Correctional Service of Canada –15

Correctional Service of Canada  –15
Correctional Service of
Canada
2014–15
Departmental Performance Report
The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
Preparedness
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
represented by the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, 2015
Catalogue No. PS81-5E-PDF
ISSN 2368-3171
This document is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
website at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca
This document is available in alternative formats upon request
ii
Table of Contents
Minister’s Message .................................................................................1
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview ........................................3
Organizational Profile .............................................................................3
Organizational Context ...........................................................................4
Actual Expenditures ............................................................................. 15
Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework............ 17
Organizational Spending Trend .............................................................. 18
Estimates by Vote ............................................................................... 19
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome ............................ 21
Strategic Outcome ............................................................................... 21
Program 1.0: Custody .......................................................................... 21
Sub-Program 1.1: Institutional Management and Support......................... 23
Sub-Program 1.2: Institutional Security ................................................. 25
Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1: Intelligence and Supervision ............................. 27
Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2: Drug Interdiction ............................................. 29
Sub Program 1.3: Institutional Health Services ....................................... 31
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1: Public Health Services ...................................... 32
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2: Clinical Health Services..................................... 34
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3: Mental Health Services ..................................... 35
Sub Program 1.4: Institutional Services ................................................. 37
Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.1: Food Services .................................................. 38
Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.2: Accommodation Services .................................. 40
Program 2.0: Correctional Interventions ................................................. 41
Sub Program 2.1: Offender Case Management ........................................ 44
Sub-Program 2.2: Community Engagement ............................................ 47
Sub-Program 2.3: Spiritual Services ...................................................... 49
Sub-Program 2.4: Correctional Reintegration Program ............................. 51
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.1: Violence Prevention Program ............................. 53
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.2: Substance Abuse Program ................................ 54
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.3: Family Violence Program................................... 56
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.4: Sex Offender Program ...................................... 57
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.5: Maintenance Program ....................................... 58
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.6: Social Program ................................................ 60
Sub-Program 2.5: Offender Education .................................................... 61
Sub-Program 2.6: CORCAN Employment and Employability ...................... 64
Program 3.0: Community Supervision .................................................... 66
Sub-Program 3.1: Community Management and Security ......................... 68
Sub-Program 3.2: Community-based Residential Facilities ........................ 70
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1: Community Residential Facilities ........................ 72
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.2: Community Correctional Centres........................ 74
Sub-Program 3.3: Community Health Services ........................................ 76
Program 4.0: Internal Services ............................................................. 77
Section III: Supplementary Information ................................................. 81
Consolidated Financial Statements Highlights .......................................... 81
Consolidated Financial Statements ......................................................... 82
Supplementary Information Tables ........................................................ 84
Tax Expenditures and Evaluations.......................................................... 84
Section IV: Organizational Contact Information ....................................... 85
Appendix: Definitions ........................................................................... 87
Endnotes ............................................................................................ 90
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Minister’s Message
As Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency
preparedness, it is my responsibility to present to
Parliament the Departmental Performance Report (DPR)
for 2014-15 as prepared by the Correctional Service of
Canada (CSC). This report accounts for the performance of
this agency during the fiscal year against the plans,
priorities and expected results set out in CSC’s prior
Report on Plans and Priorities (RPPs).
Sincerely,
The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
Organizational Profile
Appropriate Minister:
Institutional Head: Don Head
Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Enabling Instrument(s): Corrections and Conditional Release Acti and Corrections and
Conditional Release Regulationsii
Year of Commencement: 1979
Other: Correctional Service of Canada’s Missioniii
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Organizational Context
Raison d’être
The purpose of the federal correctional system, as defined in law, is to contribute to the
maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society by carrying out sentences imposed by courts
through the safe and humane custody and supervision of offenders, and by assisting the
rehabilitation of offenders and their reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens
through the provision of programs in penitentiaries and in the community (Corrections and
Conditional Release Act, s.3).
Mission
The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), as part of the criminal justice system and respecting
the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to
become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.
Responsibilities
CSC’s responsibilities are derived from the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the
Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations. The Act and Regulations direct CSC to be
responsible for the care, custody and supervision of offenders; the provision of interventions; the
preparation of offenders for release; the supervision of offenders on conditional release,
legislated release, as well as those subject to long-term supervision orders; and public education
about the operations of CSC. The Act also requires CSC to develop, implement and monitor
correctional policies, programs and practices that respect gender, ethnic, cultural and linguistic
differences and are responsive to the specific needs of women, men, Aboriginal peoples and
other groups. As well, it requires that CSC provide essential health care services and reasonable
access to non-essential mental health care that will contribute to inmates’ rehabilitation and
successful reintegration into the community. The Act mandates CSC to provide services to
victims of crime, such as information sharing and awareness building to support victims.
During the reporting year, CSC provided services across the country in small and large urban
centres, as well as in remote northern Inuit communities. On a typical day during 2014–15, CSC
was responsible for 22,958 offenders, 15,043 of whom were in federal custody (including
temporary detainees1) and 7,915 who were supervised in the community. CSC is responsible for
the management of 43 institutions (comprised of six maximum security, nine medium security,
five minimum security, 12 multilevel security, and 11 clustered institutions), 92 parole offices
and sub-parole offices, and 15 community correctional centres. CSC also manages four healing
1
4
Temporary detainees are held in custody in cases of suspension of a conditional release.
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
lodges (included in the 43 institutions) and works in partnership with Aboriginal communities to
support the reintegration of Aboriginal offenders back into the community.
Of the approximately 18,000 employees2 who compose CSC’s workforce, about 85 percent work
in institutions or in communities. About 42 percent of CSC employees are in the Correctional
Officer category and 14 percent are the Parole and Program Officers. CSC also employs nurses,
psychologists, trades people, human resources advisors, financial advisors and others. During the
reporting year, 47.6 percent of CSC staff were women, 9.1 percent were from visible minority
groups, 5.1 percent were persons with disabilities and 9.4 percent were Aboriginal peoples.
International
CSC hosted two international events in 2014. In September, the 34th Asian Pacific Conference of
Correctional Administrators was held in Victoria, B.C. The high level forum allowed more than
20 correctional jurisdictions to exchange best practices and discuss cooperation opportunities. In
December, with support from Defence Research and Development Canada, CSC held an
International Roundtable and Mini-Symposium on the Management of Radicalized Offenders,
bringing together countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France, to discuss
the emergence of correctional challenges in new areas.
CSC also advanced cooperative relationships with new and existing partners by coordinating
official visits to CSC and providing subject-matter expertise at international events led by the
Inter-American Development Bank, the Justice Education Society, and the United Nations.
Canada has assumed a two-year role as Chair of the Group of Friends of Corrections in
Peacekeeping. With this role, CSC has taken the lead as subject matter expert for this Member
State-driven initiative providing expert advice, guidance and support on correctional issues to the
United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations. CSC contributed to Prison Incident
Management Training in Jordan, and United Nations Prison and Probation Officer Predeployment Training in Rwanda.
2
In 2014–15, this population included indeterminate staff and staff with terms greater than three months
substantive employment; and employee status of active and paid leave. Source: HRMS as of March 31st, 2015
CSC's Overall Workforce Statistical Profile.
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in
communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety
1.0 Program: Custody
1.1 Sub-Program: Institutional Management and Support
1.2 Sub-Program: Institutional Security
1.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Intelligence and Supervision
1.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Drug Interdiction
1.3 Sub-Program: Institutional Health Services
1.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Public Health Services
1.3.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Clinical Health Services
1.3.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Mental Health Services
1.4. Sub-Program: Institutional Services
1.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Food Services
1.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Accommodation Services
2.0 Program: Correctional Interventions
2.1 Sub-Program: Offender Case Management
2.2 Sub-Program: Community Engagement
2.3 Sub-Program: Spiritual Services
2.4 Sub-Program: Correctional Reintegration Program
2.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Violence Prevention Program
2.4.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Substance Abuse Program
2.4.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Family Violence Prevention Program
2.4.4 Sub-Sub-Program: Sex Offender Program
2.4.5 Sub-Sub-Program: Maintenance Program
2.4.6 Sub-Sub-Program: Social Program
2.5 Sub-Program: Offender Education
2.6 Sub-Program: CSC Employment and Employability
3.0 Program: Community Supervision
3.1 Sub-Program: Community Management and Security
3.2 Sub-Program: Community-Based Residential Facilities
3.2.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Community Residential Facilities
3.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Community Correctional Centres
3.3 Sub-Program: Community Health Services
4.0 Internal Services
6
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)
CSC’s role in contributing to a safe and secure Canada is reflected in the organization’s single
Strategic Outcome “The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in
communities and institutions, contribute to public safety”. Three broad programs are aligned to
support this Strategic Outcome.

Under “Custody,” offenders are incarcerated in institutions in accordance with the terms
of their sentences.

Under “Correctional Interventions,” offenders are provided with interventions to help
them change the behaviours that contributed to their criminal activity so they become
law-abiding citizens.

Under “Community Supervision,”3 offenders who become eligible and are granted
conditional release are transferred to the community where they are supervised, including
those on long-term supervision resulting from a court-imposed order at sentencing
A fourth component of the PAA, “Internal Services,” encompasses all activities and resources
that support the organization’s needs, requirements, and corporate obligations.
3
Offenders are released according to various provisions of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act. Some
offenders are automatically released by law, whereas others are released as a result of the decision-making
authority of the Parole Board of Canada, and, in some cases, as a result of the decision-making authority of CSC
(e.g., some types of temporary absence).
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Organizational Priorities
Priority
Type4
Safe transition to and management
Ongoing
of eligible offenders in the
community
Programs

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
Summary of Progress
During the reporting year, CSC worked closely with community partners to strengthen its capacity to ensure the safe
transition of offenders into the community. CSC conducted a comprehensive assessment for each offender entering
its institutions, developed correctional plans based on risk and needs assessments, provided correctional programs to
reduce criminal behaviour and address education and employment needs, developed release plans, presented cases to
the Parole Board of Canada, established linkages with the community to assist offenders in finding support and
employment, and provided continuum of care for offenders, as well as supervision in the community.
In 2014–15, CSC’s continued implementation of the Integrated Correctional Program Model,5 resulted in greater
efficiencies in the delivery of essential correctional interventions. CSC also continued to implement the Federal
Community Corrections Strategy6 that increased capacity for community corrections and thus enhanced the safe
management of eligible offenders in the community.
Priority
Type
Safety and security of staff and
offenders in our institutions and in Ongoing
the community
Programs

Custody

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
Summary of Progress
CSC continued to address safety and security challenges inside institutions by enhancing the capacity of preventive
security and intelligence to respond to and prevent threats and risks that exist in correctional facilities and
communities. In 2014–15, CSC implemented Operational Intelligence Reports (OIR) in all Regions. The OIR is a
comprehensive security intelligence report designed to disseminate and share site-specific information and
intelligence across CSC. As a result of the OIR, National Headquarters, Regional Headquarters and operational units
were kept abreast of current and potential threats, enabling the development of robust action plans to ensure the
safety and security of institutions and community sites.
The Population Management Approach adopted by CSC also contributed to the safety and security of staff and
8
4
Type is defined as follows: previously committed to–committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the
subject year of the report; ongoing–committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report;
and new–newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR.
5
The Integrated Correctional Program Model includes three distinct correctional program streams for men
offenders: a multi-target program, an Aboriginal multi-target program, and a sex offender program, all of which
include a maintenance component. In addition to the three main programs, the ICPM includes other innovative
components, including a primer program, a motivational module and a community program, all of which have
been designed to enhance the Service’s capacity to engage more offenders in the right programming at the right
time.
6
Federal Community Corrections Strategy, http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/parole/002007-1001-eng.shtml
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
offenders by addressing the risks and needs of offenders and reduced gang-related conflicts. In an effort to combat
the trafficking and supply of drugs and organized crime, CSC continued to adapt emerging security-related
technologies to the correctional environment as well as share security intelligence information with key partners.
Priority
Type
Enhanced capacities to provide
effective interventions for First
Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders
Ongoing
Programs

Custody

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
Summary of Progress
During the reporting period, CSC worked closely with Aboriginal communities, other government departments,
and private agencies to facilitate the safe reintegration of First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders. The Aboriginal
Women Offender Correctional Program Circle of Care and the revised Aboriginal Integrated Correctional Program
Model were culturally appropriate correctional interventions available to Aboriginal offenders in addressing their
healing.
CSC continued to implement the Strategic Plan for Aboriginal Corrections and the Aboriginal Continuum of Care
initiatives and interventions (including Pathways Initiatives, Elder Services, the accommodation of Aboriginal
Spiritual Practices, Aboriginal specific correctional programs, and Healing Lodges) to contribute to the healing and
reintegration of Aboriginal offenders. For example, the 25 Pathways initiatives across the Service provide an Elderdriven, intensive healing environment for Aboriginal offenders who demonstrated a commitment to following a
traditional way of life at multi-level, maximum, medium and minimum security institutions. Pathways contributed to
positive correctional outcomes, including increased transfer to lower security/Healing Lodges and conditional
release.
Priority
Improved capacities to address
mental health needs of offenders
Type
Ongoing
Programs

Custody

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
Summary of Progress
CSC made progress on strengthening the continuum of care for offenders with mental health needs. During the
reporting year, CSC developed and implemented a revised seven-point Mental Health Needs Scale to improve
outcomes for offenders with mental health needs. The number of offenders screened by the mental health screening
system continued to exceed anticipated results. As well, CSC maintained its health accreditation status in the
Treatment Centres. CSC delivered Mental Health Status Assessment training to nursing staff, and delivered the
Fundamentals of Mental Health, and suicide and self-injury training to frontline staff. It also developed integrated
referral and consent forms for physical and mental health services, and developed enhanced assessments for
offenders who are admitted to segregation and who are being considered for transfer to the Special Handling Unit.
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Priority
Type
Efficient and effective management
practices that reflect values-based Previously committed to
leadership
Program

Internal Services
Summary of Progress
During the reporting period, CSC continued to move forward with implementing the Blueprint 2020 vision7. CSC
promoted the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector and CSC’s Values Statement by updating values and
ethics training components, and supporting values-based leadership practices by assisting managers to build
effective people management skills, work through ethical dilemmas, and to learn productive conflict management
approaches. CSC also facilitated an Ethical Leadership Program and other customized sessions that address effective
leadership practices.
To enhance the effectiveness of management practices, CSC continued to develop and implement management
tools, such as its evaluation, audit and research functions. CSC also enhanced staff training by implementing
mandatory security awareness training for all employees.
Rigorous reviews of the Financial Situation Report were conducted throughout the Fiscal Year. The reporting of
financial data has been enhanced under CSC’s Program Alignment Architecture to facilitate various reporting
requirements. In addition, CSC completed a detailed review of the various functions at National Headquarters and
the Regions to assess any potential for further streamlining of operations within clustered sites. Furthermore, CSC
introduced the revised asset management and accounting policy in keeping with the latest Treasury Board
Secretariat definitions regarding capital expenditures, and ensured capital and operating resources were aligned
accordingly.
7 Blueprint 2020, http://www.clerk.gc.ca/eng/feature.asp?pageId=350
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Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Priority
Productive relationship with
increasing diverse partners,
stakeholders, and others involved
in public safety
Type
Ongoing
Programs

Custody

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
Summary of Progress
CSC maintained partnerships with Canadian communities to foster greater understanding of correctional programs
and processes among Canadians, and to boost public support for the safe reintegration of offenders. CSC has worked
closely with various key partners to gather and share intelligence information in order to contribute to public safety.
CSC also advanced collaborative relationships with partners to address the special needs of Aboriginal offenders,
women offenders and offenders with mental health needs. The National Aboriginal Advisory Committee provides
culturally appropriate advice to the Service on the provision of correctional services to better respond to the needs of
First Nations, Métis and Inuit men and women offenders. Additionally, CSC worked in collaboration with
community partners such as the Elizabeth Fry Society, Alberta Works, and the Association for the Advancement of
Aboriginal Women, and Native Counselling Services of Alberta to enhance employment services for Aboriginal
women.
CSC continued to work with provincial and territorial counterparts with regard to transfer of offenders and other
exchange of service agreements. In addition, CSC continued to consult with regional Victim Advisory Committees
on regional/national processes and documents to acquire their valuable feedback, which has contributed to the
enhancement of services to victims of crime.
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Risk Analysis
The accurate identification and effective management of risk helps to articulate, manage and
report on corporate priorities and achieve positive results. Risk management is a central part of
daily business in all areas of CSC’s large, decentralized work environment. Senior management
oversees organizational-level risks, and medium and lower levels of risk are managed by
operational managers and staff.
Challenges that impacted CSC in 2014–15 continued to include a diverse offender population
with extensive histories of violence and violent crimes, security threat group affiliations, serious
mental health disorders and diseases such as Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus
(HIV). Furthermore, new legislation and federal government expenditure reduction measures
required CSC to continue the adaptation of its operations. Despite these challenges, CSC
sustained its proactive efforts to identify and mitigate potential risks to ensure delivery of core
business that contributes to public safety.
Key Risks
12
Link to Program Alignment
Architecture
Risk
Risk Response Strategy
There is a risk that CSC will not
be able to respond to the
complex, diverse and evolving
profile of the offender
population
CSC continued developing its multi-year

population management approach that addresses

both the complexity and diversity of the offender
population and integrates accommodation,

resources, and interventions. It continued
implementing strategies, such as the Strategic
Plan for Aboriginal Corrections, and the
Anijaarniq – a Holistic Inuit Strategy.
Additionally, CSC continued to implement its
Community Strategy for Women Offenders to
assist community staff in addressing the unique
challenges posed by women offenders. In
addition, correctional programs and policies were
designed and delivered in a manner that ensured
CSC had the capacity to address complex, diverse
and evolving offender needs.
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
Custody
Correctional Interventions
Community Supervision
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Link to Program Alignment
Architecture
Risk
Risk Response Strategy
There is a risk that CSC will not
be able to maintain required
levels of operational safety and
security in institutions and in the
community
CSC continued to develop and implement a

population management approach that supported

public safety and considered victims’ needs by
placing the offenders in the right location at the

right time in their sentences. This approach
addressed individual and group needs and risks
effectively, and helped CSC manage all groups
within the offender population. In addition, CSC
advanced efforts to eliminate contraband
substances, including drugs, from institutions to
enhance the safety and security of institutions and
communities.
Risk
Risk Response Strategy
There is a risk that CSC will not
be able to manage significant
change related to transformation,
legislative changes, and fiscal
constraints
CSC continued to implement the Strategic Plan

for Human Resource Management (2012–13 to
2014–15) and to improve and streamline the
financial situation report process. CSC also
updated its internal policy suite, improved
operational reporting data quality and
management, and continued to develop strategies
to increase the use of enterprise-wide electronic
record-keeping systems. In addition, CSC offered
sessions and coaching on “Change Management
and Leadership” and worked towards promoting a
culture where values and ethics are integrated into
daily work decisions and actions at all levels by
responding to the 2012 Ethical Climate Survey
analysis.
Custody
Correctional Interventions
Community Supervision
Link to Program Alignment
Architecture
Internal Services
Correctional Service of Canada
13
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Risk Response Strategy
There is a risk that CSC will lose
support of partners delivering
critical services and providing
resources for offenders
CSC continued to implement the Federal

Community Corrections Strategy, engaged

appropriate criminal justice and community
partners, and expanded networks. CSC continued 
to implement its Community Strategy for Women
Offenders to assist community staff in addressing
the unique challenges posed by women offenders.
CSC also worked to enhance technological
communications in order to maintain and improve
engagement with partners including citizens’
advisory committees, volunteers, ethnocultural
advisory committees, victim advisory
committees, and faith community reintegration
project organizations. CSC also worked to
increase volunteer involvement with faith‐based
organizations to enhance and sustain offender
support.
Risk
Risk Response Strategy
There is a risk that CSC will not CSC maintained a comprehensive network of
be able to sustain results related resources in the community to assist offenders’
to reoffending violently
successful reintegration in the community. CSC
revised case management policies, enhanced
correctional programming through strategic
reinvestment and improved referrals, and
implemented new correctional program models
that addressed violent reoffending. CSC
continued to engage appropriate criminal justice
and community partners as part of the Federal
Community Corrections Strategy, and helped
expand community-based networks for offenders
on release from CSC institutions. CSC continued
to encourage offenders to take accountability for
recognizing and addressing the factors that
contributed to their criminal behaviour by
ensuring that all offenders’ correctional plans
included behavioural expectations, objectives for
program participation, and that offenders are
required to meet their court-ordered obligations,
such as restitution to victims and child support.
14
Link to Program Alignment
Architecture
Risk
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
Custody
Correctional Interventions
Community Supervision
Link to Program Alignment
Architecture

Custody

Correctional Interventions

Community Supervision
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Actual Expenditures
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2,334,682,392
2014–15
Planned Spending
2,334,682,392
2014–15
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2,665,588,552
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2,575,228,312
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
240,545,920
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
18,721
18,158
(563)
Correctional Service of Canada
15
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic
Outcome,
Programs and
Internal
Services
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Planned
Spending
2016–17
Planned
Spending
2014–15 Total
Authorities
Available for
Use
2014–15
Actual
Spending
(authorities
used)
2013–14
Actual
Spending
(authorities
used)
2012–13
Actual
Spending
(authorities
used)
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.
Custody
1,471,011,448
1,471,011,448 1,501,862,617 1,502,018,578 1,736,805,173
1,686,218,075 1,821,642,937
1,739,638,255
Correctional
465,029,970
465,029,970
410,155,772
410,198,364
492,273,803
452,349,073
463,803,680
457,038,705
93,399,963
93,399,963
129,857,404
129,870,889
102,236,783
125,590,617
124,169,547
117,648,594
2,029,441,381
2,029,441,381 2,041,875,793 2,042,087,831 2,331,315,759
2,264,157,765 2,409,616,164
2,314,325,554
Internal
Services
Subtotal
305,241,011
305,241,011
311,070,547
328,673,657
Total
2,334,682,392
2,334,682,392 2,350,488,926 2,350,733,012 2,665,588,552
Interventions
Community
Supervision
Strategic
Outcome
Subtotal
308,613,133
308,645,181
334,272,793
340,675,311
2,575,228,312 2,750,291,475
2,642,999,211
For the fiscal year 2014-15, CSC’s actual spending exceeded planned spending by $240.5
million. This variance was mainly due to an increase in personnel expenditures resulting from
the eligible paylist expenditures (e.g. payment of severance benefits, parental benefits, etc.) of
$121.8 million and a one-time transition payment of $52.0 million made in 2014-15 to
implement salary payment in arrears.
To fund the above variance, CSC’s total authorities available for use were increased by $330.9
million. Taking into consideration this increase, CSC’s total authorities available for use were
$2,665.6 million and the variance with the actual spending was $90.4 million. Of this variance,
$28.8 million in operating funds and $51.7 million in capital funds were carried forward to 201516.
The net increase in authority is due to the following:
•
•
•
•
16
an increase in authority of $165.1 million due to the reimbursement of eligible paylist
expenditures and the one-time transition payment to implement salary payment in arrears;
an increase in operating authority of $60.3 million carried forward from 2013-14 of
which approximately $20.6 million was earmarked to cover pending collective
agreements upon ratification;
an increase in capital authority of $78.5 million carried forward from 2013-14 for the
completion of new living units within existing institutions;
an increase in authority of $23.6 million as a result of negotiated collective agreements;
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
•
other miscellaneous net increases in authority of $3.4 million (e.g. sales of surplus Crown
assets and transfer to Other Government Departments).
The variance between planned and actual FTEs of 563 is mostly due the implementation of
saving measures to achieve administrative efficiencies, including the internal review of National
Headquarter and Regional Headquarters organizational structures.
The detailed explanations for the variances between planned spending and the authorities can be
found in Section II: Analysis of Programs by strategic outcome. The explanations for the year
over year variances in actual spending are in the section under Departmental Spending Trend.
Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government
Framework
Alignment of 201415 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Frameworkiv
(dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program
Spending Area
Government of
Canada Outcome
201415 Actual
Spending
The custody, correctional Custody
interventions, and
supervision of offenders
in communities and
institutions, contribute to Correctional
Interventions
public safety
Social
A Safe and Secure
Canada
1,686,218,075
A Safe and Secure
Canada
452,349,073
A Safe and Secure
Canada
125,590,617
Community Supervision
Affairs
Social
Affairs
Social
Affairs
Correctional Service of Canada
17
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area
Total Planned Spending
Total Actual Spending
Social Affairs
$2,029,441,381
2,264,157,765
Organizational Spending Trend
Departmental Spending Trend Graph
3,000
2,500
Millions
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
Actual Spending
Sunset Programs
Total Spending
2016-17
2017-18
Planned Spending
0
0
0
0
0
0
$2,643
$2,750
$2,575
$2,350
$2,351
$2,378
The variance in actual spending between 2012–13 and 2013–14 (increase of $107.3 million) is
mainly attributable to:
 a net increase in personnel expenditures of $152.4 million primarily due to the ratification
of collective agreements;
 a reduction in capital expenditures of $59.4 million.
The variance in actual spending between 2013–14 and 2014–15 (decrease of $175.1 million) is
mainly attributable to:
 a net increase in salary expenditures of $5.6 million due to:
o a reduction in salary expenditures of $46.4 million and;
o an increase of $52.0 million due to the implementation of the salary payment in
arrears by the Government of Canada.
 a reduction in capital investment of $177.8 million.
18
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
For fiscal years 2015–16 to 2017–18, planned spending will remain fairly stable.
Estimates by Vote
For information on Correctional Service of Canada’s organizational Votes and statutory
expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2015 on the Public Works and Government
Services Canada website.v
Correctional Service of Canada
19
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and
institutions, contribute to public safety.
Program 1.0: Custody
Description
This program includes providing for the day-to-day needs of offenders, including health and
safety, food, clothing, mental health services, and physical health care. It also includes security
measures within institutions such as drug interdiction, and appropriate control practices to
prevent incidents.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
2014–15
Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
1,471,011,448
1,471,011,448
1,686,218,075
215,206,627
1,736,805,173
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10,966
10,791
(175)
The variance between the actual spending and the planned spending is mainly due to the in-year
increase in authorities and internal budget adjustments:

an increase in authority of $101.5 million due to the reimbursement of eligible paylist
expenditures (e.g., payment of severance benefits, parental benefits etc.);
 an increase in capital authority of $71.8 million carried over from 2013–14 for the
completion of new living units within existing institutions;
 an increase in operating authority of $35.4 million carried over from 2013–14;
 an increase in authority of $32.6 million as a result of a one-time transition payment for
the implementation of salary payment in arrears;
Correctional Service of Canada
21
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
 an increase in authority of $22.6 million as a result of negotiated collective agreements;
 a $5.7-million in-year internal budget adjustment.
The above variance analysis also explains the major variances at the sub-program and sub-sub
program levels under Program 1.0: Custody.
Taking into consideration the above adjustments, CSC’s adjusted authorities available for use
were $1,742.5 million and the variance with the actual spending was $56.3 million, which was
included in the amount to be carried forward to 2015–16.
Performance Results
Anticipated Result
Ranges*
Actual Results
Rate of non-natural offender deaths
in custody8
0.00 - 1.11
1.34
Rate of escapes from federal
custody
0.00 - 1.76
0.87
Percentage of upheld inmate
grievances
3.88% - 4.39%
2.42%
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
CSC manages the
custody of offenders
in institutions in a
safe, secure and
humane manner
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
In 2014–15, CSC continued its efforts to provide offenders in its custody with a safe, secure and
humane environment as well as address their day-to-day institutional needs.
The rate of escapes from federal custody remained low in the past two years, recording thirteen
escapes in each year. In addition, CSC continued to reduce the number of upheld inmate
grievances by examining ways to address inmate grievances such as the Alternative Dispute
Resolution process in institutions.
In spite of sustained efforts to prevent the occurrence of tragic events, rate of non-natural
offender deaths in custody was 1.34 (20 deaths) in the reporting year, against anticipated result
range 0-1.11), higher than 2013-14 (18 deaths), lower than 2012-13 (25 deaths). CSC continued
8
22
Non-natural offender deaths include the following types of death: murder, use of force, awaiting coroner’s report,
overdose, suicide, accident, other, and undetermined. The indicator represents the number of non-natural
offender deaths per 1,000 offenders in federal custody.
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
to enhance efforts to improve the result. Every incident was the subject of a thorough
investigation and review to understand what happened, and to prevent, reduce, and better react
when such situations may occur. Security protocols, measures and practices are being improved
based on findings and recommendations from those investigations, which have been shared with
all frontline staff in order to enhance dynamic security practices.
CSC continued to develop and implement the National Population Management Approach to
strategically integrate accommodation, resources, and interventions by placing offenders in the
right location, at the right time in their sentences, with the resources needed to effectively
address needs and risks. In 2014–2015, this approach included initiatives such as the clustering
of institutions, long-term accommodation planning, and a research-based offender subclassification strategy for inmates with maximum and medium-security rating. It focused on the
effective implementation of new accommodation space in federal institutions that resulted in a
reduction in the national rate of double-bunking. To support the National Population
Management Approach, Regional Population Management Committees were established, and
many operational units participated in national population management discussions to address
specific population pressures. In addition, minimum security units outside perimeter fences were
opened at four regional women offender institutions.
CSC has also started to develop a National Ethnocultural Offenders Strategy, in order to better
respond to the distinct needs of the ethnocultural offender population, and to minimize barriers
that may prevent access to the full spectrum of CSC’s services and interventions.
Sub-Program 1.1: Institutional Management and Support
Description
The Institutional Management and Support sub-program includes the daily management of
operational activities and institutional services for offenders. Key activities include the daily
administration, operation and maintenance of institutions, establishing operational processes and
procedures, ensuring compliance with national standards and regulations, managing allocated
financial and human resources, directing and overseeing the delivery of integrated correctional
operations, monitoring the effectiveness of institutional security activities, considering threats,
risks, vulnerabilities and physical security requirements and controls, managing the intelligence
function of the institution, ensuring coordination across the criminal justice system, ensuring a
safe environment for staff and inmates, and making decisions and recommendations relative to
offenders within delegated authorities.
Correctional Service of Canada
23
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$87,479,981
$129,678,173
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$42,198,192
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Planned
1,002
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
944
-58
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Institutional
management is
compliant with policy
and law
Rate of critical safety incidents9 in
federal institutions (suicides,
accidental deaths)
0.00 - 0.56
0.87
Rate of serious safety incidents10 in
federal institutions
0.00 - 3.65
9.91
Rate of minor/moderate11 safety
incidents in federal institutions
0.0 - 74.9
184.0
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC addressed offenders’ day-to-day institutional needs through the
management of operational activities and institutional services.
9
Critical safety incidents include all deaths in custody where cause of death is suicide or accident.
10 Serious safety incidents comprise any safety incident (that did not result in actual death) including any incident of
attempted suicide (that did not result in actual death) and any incident of: self-inflicted; accident; damage to
government property; fire; medical emergency; medical emergency – not attributable to assaultive behavior;
damage to property of other person; hunger strike; or protective custody request.
11 Minor/moderate safety incidents include the safety incidents not included above and that did not result in actual
death; major; or serious bodily harm.
24
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Despite persistent efforts, CSC did not meet its own expectations in the area of critical safety
incidents in institutions, and there were 13 deaths (part of the 20 deaths noted above) during the
reporting year. As noted earlier, each incident was the subject of a thorough investigation whose
findings and recommendations led to changes in operational security protocols and practices.
CSC also continued to provide suicide and self-injury prevention training as well as
Fundamentals of Mental Health training to frontline staff working in both institutions and the
community. CSC provided targeted assessment and intervention to address the mental health
needs of offenders who may be at risk of engaging in self-injury and/or suicidal behaviour.
Although the reporting year’s results for serious safety incidents and minor/moderate safety
incidents have improved over 2013–14, overall results in this area did not meet expectations.
CSC’s ability to maintain safety and security has been challenged by the number of offenders
with histories of violence and security threat group affiliations, aging infrastructure, and the need
to constantly enhance its intelligence capacity to address evolving security threats.
As part of its efforts to reduce safety incidents in federal institutions, CSC focused on policies
and procedures at principal entrances to help prevent contraband and prohibited items from
entering institutions. To this end, CSC began developing a training video for correctional officers
to highlight key components of searching staff and visitors. CSC established a national working
group comprised of Ion scanner subject matter experts to review and optimize the national
training standard, and explored measures to integrate contraband Fentanyl into the Ion scanner
library. CSC also continued to work with various key partners, primarily law enforcement
agencies, to gather and share intelligence to reduce the supply and prevent the transfer of illicit
drugs, contraband and/or prohibited items into institutions.
Sub-Program 1.2: Institutional Security
Description
The Institutional Security sub-program includes all activities related to the implementation of
and compliance with policies and procedures designed to ensure the safety and security of staff,
offenders and the public. Key activities include the implementation and coordination of security
measures and related activities to meet the stratified requirements of a diverse inmate population.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
$714,163,506
2014–15
Actual Spending
$813,299,904
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$99,136,398
Correctional Service of Canada
25
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
7,092
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
7,156
64
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Institutions are safe Rate of critical security incidents12 in
and secure
federal institutions (security-related
deaths)
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
0.00 - 0.22
0.33
Rate of serious security incidents13 in
federal institutions
0.00 - 7.30
6.76
Rate of minor/moderate security
incidents14 in federal institutions
0.0 - 127.2
167.1
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC worked to ensure the safety and security of staff, offenders and
the public through the implementation of policies and procedures.
CSC did not meet its own expectations in the area of critical security incidents in institutions,
and there were 5 deaths (part of the 20 deaths identified above) during the reporting year. As
noted, each incident was the subject of a thorough investigation whose findings and
recommendations led to changes in operational security protocols and practices.
The performance result for serious security incidents in federal institutions was within the
anticipated range. Results for minor/moderate security incidents in federal institutions, while
improved over 2013–14, did not meet CSC’s expectations.
12 Critical security incidents comprise all non-natural deaths in custody, including murder, use of force, awaiting
coroner’s report, and undetermined.
13 Serious security incidents include security incidents that are serious violent, major disturbances, and escapes.
14 Minor/Moderate security incidents include any security incident that did not result in actual death, or major or
serious bodily harm.
26
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
CSC conducted an evaluation of institutional security in 2014–15 that focussed on three broad
areas: human resource management and staff safety, security and intelligence, and institutional
security operations. The report was presented at the end of the fiscal year, and has identified
areas that will be the subject of a management action plan, including correctional officer
recruitment, Employee Protection Protocol, and monitoring, reporting and sharing of intelligence
information. The evaluation’s findings were positive regarding dynamic security where activities
contribute to safety and security in correctional institutions.
Population management, including gang management, continued to be a key focus in 2014–15.
CSC revised its policy to strengthen the assessment process for determining double occupancy
cell assignment, and reduce security incidents.
CSC continued its efforts to adapt emerging security-related technologies to the correctional
environment and explored detection and jamming technologies to identify and disrupt the use of
cell phones and drones within the controlled perimeters of institutions.
In 2014–15, CSC reviewed and updated all Emergency Management and Business Continuity
Plans to enhance CSC’s ability to respond to emergency situations quickly and to mitigate the
potential for security incidents arising out of emergency situations. The Emergency Response
Team training curriculum was revised and training of Team members was delivered in
operational units.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1: Intelligence and Supervision
Description
The Intelligence and Supervision sub-sub-program encompasses all activities related to security
and intelligence when dealing with offenders in institutions, and in the community in conjunction
with external partner agencies. Key activities include the ongoing assessment of threats and risks
to identify and mitigate both internal and external threats to the safety of individuals, (inmates,
staff and public) and the institution; collaborating, liaising and sharing information with justice
partners both domestically and internationally; identifying and managing Security Threat
Groups; preventing, intercepting and eliminating any illegal or threatening activities in order to
enhance CSC’s capacity to provide safe and secure institutions and community operations.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
$701,246,513
2014–15
Actual Spending
$799,000,414
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$97,753,901
Correctional Service of Canada
27
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
6,994
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
7,059
65
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Rate of transitions to higher security15
Activities that
threaten the safety
Rate of serious security charges16
and security of
institutions are
Median days in segregation17
managed
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
105.4 - 109.60
100.1
530.7 - 559.9
455.3
12 (marker18)
12
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC undertook a wide range of activities related to security and
intelligence in conjunction with its external partners.
All performance results in this area met or exceeded anticipations. In total, 1,496 offenders
transitioned to higher security, a figure which represents the best result achieved in the past six
years. As well, CSC laid 6,802 serious security charges that resulted in a guilty finding. The rate
of serious security charges is 455.3 per 1000 offenders, which also represents the best rate
achieved in the past six years. The positive results were achieved through activities designed to
15 The indicator was changed as a result of structural changes in data in the Offender Management System
(clustering) that removed the ability to accurately track “involuntary transfers” which took place within a clustered
site as transfer warrants were no longer used for transfers that take place within a clustered site.
16 Serious security charges (which include only those charges that resulted in a “guilty” finding) are laid when an
offender commits, attempts or incites acts that are serious breaches of security, are violent, harmful to others, or
repetitive violations of rules.
17 This indicator was modified during the reporting year to better reflect the new operational environment. It
represents the median duration (in days) that offenders are held in involuntary segregation within federal
institutions.
18 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. The marker for median days in
involuntary segregation was derived from the FY12-13 benchmark dataset (average of FY10-11; FY11-12; and
FY12-13 results).
28
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
enhance CSC’s capacity to respond to and prevent threats and risks that exist in correctional
facilities and communities, and to clarify program priorities, roles, responsibilities and reporting
expectations.
Over the past few years, CSC has embarked on a number of initiatives to combat radicalization
and violent extremism, engaging with partners both domestically and globally.
In 2014–15, CSC implemented Operational Intelligence Reports in all Regions. An Operational
Intelligence Report is a comprehensive security intelligence report designed to provide sitespecific information and intelligence, enabling National Headquarters, Regional Headquarters
and operational units to recognize potential threats and to develop and implement robust action
plans that respond to and manage identified areas of risk.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2: Drug Interdiction
Description
The Drug Interdiction sub-sub-program encompasses all activities related to the coordination of
Correctional Service of Canada’s national drug strategy, including the use of urinalysis and other
security services such as drug detector dogs, ion mobility spectrometry, and other similar
devices. Key activities include assessing risk related to drug use and trafficking, the detection
and deterrence of drug use and/or trafficking of drugs, as well as procedures for reviewing the
imposition of administrative measures. Ensuring a safe, drug-free institutional environment is a
fundamental condition for the success of the reintegration of offenders into society as lawabiding citizens.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$12,916,993
$14,299,490
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$1,382,497
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
98
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
97
-1
Correctional Service of Canada
29
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Drug interdiction
activities contribute
to successful
completion of
offenders'
correctional plans
Rate of critical drug-related incidents19
in federal institutions (deaths by
overdose)
0.00 - 0.09
0.13
Rate of serious drug-related incidents20
0.00 - 2.94
4.55
Rate of minor/moderate drug-related
incidents21
0.0 - 195.6
182.0
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC continued to focus on its National Drug Strategy. Performance
results in this area were mixed. In 2014–15, CSC was challenged by the occurrence of several
drug-related incidents, resulting in the highest rate experienced over the past six years.
CSC did not meet its own expectations in the area of critical drug-related security incidents in
institutions, and there were two deaths (part of the twenty deaths identified above) during the
reporting year. As noted, each incident was the subject of a thorough investigation whose
findings and recommendations led to changes in operational security protocols and practices.
The rate of serious drug-related incidents was also higher than the anticipated range. The rate of
minor/moderate drug-related incidents, however, remained within the expected range.
In 2014–15, CSC strengthened operational policies and procedures to eliminate the entry of illicit
materials in order to reduce the trafficking and supply of drugs in institutions, as part of its effort
to reduce drug-related incidents and help offenders complete their correctional plans. CSC also
reviewed the Drug-Detector Dog Program. A new five-year urinalysis contract was established
with Gamma-Dynacare, and CSC continued to explore the potential for expanding the testing
scheme. Furthermore, urinalysis training was updated to better reflect procedures and supporting
authorities.
19 Critical drug-related incidents are offender deaths in federal institutions due to overdose.
20 Serious drug-related incidents include any drug-related incident where there was at least one person involved in
the incident who incurred an injury of major or serious bodily harm.
21 Minor/moderate drug-related incidents include any drug-related incident where there was at least one identified
instigator who committed the incident, or one identified victim and did not have any person involved in the
incident who incurred an injury of major; serious bodily harm; or death (that did not result in actual death).
30
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
In addition, inmate effects were processed using tools such as X-ray and Drug-Detector Dogs to
prevent the entry of illicit materials. In many cases, offenders who were suspected of ingested
contraband or were carrying contraband in a body cavity were placed in a “dry cell” upon their
return to custody.
To strengthen drug interdiction efforts, CSC continued to work closely with local police and
justice partners, which assisted the Service in effectively managing and gathering intelligence
information.
Sub Program 1.3: Institutional Health Services
Description
The Institutional Health Services sub-program includes provision of essential health care
services and reasonable access to non-essential mental health services to inmates, in accordance
with professionally accepted standards. Key activities include the delivery of public, clinical and
mental health services such as basic primary health care, dental care, psychological counselling
and infectious disease detection, treatment and prevention, as well as overall administration,
developing, implementing and updating medical directives, policy, quality improvement,
accreditation, research and performance measurement for health services.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$189,610,528
$207,269,989
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$17,659,461
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
1,340
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,224
-116
Correctional Service of Canada
31
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated
Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Health services are
available to all
offenders in
institutions in
accordance with
professionally
accepted standards
Maintain Health Services
Accreditation
Accreditation
Accreditation
Maintained
Of the offenders identified by the
Computerized Mental Health Intake
Screening System (COMHISS) as
requiring follow-up mental health
services, the percentage who
received a service
Not less than
72%
95.1%
32%
45.4%
Percentage of offenders who
received an institutional mental
health service
Actual Results
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC continued to provide inmates with essential health care
services and reasonable access to non-essential mental health care services, in accordance with
professionally accepted standards.
All performance results in this sub-program exceeded expectations.
CSC’s health services were first accredited in 2011 and its accreditation status was maintained in
a follow-up survey in the fall of 2014. Accreditation status demonstrates that CSC consistently
examines, improves, and delivers high-quality health care in line with professionally accepted
standards and best practices. The accreditation status also positively impacts CSC’s efforts to
recruit and retain health care professionals.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.1: Public Health Services
Description
The Public Health Services sub-sub-program encompasses all public health activities related to:
infectious disease prevention, control and management among offenders; health promotion and
health education; surveillance and knowledge sharing; and includes a focus on Aboriginal and
women offender health.
32
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$11,305,483
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$11,393,441
$87,958
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
97
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
66
-31
Performance Results
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Public health
services are
available to all
offenders in
institutions in
accordance with
professionally
accepted standards
Percentage of newly admitted offenders
who were offered assessments for
Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted
Infections (BBSTI) and Tuberculosis
(TB)
Percentage of newly admitted offenders
who attended Reception Awareness
Program at admission
Anticipated
Results
Actual Results
BBSTI
BBSTI 85% 90%
TB 85% - 90%
100%
TB
76.6%
65% - 75%
37.0%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC provided public health services to offenders.
Performance results were mixed in this sub-sub program. All newly admitted offenders were
offered assessments for bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections; however, only threequarters were reported as having been offered an assessment for Tuberculosis. A lower rate of
participation in Tuberculosis assessments is consistent with past reports, and may be explained
by the fact that Tuberculosis Assessments require the inmate to return to healthcare for a skin test
reading days after admission, which could result in some loss to follow-up.
Offenders’ participation in the Reception Awareness Program (RAP) is below expectations. This
program is voluntary; it provides information on the prevention of infectious diseases and
encourages positive health behaviours and practices. Busy reception centres with conflicting
demands on inmates’ attention may contribute to the low participation rate. CSC recently revised
the program in an effort to improve uptake by inmates. RAP can be delivered by staff
Correctional Service of Canada
33
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
individually or in group. The option of a self-paced independent audio visual presentation is also
available.
The reporting year was characterized by an active influenza season. Although the 2014-2015
influenza vaccine was not well matched to the circulating influenza strains, delivery of the
vaccine was still a CSC priority as the vaccine still may have offered some protection against
influenza illness and other circulating viruses. CSC administered over 5,000 flu shots to inmates
across the country and effectively managed six institutional influenza outbreaks. In total, CSC
managed 28 enteric, skin and respiratory outbreaks in fiscal year 2014–15.
As part of its commitment to inmate and staff safety, CSC proactively chaired a cross-sectoral
committee to prepare for the unlikely event of an Ebola case within CSC. In the response to the
threat of Ebola, CSC also developed operational-specific guidelines, educational materials and
ongoing communication internally and with external community public health officials across
the country.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.2: Clinical Health Services
Description
The Clinical Health Services sub-sub-program includes the provision of medical and clinical
services for inmates in institutions, including nursing, pharmacy services, Opiate Substitution
Therapy Program, palliative care, outside hospitalization, dental services and optometry, etc.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$121,167,564
$137,743,992
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$16,576,428
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
755
34
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
715
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated
Results
Actual Results
Percentage of newly admitted offenders
receiving intake nursing assessment
within 24 hours of initial reception
90% - 100%
97.8%
Percentage of offenders receiving
comprehensive nursing assessment
within 14 days of admission to
Correctional Service of Canada
90% - 100%
95.8%
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Clinical health
services are
available to all
offenders in
institutions in
accordance with
professionally
accepted standards
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC provided essential health services to the offender population in
institutions.
Performance results in this sub-sub-program met expectations. Over the past three years, CSC
has maintained the results for the nursing intake assessment within 24 hours of reception and the
subsequent 14-day assessment at an above expected rate. Clinical health services have been
made available to all offenders in institutions in accordance with professionally accepted
standards.
In 2014–15, CSC revised dental service standards and completed the implementation of regional
pharmacies in all five regions.
The essential services framework was updated based on the recommendations by the National
Advisory Committee. CSC continued to monitor the application of essential services framework
to ensure that essential health care to offenders conforms to professionally accepted standards;
respects gender, cultural and linguistic differences, and is responsive to the special and specific
needs of women and Aboriginal offenders.
Economic constraints foster exploration and discovery of more effective ways of utilizing human
resources. For example, the nursing intake assessment process was revised to further integrate
mental and physical health and to enhance early identification of health care issues, referral
needs, and follow-up.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.3: Mental Health Services
Description
The Mental Health Services sub-sub program includes provision of essential mental health
services and reasonable access to non-essential mental health services for inmates. The activities
include provision of mental health services in mainstream institutions by interdisciplinary teams
Correctional Service of Canada
35
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
of mental health professionals (which may include psychiatrists, psychologists, mental health
nurses, social workers, etc.). In addition, CSC operates five Regional Treatment Centres that
provide care to offenders with the most serious mental health conditions who require in-patient
treatment.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$57,137,481
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$58,132,556
$995,075
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
487
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
443
-44
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Mental health services
are available to
offenders in institutions
in accordance with
professionally
accepted standards
Percentage of newly admitted offenders
screened by Computerized Mental Health
Intake Screening System within prescribed
timeframes
Percentage of target staff trained in the
Fundamentals of Mental Health
Anticipated
Results
Actual
Results
72%
78.2%
90%
(marker22)
96%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC provided essential mental health services and reasonable
access to non-essential mental health services to inmates in accordance with professionally
accepted standards.
All performance results exceeded expectations. The percentage of newly-admitted offenders
receiving mental health screening to identify mental health needs was better than expected, with
22 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. A 90% compliancy level has
been established for the Fundamentals of Mental Health, which is consistent with all CSC mandatory training
standards.
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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78 percent of offenders screened within prescribed timeframes. As well, 96 percent of target staff
was trained in the Fundamentals of Mental Health.
In 2014–15, CSC delivered Mental Health Status Assessment training to nursing staff working in
Treatment Centres and maximum security units; developed integrated referral and consent forms
for physical and mental health services; and developed enhanced assessments for segregation and
for offenders considered for transfer to the Special Handling Unit. In addition, CSC revised the
Institutional Mental Health Services Guidelines to reflect governance changes and streamline
processes related to screening, referral, triage and assessment, to ensure consistency with policy
directives, and to provide institutional mental health staff with clear direction on service
delivery.
CSC developed and implemented a revised seven-point Mental Health Needs Scale that helps
ensure consistency in documenting mental health assessment outcomes, prioritizing services, and
supporting appropriate placement of offenders in Intermediate Mental Health Care. CSC made
significant progress in implementing a sub-population approach through a refined mental health
care model in order to improve outcomes for offenders by more effectively matching services to
level of need. CSC re-aligned mental health beds across the continuum of care, (acute psychiatric
hospital care, high intensity and moderate intensity intermediate mental health care), creating
intermediate mental health care capacity while increasing the total number of mental health beds.
CSC developed service delivery guidelines, prepared communication material, reviewed policy
changes and standardized the organizational structure for clinical management positions in
regional treatment centres.
Sub Program 1.4: Institutional Services
Description
The Institutional Services sub program includes all activities related to the daily operations of
institutions for offenders. Key services include accommodation support, engineering services,
food services, clothing, institutional maintenance, fleet management, telecommunications,
environmental protection and sustainable development, fire safety protection, security
electronics.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
$479,757,433
2014–15
Actual Spending
$535,970,009
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$56,212,576
Correctional Service of Canada
37
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
1,532
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,467
-65
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Inmates are
provided safe,
secure and
humane living
conditions
Percentage of upheld grievances
related to living conditions
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges
3.3% - 5.8%
2.3%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC worked to maintain safe, secure and humane custody of its
offender population by providing a wide range of non-correctional activities related to the daily
operations of institutions.
The percentage of upheld grievances related to living conditions was better than anticipated, and
was at the lowest level in the last six years.
CSC streamlined its processes to identify and prioritize investments in projects, equipment and
services for areas such as accommodations, food services, electronic security systems, fleet, and
environment based on organizational needs and priorities as well as on infrastructure and
equipment lifecycles.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.1: Food Services
Description
The Food Services sub-sub program provides for the provision of nutritious balanced meals to
offenders. Key activities include setting the overall policy direction for the delivery of food
services, monitoring food services activities to ensure adherence to standards; ensuring meals
provided to the inmate population meet the appropriate nutrition standards for Canadians such as
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guidevi and dietary reference intakes; meeting the dietary needs
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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of inmates following a specific diet to meet the requirements of their faith, or a therapeutic diet
as part of a treatment regimen; ensuring all activities required for ordering, storage, preparation
and service of food and disposal of waste meet the food safety standards, and ensuring that the
cost of meals provided are within established allotments.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$58,900,224
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$77,298,497
$18,398,273
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
413
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
421
8
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Inmates' dietary needs Percentage of positive health
are met in accordance inspections by external health
with the Canada Food inspectors
Guide
Percentage of compliance with
menus meeting Canada’s Food
Guide and Dietary Reference
Intakes
Percentage of upheld grievances
related to food services
Anticipated
Results
Actual Results
91%
79%
25%
(Marker23)
5.30% - 7.25%
89%
2.16%
23 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. Due to limited structured data
availability, a 3-year average of results was not possible for this performance indicator. As such, a 1-year
snapshot marker was used (results of FY11-12).
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Food Services performance results in this area were mixed. Although the percentage of positive
health inspections by external health inspectors remained below the anticipated target of 91
percent, it is better than the previous year when it was 74 percent as opposed to 79 percent in the
reporting period. Menu compliance with Canada’s Food Guide and Dietary Reference Intakes
was significantly higher than the benchmark established last year. As well, percentage of upheld
grievances related to food services was much better than expected.
As part of CSC’s food services modernization in fiscal year 2014–15, CSC introduced regional
meal production centres with the opening of a production centre in the Pacific Region. This
centre provides quality, nutritious meals to inmates, streamlines food production, and has
realized cost savings for Canadians. Full national implementation is anticipated to be completed
in 2016 and this should further improve the results for Food Services.
Sub-Sub-Program 1.4.2: Accommodation Services
Description
The Accommodation Services sub-sub-program includes all physical resources and support
services necessary to meet operational requirements within institutions for offenders. Key
activities include the provision of basic necessities to offenders, technical support, housekeeping,
laundry services, plant maintenance, engineering services, environmental services, waste
management, electrical, water and sewage, heating/co-generation of energy, plumbing, fire
protection, motor vehicle maintenance and operations, carpentry, masonry, painting, welding and
millwright, general labour, general maintenance, and landscaping.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$420,857,209
$458,671,512
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$37,814,303
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
1,119
40
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,046
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicator
Inmates are
provided safe and
clean living and
working
environments
Percentage of upheld grievances
related to accommodation services
Anticipated
Results
Actual Results
1.71% - 4.63%
2.77%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC implemented a revised governance structure for facilities
maintenance to manage the provision of safe and clean living and working environments for
inmates. The percentage of upheld grievances related to accommodation services was within the
expected range.
A thorough review of maintenance services was conducted across CSC. As part of CSC’s effort
to improve efficiency and in line with the results of the review, a regional centralization model
was developed and is being implemented in all regions. Service Level Agreements were
developed to outline expectations, roles and responsibilities from institutions and facilities
management teams.
Program 2.0: Correctional Interventions
Description
The Correctional Interventions program includes assessment activities and program interventions
for federal offenders, as well as activities directed toward engaging Canadian citizens as partners
in CSC's correctional mandate and outreach to victims of crime. Correctional Interventions are
designed to assist in the rehabilitation of offenders and facilitate their reintegration into the
community as law-abiding citizens.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
2014–15
Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
465,029,970
465,029,970
452,349,073
(12,680,897)
492,273,803
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,615
4,388
(227)
The variance between the actual spending and the planned spending is mainly due to the in-year
increase in authorities and internal budget adjustments:




an increase in authority of $10.6 million as a result of a one-time transition payment for
the implementation of salary payment in arrears;
an increase in authority of $7.5 million due to the reimbursement of eligible paylist
expenditures (e.g., payment of severance benefits, parental benefits, etc.);
an increase in operating authority of $3.6 million carried over from 2013–14;
a $27.1 million in-year internal budget adjustment.
The above variance analysis also explains the major variances at the sub-program and sub-sub
program levels under Program 2.0 Correctional Interventions.
Taking into consideration the above adjustments, CSC’s adjusted authorities available for use
were $465.2 million and the variance with the actual spending was $12.8 million, which was
included in the amount to be carried forward to 2015–16.
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Offender risks and
needs are identified
and addressed with
targeted
correctional
interventions
Percentage of sentence served prior to
63.7% (marker24)
first release
65.3%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need who complete a
nationally recognized correctional
program prior to full parole eligibility
date
56.6% - 61.9%
72.5%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need who complete a
nationally recognized correctional
program prior to warrant expiry date
90.1% - 90.6%
95.4%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
The Correctional Interventions program includes offender case management, community
engagement, spiritual services, nationally recognized correctional programs, education programs,
employment needs assessment and training, and work experience.
Two out of three performance results were better than anticipated, and one was poorer than
expected. Positive results were achieved through strengthening the case management framework
and continuously engaging partners to address the risks and needs of offenders. The percentage
of sentence served prior to first release reflects the median percentage, where half of the inmates
served less than 65.3 percent of their sentences prior to first release and the other half of the
inmates served more than 65.3 percent of their sentences. This result continues the slight upward
trend from previous years.
In 2014–15, CSC continued its transition from individual problem-specific correctional programs
to the Integrated Correctional Program Model. The integrated program model is designed to
address, in a single moderate- or high-intensity intervention, the needs of male offenders who
meet the criteria for a correctional program. Early results indicate that the Integrated Correctional
Program Model was more efficient than the traditional cadre of correctional programs with
24 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. The marker for sentence served
prior to first release was derived from the FY12-13 benchmark dataset (average of FY10-11; FY11-12; and
FY12-13 results).
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
respect to time between admission to first program and time required to complete all correctional
programs to meet offenders’ needs. Following program completion, offenders who had
participated in the Integrated Correctional Program Model showed significant improvements in
skills, motivation and attitude, with results comparable to the traditional cadre of correctional
programs. Full implementation of the Integrated Correctional Program Model is planned by
2017.
CSC will adjust its Program Alignment Architecture over the next two years to clearly show the
transition in its correctional program suite.
CSC established a national collaboration platform for reintegration professionals, including the
development of innovative applications for parole officers. CSC also revised the Primary
Worker/Older Sister training to ensure that it continues to impart the skills necessary to
successfully complete risk assessment reports and other casework for women offenders.
CSC strengthened relationships with the National Aboriginal Advisory Committee (NAAC)
through consultations, in order to maximize its contributions to the enhancement of Aboriginal
correctional policies, programs and operations in CSC.
The 25 Pathways initiatives across the Service, situated in multi-level, maximum, medium and
minimum security institutions, continued to provide an Elder-driven, intensive healing
environment for Aboriginal offenders who have demonstrated a commitment to following a
traditional healing path. Pathways continued to achieve positive correctional outcomes including
increased transfer to lower security/Healing Lodges and conditional release. CSC continued to
provide ongoing support to the Pathways Initiatives, and facilitated the sharing of best practices
amongst the Pathways locations. CSC also implemented measures to support Institutional Heads
in managing Pre-Pathways at the maximum security level, recognizing the need for each site to
balance its unique security concerns and population management pressures while maintaining the
integrity of the Initiative.
Sub Program 2.1: Offender Case Management
Description
The Offender Case Management sub-program encompasses all activities at the community,
institutional, regional and national levels related to offender reintegration risks and needs
assessment; the development and management of individualized offender correctional plans,
institutional and community case supervision, as well as, overall sentence management. Key
activities include: sentence management, intake assessment, penitentiary placement, offender
personal development, transfers, correctional plan development, institutional and community
supervision.
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$279,062,126
$273,696,487
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$5,365,639
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2,938
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,759
-179
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
The accurate
assessment of risk
and supervision of
offenders
contributes to a
reduction in crime
Percentage of initial penitentiary
placements uninterrupted25
94.7% - 95.1%
95.3%
Percentage of successful transitions to
lower security26
90.4% - 91.3%
91.3%
Percentage of Day Parole cases
reviewed by the Parole Board of
Canada, based on the total number of
cases eligible for a review
61.9% (marker27)
61.4%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
25 Initial penitentiary placements uninterrupted represents the percentage of offenders who did not experience any
of the following interruptions to their correctional progress within 90 days of initial pen-placement: security level
changes; segregation placements >= 30 days; major/serious bodily injuries from incidents; unnatural deaths; or
escapes from custody.
26 The original indicator was “percentage of successful transfers to lower security” which required the use of a
transfer warrant. The implementation of clustered sites removed the necessity of using transfer warrants for all
transfers that take place within a clustered institution. However, the objective of the indicator was refined to focus
on the transition of an offender to a lower security level regardless of his/her location.
27 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. The marker for Day Parole
cases reviewed by Parole Board of Canada was derived from the FY12-13 benchmark dataset (average of
FY10-11; FY11-12; and FY12-13 results).
Correctional Service of Canada
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC assessed offenders’ risks and needs, developed and managed
offender correctional plans, and supervised offenders in institutions and in the community.
Two out of three performance results met expectations. The number of Day Parole cases
reviewed by the Parole Board of Canada was slightly below the anticipated result. To improve
future results in this area, CSC will ensure that all necessary information is provided to the
Parole Board of Canada, and will encourage and assist offenders to apply for review at the
earliest possible time.
In 2014–15, CSC implemented various activities to strengthen the case management framework,
including:


The continuation of the Structured Assessment and Intervention Framework (SAIF)
initiative, a multi-year project aiming to enhance case management by improving
offender assessment and the provision of appropriate evidence-based interventions,
pre-release planning and community supervision;
The development and delivery of Parole Officer Continuous Development training to
all case management staff to support the objectives of SAIF, with a focus on effective
interviewing, risk assessment, correctional planning, effective discharge planning,
parole officer interventions and correctional programming needs.
CSC continued to implement the Strategic Plan for Aboriginal Corrections (SPAC) and the
Aboriginal Continuum of Care initiatives and interventions (including Pathways Initiatives,
Elder Services, the accommodation of Aboriginal Spiritual Practices, Aboriginal specific
correctional programs, Healing Lodges) which have been developed to contribute to the healing
and reintegration of First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders. Elders continued to provide
spiritual counseling, cultural services and support to First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders.
CSC regularly transferred Aboriginal offenders to Healing Lodges to facilitate their access to
spiritual and cultural interventions and services as they return to society. Furthermore, CSC
continued to improve consultation and collaboration with Aboriginal communities in order to
enhance the healing and reintegration of First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders.
CSC continued implementing the Anijaarniq – A Holistic Inuit Strategy to ensure that Inuit
offenders have the support and resources they need to return and remain in their communities as
contributing members of society. Inuit offenders have been transferred to their home regions to
improve their access to appropriate family and cultural support and services. Also, Inuit-specific
programming has been delivered with Inuktitut speaking staff/Elders.
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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Sub-Program 2.2: Community Engagement
Description
The Community Engagement sub-program includes all activities related to enhancing the
engagement of citizens as partners in the fulfillment of the correctional mandate with offenders.
Key activities include: raising public awareness and improving confidence in federal corrections;
providing victims with information, creating collaborative working relationships with various
segments of the community, including citizens, non-governmental agencies, other government
departments, and offenders who have successfully reintegrated into the community; and
negotiating partnership agreements with various stakeholders.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$8,203,500
$9,810,282
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$1,606,782
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
73
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
72
-1
Correctional Service of Canada
47
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated
Results
Actual Results
1,500
1,756
Number of operational units which
engage citizens to provide advice,
promote volunteer involvement, act as
impartial observers, provide feedback
and liaise with partners and
stakeholders
87
81
Number and percentage of offenders
with registered victims
3,874 and 17%
(markers28)
4,213 and 18%
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
The involvement of
the public
contributes to the
offender
reintegration
process
Number of Canadians engaged through
initiatives funded under the Outreach
Fund that address the themes of:
Building relationships with new or
existing stakeholders; Enhancing the
role of Aboriginal communities; Cultural
diversity; Mental health; and Current
issues/Community safety
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC worked with citizen advisory groups, victim services,
community chaplaincy organizations, and other partners to provide continuum of care for
offenders and to support victims of crime.
More than 1,700 Canadians were engaged through outreach initiatives. The initiatives will
continue in the next fiscal year, and funds for outreach initiatives have been allocated to each
region. The number of offenders with registered victims also exceeded expectations. The number
of operational units which engage citizens was less than anticipated, which was essentially due to
the clustering of institutions, reducing the net numbers of units.
CSC strengthened community engagement by sustaining existing partnerships and developing
new and diverse ones with partners and stakeholders at local and national levels. An increased
number of Citizen Engagement meetings were held via teleconference and videoconference with
the National Ethnocultural Advisory Committee, the National Executive Committee of the
Citizen Advisory Committees and the National Volunteer Association. CSC also shared
information with the National Associations Active in Criminal Justice. Furthermore, in an effort
28 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. Due to limited structured data
availability, a 3-year average of results was not possible for this performance indicator. As such, a 1-year
snapshot marker was used (results of FY13-14).
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
to foster community engagement, CSC organized multiple community forums and formed
community focus groups in order to reach out to the local ethnocultural communities to establish
and expand partnerships.
CSC strengthened volunteer management practices which resulted in an increased number of
volunteers with program-specific training and an increased number of sites engaged in volunteer
appreciation activities.
With respect to victim engagement, CSC updated its policy framework to implement Bill C-489,
An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Corrections and Conditional Release Act
(restrictions on offenders). In addition, CSC promulgated a Case Management Tool to ensure
that:


victims have an opportunity to provide a statement with regard to upcoming release
decisions; and
conditions to protect the victim’s safety are considered in the context of offender release
decisions.
CSC has also been developing the Victim Web Portal through consultation on the external-facing
screens and usability testing.
Sub-Program 2.3: Spiritual Services
Description
The Spiritual Services sub-program includes all activities related to spiritual guidance to
offenders. Key activities include directing and coordinating religious services and sacramental
ministry for inmates, creating, coordinating, and delivering religious activities, interpreting to the
community the needs and concerns of persons affected by the criminal justice system and
educating the community concerning their role in reconciliation as well as establishing and
maintaining partnerships to assist ex-offenders to live in the community as law-abiding citizens.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
$17,287,493
2014–15
Actual Spending
$18,183,505
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$896,012
Correctional Service of Canada
49
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
22
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
17
-5
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Offenders have access Percentage compliance with
to spiritual services
established standards for
spiritual services
Number of contacts with
offenders
Number of activities and/or
hours in which volunteers are
engaged
Anticipated Results
Actual Results
100%
100%
Institutional
Chaplains: 152,000
contacts with
offenders;
Faith-community
reintegration partners:
15,050 contacts with
offenders
Institutional
Chaplains: 23,050
activities
Faith-community
reintegration partners:
17,075 hours
398, 212
35,473
32,370
32,000
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC provided spiritual guidance to offenders of various religious
traditions in all regions and institutions.
All performance results in this area exceeded expectations. CSC worked with a number of
community partners through both volunteer and contract initiatives related to chaplaincy service
delivery. The number of contacts with offenders, volunteer activities and volunteer hours all
exceeded anticipated results. Moreover, CSC was in full compliance with established standards
for spiritual services.
In 2014–15, CSC implemented the Accommodation of Aboriginal Spiritual Practices Monitoring
Tool to ensure the adequate accommodation of Aboriginal spiritual practices within CSC. Each
Institutional Head reported on the accommodation of Aboriginal spiritual practices on a quarterly
basis, focusing on ceremonies, smudging, tobacco handling, ignition source availability and the
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
accessibility of approved Standing Order for the practices, which ensured that there was no gap
in the accommodation of Aboriginal spiritual practices at CSC mainstream institutions.
CSC worked in collaboration with its main external partner, the Interfaith Committee, to
discover new and meaningful paths to enhance and sustain offender support opportunities.
Interfaith Committee representatives continued to meet with CSC’s Commissioner and Regional
Deputy Commissioners, underscoring the importance of the relationship between CSC and faith
communities at all levels of the organization.
A request for proposal process for Faith Community Reintegration Projects, with a revised and
standardized Statement of Work for all projects, resulted in multiple contracts across the country.
These new contracts are focussed on connecting inmates with faith communities to aid in
successful reintegration, and they include a new reporting tool to track interaction and
involvement with faith-based organizations in the community. CSC also moved to expand the
number of locations available for Faith Community Reintegration Project contracts, in order to
better serve the offender population and increase the number of faith-based organizations
involved in providing reintegration support to offenders.
Sub-Program 2.4: Correctional Reintegration Program
Description
The Correctional Reintegration Program sub-program encompasses structured interventions that
address empirically-validated factors directly linked to federal offenders’ criminal behaviour in
order to reduce re-offending. Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery
and effective management of national correctional programs designed to prevent criminal
behavior.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$110,037,165
$91,781,629
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$18,255,536
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
937
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
916
-21
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated Result
Ranges*
Actual
29
Results
Median time to first enrolment in a
nationally recognized institutional
correctional program
160 - 187 days
125 days
Median time to first enrolment in a
nationally recognized community-based
correctional program
42 - 43 days30
33 days
Percentage nationally recognized
correctional program completions31
80.2% - 83.5%
84.2%
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Participation in
Correctional
Reintegration
Programs
contributes to the
offender
reintegration
process
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC continued to address the underlying causes of crime by
implementing effective correctional reintegration programs that are based on a comprehensive
understanding of criminal behaviour and correctional techniques. These programs continued to
offer a broad range of cognitive and behavioral skills to prevent future recidivism.
Results in this area were very positive. Correctional program completion rates exceeded
expectations and waiting periods for enrollment in nationally recognized institutional and
community-based correctional programs continued to improve over the years. A key contributor
to the improvement in wait times is the previously noted transition to the Integrated Correctional
Program Model.
By the end of the reporting year, the Integrated Correctional Program Model had been
successfully implemented in the Pacific, Atlantic and Quebec Regions, and implementation in
the Ontario Region had begun. 2014-15 saw a reduction in both budget and FTEs in the subjectspecific correctional programs reported in sub-sub-programs 2.4.1 to 2.4.4. The reduction is
directly attributable to the transition from these programs to the Integrated Correctional Program
29 Both the traditional suite of Nationally Recognized Correctional Programs and the new Integrated Correctional
Program Model are included in all data outcomes.
30 Since February 2015, the start date used to calculate the median time has been changed from term release date
to date of first release. This resulted in the original target of 42–43 as stated in the Report on Plans and Priorities
2014-15 to be amended to 47–51. The 33 days showing in the table above is using the amended code when the
anticipated range of 42–43 days was produced using the old code.
31 These data represent institutional based programs only.
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Model. Results for those programs relate only to regions where the integrated model has not yet
been implemented.
The Aboriginal Integrated Correctional Program was revised to more closely align program
content with traditional teachings and Aboriginal Elder interventions, and to ensure that the
content is sensitive to the spiritual and cultural needs of Aboriginal offenders.
Gender and culturally responsive correctional programs, such as the Aboriginal Women
Offender Programs (Circle of Care) and mainstream Women Offender Programs (Continuum of
Care) were successfully delivered in all women’s institutions in 2014–15. Significant
improvement was seen in reduced wait times for offenders to begin the Women’s Engagement
Program (the first program on the Continuum of Care for Women Offenders); in 2014-15 it was
31 days, as compared to 186 days in 2009–10.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.1: Violence Prevention Program
Description
The Violence Prevention Program sub-sub program is a set of structured interventions designed
to assist the rehabilitation of offenders convicted of violent crimes. The Violence Prevention
Program addresses empirically validated factors directly linked to offenders’ violent behaviour.
Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery and management of national
correctional programs designed to protect society by preventing violent behavior.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$9,921,241
$10,721,370
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$800,129
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
95
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
104
9
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Completion of
correctional
program to address
violence
contributes to
reduced crime,
including violent
crime
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Violence Prevention
programming who complete prior to full
parole eligibility date
32.6% - 47.8%
49.9%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Violence Prevention
programming who complete prior to
warrant expiry date
75.9% - 80.5%
87.5%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
This subject-specific program will be phased out by 2017 as part of the transition to the
Integrated Correctional Program Model. Where it was still offered, during the reporting year,
CSC continued to plan, deliver, and monitor programs to address offenders’ violent behaviour at
intensity levels commensurate with the assessed risk.
CSC exceeded all identified and expected performance results in this area. Some 49.9 percent
and 87.5 percent of offenders with an identified need for Violence Prevention programming
completed the program prior to full parole eligibility dates and warrant expiry dates,
respectively. These results were better than expected and may be attributed to an increased
capacity to deliver the integrated correctional programs.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.2: Substance Abuse Program
Description
The Substance Abuse Program sub-sub-program is a set of structured interventions designed to
assist the rehabilitation of offenders convicted of crimes complicated by substance abuse. The
Substance Abuse Program addresses empirically-validated factors directly linked to offenders’
criminal behavior, alcohol and drug use. Key activities include the development,
implementation, delivery and management of national correctional programs designed to protect
society by preventing substance abuse and crime.
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Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$9,877,952
$8,788,160
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$1,089,792
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
93
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
84
-9
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Completion of
correctional
program to address
substance abuse
contributes to
reduced crime,
including violent
crime
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Substance Abuse
programming who complete prior to full
parole eligibility date
47.8% - 52.2%
56.3%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Substance Abuse
programming who complete prior to
warrant expiry date
74.1% - 79.2%
88.6%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
This subject-specific program will be phased out by 2017 as part of the transition to the
Integrated Correctional Program Model. Where it was still offered, during the reporting year,
CSC continued to plan, deliver, and monitor programs to address offenders’ substance abuse
needs at intensity levels commensurate with the assessed risk.
In 2014–15, 56.3 percent and 88.6 percent of offenders with an identified need for Substance
Abuse programming completed the program prior to full parole eligibility dates and warrant
expiry dates, respectively. Both results exceeded expectations.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.3: Family Violence Program
Description
The Family Violence Prevention Program sub-sub-program is a set of structured interventions
designed to assist the rehabilitation of offenders convicted of violent crimes against intimate
partners. The Family Violence Prevention Program addresses empirically-validated factors
directly linked to offenders’ violent behaviour. Key activities include the development,
implementation, delivery and management of national correctional programs designed to protect
society by preventing domestic violence.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$2,111,312
$2,032,044
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$79,268
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
24
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
21
-3
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Completion of
correctional
program to address
family violence
contributes to
reduced crime,
including violent
crime
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Family Violence
programming who complete prior to full
parole eligibility date
23.5% - 42.7%
41.1%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Family Violence
programming who complete prior to
warrant expiry date
58.9% - 66.5%
85.7%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
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Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
This subject-specific program will be phased out by 2017 as part of the transition to the
Integrated Correctional Program Model. Where it was still offered, during the reporting year,
CSC continued to plan, deliver, and monitor programs to effectively address family violence at
intensity levels commensurate with the assessed risk.
In 2014–15, CSC achieved positive results in this area: 41.1 percent and 85.7 percent of
offenders with an identified need for Family Violence programming completed programming
prior to full parole eligibility dates and warrant expiry dates, respectively.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.4: Sex Offender Program
Description
The Sex Offender Program sub-sub-program is a set of structured interventions designed to assist
the rehabilitation of offenders who are at risk to commit sexual offences. The Sex Offender
Program addresses empirically-validated factors directly linked to offenders’ criminal sexual
behaviour. Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery and management of
national correctional programs designed to protect society by preventing sexual offences.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$4,903,452
$4,508,985
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$394,467
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
42
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
42
0
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Expected Result
Completion of
correctional
program to address
sexual violence
contributes to
reduced crime,
including violent
crimes
Performance Indicators
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Sex Offender
programming who complete prior to full
parole eligibility date
27.3% - 34.1%
61.7%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified need for Sex Offender
programming who complete prior to
warrant expiry date
82.9% - 83.7%
91.5%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
This subject-specific program will be phased out by 2017 as part of the transition to the
Integrated Correctional Program Model. Where it was still offered, during the reporting year,
CSC continued to plan, deliver, and monitor programs to address sexual violence at intensity
levels commensurate with the assessed risk.
In 2014–15, 61.7 percent and 91.5 percent of offenders with an identified need for Sex Offender
programming completed the program prior to full parole eligibility dates and warrant expiry
dates, respectively. Both results exceeded expectations.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.5: Maintenance Program
Description
The Correctional Maintenance Program sub-sub-program is a set of structured interventions
designed to assist the rehabilitation of offenders who have completed national correctional
programs. It addresses empirically-validated factors directly linked to offenders’ criminal
behaviour. Key activities include the development, implementation, delivery and management of
national correctional programs designed to protect society by preventing crime.
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$6,370,412
$6,904,565
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$534,153
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
71
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
67
-4
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Completion of
Community
Maintenance
Programs
contributes to
reduced crime,
including violent
crime
Percentage Community Maintenance
program completions
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Range*
55.0% - 65.6%
69.3%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting year, CSC continued to plan, deliver, and monitor the integrated
correctional programs and initiatives at intensity levels commensurate with the assessed risk.
The completion rate for the Community Maintenance Program was 69.3 percent in fiscal year
2014–15, which exceeded expectations.
The Integrated Correctional Program Model includes both institutional and community
maintenance programs, which created efficiencies in the delivery of correctional programs prior
to release eligibility dates. The structured skill sessions addressed the basic components of all
other correctional programs, including emotions management, problem-solving, high risk
thinking, communication and interpersonal skills, goal-setting and self-management skills.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
A self-management program for women offenders was also included in both the mainstream and
the Aboriginal stream of gender-specific correctional programs, and was offered both in
institutions and the community. Its focus is to support women to solidify the strengths and skills
they learned in programs so they can make and/or maintain positive changes.
Sub-Sub-Program 2.4.6: Social Program
Description
The Social Program sub-sub program is a set of activities designed to assist humane custody and
the reintegration of all federal offenders through the provision of recreation, self-help, life skills
training, and community contact opportunities. Key activities include the development,
implementation, delivery and management of social programs designed to assist offender
reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$76,852,796
$58,826,505
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$18,026,291
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
612
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
598
-14
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicator
Offenders
Number of Community Integration
participate in social
Programs delivered.
programs
Anticipated Result Actual Results
35 (marker32)
48
32 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. The marker for Community
Integration programs delivered was derived from the FY12-13 benchmark dataset (average of FY10-11; FY1112; and FY12-13 results).
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
As compared to the other sub-sub-programs under the same sub-program, 2.4 Correctional
Program, the human and financial resources for this Social Program seem to be
disproportionately high. That is because during the first years of the transition to the Integrated
Correctional Program Model, including 2014-15, resources for the Integrated Correctional
Program Model were located in this sub-sub-program to ensure they were captured and reported.
Also incorporated in this sub-sub-program for the reporting period were women’s programs and
the integrated program for Aboriginal offenders. As noted, CSC will adapt its Program
Alignment Architecture to recognize the change.
In 2014–15, CSC delivered 48 Community Integration Programs, which exceeded expectations.
In addition, CSC delivered 15 Social Integration Programs for Women.
Structured and unstructured recreational and cultural activities were provided to offenders in all
institutions to enhance their mental and physical well-being, and to provide them with
opportunities to demonstrate pro-social behavioural gains. The provision of such activities is
consistent with the United Nations’ Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners,
which ensures that such opportunities are provided to all inmates, regardless of classification and
risk.
In 2014–15, CSC established a National Working Group to revamp the Peer Support Program in
Women Offender Institutions. Through consultations, partnerships, and collegial curriculum
design, the group will be developing a more skills-based program to ensure peer mentors are well
equipped to refer fellow inmates to the appropriate resource.
CSC continued to monitor the delivery of women offender programs to ensure that their social
programming needs were met. CSC also organized ethnocultural activities in operational units to
address the specific needs of the ethnocultural offender population. As well, CSC implemented a
‘Parenting Circle’ in the Pacific Region, which can be described as a volunteer facilitated selfhelp group for inmates where they can discuss their stress and concerns, receive support and
information, as well as acquire parenting and life skills.
Sub-Program 2.5: Offender Education
Description
The Offender Education Program sub-program is a set of interventions designed to assist the
reintegration of federal offenders by increasing education levels to promote employment and
rehabilitation opportunities. Offender Education Programs include academic assessment,
delivery of provincially accredited and certified education curricula, and library services. Key
activities include: education needs assessment, and the implementation, delivery and
management of provincial adult basic and secondary education programs and library services.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$24,343,106
$24,294,557
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
-$48,549
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
170
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
159
-11
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Education
programs
contribute to the
rehabilitation and
reintegration of
offenders
Percentage of offenders with an
identified education need who upgrade
their education prior to full parole
eligibility date
30.5% - 36.4%
54.4%
Percentage of offenders with an
identified education need who upgrade
their education prior to warrant expiry
date
41.3% - 49.4%
63.2%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
CSC assesses offenders’ educational needs upon their admission. During the reporting year,
approximately three-quarters of federally sentenced-offenders were identified as needing
educational programming. Education Programs are intended to address offenders’ educational
needs; increase their basic literacy, social cognition, and problem solving skills; prepare them for
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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
participation in correctional programs; and provide them with the knowledge and skills necessary
to gain and maintain employment and lawfully reside in the community upon their release.33
CSC has been improving education results every year over the past six years. By the end of fiscal
year 2014–15, 54.4 percent and 63.2 percent of offenders with an identified education need have
upgraded their education level prior to their full parole eligibility dates and warrant expiry dates,
respectively. Both results exceeded expectations.
CSC completed an Evaluation of Offender Education Programs and Services34 in February 2015,
which concluded that:




Educational programming addresses the federal government’s priority concerning
education, literacy and economy and supports CSC’s strategic priority to enhance public
safety by facilitating the safe transition of eligible offenders into the community;
Offender participation in educational programming has a positive impact on employment
outcomes for medium and high risk offenders, particularly for those who completed more
than 10 educational achievements;
CSC provides education programming in a cost-effective manner given that education
program participants typically recidivate at lower rates than non-participants; and
Higher risk offenders who participated in education programs had better conditional
release outcomes than higher risk offenders who did not participate.
Regions undertook innovative initiatives to continue to support education programs in 2014–15.
Of note, the Quebec Region maintained its agreement with the provincial Ministry of Education
to promote the identification of mutual objectives and help to establish linkages with the
community, academic institutions and the labour market. The region also promoted and
prioritized Inuit offenders for participation in a program focusing on "starting and managing a
business," offered by the CEGEP Marie-Victorin.
The Prairie Region implemented a four-step approach. First, all offenders with an Education
need were assigned as part-time students, thereby maximizing the number of students who could
receive instruction. Second, it optimized CSC’s ability to address offenders’ Education need by
using both a traditional and non-traditional delivery approach. Third, it maximized opportunities
to assess offenders for elective high school credits, using the Prior Learning Assessment and
Recognition strategy. Finally, teachers were expected to maintain a full caseload, comprised of
students on both a traditional and non-traditional instruction schedule.
The Ontario Region initiated pilot projects focusing on learning disabilities and English as a
Second Language. These initiatives provided offenders with more assistance in order to progress
33 Correctional Service Canada Review Panel, 2007; Nafekh, Allegri, Fabisiak, Batten, Stys, Li, et al, 2009; Sharpe
& Curwen, 2012
34 CSC Evaluation Report (2015): Evaluation of CSC's Education Programs and Services
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
through their educational journey, thus allowing them to be successful in their Correctional
Plans. The Ontario Region also provided training on how to use computer software to offenders
through online tutorials.
Sub-Program 2.6: CORCAN Employment and Employability
Description
The CSC Employment and Employability sub-program is focused on employment skills
development to meet the specific demands of the labour market while preparing offenders for
release. It includes employment training and career planning programs for inmates and is
designed to allow offenders to acquire skills, attitudes and behaviours valued by employers.
CORCAN program plays a key role in CSC’s efforts to actively encourage offenders to become
law-abiding citizens. Vocational Education, Employment Skills and Career Counselling, and
Specific Employment Skills, On-the-job Training and National Employability Skills Program are
also included in this program area. CSC provides employment services and job placement to
offenders after release.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$26,096,580
$34,582,613
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$8,486,033
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
475
64
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
465
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Offenders have the
employment skills
to meet labour
markets and obtain
employment upon
release from
institutions
Percentage of offenders with an
identified employment need who
complete vocational training prior to
first release
Percentage of offenders with an
identified employment need who secure
employment in the community prior to
warrant expiry date
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
49.50% - 50.84%
60.55%
59.6% - 62.8%
74.1%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting year, CORCAN continued to focus on helping offenders develop
employment skills that meet the specific demands of the labour market.
Performance results in this area exceeded expectations: 60.55 percent of offenders with an
identified employment need completed vocational training prior to first release, and 74.1 percent
of offenders secured employment in the community prior to their warrant expiry date.
In 2014–15, CORCAN delivered vocational training in institutions and undertook a mid-year
training review to ensure that training is appropriate and assists offenders in gaining the skills
required to meet the demands of the labour market. As well, CSC continued to strengthen
relationships with various stakeholders and external community partners. As an example,
CORCAN continued to work with Habitat for Humanity in the Prairie Region where offenders
are able to contribute to building a number of Ready to Move homes. Through this initiative,
offenders gain a number of hard and soft skills (communication, timeliness, carpentry skills, how
to work with others), and are able to apply the skills learned in their correctional programs.
In 2014–15, over 4,000 offenders earned more than 2.2 million hours of on-the-job skills training
in institutional CORCAN employment. This training provides offenders with the opportunity to
develop and practise essential skills in a workplace setting and to learn and develop technical
skills. Additionally, 90 offenders in CSC’s three community-based shops were provided with
over 47,000 hours of on-the-job training. Finally, 220 offenders logged apprenticeship hours
related to trades such as Welder, Industrial and Heavy Duty Mechanics (Millwright), Painter,
Carpentry, Electrician, Plumber, Professional Cook and Cabinetmaker, among others.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Through community partners, such as Community Colleges and other recognized training
providers CORCAN continued to create sustainable partnerships to obtain third-party
certifications and assist in successful offender reintegration.
In order to provide services and support to Aboriginal women, CSC established a National
Committee on Services for Aboriginal Women with participation from various Aboriginal
organizations across the country with the goal of strengthening partnerships and collaboration.
To address the employment needs of ethnocultural offenders, emphasis was placed on the
identification of employment gaps so as to increase viable and meaningful employment
opportunities both at the institutional and community levels. Release planning sessions were also
provided to ethnocultural offenders to allow them to connect with employment services at the
pre-release stage. CSC also increased the number of successful Cultural Employment Escorted
Temporary Absences, which could ultimately result in higher employment rates for ethnocultural
offenders upon release, and an increase in successful reintegration.
Program 3.0: Community Supervision
Description
The Community Supervision program includes all program activities that protect society through
the administration of community operations, including the provision of accommodation options,
establishment of community partnerships and provision of community health services as
necessary. Community supervision provides the structure to assist offenders to safely and
successfully reintegrate into society.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
2014–15
Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
93,399,963
93,399,963
125,590,617
32,190,654
102,236,783
Human Resources (FTEs)
66
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
211
192
(19)
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
The variance between the actual spending and the planned spending is mainly due to the in-year
increase in authorities and internal budget adjustments:




an increase in operating authority of $7.5 million carried over from 2013–14;
an increase in authority of $0.6 million as a result of a one-time transition payment for
the implementation of salary payment in arrears;
an increase in authority of $0.4 million due to the reimbursement of eligible paylist
expenditures (e.g., payment of severance benefits, parental benefits, etc.);
a $23.3 million in-year internal budget adjustment.
The above variance analysis also explains the major variances at the sub-program and sub-sub
program levels under Program 3.0 Community Supervision.
Taking into consideration the above adjustments, CSC’s adjusted authorities available for use
were $125.6 million and the variance with the actual spending was $9.2 million, which was
included in the amount to be carried forward to 2015–16.
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Offenders are
reintegrated into
the community as
law-abiding citizens
while under
supervision
Percentage of offenders on conditional
release successfully reaching warrant
expiry date without re-offending (no
revocation, charge or conviction)
47.75% - 53.60%
54.90%
Percentage of supervision intensity
successfully reduced
83.5% (marker35)
N/A36
Percentage of time employed in the
community
58.9% - 61.2%
64.5%
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
35 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. Due to limited structured data availability, a
3-year average of results was not possible for this performance indicator. As such, a 1-year snapshot marker was used
(results of FY12-13).
36 Due to changes to policy and to administrative data, CSC no longer reports performance results for the
percentage of supervision intensity successfully reduced.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
CSC continued to work with community partners to provide offenders with safe accommodation,
employment opportunities and necessary health services.
In 2014–15, CSC achieved very positive results in this area. The percentage of time that
offenders were employed (64.5 percent) exceeded performance targets, as the community
employment rate continued to increase (64.5 percent compared to 59.3 percent five years ago).
As well, the percentage of offenders on conditional release who successfully reached warrant
expiry without re-offending was the best of the last six years. Offenders on conditional release in
the community were able to access correctional programs more quickly than in the past (29 days
compared to 49 days five years ago).
During the reporting year, CSC strengthened management and community capacity by
implementing the Federal Community Corrections Strategy. CSC continued to encourage the
involvement of districts, partners and stakeholders in realizing the strategy’s five principles to
ensure that community reintegration begins at the earliest possible time in the offender’s
sentence.
Districts and partners continued to strengthen capacity through local initiatives that included,
among others: in-reach activities; targeted employability programs; the provision of additional
accommodation options for offenders with complex needs; and the implementation of
reintegration teams to facilitate release planning.
Sub-Program 3.1: Community Management and Security
Description
The Community Management and Security sub-program includes all activities related to the
administration of the supervision and management of offenders in the community in an effort to
ensure safe reintegration of offenders thereby contributing to public safety.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
$12,671,608
68
2014–15
Actual Spending
$14,893,571
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$2,221,963
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
120
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
120
0
Performance Results
Expected Result
Community
management is
compliant with
policy and law
Performance Indicators
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Rate of critical convictions under
supervision
0.00 - 0.84
0.37
Rate of serious convictions under
supervision
0.00 - 53.60
28.00
225.20 - 256.80
183.10
Rate of minor/moderate convictions
under supervision
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting year, CSC continued its efforts in the safe transition of offenders through
their active supervision and management in the community.
CSC achieved very positive results in community management and security in 2014–15. The
rates of critical and serious convictions under supervision were within the anticipated result
ranges. The rate of minor/moderate convictions was better than the anticipated result range.
When compared to past results, the rate of critical convictions under supervision was 0.37 in
2014–15 compared to 1.14 five years ago; the rate of serious convictions under supervision was
28.0 compared to 66.4 five years ago; and the rate of minor/moderate convictions on supervision
was 183.1, compared to 235.9 five years ago.
CSC continued to explore the use of technology and software to enhance the safety of
community staff members and the public. As part of this effort, in 2014–15, CSC was approved
to be a testing department for the Blackline GPS Loner 900/Loner Bridge System as part of the
Build-in-Canada Innovation Program.
CSC signed a contract with Jemtec (Omnilink) in order to implement electronic monitoring (EM)
services to augment CSC’s ability to supervise offenders in the community. CSC will commence
the implementation of a three-year EM Research Pilot in July 2015.
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Sub-Program 3.2: Community-based Residential Facilities
Description
The Community-based Residential Facilities sub-program includes all activities related to the
provision of a structured and supportive environment during the gradual reintegration process
through the provision of accommodation for offenders on parole, statutory release, temporary
absence or Long Term Supervision Order. CSC has federally operated residential facilities and
contracts with numerous non-governmental organizations to provide services, support and
monitoring of offenders on release.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$73,688,937
$100,224,944
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$26,536,007
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
17
70
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Community-based
Residential
Facilities provide
supervised and
supportive
accommodation
that supports safe
reintegration
Percentage of successful residency
supervision periods (no revocations,
sensational incidents, charges or
convictions) - Community-based
Residential Facilities
69.41% - 71.60%
72.80%
Rate of Community-based Residential
Facility incidents
156.80 (marker37)
361.50
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Over the past 10 years, there was a slight increase in the community population and an increase
in the proportion of offenders being released on Statutory Release. As well, CSC’s national bed
utilization rates increased from 78 percent five years ago to 81 percent in 2014–15 as a result of a
greater share of offenders requiring residency. To ensure the safe reintegration of offenders, CSC
continued to partner with non-governmental organizations to provide community-based
residential facility services to offenders released with residency requirements.
Performance results in this area were mixed. The successful residency supervision periods in
Community-based Residential Facilities exceeded expectations. While the rate of incidents in
Community-based Residential Facilities was higher than projected marker, it is important to note
that the anticipated performance was a marker, which means accessible data were too limited to
establish a result range. CSC will continue to monitor results against this marker and will
stabilize a result range when sufficient data are available to better reflect operational
performance.
CSC has been working to modernize the technology supporting the tracking and monitoring of
community accommodation capacity and utilization information. In 2014–15, progress was made
in identifying requirements and in modelling an automated Offender Accommodation
Management solution. This system is expected to improve efficiencies in the areas of release
planning, population management and forecasting by providing accurate, up-to-date information
on vacancies and services available, as well as on the profile of offenders being accommodated.
37 Markers are used when there is not yet sufficient data to establish a benchmark. Due to limited structured data
availability, a 3-year average of results was not possible for this performance indicator. As such, a 1-year
snapshot marker was used (results of FY12-13).
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Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1: Community Residential Facilities
Description
The Community Residential Facilities sub-sub-program includes all activities related to the
provision of accommodation for offenders in what is commonly referred to as halfway houses as
well as Hostels, Private Home Placements and Treatment Centres. Community Residential
Facilities are operated by non-profit community-based agencies under contract with CSC.
Community Residential Facilities promote the successful reintegration of offenders and ensure
public safety by providing supervision, intervention, support, monitoring and accommodation for
offenders on release.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$65,439,986
$86,754,624
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$21,314,638
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
Not applicable – contracts with Not applicable – contracts with Not applicable – contracts with
community agencies
community agencies
community agencies
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicator
Offenders with
residency
conditions have
appropriate
supervision and
housing in the
community
Percentage of successful residency
supervision periods (no revocations,
sensational incidents, charges or
convictions) - Community Residential
Facilities
Rate of "fail to return”38 among
offenders residing in a Community
Residential Facility
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
71.99% - 74.66%
77.30%
0.00 - 442.20
250.30
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
CSC worked to ensure safe reintegration of offenders by providing supervision, intervention,
support, monitoring and accommodation to offenders through specific contracts with non-profit
community-based agencies.
All results in this area were positive. Successful residency supervision periods in Community
Residential Facilities exceeded the anticipated result range and surpassed results achieved over
the past four years. In addition, "fail to return" among offenders residing in a Community
Residential Facility reached its lowest level as compared to results achieved over the past six
years.
CSC continued to work with Aboriginal Elders to provide support to Aboriginal offenders. For
example, CSC contracted with the Kikewey Wig, a privately operated Healing House in New
Brunswick, operated by an Aboriginal Elder. This residential option is expected to provide a
consistent continuum of care to offenders following the traditional path.
38 The data represent the number of events per 1,000 offenders over a one year period, where a “fail to return” to a
Community Residential Facilities (CRF) is recorded. A “fail to return” to CRF event occurs when an offender
leaves the CRF without authorization, does not return to the CRF, or is late returning to the CRF where he/she is
residing after having signed out.
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Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.2: Community Correctional Centres
Description
The Community Correctional Centres sub-sub-program encompasses all activities related to the
management of federally operated community-based residential facilities that provide a 24-hour,
structured living environment for the purpose of safely reintegrating offenders into the
community. Community Correctional Centres accommodate offenders under federal jurisdiction
who have been released to the community on unescorted temporary absences, day parole, full
parole, work releases, statutory release, as well as those subject to long-term supervision orders.
Community Correctional Centres are designated as minimum security institutions.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$8,248,951
$13,470,320
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$5,221,369
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
17
74
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicators
Higher risk
offenders have
appropriate levels
of supervision and
housing while on
conditional release
with a residency
condition
Percentage of successful residency
supervision periods (no revocations,
sensational incidents, charges or
convictions) - Community Correctional
Centres
Rate of "fail to return”39 among
offenders residing in a Community
Correctional Centre
Anticipated Result Actual Results
Ranges*
47.77% - 50.65%
51.72%
0.00 - 769.80
480.70
*The range for the anticipated performance result is established through the statistical analysis of
historical data and a review of factors within the operational context. The methodology ensures that what
is anticipated as a performance range is objective and reflective of changes within the operational
context.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC worked to ensure the safe reintegration of offenders by
providing a structured living environment in the community to supervise, and support high-risk
offenders who are released with a residency requirement.
All results in this area were positive. The results achieved in the area of successful residency
supervision periods in Community Correctional Centres exceeded the anticipated range, and the
rate of "fail to return" among offenders residing in a Community Correctional Centre reached its
lowest level as compared to results achieved over the past six years.
In 2014–15, CSC made considerable progress in the first year of its three-year commitment to
bring all Community Correctional Centres up to new minimum static security standards. These
minimum standard requirements are reflected in the revised version of Commissioner’s Directive
714 - Community Correctional Centres, which brings a greater degree of clarity and consistency
to the operation and governance of Community Correctional Centres.
39 The data represent the number of events per 1,000 offenders over a one year period, where a “fail to return” to a
Community Correctional Centre (CCC) is recorded. A “fail to return” to CCC event occurs when an offender
leaves the CCC without authorization, does not return to the CCC, or is late returning to the CCC where he/she
is residing after having signed out.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Sub-Program 3.3: Community Health Services
Description
Through the Community Health Services sub-program, CSC pays, on a fee-for-service basis, the
costs associated with essential health services for non-insured offenders in the community. In
addition, at some community sites, CSC provides mental health services to offenders with
significant mental health challenges in order to contribute to their successful reintegration into
the community. Key activities include providing specialized psychological support and services
to address mental health needs (e.g. crisis intervention and counselling), and linkage with
community agencies.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2014–15
Actual Spending
$7,039,418
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
$10,472,102
$3,432,684
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
75
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
70
-5
Performance Results
Expected Result
Performance Indicator
Mental health
services are
available to
offenders in the
Percentage of offenders who received
community in
a community mental health service
accordance with
professionally
accepted standards
76
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
Anticipated
Result
Actual Results
22%
23.4%
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC supported the reintegration of offenders into the community by
facilitating access to essential health care, and providing mental healthcare for offenders in the
community.
Some 23.4 percent of offenders have received a community mental health service in 2014–15,
which exceeded CSC’s anticipated result.
Prior to the offender reaching warrant expiry, CSC staff worked to establish linkages with
provincial or territorial health services and community agencies to provide coordination and
support (e.g., accompaniment support, assistance completing forms and applications) and to
facilitate safe transition between the institution and the community by providing continuity of
services, access to mental health specialists and accommodation. Upon release, CSC continued
to work with community mental health professionals, including nurses, social workers and
psychologists at selected community sites, to provide specialized support to address the mental
health needs of offenders, including direct service provision (e.g., crisis intervention and
counselling).
In continued collaboration and communication with other correctional jurisdictions, the FederalProvincial-Territorial Heads of Corrections Working Group on Mental Health developed an
action plan to support implementing the Mental Health Strategy for Corrections in Canada.
Program 4.0: Internal Services
Description
Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support
the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are:
Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human
Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management
Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services;
Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include
only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided
specifically to a program.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
2014–15
Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
2014–15
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus
planned)
305,241,011
305,241,011
311,070,547
5,829,536
334,272,793
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15
Planned
2014–15
Actual
2014–15
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,929
2,787
(142)
The variance between the actual spending and the planned spending is mainly due to the in-year
increase in authorities and internal budget adjustments:





an increase in operating authority of $13.8 million carried over from 2013–14;
an increase in authority of $6.9 million as a result of a one-time transition payment for
the implementation of salary payment in arrears;
an increase in capital authority of $6.8 million carried over from 2013–14 for the
completion of new living units within existing institutions;
an increase in authority of $5.0 million due to the reimbursement of eligible paylist
expenditures (e.g., payment of severance benefits, parental benefits etc.);
a $1.9 million in-year internal budget adjustment.
Taking into consideration the above adjustments, CSC’s adjusted authorities available for use
were $332.3 million and the variance with the actual spending was $21.3 million, which was
included in the amount to be carried forward to 2015–16.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
During the reporting period, CSC continued its effort to build a public service agency of the
future as outlined in Destination 2020. All CSC regions developed and began implementing the
Blueprint 2020 action plan.
CSC engaged in numerous initiatives and activities in order to support the success and wellness
of CSC’s employees. CSC provided objective advice to managers and staff on ethical issues,
facilitated sessions and workshops on a variety of subjects related to ways of improving wellbeing within the organization, facilitated informal conflict management processes to empower
and better equip people in resolving conflicts, provided an Ethical Leadership Program, and
began developing an Ethical Risk Assessment with the regions to identify circumstances that
could lead to an ethical breach within CSC.
To enhance the effectiveness of management practice, CSC continued to develop and implement
management tools, such as CSC’s Departmental Security Plan, the Five-Year Evaluation Plan
(2013–2014 to 2017–2018), the Three-Year Risk-Based Audit Plan, CSC’s Strategic Plan for
Human Resource Management 2012-2015, the Employment Equity Action Plan, the Official
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Languages Action Plan, the National Recruitment & Retention Action Plan for health
professionals, and the CSC/Parole Board Canada IM/IT 2014–17 Business Plan.
CSC enhanced staff training by implementing a mandatory security awareness training
(e-learning) for all employees. To date, over 15,000 employees completed the online security
awareness training. CSC also implemented a new 15-day, skill-focused national Parole Officer
Induction Training to provide new parole officers with the necessary skills for the workplace.
The Parole Officer Induction Training will be managed on an ongoing basis; adjustments will be
made when required.
CSC continued to assess the operating effectiveness of key internal controls and monitor the
implementation of the related Management Action Plans. CSC continued to enhance the
processes supporting the analysis, monitoring and reporting of the financial situation. CSC
enhanced the reporting of financial data under the CSC’s Program Alignment Architecture to
facilitate the various external reporting requirements. Rigorous reviews of the Financial Situation
Report were conducted throughout the Fiscal Year.
The clustered sites were formed to enhance resource efficiencies through shared services. CSC
has also completed a detailed review of various functions at National Headquarters and Regions,
including clustered sites, to assess any potential for further streamlining.
CSC introduced the revised asset management and accounting policy in keeping with the latest
Treasury Board Secretariat definitions regarding capital expenditures and ensured capital and
operating resources are aligned accordingly. Use of capital and operating funding was monitored
throughout the reporting year.
CSC continued to finalize the standardization of Chiefs of Materiel Management roles and
responsibilities across the organization, and to strengthen contracting management by
introducing more standardized templates and exploring consolidation of some roles and
responsibilities for maximum effectiveness. Standardized templates have been made accessible
to all regional Contracting and Materiel Services staff. The templates encompass all areas of
contracting, including Requests for Proposals, Elders, construction, and health services. The
standardization of templates and national accessibility for staff increased efficiency and was well
received and supported across the country.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Section III: Supplementary Information
Consolidated Financial Statements Highlights
Correctional Service of Canada
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Organizational Net Financial Position
(unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2015
(dollars)
Difference
Difference
(2014–15 actual (2014–15 actual
minus 2014–15 minus 2013–14
planned)
actual)
2014–15
Planned
Results
2014–15
Actual
2013–14
Actual
Total expenses
2,483,566,392
2,582,837,871
2,640,282,562
99,271,479
(57,444,691)
Total revenues
47,936,000
49,229,927
40,134,092
1,293,927
9,095,835
2,435,630,392
2,533,607,944
2,600,148,470
97,977,552
(66,540,526)
Financial Information
Net cost of
operations before
government funding
and transfers
As reflected in the Consolidated Financial Statements, CSC’s total expenditures decreased by
$57.4 million compared to 2013-14 mostly due to the net effect of the one-time retroactive
payments made in 2013-14 following the ratification of collective agreements and the increase in
the 2014-15 severance pay expenditures.
CSC total revenues increased by $9.1 million compared to 2013-14 due to an increase in
CORCAN’s sales of goods and services.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
2014-15 Expenditures by Program
Community
Supervision
5%
Internal
Services
12%
Correctional
Interventions
20%
Custody
63%
Consolidated Financial Statements
Correctional Service of Canada
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
(unaudited)
As at March 31, 2015
(dollars)
Financial Information
2014–15
2013–14
Difference
(2014–15 minus
2013–14)
Total net liabilities
399,516,978
443,010,301
(43,493,323)
Total net financial assets
247,883,672
202,922,500
44,961,172
Organisational net debt
151,633,306
240,087,801
(88,454,495)
Total non-financial assets
2,210,479,983
2,136,261,893
74,218,090
Organisational net financial
position
2,058,846,677
1,896,174,092
162,672,585
CSC’s net liabilities included $233 million in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, $95.6
million in employee future benefits, $52.6 million in vacation pay and compensatory leave and
$18.3 million in the inmate trust fund. The reduction in total net liabilities is mainly explained by
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Section III: Supplementary Information
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
reductions of $51.8 million in the obligation for severance benefits as well as $7.4 million in
vacation pay and compensatory leave and an increase of $15.9 million in accounts payable and
accrued liabilities.
The total net financial assets included $223.2 million in the due from the consolidated revenue
fund, $14.5 million in accounts receivable, advances and loans and $10.2 million in inventory
held for resale. The increase in total net financial assets is mainly attributed to an increase in the
due from consolidated revenue fund account following the implementation of salary payments in
arrears.
Consolidated Financial Statements
Consolidated Financial Statements
vii
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Supplementary Information Tables
The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
can be found on the CSC’s website.
 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategyviii;
 Internal Audits and Evaluationsix;
 User Fees Reportingx.
Tax Expenditures and Evaluations
The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special
measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of
Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax
Expenditures and Evaluationsxi publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures
and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Section IV: Organizational Contact Information
Correctional Service of Canada website: http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca
340 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P9
Feedback Form: http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/contact-us/008-0001-eng.shtml
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Appendix: Definitions
appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated
Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Includes operating and capital expenditures;
transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to
Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an
appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected
results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in
Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): Is a measure of the extent to which an employee
represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are
calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of
work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16
high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas:
economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des
résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs,
resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are
depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which
they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the
Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Includes net outlays and receipts
related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets
of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results,
how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well
lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of
measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an
organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of
communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports
decision making, accountability and transparency.
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2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and
Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that
receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include
amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The
determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be
able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plan (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an
organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain
the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected
result.
priorities (priorité): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on
during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must
be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to
meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes): A structured
inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between
programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on
the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period.
These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
result (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program
or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or
initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved
through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the
expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is
linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé): A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing
funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made
whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope,
funding level and duration.
88
Appendix: Definitions
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or
initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or
qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through
an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these
expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial
contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a
set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.
Correctional Service of Canada
89
2014–15 Departmental Performance Report
Endnotes
90
i
Corrections and Conditional Release Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C44.6/index.html
ii
Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations,
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-92-620/
iii
Correctional Service of Canada’s Mission, http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca./about-us/indexeng.shtml
iv
Whole-of-government framework, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx
v.
Public Accounts of Canada 2014, http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/cpc-pac/indexeng.html
vi
Canada’s Food Guide, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index-eng.php
vii
Consolidated Financial Statements; http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/publications/005007-4007eng.shtml
viii
Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, http://www.cscscc.gc.ca/publications/005007-8601-eng.shtml
ix
Internal Audits and Evaluations, http://cscweb.csc-scc/publications/005007-4500-20142015-01-eng.shtml
x
User Fees Reporting, http://cscweb.csc-scc/publications/005007-4500-2014-2015-02eng.shtml
xi
Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp
Endnotes
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