Occupational Safety Regulation
STATE OF ALASKA
 AS 14.33.100 – School Crisis Planning
 AS 18.60 – Safety
 8 AAC 61.1010 – Occupational Safety and Health Standard
 2009 International Fire Code w/SOA Amendments
 2009 International Building Code w/SOA Amendments
MUNICIPALITY OF ANCHORAGE
 MC Article IV, Section 6.01 – Public Schools (formulation of policy)
 2009 International Fire Code w/MOA Amendments
 2009 International Building Code w/MOA Amendments
 MOA Code 23.45.405 – Emergency Evacuation Drills
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
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All injuries are preventable.
Working safely is a condition of employment.
All employees have a right to a safe and healthy workplace.
Management at all levels is accountable for managing safety, health and property
as set forth in SBP 729.3a.
All accidents and injuries should be investigated.
All operating exposures should be reasonably safeguarded.
Training employees to work safely is essential.
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SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES
Safety is a responsibility shared by all employees of the Anchorage School District. Our actions
affect more persons than just our fellow employees. Every action we take or fail to take also has
a direct impact on our volunteers, visitors, the public, and especially the very students in our
charge. The following sections detail the ASD guiding principles and responsibilities expected
of the different levels of responsibility within the District.
EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES
The success of the Anchorage School District is directly related to the performance of each
individual employee. The following safety rules have been extracted from OSHA standards and
as such represent a MINIMUM standard of responsibility for all Anchorage School District
employees. Employees are expected to demonstrate their positive attitude toward safety and
injury prevention by:
 Accepting responsibility for performing safely on the job.
 Working safely and in accordance with the appropriate laws, regulations, policies
and procedures. See “Applicable Laws and Regulations” above.
 Observing and obeying all hazard warning signs.
 Keeping all emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers, alarms, circuit
panels, exit routes and stairs clear of obstacles and all flammable and combustible
materials.
 Encouraging safe behavior by students, coworkers, visitors and other staff.
 Taking the necessary actions to stop unsafe acts and/or correct unsafe conditions
or report them to their supervisor if they lack the knowledge or ability to do so
themselves.
 Actively participate in school safety programs, emergency action drills, and safety
committees and meetings.
 Reporting all injuries, occupational illnesses, incidents, near misses, fires and
property damage.
 Report any job related injury or illness and seek treatment promptly.
 Operating only the equipment that you have been properly trained to operate and
been approved by your supervisor to operate.
 Operating tools and equipment according to manufacturer’s recommendations and
only with appropriate guards installed.
 Not wearing frayed, torn or loose clothing, jewelry, or long unrestrained hair near
moving machinery or other sources of entanglement or around electrical
equipment.
LEADERSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES
Every employee with managerial or supervisory responsibility will be held accountable for injury
or property loss due to accidents, occupational illnesses, and incidents. All productivity and
educational goals are to be accomplished in the safest manner possible. Supervisors and
management employees are responsible, in addition to those responsibilities listed for employees
above, for:
 The safety of the schools and support functions.
 Set an example for employees, students and the public.
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Know, support and inform employees of District policies and procedures related
to safety.
Communicate safe work policies, processes, and procedures to each employee as
well as the safety expectations for each employee’s performance. Working safely
is a condition of employment with the Anchorage School District.
Know the job and have a thorough knowledge of the hazards associated with each
operation/position.
Ensure that all new employees receive a general and site-specific safety
orientation prior to beginning any work assignment.
Ensure that all employees receive all applicable training in the work practices
necessary to safely perform their work.
Ensure that employees know how to report all accidents, injuries, work-related
illnesses, and unsafe conditions or practices.
Conduct periodic (monthly preferred) safety meetings and share safety
information through bulletin boards and/or handouts.
Perform periodic safety surveys to ensure that safe conditions exist and that safe
practices are being followed.
Thoroughly investigate all accidents, injuries, occupational illnesses, near misses,
and incidents, and ensure that the appropriate accident/injury/illness forms have
been completed, corrective actions taken at the lowest possible level, and that
preventive measures are in place to prevent similar occurrences.
Perform a monthly “Hazard Assessment” of the facility they are responsible for
and document that assessment.
Take prompt action to correct any hazardous condition found or reported.
GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES
1. ASK if you are unsure. Ask your supervisor, coworker or Risk Management &
Emergency Preparedness (hereinafter referred to as RM&EP) if you ever have any
questions about whether a condition or procedure is safe or if communication is unclear.
2. Be alert for unsafe work methods or unsafe conditions. Either correct them yourself, if
you can do so safely, or report them on a Hazard Report to your supervisor immediately.
3. Report every injury/incident immediately. Reporting is important whether medical
attention is required or not. Your report may save someone from having the same
accident.
4. Drinking alcohol just before, or during work hours or school activities, is prohibited. The
abuse of drugs in any form is prohibited.
5. No horseplay, practical jokes, sparring or similar unsafe activities.
6. Use the proper personal protective equipment required by the existing job hazards. This
includes wearing appropriate footwear for the weather and ground conditions.
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EMPLOYEE RIGHTS
Employees, without regard to position, have the specific rights under federal and state statute and
regulation. This is a simple list of an employee’s rights. The full description of what these rights
consist of as well as detailed definitions are contained in OSHA Publication 3021-08R 2003
which is available from RM&EP or on the OSHA website.
Employees have the right to
 Review copies of appropriate standards, rules, regulations and requirements that the
employer is required to have available in the workplace;
 Request information from the employer on safety and health hazards in the workplace,
appropriate precautions to take, and procedures to follow if the employee is involved in
an accident or is exposed to toxic substances;
 Gain access to relevant employee exposure and medical records;
 Request a RM&EP or an OSHA inspection if they believe hazardous conditions or
violations of standards exist in the workplace;
 Accompany an OSHA compliance officer during the inspection tour, or have an
authorized employee representative do so;
 Respond to questions from the OSHA compliance officer;
 Observe any monitoring or measuring of hazardous materials and see the resulting
records, as specified under the OSH Act and required by OSHA standards;
 Review or have an authorized representative review the employer’s Log of Work-Related
Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (OSHA 300) at a reasonable time and in a reasonable
manner;
 Object to the timeframe set by OSHA for the employer to correct a violation by writing to
the OSHA area director within 15 working days from the date the employer receives a
citation;
 Submit a written request to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for
information on whether any substance in the workplace has potentially toxic effects in the
concentration being used, and, if requested, have their names withheld from the
employer;
 Be notified if the employer applies for a variance from an OSHA standard, and have an
opportunity to testify at a variance hearing and appeal the final decision;
 Have their names withheld from their employer, by request to OSHA, if they sign and file
a written complaint;
 Be advised of OSHA actions regarding a complaint, and request an informal review of
any decision not to inspect the site or issue a citation; and
 File a complaint if punished or discriminated against for acting as a “whistleblower”
under the OSH Act or 13 other federal statutes for which OSHA has jurisdiction, or for
refusing to work when faced with imminent danger of death or serious injury and there is
insufficient time for OSHA to inspect.
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SAFETY AWARDS PROGRAM
The Anchorage School District Safety Awards Program has four distinct types of safety
recognition. Awards certificates will be issued for heroism, life-saving, and facility or
department annual and sustained safety performance. Both the Hero and Life Saver awards may
be issued to an individual or a group of individuals while the safety performance awards are
based on the performance of an entire facility or department’s personnel.
HERO AWARD
This award is given for personal heroism and for distinguished services in the saving of a life.
The act may occur in the line of duty or elsewhere by an active or inactive employee of the
Anchorage School District under the following conditions:
 In the performance of an act to save life, the individual loses his or her own life.
 In the performance of an act, the individual seriously risks his or her own life, but
saves the lives of one or more persons.
 Attempting at serious risk of his or her own life to save the life of one or more
persons without success.
 Giving warning, at personal risk, of impending danger to others.
 Directing individuals to a place of safety while exposed to some personal danger.
 Staying at his or her own post of duty in the presence of impending danger to self
and others.
 Assisting with others collectively at personal risk to save the lives of one or more
persons.
Nominations for this award are made by the individual’s supervisor submitting a completed ASD
Incident Report Form or any other person submitting a written observation to RM&EP.
LIFE SAVER AWARD
This award is given for saving, or attempting to save, a life using modern life saving techniques
and/or quick and appropriate action in an attempt to save a life. No risk to the rescuer’s own life
is required. Trained professional health personnel are not normally eligible for this award. The
act may occur in the line of duty or elsewhere by an active or inactive employee of the
Anchorage School District under the following conditions:
 Performing mouth-to-mouth or some other type of artificial ventilation.
 Performing CPR.
 Performing an anti-choking maneuver.
 Performing other life saving first aid techniques.
 The performance of an act involving quick thinking and decision making that
prevents others from being seriously injured or prevents the loss of additional life.
Nominations for this award are made by the individual’s supervisor submitting a completed ASD
Incident Report Form or any other person submitting a written observation to RM&EP.
SAFE FACILITY AWARD
This award is given in recognition of schools, facilities or departments with good safety records
and documentation of one full year with:
 No fatality or lost time injury.
 Documented monthly (months when a facility is vacant are not counted) safety
committee meetings conducted in accordance with this hndbook.
 No serious findings in a RM&EP or outside agency inspection (a minimum of one
inspection during the year is required for consideration).
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 Compliance with ASD Safety Handbook procedures.
Nominations for this award are made by RM&EP based on inspection results and an annual
review of records and statistics.
FACILITY SAFETY EXCELLENCE AWARD
This award is given for two or more consecutive years of achieving a Safe Facility Award.
Nominations for this award are made by the individual’s supervisor completing an ASD Incident
Report Form and submitting it to RM&EP within one year of the occurrence
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INCIDENT REPORTING AND PROCEDURES
INCIDENTS REQUIRING IMMEDIATE NOTIFICATION OF RM&EP
RM&EP (742-4371) must be notified immediately if:
 An incident involves death or serious injury.
 An incident involves property damage over $1,000.
 A non-ASD employee wishes to make claim against the District.
 Contacted by an attorney regarding an incident on District property or involving a
District employee.
 Served with a summons and complaint, or other legal documents requiring a
response or appearance, because of a work related incident.
REASONS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR INCIDENT REPORTING
Federal and state laws require timely and accurate recording of occupational accidents and
illnesses. Prompt and complete reporting of incidents involving employees, students and visitors
also directly affects the ability of the District to provide quality education to our students.
Accurate and complete reporting is also the only way preventative steps can be taken to reduce
the chance of similar future incidents occurring. Injury and property damage incidents should be
documented as soon as possible following the occurrence and reported to the appropriate
office(s). Incidents include the following:
 Injury
 Employees
 Occupational Illness
 Students
 Visitors
 Property Damage or Theft
Involving
 Vehicle Damage or Theft
 Volunteers
 Near Miss
 Contractor Employees
 Imminent Danger
The appropriate report form, posted on the ASD District Connection/RM&EP intranet site,
should be utilized whenever an activity or property of the District is involved in any mishap.
The report may be the District’s first and only notice of the incident. Prompt reporting
accomplishes several things for the District.
 Captures accurate information. Conditions and memories can change over time.
 Make follow-up investigations easier.
 Makes recovery of damages from persons injuring ASD employees or damaging property
easier.
 Provides the injured person with the appropriate, proper and continuing health care and
benefits to which they are entitled.
 Provides necessary information to determine responsibility and corrective actions.
 Facilitates good employee and public relations. Delay in action or incomplete
information easily leads to litigation.
Employees involved in an incident or the administrative processing of incident reports should not
admit or discuss liability with other parties or claimants since such information could be used
against the employee or the District.
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OCCUPATIONAL/EMPLOYEE INCIDENT REPORTING
(Includes Workers’ Compensation)
TIME RESTRICTIONS
State and federal regulations mandate the completion of paperwork and reporting within a set
time frame. Reporting information required by OSHA must be done within 8 hours if the
employee dies or is admitted to the hospital (not just seen in the emergency room) and 48 hours
for all other employee injuries. Workers’ compensation forms must be filed with Risk
Management within 5 calendar days of the incident in order for Risk Management to meet the
state requirements for filing. There is a difference between the two legal requirements; therefore,
all paperwork should be submitted to arrive at Risk Management within 48 hours to meet the
requirements of both laws. NOTE: Employees can NEVER be told that they cannot file a claim;
even if the filing will be late.
EMPLOYEE ACTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
The employee is usually the first observer of a near-miss or property damage incident and is
always the first to know about a personal occupational injury/illness. Therefore, employees
must:
 Report all job-related injuries or illnesses as soon as possible, but at least within
24 hours, regardless of severity, to their supervisor who will provide them with
the Workers’ Compensation Packet.
 Complete Employee Report of Occupational Injury or Illness to Employer form
and return it to the supervisor.
 Obtain medical aid as soon as possible after becoming ill or injured and inform
the doctor if the injury or illness is job-related. Use the pharmacy “First Fill” form
to obtain prescriptions until a pharmacy card is received.
 Give weekly recovery progress updates to their immediate supervisor.
SUPERVISOR ACTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
"Supervisor," for the purpose of this section, refers to the senior ASD employee on-site or the
employee's departmental supervisor. The facility supervisor is legally responsible for the
accuracy of all recordkeeping forms. In the event of any on-the-job injury or illness, the
supervisor must:
NOTE: Support Services departments have additional reporting requirements. See the Support
Services Supplemental Injury Reporting Packet.
 Ensure that the injured worker receives prompt medical aid regardless of severity.
Any injury can become more serious.
 Complete Employee Report of Occupational Injury or Illness to Employer form
for the employee if they cannot or will not complete it.
 Investigate the incident (with photos and witness statements whenever possible)
and fill out Employer Report of Occupational Injury or Illness to Division of
Workers’ Compensation according to the detailed instructions as well as the ASD
Supervisor’s Supplemental Incident Report form and deliver them to RM&EP
within 48 hours of the incident. A PowerPoint® presentation on incident
investigation is available on the RM&EP intranet site and classroom training is
available by appointment from the ASD Safety and Training Specialist.
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Obtain a copy of the doctor's statement from the injured employee if the employee
will miss work or will work with restricted duties.
 Forward the original doctor's statement and any follow-up doctor’s notes to
RM&EP.
 Obtain a doctor's medical release to return to work before the employee returns to
work after a serious job-related injury.
 Ensure that no equipment involved in a fatal or severe accident is moved until
investigated by a representative of the Alaska Department of Labor.
Remove/move the equipment only if it is absolutely necessary to prevent further
injury or if the state representative authorizes its removal. In either case, the area
must be thoroughly photographed prior to or while moving the equipment.
 Report any fatality or severe accident as soon as possible (immediately after
calling 911) to RM&EP [742-4371 (office) or 440-8294 (cell) regardless of the
time of day)], the appropriate Executive Director and the Superintendent (7424312).
NOTE: Do not make any statements to the media or attorneys regarding details of the incident.
The statement that can be made is: “We are currently investigating the incident and will have
more information for you once the investigation is completed.” Otherwise, refer media to the
Communications Office and attorneys to RM&EP.
RM&EP DEPARTMENT ACTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
 Report ALL fatalities or severe injuries (one or more employees admitted to a
hospital) within 8 hours of their occurrence to the nearest Department of
Occupational Safety and Health office. When possible, this report should include
statements from witnesses and the supervisor.
 Conduct a follow-up investigation if the supervisor's report indicates that one is
required.
 Update entries to OSHA Form 300.
 Process all workers’ compensation forms, bills and reimbursements in accordance
with Alaska statutes and regulations.
 Publish a monthly status report on injury statistics and investigation results.
WHAT IS WORKERS’ COMPENSATION?
Workers’ compensation is a ‘no-fault’ insurance established by state law and required for all
employers to cover their employees. The coverage compensates for medical expenses and time
lost due to the employee being unable to work their normal job tasks/duties because of a workrelated injury. A work related injury is defined as an injury or illness which is the result of the
employee’s duties. Also, the law now states that the work injury or illness itself must be the
substantial cause in the need for medical treatment. Workers’ compensation only provides
coverage to return the worker to their pre-injury status and is not responsible for correction of
medical issues not directly resulting from the work incident.
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LEAVE
Workers’ compensation leave, when provided for in labor contracts, only applies to the time that
a doctor states, in writing, that an employee cannot perform their duties. Time away from the
employee’s duty site for the purpose of getting medical diagnosis or treatment is not considered
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by the government as “time lost” and therefore must be accounted for as annual, sick or
compensatory time taken. Contact HR’s leave specialist at 742-4026 for any questions regarding
leave.
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Employee Incident Reporting and Recordkeeping Process
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STUDENT/VISITOR INCIDENT REPORTING
Any incident that results in an injury to a student or a visitor will be reported using the ASD
Student/Visitor Incident Report Form. NOTE: Call 911 first for any incident involving death or
critical injury. The site should notify their supervisory Director/Executive Director, who should then
notify the Superintendent’s office and the RM&EP Department (742-4371) as soon as possible
thereafter. The District does not carry insurance covering students. Persons who feel the District is
responsible or negligent and wish to make a claim for injury or damages must be referred to the
RM&EP Department.
School personnel who are in charge of students or who witness an incident involving a visitor, are the
one(s) primarily responsible for the completion of the report. The report should then be forwarded to
the school principal or unit/facility manager for review, investigation if necessary and signature
forwarding along with any investigation report, photos and witness statements to RM&EP within 48
hours of the incident. Contact the RM&EP Department if assistance in the investigation is needed.
The responsibilities and procedures for student or visitor incident reporting are essentially the same as
those for employee incident reporting. The only differences are those relating to OSHA recordkeeping
and reporting that do not apply to non-employee incidents.
VEHICULAR INCIDENTS
If you drive a District-owned vehicle and are involved in an accident:
1. Obtain medical attention for any injured parties.
2. Notify the police.
3. Notify your supervisor.
4. Complete an “Automobile/Equipment Accident Report” form.
5. Complete the AK Report of Injury Form and Supervisor’s Supplemental Employee Report of
Injury Form for all injured employees involved.
NOTE: Your supervisor should endorse or review all forms for completeness prior to submission.
Also, only the Superintendent, her designee, or the RM&EP Department can authorize the release of
information regarding accidents to any party outside the Anchorage School District. Details involving
an accident are very important with a high potential for adverse actions and should therefore be
discussed only after consulting with the Superintendent, her designee, ASD legal counsel or RM&EP.
PROPERTY LOSS, THEFT AND VANDALISM INCIDENTS
Property loss theft and vandalism, unfortunately, are not rare events. When property is stolen or
vandalized:
1. Report the loss, theft or vandalism to the police.
2. Notify your supervisor.
3. Take pictures of any damage.
4. Complete a “Property Loss or Damage” form.
5. Obtain statements from any witnesses or persons responsible for the property.
6. Complete a maintenance work order for the repair of any physical ASD property damage.
7. Send completed packet of materials to the appropriate Executive Director/Asst. Superintendent
and a copy to Risk Management.
NOTE: ASD Management, in consultation with Risk Management, will determine how any property
will be repaired or replaced.
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Student/Visitor Incident Reporting and Recordkeeping
Process
INCIDENT
OBTAIN 1ST AID
AND/OR MEDICAL
TREATMENT
PRINCIPAL/
NURSE NOTIFIES DIRECTOR/
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
YES
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NOTIFIES
RISK MANAGEMENT &
SUPERINTENDENT
911 Called or ER
Visit?
NO
Teacher, Coach or
Principal
Investigates Incident
Teacher, Coach or
Principal Completes
ASD Student/Visitor
Incident Report
Form
Form Sent to Arrive at
Risk Management in 2
Working Days
Safety & Training
Specialist
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Incident
Incident or
Claim Form
Claim
Claims
Adjuster
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OCCUPATIONAL INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING
REQUIREMENT FOR RECORDKEEPING
OSHA requires that employers keep records of all occupational injuries and illnesses and that a
facility’s management is aware of the facility’s occupational injury statistics. Risk Management
will maintain all records associated with workers’ compensation claims and the ASD Safety and
Training Specialist will maintain a current District-wide log and summary of occupational
injuries and illnesses on OSHA Form 300 in addition to the ASD Incident Report Forms.
RECORDKEEPING
 Each facility supervisor will retain a copy of employee incident reports, for all incidents
that occur at that facility, in the facility Safety Committee file for review at the next
committee meeting. These reports should be destroyed after review.
 ASD RM&EP Department will keep a copy of all records relating to employees’ jobrelated injuries.
 Every February the Safety and Training Specialist will prepare an overall ASD OSHA
Form 300 for review and signature of the Superintendent. A copy of the signed form will
be sent to every facility for posting
RECORDS RETENTION
OSHA Form 300 and the ASD Incident Report Forms will be kept on file for five consecutive
years from the date of injury.
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EMERGENCY PLANNING
Each facility is responsible for creating, maintaining and conducting a documented annual
review of an emergency action plan in accordance with the guidance published in the ASD
Emergency Action Plan (EAP). Every EAP must be reviewed whenever there is a change in
scope or personnel per 29 CFR 1910.38. Therefore, the plan must be revised whenever there is a
key personnel change (annually for schools) and the plan must be revised and personnel trained
on the new plan whenever a change in operations such as summer school occurs.
RESPONSIBILITIES
ASD SENIOR MANAGEMENT
Providing the resources (personnel, time, and materials) necessary to achieve and maintain
readiness for a foreseeable emergency.
RISK MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY PLANNING
RM&EP is responsible for:
 Creating the district level emergency plans and guidance covering all foreseeable
emergencies.
 Conducting an annual review of all district level emergency plans and guidance.
 Coordinating with state and local emergency planning authorities.
 Collecting and maintaining all emergency planning records required by local, state and
federal statutes and regulations.
SCHOOLS
Principals are responsible for, in addition to the above, the following by NLT 10 (ten) calendar
days of the first day of school:
 Holding their first safety & emergency planning committee meeting (monthly
after the first meeting);
 Reviewing their EAP;
 Making any necessary changes;
 Ensuring that a current site plan is on hand showing assembly points;
 Ensuring that the floor plans and evacuation routes are up-to-date;
 Training all school based personnel;
 Conducting the first evacuation drill.
For
more
information
on
school
crisis
planning
go
to
http://eed.alaska.gov/tls/schoolsafety/crisis.html.
NON-SCHOOL FACILITIES
The senior ASD employee at a non-school facility is responsible for, in addition to the opening
paragraph, the following annually:
 Reviewing their EAP;
 Making any necessary changes;
 Ensuring that a current site plan is on hand showing assembly points;
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

Ensuring that the floor plans and evacuation routes are up-to-date;
Training all personnel;
DRILLS
Drills will be reported every month they are conducted using a reporting method to be published
annually by RM&EP & Emergency Preparedness on Google Docs.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DRILLS
Elementary schools must hold the following emergency drills:
 Duck-Cover-Hold: Monthly
 Evacuation: Monthly
 Lockdown: Quarterly
 Shelter-in-Place: Annual (may be “table top” exercise)
SECONDARY SCHOOL DRILLS
Elementary schools must hold the following emergency drills:
 Duck-Cover-Hold: Twice a year
 Evacuation: Monthly
 Lockdown: Quarterly
 Shelter-in-Place: Annually (may be “table top” exercise)
OTHER FACILITY DRILLS
Non-school facilities must hold one Duck-Cover-Hold, Evacuation, Lockdown and Shelter-InPlace (may be a ‘table top exercise) drill annually.
SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMITTEES
PURPOSE
The Safety Committee and Emergency Planning Committee brings management and employees
together to discuss facility emergency plans as well as reducing or eliminating unsafe conditions
and practices in the workplace. Committee members have valuable work experience that helps
them evaluate unsafe conditions and work methods, suggest corrective measures and encourage
fellow employees to work safely. This committee is also tasked with reviewing the facility
emergency plans and recommending changes as needed to ensure the greatest degree of safety
feasible in the event of an emergency.
NOTE: The Committee’s work does not replace management’s responsibility for safety.
COMPOSITION
ASD SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMITTEE
The ASD Safety & Emergency Planning Committee is an upper level committee to identify
review and address safety, health and emergency planning issues that are beyond the direct
control of individual facilities or departments or concern multiple facilities/departments. This
committee will be composed of:
 1 representative from each Education executive director (Elementary and Secondary); 2
total.
 1 RM&EP representative (Safety & Training Specialist).
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
1 representative from Maintenance/Operations.
This committee will only meet five times per year in August, October, December, February and
April for a maximum of two hours. The agenda will consist of reports, communications from
non-committee members, old business, new business, review of action items/responsibilities, and
general information/discussion. Minutes of the meeting agenda will be sent to each committee
member, each assistant superintendent and posted on the District Connection.
FACILITY AND SCHOOL SAFETY COMMITTEES
The Facility Safety Committee should be composed of a minimum of 5 members. The minimum
members shall be:
 Facility Manager or designee.
 Facility BPO
 3 employees elected by their peers each school year (the Facility Manager may
appoint these members if there are insufficient volunteers).
NOTE: Facilities with no BPO may also eliminate one of the elected positions.
The School Safety Committee should be composed of a minimum of 5 members. The minimum
members shall be:
 Facility Principal or designee.
 Facility BPO
 2 employees elected by their peers each school year (the Principal Manager may
appoint these members if there are insufficient volunteers).
 1 parent of a child attending the school as required by AS 14.33.100
The Unit Safety Committee will meet monthly, prior to the 10th day. The agenda for each
meeting shall be:
 Review of incident and investigation reports since the previous meeting;
 Review of any inspection reports received since the previous meeting;
 Review of the emergency action plan/emergency drills held since the last
meeting;
 Other safety, health and emergency planning issues;
 Documentation of safety issues, any recommendations for corrective actions
and/or any identification of additional assistance needed.
The Safety and Emergency Planning Committee will complete a Monthly Unit Safety Report on
Google Docs by the 15th of each month. Copies of outside agency reports must be sent by email
to Risk Management as received or on the same day the report is entered. Action items must
also indicate the assigned responsible person or local contact for action items outside the control
of the facility/school.
The facility will keep copies of the report and all checklists. This documentation is critical in the
case of claims against District and must be made available upon request to RM&EP. Files will
be kept on site for the current school year and sent to RM&EP at the end of the year for
archiving.
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ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
UNIT SAFETY REPORT
1
Unit/School
3
Date of Meeting: _______
__________
COMMITTEE MEETING
Persons in Attendance
1.
2.
3.
2
Month of
4.
5.
6.
4
Incident Summary Since Last Meeting:
#
Type
#
6
5
Student
7.
8.
9.
#
Visitor
7
#
Employee
8
Other
INSPECTION REPORTS:
Adequate
Inadequate
N/A
1.
2.
Fire Protection: Sprinkler Valve Checks
_______
_______
_____
9
Safety Checklists
a. Classrooms
_______
_______
_____
b. Custodial
_______
_______
_____
c. Electrical Rooms
_______
_______
_____
d. Halls/Commons
_______
_______
_____
e. Kitchens
_______
_______
_____
f. Office/Library
_______
_______
_____
3. Laboratory/Shop Equipment
_______
_______
_____
4. Grounds and Walkways: Tripping Hazards, ice
_______
_______
_____
5. Emergency lighting and/or emergency generator condition
_______
_______
_____
Inadequacies and temporary or permanent solution suggested (continue on separate sheet if necessary):
10
Outside Agency Inspections (example Fire Dept., DOL, DEC, etc.)(Attach a copy of the report.):
Agency
Date
Agency
Date
11
12
Other Topics, action or resolutions recommended (continue on separate sheet if necessary):
13
14
Date of Report: _______________
16
_________________________________
Principal’s Signature
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Report Prepared by:__________________________
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17
________________________
________________
Signature
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UNIT SAFETY REPORT FORM INSTRUCTIONS
The numbers below refer to the corresponding numbers on the example form.
1-8 Heading information.
1. Enter the school or facility name.
2. Enter the name of the month.
3. Enter the date of the meeting.
4. Enter the names of the particpants.
5. Enter the number of student incidents since last meeting.
6. Enter the number of visitor incidents since last meeting.
7. Enter the number of employee incidents since last meeting.
8. Enter the number of other (vehicle, vandalism, etc.) incidents since last meeting.
9-12 Inspection information.
9. Check the appropriate line (adequate, inadequate or N/A). Do not check any item for
which a complete checklist is not on file. The date of the playground inspection is
required.
10. Describe why a certain line was inadequate and recommendations or action taken to
correct the issue.
11. Enter the name of the outside inspecting agency.
12. Enter the date of the outside agency inspection and attach a copy of the inspection report.
13 Other Topics
13. Summarize other topics discussed and any actions scheduled or recommended, the
responsible party or parties and any critical dates or time frames.
14-18 Preparation and Approval information.
14. Enter date of report.
15. Enter printed name of individual preparing the report.
16. Enter the facility manager’s signature.
17. Enter the signature of the individual preparing the report.
18. Enter the title of the individual preparing the report.
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ANCHORAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION UNIT SAFETY REPORT
Unit/School
Month of
1
3
Date of Meeting: _______
__________
COMMITTEE MEETING
Persons in Attendance
1.
2.
3.
2
4.
5.
6.
4
Incident Summary Since Last Meeting:
#
Type
#
6
5
Student
7.
8.
9.
#
Visitor
7
#
Employee
8
Other
INSPECTION REPORTS:
Adequate
Inadequate
N/A
6. Fire Protection: Sprinkler Valve Checks
_______
_______
_____
9
7. BPO Monthly Safety Checklist
8. Playground Safety Checklist (Enter Date)
_______
_______
_____
9. Defibrillator
_______
_______
_____
10. Grounds and Walkways: Tripping Hazards, ice
_______
_______
_____
Inadequacies and temporary or permanent solution suggested (continue on separate sheet if necessary):
10
Outside Agency Inspections (example Fire Dept., DOL, DEC, etc.)(Attach a copy of the report.):
Agency
Date
Agency
Date
12
11
Emergency Action Drills:
TYPE
DATE
Comments
Fire/Evacuation
Earthquake
Lock-Down/Stay Put (circle one)
Other
Other Topics, action or resolutions recommended (continue on separate sheet if necessary):
13
14
Date of Report: _______________
16
_________________________________
Principal’s Signature
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18
17
________________________
________________
Signature
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UNIT SAFETY REPORT FORM INSTRUCTIONS
These instructions are for the completion of the Unit Safety Report Form for Elementary Schools
ONLY. A different form is used for Secondary Education and other departments; see above. The
numbers below refer to the corresponding numbers on the example form.
1-8 Heading information.
19. Enter the school or facility name.
20. Enter the name of the month.
21. Enter the date of the meeting.
22. Enter the names of the particpants.
23. Enter the number of student incidents since last meeting.
24. Enter the number of visitor incidents since last meeting.
25. Enter the number of employee incidents since last meeting.
26. Enter the number of other (vehicle, vandalism, etc.) incidents since last meeting.
9-12 Inspection information.
27. Check the appropriate line (adequate, inadequate or N/A). Do not check any item for
which a complete checklist is not on file. The date of the playground inspection is
required.
28. Describe why a certain line was inadequate and recommendations or action taken to
correct the issue.
29. Enter the name of the outside inspecting agency.
30. Enter the date of the outside agency inspection and attach a copy of the inspection report.
13 Other Topics
31. Summarize other topics discussed and any actions scheduled or recommended, the
responsible party or parties and any critical dates or time frames.
14-18 Preparation and Approval information.
32. Enter date of report.
33. Enter printed name of individual preparing the report.
34. Enter the facility manager’s signature.
35. Enter the signature of the individual preparing the report.
36. Enter the title of the individual preparing the report.
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE CONTROL
Each facility is responsible for creating and maintaining a Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure
Control Plan. The facility will utilize the “Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan”
template developed by RM&EP. This plan must be reviewed annually for the following:
 New or modified tasks or procedures.
 Changes in technologies that eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne
pathogens.
 Consideration and implementation of appropriate commercially available and
effective safer medical devices designed to eliminate or minimize occupational
exposure.
 Input from non-managerial employees responsible for direct patient care who are
potentially exposed to injuries from contaminated sharps in the identification,
evaluation, and selection of effective engineering and work practice controls.
This annual review and documentation showing consideration of the above items, along with a
copy of the solicitation for input and responses, will be included in the Exposure Control Plan.
ALLERGIES
Some employees and students of the District have health threatening allergies such as allergies to
foods, latex and fragrances. RM&EP will publish and maintain an allergy handbook which
covers how we routinely address allergy issues. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of
Disability Employment Policy has stated that exposure to allergens is a function of going out in
public and may not be covered for accommodation. However, any such condition may be
evaluated on a case by case basis as an ADA issue by the affected facility and the HR’s
Compliance/EEO office to determine if special protective measures are required to safeguard the
affected individuals.
ANIMALS/PETS IN THE SCHOOLS
PROHIBITED ANIMALS
The following animals are prohibited at any time based on local ordinances and national
educational guidelines:
 Birds – Parrots, parakeets, cockatoos, etc. due to potential for spreading psittacosis and
other diseases.
 Rats – Prohibited by Municipality of Anchorage ordinance.
 Ferrets or any other members of the weasel family – potential biters, stink (unless descented) and potential for escaping into air ducts.
 Turtles – due to potential for spreading salmonella.
 Reptiles* – Any reptile including iguanas due to potential for spreading salmonella
 Undesirable Insects – includes cockroaches, poisonous spiders, bees, wasps, scorpions,
etc.
 Food Insects* – includes crickets, grasshoppers, etc.
 Cats – May exhibit aggressive behavior when stressed
 Wild or Exotic Animals – Includes wolf hybrids. Such animals may exhibit
unpredictable and aggressive behavior.
* NOTE: some exceptions possible for science curriculum see below
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ANIMALS ALLOWED WITH RESTRICTIONS
The following animals may be brought into the schools with the principal’s permission as long as
they meet the requirements listed below.
 Mice – No handling allowed and they must be kept in “escape-proof” cages.
 Rabbits, Guinea Pigs and other small “furry” pets not on the prohibited list above.
 Dogs and kittens – Not including service animals. Only allowed for specific purposes
such as show-&-tell, curriculum aids, as part of an IEP, etc.
 Science curriculum animals, insects, etc. – MUST be removed upon completion of the
learning track.
 Service Animals (see below).
All animals brought into the school must have current vaccinations (as applicable) and not cause
an allergic reaction or bite any student or staff member. The pet must be immediately removed
from the school if either type of event occurs.
All pets brought into the school must be adequately cared for and cleaned up after by the owner,
or the teacher for animals used as part of a curriculum, to include waste from cages, spilled food
or water, etc.. Food supplies must be stored in closed, impervious containers to preclude
rodent/insect infestations.
SERVICE ANIMALS
Service animals are individually trained to do work or perform specific tasks for persons with a
disability. The work or tasks performed must be directly related to the person’s disability. The
tasks may include, but are not limited to, guiding a visually impaired person, alerting a person
who is deaf or hard of hearing, pulling a wheelchair, assisting with mobility or balance, alerting
or assisting a person who is subject to seizures, retrieving objects, and preventing or interrupting
impulsive or destructive behavior by persons with psychiatric and/or neurological disabilities.
Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship
or to promote emotional well-being are considered pets or comfort animals and do not fall within
the definition of a service animal. Such animals are therefore subject to the restrictions listed in
the preceding sections.
Service animal access to ASD facilities is governed by federal and state law and managed by
ASD policy and procedure. For more information or assistance with completing the “Service
Animal Access Form,” contact your facility principal/manager/supervisor or the Equal
Employment Opportunity Office at 742-4132.
WILDLIFE SAFETY
Wildlife in the Anchorage area provides unique challenges for our schools. Wildlife can carry
diseases and pests which can be harmful; especially to young children. Some of the diseases that
are common to wildlife are rabies, viruses, many forms of bacteria and the physical dangers
associated with bites, scratches and other physical assaults. The Alaska Department of Fish and
Game (ADF&G) is available to come and make a presentation on bear and moose safety by
simply going to their website and filling out their presentation request form. General wildlife
safety guidelines include:
 Always stay a good distance away from wildlife;
 Never feed wildlife;
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

Do not attempt to catch or pet wildlife;
Report any wild animals that don’t appear afraid of humans to the Department of Fish
and Game at
 When in doubt don’t go out.
BEAR SAFETY
ADF&G has a video titled “Hey Bears! How You Can Stay Safe in Bear Country” which was
created by Mirror Lake Middle School; it is available for free by requesting it from them or
viewing it on YouTube. The key points to remember, in addition to those mentioned above, is
never get in a situation in where the bear may feel trapped, never get between a sow and her
cubs, never go near a kill being fed on by a bear, travel in groups, and make plenty of noise (loud
talking or singing).
BEAR SPRAY
To carry or use bear spray ASD employees must first:
 Read the USGS fact sheet titled “Bear Spray Safety Program” available in the ASD
Forms and Publications Library.
 Watch the Risk Management training video on bear spray use.
MOOSE SAFETY
The Alaska Department of Fish and game has a video on staying safe around urban moose. The
video was created by Mirror Lake Middle School and is available for free by request or on
YouTube. ADF&G also has a poster available for download for students to color. The key points
to remember, in addition to those mentioned above, is never get in a situation in where the moose
may feel trapped and never get between a cow and her calves.
DEAD BIRDS AND SMALL ANIMALS
Dead birds and small animals can pose an attractive nuisance and health hazard for children and
a lure for scavengers from varmints such as fox all the way up to bear. Dead birds and small
animals found on ASD properties must be double bagged in plastic garbage bags and disposed of
in the dumpster. This procedure is subject to change upon the orders of either the ADF&G or the
Alaska Department of Health and Human Services.
ERGONOMICS
The Anchorage School District has historically paid out almost 25% of its workers’
compensation payments annually on ergonomic related injuries. An average worker’s
compensation ergonomic related claim has an average cost of approximately $60,000. The
average cost of ergonomic solutions ranges from $200 to $1,500 if the situation is addressed
promptly before the employee needs to file a claim. Therefore, each proactive measure taken by
departments and facilities that prevents a claim can havee an impact of up to $59,000 remaining
available for education. An ASD Ergonomics Handbook is available on the ASD District
Connection which provides much greater detail on this topic than is possible within this
document.
DEFINITION
Webster defines ergonomics as “the study of equipment design in order to reduce operator
fatigue and discomfort.” The other accepted definition is “the design of the work to fit the
worker.” OSHA regulations require an employer to provide tools, workstations and equipment
that reduce the adverse impact of the work environment on the worker.
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CAUSES
There is no medical and scientific consensus on the causes of office related repetitive stress
injuries. There is also no medical and scientific consensus on the remedies for ergonomic
injuries. An across-the-board prescription runs the risk of doing more harm than good until
doctors have a clear developed medical understanding of the causes and cures of ergonomic
injuries. Today, for example, two administrative assistants can be working side-by-side, same
work, same working conditions, - yet one develops carpal tunnel syndrome while the other does
not. Doctors are not able to explain why. However, the evidence does show that the following
factors are linked to ergonomic injuries:
 Holding the body in static, cramped positions.
 Vibration.
 Impact.
 Emotional stress.
In fact, most ergonomic injuries experienced by employees are probably initially caused by their
hobbies. Activities such as water skiing, snow machining, knitting and landscaping are more
likely to cause an ergonomic injury than any office task.
PREVENTION/RESPONSE
The District endeavors to do whatever is reasonable to limit the impact that these factors play in
aggravating the employee’s injury prior to the generation of a worker’s compensation claim.
The following list shows the progression of reporting and actions to address an ergonomic issue:
1. The employee notifies their supervisor when they begin to feel discomfort.
2. The supervisor should review the risk factors above and the guidelines below to
determine if they could resolve any obvious issues.
3. The supervisor will contact RM&EP if the symptoms persist to see if an ergonomic
assessment to identify the conditions that are contributing to their discomfort is
necessary.
4. RM&EP recommends actions for the employee and equipment for the workspace after
conducting an ergonomic assessment.
5. The department/facility purchases the appropriate equipment/aids for the employee from
their existing budget if necessary.
GUIDELINES
The following guidelines are available for office workstations:
 Lighten up – Most people use more force than is really necessary to perform
many tasks involving the hands. Type lightly and use less pressure to grip objects
such as pens or pencils.
 Take micro-breaks – Give your hands a break every 15 or 20 minutes by
stretching or moving them. It is preferable to change your entire body position at
least every hour. Go from typing to filing or stand up while talking on the phone.
 Watch your form – Avoid cramped or bent posture. Avoid bending your wrist up
or all the way down.
 Improve your posture – Incorrect posture can cause your shoulders to roll forward
compressing your neck and shoulder muscles, which compresses the nerves in
your neck affecting your arms and hands.
 Keep your hands warm – you are more likely to develop hand pain and stiffness if
your fingers are cold. Wear fingerless gloves if you can’t control the temperature.
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





Adjust your chair properly so that your knees are slightly below the level of your
thighs. More information is available on the RM&EP intranet site. A proper
office task chair has the following features:
o Height adjustment from the seated position.
o Seat pan properly sized for the individual. Most models are designed to
accommodate 90% of the population. Very large or small persons require
a specially sized seat pan.
o Seat pan tilt and backrest angle adjustment from the seated position.
o Backrest height adjustment.
o Lower back support.
o Padded armrest adjustability/removal.
o Five spoke base with low friction casters.
Keep your feet flat on the floor or on a footrest. NOTE: Footrests are not
recommended for persons with upper extremity injuries.
Keep frequently accessed files and binders within easy reach.
Keep documents directly in line with the monitor or adjacent to it.
Have adequate lighting without glare. Task lighting must be provided for
frequent reading when room lighting is insufficient or different light intensities
exist.
Insure that keyboard and mouse surfaces are adjusted to insure arms, wrists and
hands are positioned in a neutral posture at or below elbow level. Also, the arms
and wrists should not contact any sharp edges. Use of palm/wrist rests allows the
user to rest their arms/hands during their micro-breaks.
FUNDING
Funding for ergonomic corrections is ultimately the responsibility of the affected
department/facility.
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HAZARD COMMUNICATION
Every facility is required to develop and maintain a hazard communication (HAZCOM) program
that complies with 29 CFR 1910.1200. RM&EP has developed a template for use that is
available upon request by the facility. The HAZCOM Program (also known as the “Right to
Know” law) is designed to provide employees with a full disclosure of the hazards associated
with their workplace. Alaska law has broadened the federal law by including physical hazards.
The minimum requirements of the HAZCOM program are:
Employers –


Identify all chemicals and work conditions with physical and health hazards.
Identify necessary PPE and emergency procedures required for employee protection
during routine operations.

Identify steps required for employee protection during non-routine operations
(container breakage, spilled chemicals, etc.).

Provide employee training prior to the use of any potentially hazardous material.

Conduct annual inventories and program reviews to insure that the program and
SDS/MSDS information is current.
Employees –

Receive training prior to using any potentially hazardous material.

Read SDS/MSDS for any hazardous material prior to using it.

Comply with the SDS/MSDS instructions for handling, disposal, and PPE.
Only trained personnel may handle hazardous chemicals or clean up chemical spills or leaks. All
other personnel must immediately leave the area.
HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS, LABELS AND MSDS
HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS
A chemical's physical and chemical properties determine its hazard level. Physical properties
include flammability, state (gas, liquid or solid), appearance, and odor. Chemical properties
include toxicity, reactivity, and combustibility. The key to safely handling any chemical is to be
aware of the hazards and to take the necessary precautions.
CONTAINER LABELING
Hazardous chemical containers must be legibly and prominently labeled with the names of
hazardous ingredients and the appropriate hazard warnings. Incoming shipments of hazardous
chemicals are pre-labeled and require no further labeling. Existing labels should not be altered
or removed. Use the standard pre-gummed safety labels whenever possible.
Portable containers used by a single individual for immediate transfer (such as buckets) do not
need labeling as long as they remain in the individual’s personal and exclusive control.
SAFETY DATA SHEETS/MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
SDS/MSDS are required for:
 All hazardous chemicals not normally available at a general retail store.
 Generally available items used in quantities greater than normal household use.
Example: Bleach is normally used in households in 1-gallon containers. 2
gallons on-site requires an SDS/MSDS.
 Bulk purchased chemicals transferred to smaller containers.
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Information on the SDS/MSDS must include, but is not limited to:
 Generic, chemical, trade, and commonly used names
 Safe exposure level to the hazardous material
 Known acute and chronic effects of hazardous level exposure
 Known symptoms of exposure effects
 Flammability, potential for explosion, or reactivity
 Appropriate emergency response
 Leak and spill cleanup procedure
 Employee self-protection measures (i.e., Personal Protective Equipment).
Chemical manufacturers and distributors provide SDS/MSDS with the initial shipment of a
hazardous chemical and update it whenever necessary. Take time to look over the SDS/MSDS
and become familiar with the hazards and necessary safety precautions.
CHEMICAL INVENTORY
Each facility must conduct an inventory annually of all potentially hazardous chemicals and
verify that the current SDS/MSDS is on-hand. This signed inventory list and verification
documentation must be filed with the facility’s HAZCOM program with a copy provided to
RM&EP.
EMPLOYEE TRAINING
All employees who use hazardous materials will receive training and will read the applicable
MSDS prior to working in any area. Employees transferred from one work area to another may
require additional training and monitoring. Special attention must be given to short-term and
temporary employees whose jobs may change frequently. Regular job orientation includes
hazardous materials handling training.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
Dial 911 or 9-911 depending on your telephone system in the event of exposure to any chemical
or hazardous material then contact the nearest first-aid-qualified employee and supervisor and
take necessary immediate action.
CHEMICAL/WASTE DISPOSAL
Contact the ASD Purchasing Department for hazardous chemical or hazardous waste clean up
and disposal.
HEARING CONSERVATION
HEARING CONSERVATION APPLICABILITY
A Hearing Loss Prevention Program must be implemented whenever noise measurements
indicate a noise exposure level over an 85 dBA eight hour time weighted average (TWA). The
ASD Hearing Loss Prevention Program currently applies to only Middle and High School band
teachers with over six hours of class time in one day. Principals will notify RM&EP annually
whenever a teacher meets this criterion.
HEARING LOSS PREVENTION PROGRAM
The ASD Hearing Loss Prevention Program is maintained by RM&EP and is available
electronically at https://home.asdk12.org/forms/details.asp?FormID=576. ASD supervisors and
employees concerned that they may have a noise exposure risk must contact the ASD Safety
Specialist for a noise hazard evaluation.
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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Personal protective equipment (PPE) is required whenever an employer cannot remove hazards
from the workplace by the use of either engineering or administrative procedures. The
department/facility requiring the use of PPE will provide all PPE except standard safety
boots/shoes, prescription safety glasses and cold weather gear; those items are the responsibility
of the employee to obtain. The following conditions will be met for the wear of any PPE:
 Supervisors must perform a Job Hazard Assessment to determine the appropriate
type of PPE required.
 Employees must be trained on PPE use, care and selection prior to being issued
PPE.
 All PPE must be maintained in accordance with the manufacturer
recommendations, cleaned daily, checked for damage before and after use, and
stored according to manufacturer instructions.
 Employees must wear the PPE as the manufacturer has designed it to be worn.
 Employees must wear the proper size PPE.
 Disposable PPE will never be reused.
HAZARD ASSESSMENT
A Job Hazard Assessment (JHA), also known as a Job Safety Assessment (JSA) or PPE Hazard
Assessment, must be performed on any task involving hazards that cannot be removed or
eliminated through engineering controls. A JHA form (Word template) is available from
RM&EP for this purpose. Hazard assessments must be first completed on tasks with a history of
incidents, secondly on tasks with a high potential for injury and then all other tasks.
RM&EP training for supervisors on JHA preparation is available on ASDTube.
EYE PROTECTION
SAFETY GLASSES
Without exception, ASD employees must use safety glasses with integral or locking side shields
and/or goggles while performing any task in which a foreign object may come in contact with the
eyes. Splash resistant, ventilated goggles are required to be worn whenever working with
hazardous liquids. Face shields are not a substitute for either safety glasses or goggles.
CONTACT LENSES
Only gas permeable contact lenses may be worn in conjunction with other forms of eye
protection.
HEARING PROTECTION
Hearing protection will be used at any time an employee is exposed to noise greater than 85 dBa.
Disposable foam earplugs to protect employee hearing are the preferred primary method of
hearing protection. Any employee working in an area that requires double hearing protection
(pump rooms, generators, etc.) will receive earmuff style hearing protection from their
department or facility. ASD discourages multiple use ear plugs because they are difficult to keep
clean and sterile, increasing the chance of ear infections. See also “Hearing Conservation
Program.”
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EXTERNAL PROTECTION
HARD HATS
Class B/H hard hats will be worn whenever the potential for falling objects exists.
HAND PROTECTION
Employees must wear gloves or other appropriate hand protection whenever there is a danger of
cuts, nicks or abrasions, exposure to infectious diseases, heat, extreme cold, and exposure to
certain chemicals. Gloves or mittens used solely for keeping hands warm during the winter are
the employee's personal responsibility.
SAFETY SHOES
Hard-toed safety shoes or boots are required whenever there is a risk of harm due to rolling,
dropping, pinching, etc. to employee feet. Hard-toed shoes or boots must meet ANSI Z41.1
standards and the toes may be either steel or composite. Highly recommended (but not required),
boots providing ankle support (3/4 to full height) reduce ankle injury potential.
RESPIRATORS
A respirator is required working with many different chemicals and in the performance of some
types of woodworking. Some employees of the District may also wish to wear “dust masks”
under some conditions. The follow criteria are the minimums must be met prior to the use of any
form of respirator (including disposable face masks):
 A facility specific written respirator program (the ASD Safety Specialist can
assist in developing this document).
 Medical clearance of all respirator users.
 Respirator training for all users; contact RM&EP to schedule.
 Fit testing either qualitative or quantitative – NOTE: The type of fit test required
depends on the material being worked with and the type of respirator being used.
OTHER PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
The RM&EP Department will approve and provide other personal protective equipment as
required.
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FIRE PROTECTION
The Anchorage Fire Department has provided the following requirements from Anchorage
Municipal Code as well as the National Fire Protection Association and the International Fire
Code. This list covers the majority of issues but is by no means complete. Contact RM&EP with
any questions.
STORAGE
The following items apply to all storage at any ASD facility.
GENERAL
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Neat.
Orderly.
24 inch wide aisles (no public, student or volunteer access).
30 inch wide aisles (public, student or volunteer access).
Nothing protruding from front of shelves.
Nothing stored in aisles.
24 inches below ceiling or 18 inches below sprinkler head whichever is lower.
No burning candles, plug in air fresheners or burning incense is allowed.
CUMBUSTIBLES (ANYTHING THAT MAY BURN)
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No storage in exit-ways, halls, corridors, arctic entries, vestibules, under stairs,
etc. at any time.
No storage in mechanical spaces such as: boiler rooms, air handling rooms,
electric vaults, elevator control rooms, utilidors, generator rooms, sprinkler
control closets, etc. at any time for any reason.
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS (FUELS, THINNERS, SOLVENTS, ETC.)
Cannot be stored indoors (inside any building attached or integral to main structure)
unless:
 Stored in FM approved explosion-proof containers or, if stored in manufacturers
containers, stored within an approved cabinet (plastic containers of any type are
not acceptable).
 Limited to quantities as listed in the current version of the International Fire Code.
EXITS (EGRESS)
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No hasps, padlocks, chains, bars, etc. are allowed on doors to spaces designed
for human use at any time.
Maintain exit pathways (within offices, classrooms, lounges, etc.) minimizing
bottlenecks or serpentine routes.
Emergency exit routes placarded and posted at all doors leading to halls and the
building exterior from rooms.
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Egress hardware maintained at all times.
Exit signs and emergency lighting maintained at all times and in full readiness.
No trip hazards or combustibles in exit pathways at any time.
School doors opening onto corridors may only be propped open with magnetic
door holders that automatically release upon activation of the building alarm.
ELECTRICAL
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Open area, 36 inches deep, 30 inches wide and 72 inches tall in front of all panels
(larger if panel is larger).
Pathway 30 inches wide and 72 inches tall must be maintained from panel to exit
door at all times.
All breakers must be identified inside panel cover.
“Fire Alarm Breakers” sign posted on all panels containing fire alarm breakers.
Doors into electrical control panel rooms shall be marked with a plainly visible
and legible sign stating “Electrical Room” or similar approved wording.
No extension cords for other than temporary use. Only three pronged (grounded)
14 gauge or larger cords with an amperage rating greater than the device being
powered may be used. Extension cords may only be repaired by a licensed
electrician and certified to meet or exceed original manufacturer protection.
NOTE: Temporary use is defined as use to perform a specific task, attended by an
adult with the length of the cord and not to exceed one work shift, after which the
cord is disconnected and stored. The only exception is power strips.
Power strips rules:
o Plugged directly into permanent wiring
o No modifications allowed
o Only one computer unit per power strip. A computer unit is defined as the
CPU and all units slaved to the CPU such as printers, scanners, monitors,
hard drives, etc. The total ampacity of the items may not exceed the rated
ampacity of the power strip.
o No high amp devices such as microwaves, toasters, coffee pots, popcorn
makers, heaters, copy machines, refrigerators, soda machines, laminating
machines, etc. may be plugged into a power strip. These items must be
plugged directly in to permanent wiring.
o Daisy chaining is not allowed. Daisy chaining is defined as: “the over-use
of power strips by plugging one into another to extend the length or use of
the original power strip that is plugged into the permanent wiring”.
Cords and strips shall not be affixed (includes use of tape) to structures, extended
through walls, ceilings, floors, under doors or floor coverings, or be subjected to
environmental or physical damage (use a cord protector).
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DECORATIONS
HALLS, CORRIDORS, EXIT WAYS, ETC.
The International Fire Code does not allow ANY decorations in the halls, corridors, exit ways,
etc. at any time. The Anchorage Fire Department policy allows the use of decorations under the
following rules.
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No expanded decorations are allowed at any time. Expanded decorations are
defined as: “decorations with more than one surface area exposed to the
atmosphere”.
No decorations attached to, or hanging from, the ceiling.
No decorations within eight feet of any emergency device or to hinder the access
or use of any device.
Flat paper decorations are allowed on the walls if no more than 25% of the wall
surfaces on both sides of the hall are covered at one time, or no more than 50% of
the wall surface, if one side is covered. When calculating total allowable area, the
space above eight feet from the floor and windows do not count.
All fabric decorations must be treated with fire retardant, documented and the
documentation maintained in the front office and kept accessible at all times.
CLASSROOMS
The International Fire Code only allows up to 20% of the wall surface area (does not include
windows or fixtures) in classrooms to be covered with decorations. The Anchorage Fire
Department will allow up to 80% of the walls in classrooms to be covered when the following
rules are applied:
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No expanded decorations are allowed in the general vicinity of the exit doors or
the exit pathways.
No decorations are allowed on the ceilings.
Mobiles are allowed as long as they are 24 inches below the ceiling and seven feet
off the floor when they are in the pathways. Mobiles should not be clustered and
cannot hinder or block sprinkler operation.
Deduct 2% off the total allowed coverage for every 1% of expanded decoration
surface area.
No wires, cords, strings, chains, cables, etc. are allowed to hang from the ceiling
below seven feet from the floor.
All ceiling tiles must be kept in the racks at all times. Damaged tiles must be
replaced.
No trip hazards are allowed in the pathways at any time.
Exit pathways in rooms must be maintained without bottlenecks, serpentine routes
or other restrictions at all times. Exit pathways must be between 28 and 48 inches
wide (corridors have different requirements). Contact the Safety Specialist to
determine which measurement applies.
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RED TAG PERMIT SYSTEM
Our property insurer requires the use of a Red Tag Permit System whenever the sprinkler system
is impaired. The requirements of this system are:
BEFORE SPRINKLER SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
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Plan to do the work when the facility is not operating, and/or shut down
hazardous processes, if possible.
 Have everything ready before impairing or shutting off the sprinkler system.
 Plan for temporary protection such as extra extinguishers, charged hose lines,
temporary sprinkler protection, etc.
 Notify FM Global at 888-247-9062, in addition to local fire dispatch and our
security company.
EMERGENCY SPRINKLER SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
 Stabilize the situation and initiate above precautions.
DURING SPRINKLER SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
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Shut down hazardous processes.
Prohibit smoking.
Prohibit all hot work including cutting and welding. Discuss in advance with FM
Global if hot work is essential to complete the work.
 Have guards patrol area where protection is out of service until protection is
restored.
 Use Red Tag Permit and reusable Impairment Tag (posted near sprinkler system
valves). Additional permit forms and tags are available from RM&EP.
AFTER SPRINKLER SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
 Make certain all fire protection systems are active and in automatic service.
 Conduct 2-inch drain test at the sprinkler riser.
 Lock sprinkler control valve in the wide open position.
 Reset alarm and notify fire department and security company.
 Complete Red Tag Permit and send Part 2 to RM&EP.
 Notify FM Global at 888-247-9062 that the system is operational.
MULTIPLE DAY SYSTEM SHUTDOWNS
For a project involving multiple consecutive days of shutting down the system and reactivating it
each evening, the following steps may be taken:
 Fax the schedule, name of facility, and FM Global Index Number to 800-7365564.
 Contact the FM Global 888-247-9062 if the schedule is extended past the
estimated completion date.
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PRESCHOOL HEALTH & SAFETY
This section is intended to function as an addendum to the student safety and security policies
and procedures already existent in the School Board Policy and the appropriate education
manuals. These requirements are provided to specify both the statutory and regulatory
requirements for preschool health and safety in Alaska. Any questions regarding preschool
health and safety should be directed to the employee’s supervisor.
APPLICABILITY
These requirements apply to all preschool classrooms regardless of the program (Title I,
Developmental, Title VII, etc.).
GENERAL CLEANING AND SANITATION
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Toys will be cleaned and sanitized weekly. Toys which cannot be cleaned and
sanitized will be removed from the classroom.
Tables and other furniture will be cleaned as necessary and working surfaces will be
sanitized daily.
Objects contaminated with bodily fluids will be removed from the reach of other
children until they can be properly cleaned and sanitized. Objects which cannot be
removed from the reach of other children will be cleaned and sanitized immediately.
See diapering procedures for cleaning and sanitizing of diapering areas.
Carpets and rugs will be vacuumed daily and cleaned monthly. Carpets and rugs
contaminated with bodily fluids will be cleaned and sanitized immediately.
Linens (blankets, pillow covers, sheets, etc.) will be laundered weekly and before
being used by a different child.
Damaged or worn toys, equipment and furniture will be immediately removed from
the classroom and replaced or repaired upon discover.
Children and staff must wash their hands:
o Before and after eating or drinking.
o After diapering or using the bathroom.
o After any contact with bodily fluids.
o Before and after using the sand/water table.
GENERAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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Preschool staff may not work if they have a communicable disease, rash, infection or
an acute respiratory infection.
Preschool staff will take the ASD Infectious Disease Control training annually.
Discovery of insects or other pests will be reported immediately to the school’s office
staff.
No poisonous plants may be kept in the classroom.
Fertilizers and potting mixtures/soil used for nonpoisonous plants must be non-toxic.
No animals may be kept in the preschool classroom.
Fish tanks must be cleaned monthly and any fish foods and tank chemicals kept out of
reach of the children.
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Dead fish must be disposed of immediately by flushing down the toilet for smaller
fish or sealed in an impervious plastic bag and placed in the diaper trash can for larger
fish.
Trampolines, regardless of size, can only be used if proper fall protection is in place,
a minimum of three foot clearance around the equipment is maintained, staff has been
properly trained on ‘spotting’ and a written child specific procedure (may be part of
the IED/504 plan) has been read, understood and put into practice by the staff.
Any product marked “Keep out of reach of children” must be kept out of children’s
reach
DIAPERING/BATHROOM ASSISTANCE
Staff will use Diapering and Bathroom Assistance under Student Safety.
ELECTRICAL
In addition to the electrical safety requirements contained in the ASD Safety Handbook, all
electrical outlets lower than 5 feet from floor level not in use will be capped with outlet safety
caps.
EMERGENCY PLANNING
Preschool classes will conduct their drills in conjunction with their school. In addition, they will
conduct additional drills as necessary to ensure that every class participates in at least one
evacuation drill once a month and record any drill conducted separately from the school’s drill
on the Risk Management facility drill input form. Comments, concerns and lessons learned
regarding the drills will be submitted to the school’s Safety and Emergency Planning Committee.
FIRST AID/MEDICATIONS
 The school nurse or their trained and designated alternate are the primary first aid
providers at all schools. Preschool staff my only provide first aid if they are properly
trained and certified and the nurse or their alternate is unavailable.
 Every preschool class will maintain a mini-first aid kit containing:
o Disposable non-porous, non-latex gloves (2 pair).
o Non-latex Band-Aids (6 ea. small and medium).
o A contact card with instructions on how to contact the school nurse and the poison
control hotline.
 Medications (including over the counter medications) may normally only be given to
children by the school nurse or their trained alternate.
 Preschool staff may provide medications if:
o They have been trained by the school nurse in how to properly dispense the
medication; and
o The nurse or the alternate is unavailable; and
o They have the written permission from the parent/guardian to dispense the
medication(s).
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FOOD SAFETY
 Staff will wash their hands and don disposable gloves prior to handling food.
 Preparing and plating food must be done on a cleaned and sanitized surface.
 Fruit and vegetables will be cut on a clean and sanitized cutting board.
 Knives and cutting boards will be clean and sanitized immediately after use and
stored out of the children’s reach.
 Foods requiring refrigeration must be kept stored in the school kitchen refrigerators.
 Children must be kept at least 3 feet away from the stove when it is in use.
 The temperature control knobs will be removed from the stove when it is not in use
and stored out of the reach of children.
 Dry foods will be stored in plastic airtight insect-proof containers marked with the
name of the food and the date it was opened (use masking tape to assure reusability of
the container).
 Dry foods will be disposed of upon their expiration date, if they have one, or at the
end of the school year if opened.
 Foods brought in by parents/guardians for a specific child must be marked with the
date provided, the name of the food and the name of the child they are intended for.
 Uneaten plated/prepared food leftovers must be discarded immediately.
OUTDOOR PLAY AREAS
 Play area equipment will be visually checked for hazards and/or damage daily.
 All potentially hazardous objects (to include cigarette butts) found during the daily
inspection must be removed and discarded prior to allowing children to play in the
play area.
WATER TABLES
 Water tables must be maintained at 2-10 parts per million (PPM) chlorine solution
during use. Chlorine test strips must be used prior to use and every two hours during
use to verify that the chlorine level is maintained at an adequate level.
 Children with open sores or wounds are not allowed to play at the table.
 Water must be drained and the table cleaned and sanitized daily.
HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING
 All preschool staff must, in addition to the training mentioned previously, complete a
preschool health and safety training course.
 All health and safety training requirements apply to regular preschool staff,
substitutes and volunteers.
 The Risk Management Safety Specialist shall prepare all health and safety courses
and determines the appropriate delivery method.
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STUDENT SAFETY
This section is intended to function as an addendum to the student safety and security policies
and procedures already existent in the School Board Policy and the appropriate education
manuals. These items are ones which have been brought to the attention of RM&EP and have
not been otherwise addressed.
GENERAL SAFETY
The underlying premise for most student safety issues is that if federal and/or state law states that
an activity is dangerous for adult employees then it is dangerous for students as well. The other
items here are the result of past significant injuries involving students in our district.
CHEMICAL SAFETY
Any product labeled “Keep Out of Reach of Children” must be stored above the reach of
students or in a locked cabinet. No elementary level child is allowed to use such a product, even
under supervision, unless the chemical or product is part of an approved science curriculum and
used only in a manner compliant with the curriculum and under direct observation of the teacher.
Any student allowed to use any chemical product must be instructed on the proper procedures for
safe use before being allowed to use the product and then actively supervised during its use.
Art supplies used at the elementary level must all be certified as non-toxic. No product requiring
“adequate ventilation” may be used indoors in any location unless an adequate exhaust
ventilation system exists, is activated prior to use and is left on until all off-gassing is complete
(product has cured/dried completely).
DISEASE PREVENTION
Elementary School students may be asked by their teacher to assist in classroom clean-up or by
their school to assist in lunchroom cleanup under the following conditions:
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No chemical products other than a simple soap solution are used.
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Application of any disinfectant will only be done by an adult and only when students will
not be allowed in the area until the disinfectant has dried.
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Children wash their hands immediately after clean-up.
Middle and High School students may use cleansers and disinfectants if properly trained and
constantly supervised (see Chemical Safety above).
SHARPS SAFETY
No sharp objects such as knives, pointed scissors or paper cutter blades will be left unsecured
within the reach of elementary level children. Paper cutter blades must always be secured
whenever not in use without regard as to their location or the education level.
CART SAFETY
No student will move audio/visual, television, or any other storage carts. Movement of these
items is restricted to school staff and adult volunteers only. Many of these carts are top-heavy,
awkward or both and subject to tipping over if mishandled.
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DIAPERING
See also the procedures listed on RM Form #029 “Diapering Procedures.”
 Diapering cannot be done near any food preparation/consumption area.
 Diapering surfaces must be smooth, durable, nonabsorbent and easily cleanable.
 All objects/items in the bathroom or changing area must be able to be cleaned and
sanitized.
 Easy access must be maintained to hand washing sinks.
 All staff must be trained annually on the diapering/changing procedures contained in
the next section.
 All staff must be trained annually by the school’s nurse on any child specific medical
issues regarding diapering/changing.
 Staff must wear non-latex gloves while diapering.
 Soiled clothes and/or cloth diapers must be placed in an impervious bag (not a plastic
grocery bag) without rinsing and given to the parent/guardian that day (may not be
kept overnight) for laundering.
 Soiled disposable diapers/pull-ups must be disposed of in a trash can with a selfclosing lid lined with a plastic trash bag.
 Diapering supplies must be kept clean and sanitary.
 Children may not handle diaper changing supplies.
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THEATRE SAFETY
Theatre is a place where magical things can happen; actors emerge out of the mist to tell their
stories, imaginative sets roll out and exciting sword fights take place on stage. For those involved
in theatre the creation of a show can pose many potential safety hazards from the creation of sets,
costumes and props with specialized knowledge and equipment to the movement of furniture and
actors under overhead lights or in complete darkness. Performers, technicians, volunteers,
teachers, students, supervisors and managers all share responsibility for health and safety in the
theatre.
The health and safety of minor students in the performing arts are included in this obligation of
protection. The courts have found repeatedly that facility managers, administrators, and teachers
have an obligation for safeguarding students that is even greater than that owed to employees due
to the students’ lack of experience and subsequently lesser degree of judgment as well as a
heightened level of trust.
Many aspects of a theatre safety program are already mandated by OSHA general industry and
construction safety regulations and ASD procedures. They are therefore already in this
handbook. This section will outline the theatre responsibilities not noted earlier. Other aspects of
theatre safety, not already covered elsewhere in this handbook, will be covered in a separate
document which will include checklists, theatre specific work practices and procedures. The
creation and maintenance of the Theatre Safety Supplement is the responsibility of the ASD
Safety Specialist and the Auditorium Technical Manager.
THEATRE SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES
The following responsibilities are specific to theatre safety and are in addition to those listed in
the earlier section of this handbook.
ASD DIRECTOR OF RENTALS/PRINCIPALS
Ensure that all field operations personnel/technicians (responsibility Director of Rentals) and
theatre teachers (responsibility Principals) are aware of and effectively practice the safety
policies and procedures set out in Board policy and this handbook.
ASD AUDITORIUM TECHNICIANS
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Ensure that all personnel using the facilities are complying with safety requirements.
Post theatre specific safety rules.
Brief facility users on safety rules for the facility before they use the facility.
Establish schedules of inspection for theatre equipment.
Inspect and prepare inspection reports on equipment.
ASD TEACHERS


Rev. 5
Ensure that all students are trained in theatre safety and use the facilities in compliance
with safety requirements.
Conduct job hazard analysis for student tasks in accordance with this handbook.
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


Identify and provide all necessary personal protective equipment to students as deemed
appropriate per the job hazard analysis.
Maintain good housekeeping.
Enforce all safety standards and apply necessary disciplinary action as required to assure
compliance.
ASD STUDENTS


Rev. 5
Report any unsafe conditions.
Comply with the direction of ASD Auditorium Technicians and Teachers.
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COMPRESSED GASES
29 CFR 1910.101-105 and 253, 29 CFR 1926.350, 49 CFR parts 171-179 and the Compressed
Gas Association mandate a number of requirements for compressed gas cylinders (CGCs). The
following requirements adopt the most restrictive of these requirements in order to standardize
our compliance and reduce the potential for violations and incidents due to an employee
misunderstanding or misapplication of the standards. This section is intended to be a short
summary of compressed gas safety requirements which should insure compliance if followed.
See also the welding, cutting, and brazing section.
MANAGER/SUPERVISOR RESPONSIBILITIES


Ensure users are properly trained in the use, handling and storage of CGCs.
Ensure all CGCs are properly stored, handled and used in accordance with the
requirements of this section.
 Designate, in writing, a person responsible for required inspections and verify that
the inspections are conducted and documented.
 Ensure all compressed gases are ordered through a commercial supplier.
 Ensure that equipment is maintained in good operating condition.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Compressed gases will only be purchased from an established commercial gas
supplier.
 No gas cylinders will be refilled by an ASD employee.
 All cylinders must be labeled, inspected and appropriately marked by the supplier.
Color coding alone is not an acceptable method of labeling. All cylinders must be
tagged as either full, in use, or empty (MT).
 Notify the ASD Safety Specialist at 742-4274, if any question arises concerning
the safety of cylinders.
INSPECTIONS

A daily visual inspection of the cylinder, connections, regulators and hoses for
any form of leaks or damage.
A monthly inspection of cylinders and cylinder storage areas.
Hydrostatic testing and detailed inspection are the responsibility of the gas
supplier.


LABELING
The contents of any CGC must be clearly identified. Gas identification should be stenciled or
stamped on the cylinder or a label. Commercially available three-part tag systems will be used
for cylinder status.
No compressed gas cylinder should be accepted for use that does not legibly identify its contents
by name. If the labeling on a cylinder becomes unclear the cylinder should be marked “contents
unknown” and returned to the supplier.
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Cylinder color-coding and labels on cylinder caps are unacceptable methods of cylinder
identification and labeling. Cylinder colors can vary depending on the supplier and cylinder caps
may be placed on similar cylinder types resulting in the cylinder being mislabeled.
HANDLING AND USE
PRIOR TO USE





Make sure the cylinder is equipped with the correct regulator.
Inspect the regulator and cylinder valves for grease, oil, dirt and solvent. Never
use grease or oil to lubricate connectors, regulators or cylinder valves as this
could result in an explosion.
The cylinder should be placed so that the valve handle at the top is easily
accessible.
Only use wrenches or tools that are provided by the cylinder supplier to open or
close a valve. Pliers should never be used to open a cylinder valve. Some
regulators require washers; this should be checked before the regulator is fitted.
Fire extinguishing equipment should be readily available when combustible
materials can be exposed to welding or cutting operations using compressed
cylinder gases.
MOVING CYLINDERS









Steel toed safety footwear must be worn when moving large cylinders.
Never drag, slide or roll a cylinder.
Always use a cylinder cart or basket to move a cylinder.
Never transport or store a cylinder with the regulator in place.
Make sure that the cylinder is secured to the cart before moving it.
Do not lift a cylinder using the valve cover.
Do not drop cylinders or allow them to strike against each other or against other
surfaces violently.
ASD employees, other than trained maintenance workers, are not allowed to
transport CGCs.
CGCs may only be transported on commercial vehicles complying with DOT
regulations.
USE AND OPERATION




Rev. 5
Only properly trained personnel may handle CGCs.
Safety glasses or goggles must be worn while making cylinder connections.
Back off the pressure adjusting screw of the regulator to release spring force
before opening the cylinder valve.
With the proper regulator in place, slowly open the valve; always keep the
cylinder between yourself and the regulator.
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
Fuel gas cylinder valves should never be opened more than ½ turn of the spindle
and no more than ¾ of a turn.
 Never force connections.
 Never heat a cylinder to raise pressure.
 Keep cylinder clear of all electrical circuits, flame and sparks.
 Never leave the valve open when equipment is not in use, even when on empty.
CYLINDER STORAGE


Cylinders must be secured at all times to prevent tipping.
Use appropriate material, such as a chain, plastic coated wire cable, commercial
straps, etc., to secure cylinders.
 Gas cylinders cannot be stored in hallways or other unprotected areas.
 Cylinders must be segregated by hazard class when in storage. Oxidizers (oxygen)
must be separated from flammable gases and empty cylinders must be isolated
from filled cylinders.
 A minimum of 20 feet of separation, or a five foot tall firewall must be
maintained between oxygen and flammable gas cylinders.
 Oxygen and flammable gas cylinders may be left on welding carts together if they
are properly secured and configured for use. EXCEPTION: Cylinders for which
use is not planned within 24 hours will be placed back in storage.
 Storage areas must be non-combustible, ventilated, dry, protected from the
weather, not subject to temperature extremes, and not in direct contact with soil.
 Acetylene cylinders must never be stored on their sides.
 Valve protectors must be in place whenever the cylinders are not connected for
use.
CYLINDER LEAKS
The following responses should be taken whenever a leak is detected.






Rev. 5
Use soapy water or a gas meter to detect leaks. Do NOT try to repair any leaks on
the cylinder or cylinder valve.
Evacuate the area and call 911 if the MSDS for the gas indicates a probable health
hazard and then notify RM&EP (742-4371).
Remove the cylinder to an isolated, well ventilated area away from possible
ignition sources.
Post the area as hazardous and keep any other personnel from getting within 50
feet of the cylinder.
Allow it to remain isolated until the gas has discharged.
Tag the cylinder and return it to the supplier.
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WELDING, CUTTING & BRAZING (WCB)
29 CFR 1910.250-255 and 29 CFR 1926.350-354 (includes NFPA 51B). This section is
intended to be a short summary of welding safety requirements which should insure compliance
if followed. See also the compressed gases safety as those requirements are not duplicated in
this section.
MANAGER/SUPERVISOR RESPONSIBILITIES

Ensure employees involved with welding, cutting and brazing (WCB) operations
are properly trained in their duties and responsibilities.
 Shall designate a permit authorizing individual (PAI).
 Ensure all WCB operations comply with this section.
 Ensure that equipment is maintained in good and safe operating condition.
Equipment needing repair or replacement shall be tagged out of service and not
utilized.
PERMIT AUTHORIZING INDIVIDUAL (PAI)

Shall, in conjunction with management, be responsible for the safe operation of
hot work activities.
 Shall complete a job hazard assessment for the specific hot work being performed
and ensure that the following is addressed prior to authorizing hot work:
o All site-specific flammable materials, hazardous processes or other
potential fire hazards that are present or likely to be present in the work
location.
HOT WORK PERMIT REQUIREMENTS
A hot work permit is required whenever:
 Open flame, welding, burning/cutting, or grinding will be conducted within 50
feet of flammable materials or 35 feet of recognized combustible material.
 Existing sprinkler suppression is inoperative or not yet installed.
 Open flame, welding, burning/cutting, or grinding will be conducted within a
confined space; see also confined space safety.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
WCB operations must conform to the following:
 Combustible material. Wherever there are floor openings or cracks in the flooring
that can’t be closed, precautions shall be taken so that no readily combustible
materials on the level below will be exposed to sparks which might drop through
the floor. The same precautions shall be observed with regards to cracks or holes
in walls, open doorways and open or broken windows.
 Fire extinguishers. Suitable fire extinguishing equipment shall be maintained in a
state of readiness for instant use. Such equipment may consist of pails of water,
buckets of sand, hose or portable extinguishers depending upon the nature and
quantity of the combustible material exposed.
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
All cylinders must be labeled, inspected and appropriately marked by the supplier.
Color coding alone is not an acceptable method of labeling. All cylinders must be
tagged as either full, in use, or empty (MT).
 Notify the ASD Safety Specialist at 742-4274, if any question arises concerning
the safety of cylinders.
INSPECTIONS

A daily visual inspection of the cylinder, connections, regulators and hoses for
any form of leaks or damage.
A monthly inspection of cylinders and cylinder storage areas.
Hydrostatic testing and detailed inspection are the responsibility of the gas
supplier.


LABELING
The contents of any CGC must be clearly identified. Gas identification should be stenciled or
stamped on the cylinder or a label. Commercially available three-part tag systems will be used
for cylinder status.
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FALL PROTECTION
The District is required to implement a fall protection program and plan whenever its employees
are working at heights over four feet. The ASD Safety Specialist will write and maintain the
District’s program. The supervisor of the employee(s) at risk will incorporate the appropriate fall
protection safeguards into the job hazard analysis and work safety briefing.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
PURPOSE
This section outlines procedures to protect Anchorage School District employees from the
hazards associated with entering confined spaces found in and around buildings throughout the
District.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY POLICY
Confined space entry by Anchorage School District employees is only authorized under the
following conditions:
 A written procedure addressing the potential hazards of the space is complete and
available to all affected workers.
 All workers must have current training appropriate to their designated task(s).
 No hazardous atmosphere recorded or detected (specific procedures will address when
testing is necessary) unless there is no other acceptable alternative and all employees
involved in the entry have received medical evaluation, respiratory protection training, fit
testing and issue of respirators determined by RM&EP to be appropriate to the hazard.
 No hot work without adequate ventilation to prevent a hazardous atmosphere.
DEFINITIONS
Attendant – Employee responsible for maintaining constant communication with entrants,
preventing unauthorized persons from approaching/entering the confined space, and summoning
rescue personnel. No duties other than Entry Supervisor may be assigned/performed during the
entry.
Confined Space – Any space that meets all of the following conditions:
 Large enough and configured so an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned
work.
 Has limited or restricted entry and exit.
 Is not designed for continuous human occupancy.
Entrant – Individual(s) entering a confined space.
Entry – Breaking the plane of the opening into the confined space with any part of the entrant’s
body.
Entry Supervisor – Employee in charge of the confined space entry and the authority to stop
work.
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Hazardous Atmosphere – An atmosphere that may expose employees to the risk of death,
incapacitation, impair their ability to self-rescue (escape the space without assistance), injury or
acute illness from one or more of the following:
 Flammable gas, vapor or mist at concentrations greater 10% of the Lower Explosive
Limit (LEL).
 Oxygen levels below 19.5% or above 23.5%.
 Atmospheric concentrations of substances greater than the Permissible Exposure Limit
(PEL).
 Any other atmospheric condition that is IDLH.
IDLH – Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health, poses an immediate or delayed threat to life
or that would cause an irreversible adverse health effect, disorientation, or loss of consciousness.
LEL – Lower Explosive Limit, the lowest concentration at which a substance could
ignite/explode.
Non-Permit Required Confined Space – A confined space that does not contain hazards, or
potential hazards, dangerous to life or health (see Permit Required Confined Space for a listing
of the conditions.
PEL – Permissible Exposure Limit, the highest concentration allowed before the substance may
cause death, incapacitation, impairment of ability to self-rescue, injury or acute illness.
Permit Required Confined Space – A confined space that has one or more of the following
characteristics:

Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere;

Contains material that may engulf an entrant;

Is configured in such a way that an entrant could be asphyxiated by inwardly converging
walls or by a floor that slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section; or

Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard.
Examples of permit required confined spaces include, but are not limited to, tanks, sumps, pits,
sewers, compartments with a manhole, and excavations over 4 feet deep.
CONFINED SPACE IDENTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT
The Maintenance Department will identify locations, using Figure 1, as potentially confined
spaces and provide the list to the RM&EP Department.
The RM&EP Department will conduct an assessment of the space to determine the classification
of the space and develop procedures for entry. These procedures must contain the following
information:

Work space identification

A list and a description of the potential hazards.

Determination of permit status using Figure 2

Conditions for entry without a permit (if applicable); to include:
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o Energy isolation (lock-out/tag-out) requirements.
o Hazard controls.
o Entry procedures.
o Manning requirements.
o Rescue requirements.

Conditions for entry with a permit; to include:
o Energy isolation (lock-out/tag-out) requirements.
o Hazard controls.
o Testing requirements.
o Surveillance requirements.
o Entry procedures.
o Ventilation requirements.
o Manning requirements.
o Rescue requirements.
FIGURE 1 CONFINED SPACE DETERMINATION CHART
Is the space large enough so an employee can
bodily enter to perform work?
YES
Does the space have limited or restricted entry
and exit (small hatch, piping within 7 feet of
floor, vertical ladder, etc.)?
NO
NO
STOP
NOT a Confined Space
YES
YES
Is the space designed for continuous human
occupancy?
NO
This is a confined space. Go to Figure 2.
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FIGURE 2 PERMIT REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE DECISION CHART
Does the space contain, or have the potential to
contain, a hazardous atmosphere?
YES
NO
Does the space contain material that may engulf
an entrant?
YES
Permit Required
Confined Space
NO
Is the space configured in a way that an entrant
could be asphyxiated by inwardly converging
walls or by a floor that slopes downward and
tapers to a smaller cross-section??
NO
YES
YES
Does the space contain any other recognized
serious safety or health hazard?
NO
This is not a permit required confined space.
ATMOSPHERIC TESTING PROCEDURES
Atmospheric testing is required for two distinct purposes: evaluation of the hazards of the permit
space and verification that acceptable entry conditions for entry into that space exist.
Evaluation testing. The atmosphere of a confined space will be analyzed using equipment of
sufficient sensitivity and specificity to identify and evaluate any hazardous atmospheres that may
exist or arise, so that appropriate permit entry procedures can be developed and acceptable entry
conditions stipulated for that space. Evaluation and interpretation of these data, and development
of the entry procedure, will be done by, or reviewed by, the RM&EP Department based on
evaluation of all serious hazards.
Verification testing. The atmosphere of a permit space which may contain a hazardous
atmosphere will be tested for residues of all contaminants identified by evaluation testing using
permit specified equipment to determine that residual concentrations at the time of testing and
entry are within the range of acceptable entry conditions. Results of testing (i.e., actual
concentration, etc.) will be recorded on the permit in the space provided adjacent to the
stipulated acceptable entry condition.
Duration of testing. Measurement of values for each atmospheric parameter will be made for at
least the minimum response time of the test instrument specified by the manufacturer.
Testing stratified atmospheres. When monitoring for entries involving a descent into
atmospheres that may be stratified, the atmospheric envelope will be tested a distance of
approximately 4 feet (1.22 m) in the direction of travel and to each side. If a sampling probe is
used, the entrant's rate of progress will be slowed to accommodate the sampling speed and
detector response.
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Order of testing. A multi-sensor meter (O2, CO, H2S and LEL) will be used whenever possible.
When a multi-sensor monitor is not available a test for oxygen is performed first because most
combustible gas meters are oxygen dependent and will not provide reliable readings in an
oxygen deficient atmosphere. Combustible gases are tested for next because the threat of fire or
explosion is both more immediate and more life threatening, in most cases, than exposure to
toxic gases and vapors. If tests for toxic gases and vapors are necessary, they are performed last.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY - GENERAL
Entry into confined spaces will be conducted, in most cases, in accordance with the procedures
established by RM&EP for either a category of spaces sharing the same characteristics and
hazards or by individual space. Spaces that have not been fully evaluated may be entered as long
as the chart in Figure 3 indicates that the entry may be performed without a permit and the
following elements are detailed/addressed on the Confined Space Entry Permit form to document
the conditions that allow an otherwise permit required space to be entered as a non-permit
required space and the work to be performed with a minimum of risk. Every entrant, or their
authorized representative, has the right to observe any monitoring or testing of a confined space
prior to entry. RM&EP must be contacted if there are any questions regarding the entry.
PERMIT ENTRY REQUIRED ELEMENTS
DURATION
Entry permits are only valid for the time required to complete the planned work, 8 hours, the end
of the work shift or whenever an emergency exists; whichever occurs first. The Confined Space
Entry Supervisor will initiate an ASD Confined Space Entry Permit. Every employee involved
in an entry must sign the permit form acknowledging the conditions, risks, air sampling results,
work procedures, rescue and communications procedures, and entry assignments prior to entry.
EVACUATION ALARM
The standard evacuation alarm to be used by the entry team is an air horn.
MANNING
The following duties must be fulfilled for every space entry:
Entry Supervisor (may also have the duties of Attendant or Entrant):
 Identify and evaluate the hazards inherent to the space or that may be introduced to the
space as a result of the work being performed.
 Ensure that the space is isolated from any hazardous or potentially hazardous energy
sources.
 Ventilate or flush the space as necessary to eliminate or control atmospheric hazards.
Purging or inerting atmospheres will not be performed by ASD employees.
 Initiate the Confined Space Entry Permit by:
o Documenting the date and time the permit was issued (paperwork completed).
o Documenting the date and time the permit will expire (workers out of space with
all tools and equipment and the space secured).
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o The location of the space.
o Entering printed names of the all persons with entry responsibilities.
o Description of the equipment to be worked on.
o The specific work to be performed; i.e., repair water pipe, replace heat pipe
insulation, etc.
o Communication procedures to include type of communication equipment (cell
phone, radio, voice, etc.), communications checks, actions in the case of loss of
communication (usually immediate evacuation). A verification of
communications equipment operability will be made at this point.
o Rescue procedures specific to the space and type of entry (horizontal or vertical).
The preferred method of rescue is self-rescue using the tripod system available in
the Maintenance Department. Anchorage Fire Department will respond when
available, however, they must be contacted in advance to verify ability to respond
within 10 minutes of notification. No entry is authorized if a suitable method of
rescue is not available.
o Verification that required equipment is available and on site prior to entry.
 Ensure space entry is isolated (energy) and barricaded/marked off to prevent
unauthorized entry.
 Ensure that every employee involved in the entry is aware of the specific procedures
being used for the entry and signs the permit when they understand their responsibilities.
 Ensure that all personnel, equipment and tools are accounted for before closing out the
permit.
 Hold a post entry discussion with all employees involved in the entry and document any
‘lessons learned’ that will help in future entries to either that specific confined space or
confined spaces in general.
Attendant:
 Acknowledge entry hazards, procedures and air sampling results.
 Be aware of possible behavioral effects of hazard exposure in authorized entrants.
 Prevent unauthorized entry to space.
 Maintain constant communication with entrants.
 Never leave the space while entrants are in the space unless relieved by another trained
Attendant. Relief may only be authorized by the Entry Supervisor and must be
documented on the permit. The new attendant must be briefed and the attendant being
relieved must be confident that the entry operations will remain consistent with the terms
of the permit and that acceptable entry conditions will be maintained.
 Never enter the space unless properly relieved and authorized by the Entry Supervisor to
become an Entrant.
 Record air monitoring results on the entry permit.
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 Maintain an accurate count of authorized entrants.
 Call for immediate evacuation if:
o The evacuation alarm sounds.
o Conditions inside or outside the space are detected or change in any manner that
may expose entrants to new or unforeseen hazards that may threaten life or
health.
o Entrants begin exhibiting signs or symptoms of exposure to a dangerous
atmosphere or situation.
 Summon rescuers as required.
 Perform non-entry rescue using the tripod or rope system as determined by the Entry
Supervisor during entry preparation and detailed on the permit. NOTE: Rescues will
only be performed by persons specifically trained for such duties.
 Perform no other duties other than Entry Supervisor.
Entrant (in addition to the work requiring the entry):
 Acknowledge entry hazards, procedures and air sampling results.
 Verify energy isolation.
 Wear appropriate PPE as identified prior to entry.
 Immediately evacuate if the evacuation alarm sounds, conditions inside the space change
in any manner that may expose entrants to new or unforeseen hazards that may threaten
life or health or entrants begin exhibiting signs or symptoms of exposure to a dangerous
atmosphere or situation.
 Immediately evacuate when notified to do so by any other entrant, the entry supervisor
or the attendant.
 Maintain constant communication with attendant.
Rescuers – Non-entry rescues is the only type of rescue to be performed by ASD employees.
Non-entry rescues will be accomplished using the tripod/winch system, body harnesses and
retrieval lines available from the Maintenance Department. Training in non-entry rescue is
mandatory for all entry personnel as part of their confined space entry training. Non-entry
rescue will be practiced and documented annually.
AIR SAMPLING
Air sampling will be documented per the specific space entry procedures or continuously if no
procedure exists. Air sampling will be accomplished using a monitor with sensors appropriate to
the potential atmospheric hazards that may be encountered during the entry by a trained and
designated entrant. Every entrant, or their authorized representative, has the right to observe
any monitoring or testing of a confined space. Air sampling results will be documented on the
permit every 2 hours and at the end of work prior to the entrants exiting the space by the
attendant.
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ISOLATION AND BARRIERS
Confined spaces will be isolated from any form of hazardous or potentially hazardous energy
prior to entry. The preferred method is ‘lock-out’; ‘tag-out’ is authorized only when there is no
physical means of locking out the energy source. Barriers will be placed to prevent unauthorized
entry to the space. A barrier may be floor signs, saw-horses, construction fencing (plastic) using
temporary posts, or warning tape depending on the potential for human or vehicular traffic in the
area. Barriers will be erected prior to opening the confined space for any reason.
POSTING
The original permit must be retained by the attendant during an entry. A warning sign “Confined
Space Entry in Progress”, or similar, will be posted at the entry to the space. The original permit
will be sent to RM&EP upon completion of the entry with a copy retained for the project file (if
applicable) and a copy sent to the Director of Maintenance.
PROGRAM REVIEW
INITIAL
All affected employees will review this program prior to implementation and their review will be
documented by the Director of Maintenance.
ANNUAL/FOR CAUSE
This program will be reviewed annually or whenever an incident occurs during an entry;
whichever occurs first. The review will be conducted by the Safety Specialist and
representatives of the Maintenance Department. Routine reviews will be documented by
RM&EP and record discussion points, recommendations and decisions and be retained on file for
up to two (2) years (current review and the previous review on file at any time). Reviews as a
result of an incident will be filed in the review file with a copy included in the incident report
file.
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Figure 3 Permit Required Confined Space Decision Flow Chart
NO
Does the facility contain Confined Spaces as defined by OSHA (Figure 1)?
YES
Does the facility contain Permit Required Confined Spaces as defined by OSHA (Figure 2)?
NO
STOP Consult other applicable
OSHA standards.
YES
Document space and inform employees
Will permit spaces be entered by ASD or Contractor employees?
STOP Prevent unauthorized entry.
Perform task(s) from outside the space.
NO
YES
Will contractors enter?
Verify contractor confined space entry program.
Inform contractor of known hazards.
YES
NO
Will any ASD employees enter the space?
STOP Prevent
unauthorized entry.
NO
YES
Will both contractor and ASD
employees enter the space?
NO
YES
Coordinate entry operations. Prevent
unauthorized entry.
Does space have known or potential hazards
STOP1 Not a permit required confined space.
Consult other OSHA standards.
NO
NO
Can hazards be eliminated?
STOP1 Contact Risk Management to document
temporary or permanent reclassification of space.
YES
NO
Can the space be maintained in a condition safe to
enter by continuous forced air ventilation only?
Space may be entered with only
continuous air monitoring.
YES
NO
Prepare for entry with permit procedures.
Verify acceptable entry conditions (Test results recorded, space isolated,
rescuers/means to summon available, entrants properly equipped, etc.)?
NO
Permit not valid until conditions
meet permit specifications.
YES
Permit issued by authorizing signature. Acceptable
entry conditions maintained throughout entry.
NO
YES
Entry task(s) completed. Permit returned and canceled.
Emergency Exists (prohibited condition)! Entrants
evacuated and entry aborts. (Call rescuers if needed).
Permit is void. Reevaluate program to correct/prevent
prohibited condition. Occurrence of emergency
(usually) is proof of deficient program. No re-entry
until program (and permit) is emended. (May require a
new program.)
Audit permit program and permit based on evaluation of entry by entrants,
attendants, testers, preparers, etc.
1
Spaces may have to be evacuated and re-evaluated if hazards arise during entry.
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TRAINING
RM&EP will develop and provide training programs for the following tasks/workers. Entrant,
Supervisor and Attendant training will include self-rescue techniques and equipment, use of air
sampling equipment and techniques, PPE, recordkeeping, communication and energy isolation.
 Confined Space Awareness – Basic level training on confined space entry and
determining the classification of a confined space. Required training for all employees
with a potential for entering or working near an open confined space.
 Confined Space Attendant – Training on the specific duties and responsibilities of a
confined space attendant. Required training for all employees with a potential to be
designated as an attendant or entry supervisor.
 Confined Space Entrant – Training on the specific duties and responsibilities of a
confined space entrant. Required training for all employees with a potential for working
as an entrant or entry supervisor.
 Confined Space Entry Supervisor – Training on the specific duties and responsibilities of
a confined space entry supervisor. Required training for all employees with a potential
for working as an entry supervisor.
CONTRACTORS
Contractors entering into any ASD identified confined space must:
 Certify that their confined space entry program meets or exceeds the requirements of 29
CFR 1910.146.
 Be provided with a list of the known existing and potential hazards associated with the
space and any procedures for entry developed by ASD.
 Acknowledge receipt of the hazards and procedures (if applicable) in writing.
 Provide a written report of any incident or near miss occurring during or as a result of the
entry to the RM&EP Department.
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ENERGY ISOLATION (Lock-Out/Tag-Out)
PURPOSE/SCOPE
This Program establishes the minimum requirements for protecting ASD personnel from injury
due to the unexpected release of energy during equipment maintenance and startup. Only
authorized maintenance personnel assigned by the Director of Maintenance or Zone Supervisor
and contractor personnel will perform lock-out.
Every worker shall have the right to exclusive control over the energy isolation associated with
their work. This right allows every worker to do the following each shift:
1. Physically verify each Energy Isolation Device.
2. Physically verify “Zero Energy State.”
3. Physically apply their Personal Locks/Tags.
APPLICABILITY
This program applies to all energy isolation conducted on ASD properties. Contractors shall have
a program meeting or exceeding this program or use this program.
1. This program applies to the following:
A. Equipment that must be serviced or maintained during normal operations, AND
B. When a worker is required to do one of the following:
1) Remove or bypass a guard or other safety device, OR
2) Place their body in an area around the equipment where an accidental release of
energy could result in personal injury (“Point of Operation”)
2. This Program DOES NOT apply to the following:
A. Minor tool changes/adjustments and other minor services activities that meet all 3 of the
following criteria.
1) It is essential that the equipment continue to operate, AND
2) The work is routine, repetitive, and part of the normal operation with a documented
procedure, AND
3) Alternate protection methods, other than energy isolation, are used. Examples:
machine guards, electrical “hot sticks,” a local control switch under the exclusive
control of the worker.
Note: The RM&EP Department must concur and document this exemption.
B. Work on corded or plugged equipment, PROVIDED:
1) Unplugging the equipment results in complete isolation of the equipment from all
energy sources, AND
2) The plug is under the exclusive control of the worker
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ENFORCEMENT
The potential consequences of violating this procedure are the severe injury or death of a worker
and therefore violations will result in the following progressive discipline. All incidents
involving the hospitalization or death of any individual will be investigated for root cause
factors.
First violations, not resulting in severe injury or death, will result in a written reprimand placed
in the employee’s permanent record and reflected in the employee’s annual evaluation.
Second violations, not resulting in hospitalization or death, will result in suspension without pay
for three (3) days with a record included in the employee’s permanent record and annual
evaluation.
Third violations or investigation results showing intention violation as a root cause of a
hospitalization or death will result in termination.
TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
ASD employees will not perform work around any energy source such as electrical, mechanical,
hydraulic, pneumatic, or stored energy such as springs, steam, pressurized air or liquids, until
they have received proper training in:





Recognizing hazardous energy
Type and magnitude of workplace energy
Methods of controlling energy
Means of verifying effective energy control
Purpose of the procedures used.
LOCKS AND TAGS
All individually assigned personal locks and tags shall be removed ONLY by the person who
installed them.
This program recognizes the following locks and tags:
1. Personal Lock - A lock, or set of locks, with a single, unique key. These locks shall meet
the following requirements:
A. Be used exclusively for energy isolation and not for any other purpose.
B. Be standardized, colored red and clearly labeled or tagged with the employee’s name and
contact number.
C. Personal Locks shall be issued to an individual employee and the key shall be under the
control of that individual.
2. Device Lock – Uniquely keyed lock(s) where the key is under the exclusive control of the
lockbox. This lock is applied directly to the energy isolation device when a lockbox Lockout
technique is being used. Device locks that are assigned for use with a lockbox shall have a
“Danger” tag attached.
3. Control Lock - These are keyed-alike locks, any color other than red, that are used to
protect the equipment, and are not to be used for personal protection. Control locks are
generally the first lock on a lockbox and the last lock off.
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4. “Danger” Tag – A tag used to identify hazards that could present a threat of death or
serious injury to personnel. These tags shall be attached to all energy isolation devices.
These tags shall meet the following requirements:
A. Be standardized with the same style, label, print, and format. This includes having an
Energy Isolation box printed on the tag.
B. Be able to withstand the environmental conditions where it is applied and still be legible.
C. Be attached with a non-reusable, self-locking device, such as a nylon cable tie, that is
able to withstand a minimum 50 lb. force without breaking.
D. Be designed with a removable tag stub.
E. Be stamped with a unique number both on the tag and on the tag stub.
F. Be clearly and completely filled out with employee’s name/position and contact number.
5. Lockout is always required over tagout; therefore:
A. All energy isolation devices that are lockable MUST be locked and tagged.
B. If an energy isolation device CANNOT be locked, then a “Danger” tag shall be attached
at the same location as a lock would have been installed. Alternative safety measures to
provide full employee protection shall be undertaken; such as the removal of an isolating
circuit element, blocking of a controlling switch, opening of an extra disconnecting
device, or the removal of a valve handle to reduce the likelihood of inadvertent
energization.
6. If an energy isolation device is being used for multiple energy isolations, then the device
shall have a separate lock and tag for each energy isolation.
7. If the worker who installed a personal lock or tag is not available to remove it, or when a
worker who signed in on the job and then fails to sign out is not available, then the following
procedure shall be followed by the worker’s immediate supervisor:
A. Verify that the worker is not in the work area.
B. Ensure the safety and integrity of the equipment to be re-energized before removing the
lock or tag.
C. Authorize the physical removal of the personal lock (or the signing out on the worker
log) by signing the worker log next to the worker’s name.
D. Make all reasonable efforts to contact the worker to inform them that their personal lock
has been removed or that they failed to sign out.
E. Ensure that the worker is informed that his/her personal lock has been removed BEFORE
the worker returns to the work area.
LOCKOUT TECHNIQUES
Note: For the purpose of this Program, the term “AE” shall be used to describe the Authorized
Employee in charge of the energy isolation. This could be a maintenance, facilities or contract
employee.
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LOCKBOX TECHNIQUE
1. The AE locks all lockable energy isolation devices with a Device Lock. This Device Lock is
the first one on an energy isolation device, the last one off and the last item signed off the
energy isolation list.
2. The AE tags all energy devices, including both lockable and non-lockable devices, with a
“Danger” Tag.
3. The AE places inside the lockbox:
A. The unique key(s) for the Device Lock(s) that are attached to the energy isolation
devices.
B. If tags are used in lieu of locks because the device will not accept a lock, then the stubs
are placed in the lockbox or Master Card envelope.
4. The AE “Locks” the lockbox at the hasp with their Control Lock.
5. All workers or the Designated Worker attach their personal locks on the lockbox at the
beginning of the shift, remove them at the end of the shift, and sign in and out of the Worker
Log. If a Worker is not working under a Designated Worker’s lock, then the worker will
attach their Personal Lock to the lockbox.
6. When the work is completed, all workers or the Designated Worker remove(s) their Personal
Locks from the lockbox, and then the AE “unlocks” the lockbox and uses the unique key(s)
and tag stubs to remove all the Device Locks from the energy isolation devices.
LOCK-OUT/TAG-OUT TECHNIQUE
The Lock-out/Tag-out Technique can be used without a written procedure for situations where
the following conditions are met:
1. The work is completed within a single shift.
2. The machine or equipment has no potential for stored or residual energy or re-accumulation
of stored energy after shut down which could endanger employees.
3. The machine or equipment has a single energy source which can be readily identified and
isolated.
4. The isolation and locking out of that energy source will completely de-energize and
deactivate the machine or equipment.
5. The machine or equipment is isolated from that energy source and locked out during
servicing or maintenance.
6. A single lockout device will achieve a lockout condition.
7. The lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the
servicing or maintenance.
8. The servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other employees.
9. ASD, in utilizing this exception, has had no accidents involving the unexpected activation or
re-energization of the machine or equipment during servicing or maintenance.
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Maintenance can apply a Control Lock to protect equipment if they choose to do so.
NOTE: In the above cases, the worker shall attach their individually assigned Personal Lock and
tag directly on the energy isolation device. Example: Motor PMs.
ENERGY ISOLATION PROCEDURES
1. Written energy isolation procedures are required for all energy isolations involving more than
one energy isolation device. It is recommended that P&ID’s or the appropriate engineering
documentation be utilized when developing energy isolation procedures.
2. These energy isolation procedures shall be specific to each piece of equipment being serviced
or maintained.
3. Specific procedures shall include procedural steps unique to the equipment being isolated,
such as:
A. Shutting down the equipment
B. Isolating the equipment
C. Locking out the equipment
D. Releasing any stored energy in the equipment
E. Verifying “Zero Energy State”
F. Returning the equipment back to service
4. Energy isolation procedures or changes to energy isolation procedures shall be approved by
First-Line Supervision or Designee.
5. Temporary Re-energize Procedures (if applicable).
A. These procedures are required if a part of the energy-isolated equipment must be reenergized to ensure proper servicing or maintenance.
B. These procedures shall include the following:
1) Notification of all affected employees that part of the equipment is being temporarily
removed from energy isolation.
2) Removal of all tools and materials.
3) Removal of any Personal Locks and “Danger” tags.
4) Energizing of the equipment.
5) De-energizing the equipment once proper servicing or maintenance is completed.
6) Reapplication of the Energy Isolation/Safe Out Procedure.
7) Notification of all affected employees that the equipment is being returned to energy
isolation.
6. Documents Used
A. Energy Isolation List (EIL; either on Master Card or separate sheet)
B. Worker Log (either on Master Card or separate sheet)
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C. Energy Isolation/Safe-Out Procedures as required.
All documents must be completely filled out.
ENERGY ISOLATION METHODS
The following isolation methods for electrical and pressure shall be considered, in the order
given.
ELECTRICAL ENERGY SOURCES
1. On electrical equipment or circuits with the potential of 50 volts or higher, the electrical
supply will be turned off and locked out in accordance with the following:
A. A qualified/authorized employee will turn off the power to the equipment that’s being
worked on by opening the circuit breaker. The equipment shall be tested to insure that it
is de-energized by trying the start/stop switch.
B. If the equipment cannot be tested by the use of a start/stop switch or if the work involves
electrical components of the equipment (such as motor leads), then a qualified electrician
will be required to test the load side of the circuit breaker to insure that the equipment is
de-energized.
C. Once the equipment has been tested and found to be de-energized, the
qualified/authorized employee shall lock and tag the equipment per the energy isolation
program and complete the energy isolation list.
D. Electrical equipment rated above 480 volts shall be isolated by a qualified and authorized
person or a qualified electrician during safe outs.
2. When the tag-out option is used for electrical isolation such as a circuit breaker that cannot
be locked out, the qualified electrician shall isolate the energy source by:
A. Removal of an isolating circuit element, or
B. Racking out a breaker.
3. The following Wiring Disconnect Procedure may be used when it is not possible to
physically lock out an electrical isolating device:
A. The electrician disconnecting the power source will test the circuit to assure that it is deenergized. The wires will be disconnected, properly isolated and tagged so that they do
not constitute a hazard.
B. The electrician shall tag the disconnect switch with a “Danger” tag and log it into the
Energy Isolation List.
C. Under no circumstances will the wiring be reconnected if there is another person’s tag in
place. Each person must remove their own tag just as they would remove their own lock,
as specified under control of locks/tags and keys.
Note: Treat all disconnected neutral conductors, ground conductors, and bonding jumpers as
energized.
Pushbuttons, selector switches, and other control circuit type devices that do not directly control
the electricity shall not be used as energy isolation devices.
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PRESSURE - HYDRAULIC, PNEUMATIC
4. Blinding - Install full-rated blind.
5. Disconnection/Misalign - This involves physically removing part of the equipment, or
misaligning piping. “Danger” tags shall then be attached as close to the energy source as
possible and listed on the Energy Isolation List.
6. Double Block and Bleed - This involves three valves: two block valves and a bleed valve in
between. For Energy Isolation purposes, all three valves shall be tagged with a “Danger” tag
and listed on the Energy Isolation list. In addition, the two block valves shall be locked.
7. Single Block - This involves closing one block valve, then applying locks and tags. Note,
this option requires the prior approval of the Zone Supervisor or Maintenance Director and,
where applicable, the contractor’s first-line supervisor (not authorized for confined space
entry).
Note: Control valves shall not be used for energy isolation. Remote operated valves, designed
for positive pressure containment, can be used provided they are disconnected from all energy
sources and manually closed.
OTHER ENERGY/HAZARD SOURCES
1. Energy of motion – is present in all moving objects. Examples: Moving vehicles, running
machinery, loads swinging or moving, cutting actions, etc., are all examples of energy of
motion hazards.
2. Chemical energy – is released during contact with chemicals. Examples: Chemicals in
piping, paints and thinners, and cleaners. Our hazard communication program addresses
these chemicals and MSDS sheets are provided for review.
3. Radiation energy – radiation energy emanates from radioactive sources. Examples:
exposure to ionizing radiation (radioactive materials) used for X-Ray operations, and nonionizing radiation (light, radio waves, etc.) that can be found in welding light, lasers, and
microwaves.
4. Electrical energy – electrical energy is a flow of an electrical charge through a conductor.
Examples: power lines, heat trace, lighting systems, static electricity, cords and cables.
5. Gravity – Gravity is a force on elevated bodies such as rig traveling equipment, materials
suspended from a crane, or people in elevated positions.
6. Heat/Cold – Examples: Hot process piping, steam systems, hot air heaters, heat trace,
welding, open flame, and heat recovery systems are common around our work area.
7. Pressure – Pressure, energy stored in circulating, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems.
Examples: Pumping operations, compressed air, gas pressure, pressure testing, hydraulics.
Pressure can be active, as found in the circulating system with oil or drilling mud moving
through the piping, or it can be stored in accumulators and hydraulic systems and hoses. We
may also find pressure in threaded connections when we take them apart or formation
pressure stored in downhole tools. Knowing the system and the potential for pressure release
is critical for safe operations. Noise is measured as sound pressure so we include noise under
pressure to keep things simple.
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MANAGE THE ABOVE ENERGY/HAZARD SOURCE(S) BY:
 Eliminate the energy source(s) Examples: Safe outs; lock out / tag out, drain systems,
purge/ventilate, neutralize, substitute, blinds, and cold cutting etc.
 Control the energy source(s) and/or Examples: shoring, tag lines, blocks, cribbing,
wheel chocks, double block and bleed, whip checks, and mechanical stops and
disconnection etc.
 Protect against contact with the energy source(s). Examples: Barricades, fall protection,
exclusion zones, belt guards, insulation, warning signs, monitor exposure, and PPE etc.
EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES
It is the responsibility of every employee to ensure his or her own safety by following all safety
procedures.
ZONE SUPERVISOR:
Responsible for the proper preparation of personnel and equipment for maintenance and ensuring
the coordinated energy isolation procedure is in place and properly implemented. The
Supervisor shall conduct periodic inspections to ensure the Energy Isolation Program is being
followed.
BEFORE WORK BEGINS
1. Authorized Employee:
A. Prepare or verify written energy isolation procedures.
B. Notify all affected employees that the equipment will be shutdown and energy isolated.
C. Shut down the equipment.
D. Isolate the equipment from all energy sources.
E. Apply Device Lock(s), “Danger” tag(s) as described in the Lockout Technique section.
F. Verify “Zero Energy State” for each energy source by attempting to re-energize the
equipment from every location.
G. Record all information on the Energy Isolation List or Master Card.
H. Complete the requirements for using a Lockbox if one is used, per the Lockout
Technique section.
I. AE applies control lock to lockbox.
J. If AE will be a Worker, their Personal Lock must also be applied to the lockbox.
K. Verify that all Workers and/or Designated Workers have completed the Worker Log and
Have:
1) Been notified of their rights to verify the energy isolation.
2) Signed in (Initials required) on the Worker Log or Master Card.
3) Installed a Personal Lock on the lockbox.
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2. Worker:
A. Physically verify the energy isolation per the Energy Isolation List or Master Card with
the AE, if they so choose.
B. Attach Personal Lock(s) or tags.
C. Completes Worker Log or Master Card.
3. Designated Worker:
A. Physically verifies the energy isolation.
B. Attaches Personal Lock(s) or tags.
C. Completes Worker Log or Master Card.
D. Ensures that each Worker in the group is notified of their right to verify the energy
isolation.
E. Ensures that each Worker in the group has personally signed in on the Worker Log or
Master Card.
Note: The Designated Worker CANNOT complete the Worker Log or Master Card for the
Worker. Only the Worker can sign it.
F. Worker cannot assume they can work under the Designated Worker’s Personal Lock.
There must be a mutual agreement between the Worker and the Designated Worker and
the Designated Worker must initial next to the Worker’s name on the Worker Log or
Master Card.
G. Signs (Initials) their name on the Worker Log or Master Card next to each Worker’s
name in their group.
SHIFT OR CREW CHANGES
LOCKBOX
In all cases where the Worker/Designated Worker (Authorized Employee) is leaving they shall
remove their personal lock. If the equipment is not safe to start they may apply a control lock to
protect the equipment. The control lock does not provide personal protection.
1. Outgoing AE communicates to the Incoming AE:
A. The types and locations of energy isolation devices (Energy Isolation List or Master
Card);
B. The hazards involved if these devices are removed;
C. Reviews the Worker Log or Master Card;
D. Removes their personal lock from the lockbox, if the lock has been attached to the
lockbox, and signs out on the Worker Log or Master Card; and,
E. Leaves the Control Lock in place on the lockbox.
2. Incoming AE:
A. Reviews the Energy Isolation List/Master Card
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B. Reviews the Worker Log/Master Card
C. If they are going to perform servicing or maintenance under the Energy Isolation
Program, applies their personal lock and signs in on the Worker Log or Master Card.
D. Leaves the Control Lock in place on the lockbox.
3. Outgoing Designated Worker:
The Designated Worker assumes full responsibility for the safety of the Workers in their
group. For this reason, the Designated Worker shall have control over who is in their group.
A. Ensures that each outgoing Worker in their group completes the appropriate blocks on the
Worker Log or Master Card, signing initials next to each Worker’s name.
B. Removes their personal lock and signs out on the Worker Log or Master Card.
C. Reviews the Energy Isolation List/Master Card with the oncoming Designated Worker.
D. If the equipment is not safe to put back in service and there is not an oncoming
Designated Worker, the Designated Worker may apply a Control Lock to the lockbox.
4. Incoming Designated Worker:
A. Review the Energy Isolation List or Master Card;
B. Physically verify the energy isolation;
C. Attach personal locks or tags;
D. Completes the appropriate blocks on the Worker Log or Master Card;
E. Ensures that each Worker in their group is notified of the Worker’s right to verify energy
isolation and apply personal locks or tags if the Worker wishes to do so; and
F. Ensures that each Worker in their group completes the appropriate block on the Worker
Log or Master Card, signing initials by each Worker’s name.
5. Outgoing Worker communicates to the incoming Worker:
A. The types and locations of energy isolation devices; and,
B. The hazards involved if these devices are removed.
C. Signs out on the Worker Log or Master Card.
D. Removes their personal locks and/or tags if they have been attached.
E. If the equipment is not safe to put back into service and there is not an oncoming Worker,
the Worker may apply a control lock to the lockbox.
6. Incoming Worker:
A. Verifies isolations with the AE if they so choose.
B. Installs personal locks and/or tags, if not working under a Designated Worker.
C. Signs in on the Worker Log or Master Card. Obtains approval from the Designated
Worker to work under the Designated Worker’s Personal Lock.
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WHEN WORK IS COMPLETE:
1. Worker or Designated Worker:
A. Notifies Unit AE that work is completed.
B. Verifies that all personnel in their group have signed out by signing initials next to each
Worker’s name on the Worker Log or Master Card.
C. Signs out on the Worker Log or Master Card.
D. Removes personal locks and/or tags.
2. AE:
A. Verifies that all Worker locking devices and/or tags have been removed and all personnel
have signed out of the Worker Log or Master Card.
B. Removes device locks and/or tags.
C. Dates and initials Energy Isolation List or Master Card.
D. Ensures personnel and equipment are clear and it is safe to place the equipment in
service.
E. Removes locks, matches tag stubs to tags prior to reenergizing.
F. Returns equipment to service.
G. Ensures the Master Card, Energy Isolation List and the Worker Log are filed per the
facility’s administrative requirements.
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LOCK-OUT/TAG-OUT REQUIREMENTS FUNCTIONAL FLOW DIAGRAM
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CONDUCT MACHINE/PROCESS HAZARD ANALYSIS
DEVELOP DOCUMENTED LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURE
DEVELOP TRAINING PROGRAM
PROVIDE TRAINING TO
AFFECTED EMPLOYEES
PROVIDE DETAILED TRAINING
TO AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEES
PROVIDE TRAINING TO ALL
OTHER EMPLOYEES
ASSIGN MAINT./SERVICE TASK TO AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEES
CONSULT COMPANY PROCEDURES DOCUMENT
NOTIFY AFFECTED EMPLOYEE(S) OF MAINT./SERVICE OPERATIONS
IDENTIFY ENERGY ISOLATING DEVICES
IDENTIFY AND OBTAIN LOCKOUT/TAGOUT DEVICES
LOCKOUT
TAGOUT
BOTH
DEACTIVATE AND LOCKOUT
NO
DEACTIVATE AND TAGOUT
VERIFY HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROLLED
YES
PERFORM TASK
REPLACE GUARDS AND RETRIEVE TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
VERIFY PERSONNEL CLEAR AND ACCOUNTED FOR
REMOVE LOCKOUT/TAGOUT DEVICES
NOTIFY AFFECTED EMPLOYEES
RESTORE POWER AND TEST EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT FUNCTIONS NORMALLY
EQUIPMENT PROBLEMS IDENTIFIED
RETURN CUSTODY OF EQUIPMENT TO AFFECTED EMPLOYEE(S)
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LEAD PAINT
All schools built before 1978 are subject to special lead prevention precautions. These
precautions are subject to the following exceptions:
1. Building section remodeled after 1978.
2. Work area not a window or door and less than 6 square feet (interior) or 20 square feet
(exterior).
No use of heat guns, open-flame burning, or use of power tools without HEPA filters.
Projects or repairs that do not meet the above exceptions must:
1. Have areas tested by a certified lead-based paint inspector or risk assessor or be assumed
to contain lead.
2. Provide the EPA “Renovate Right” pamphlet distributed to all occupants and parents of
all children occupying the school prior to beginning work.
3. Have a “Certified Renovator” supervising work.
4. Use EPA approved work practices.
5. Conduct post-job testing to verify adequacy of clean up.
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FORMS
Safety Forms Are Available on the District Connection
In the Forms and Publications Library in the RM&EP Category.
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