Outlook workbook 2013

Outlook workbook 2013

Microsoft

®

Office

Outlook 2013

© 2010 by CustomGuide, Inc. 3387 Brownlow Avenue, Suite 200; Saint Louis Park, MN 55426

This material is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by CustomGuide, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of

CustomGuide, Inc.

We make a sincere effort to ensure the accuracy of the material described herein; however, CustomGuide makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the quality, correctness, reliability, accuracy, or freedom from error of this document or the products it describes. Data used in examples and sample data files are intended to be fictional. Any resemblance to real persons or companies is entirely coincidental.

The names of software products referred to in this manual are claimed as trademarks of their respective companies.

CustomGuide is a registered trademark of CustomGuide, Inc.

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Table of Contents

Program Fundamentals .......................................................................................................................................... 8

Starting Outlook 2013 ............................................................................................................................................. 9

What’s New in Outlook 2013 ................................................................................................................................ 10

Understanding the Outlook 2013 Program Screen .............................................................................................. 12

Understanding Items ............................................................................................................................................ 13

Understanding the Message Window ................................................................................................................... 14

Giving Commands in Outlook ............................................................................................................................... 15

Using Command Shortcuts .................................................................................................................................. 18

Using the Navigation Bar ...................................................................................................................................... 20

Using the Reading Pane....................................................................................................................................... 22

Using the To-Do Bar ............................................................................................................................................. 23

Using Help ............................................................................................................................................................ 24

Exiting Outlook 2013 ............................................................................................................................................ 26

Program Fundamentals Review ........................................................................................................................... 27

Composing and Sending Email ........................................................................................................................... 30

Composing and Sending an Email Message ....................................................................................................... 31

Specifying Message Options ................................................................................................................................ 33

Formatting Text ..................................................................................................................................................... 35

Checking your Spelling ......................................................................................................................................... 37

Working with Hyperlinks ....................................................................................................................................... 38

Attaching a File to a Message .............................................................................................................................. 40

Composing and Sending Email Review ............................................................................................................... 41

Receiving Email ..................................................................................................................................................... 43

Receiving and Reading Email .............................................................................................................................. 44

Replying to and Forwarding a Message ............................................................................................................... 46

Using the Inline Feature ....................................................................................................................................... 47

Opening an Attachment ........................................................................................................................................ 48

Deleting a Message .............................................................................................................................................. 50

Flagging a Message for Follow-up ....................................................................................................................... 51

Using Color Categories ........................................................................................................................................ 53

Viewing Conversations ......................................................................................................................................... 55

Managing Conversations ...................................................................................................................................... 57

Sorting Messages ................................................................................................................................................. 59

Changing Views .................................................................................................................................................... 61

Printing a Message ............................................................................................................................................... 62

Receiving Email Review ........................................................................................................................................ 63

More Email Features ............................................................................................................................................. 66

Saving Unfinished Messages (Drafts) .................................................................................................................. 67

Recalling a Message ............................................................................................................................................ 68

Resending a Message .......................................................................................................................................... 69

Using the Out of Office Assistant .......................................................................................................................... 70

Delaying Sending a Message ............................................................................................................................... 71

Using Quick Steps ................................................................................................................................................ 72

Inserting a Signature ............................................................................................................................................ 74

Using Stationery and Themes .............................................................................................................................. 76

Changing Message Format .................................................................................................................................. 77

Dealing with Junk Email ....................................................................................................................................... 78

Adding Addresses to the Safe and Blocked Senders List .................................................................................... 80

Changing Outlook’s Security Settings .................................................................................................................. 82

Inserting Screenshots ........................................................................................................................................... 83

More Email Features Review................................................................................................................................. 84

Your Organization’s Name Here 3

Working with Contacts ......................................................................................................................................... 87

Introduction to the Address Book ......................................................................................................................... 88

Adding a Contact .................................................................................................................................................. 89

Adding a Contact from an Email ........................................................................................................................... 90

Editing and Deleting Contacts .............................................................................................................................. 91

Viewing and Sorting Contacts .............................................................................................................................. 92

Mapping a Contact’s Address ............................................................................................................................... 94

Working in a Contact Window .............................................................................................................................. 95

Finding and Organizing Contacts ......................................................................................................................... 97

Creating a Contact Group..................................................................................................................................... 99

Printing the Contacts List .................................................................................................................................... 101

Working with Contacts Review ........................................................................................................................... 103

Using the Calendar ............................................................................................................................................. 106

Viewing the Calendar ......................................................................................................................................... 108

Navigating the Calendar ..................................................................................................................................... 110

Scheduling Appointments ................................................................................................................................... 112

Scheduling an Event ........................................................................................................................................... 114

Editing and Rescheduling Appointments and Events ......................................................................................... 115

Working with Recurring Appointments ............................................................................................................... 116

Setting Availability ............................................................................................................................................... 118

Color-coding Appointments ................................................................................................................................ 119

Setting Reminders .............................................................................................................................................. 121

Viewing Calendar Items ...................................................................................................................................... 123

Changing the Appearance of a Calendar ........................................................................................................... 124

Changing Work Days and Times ........................................................................................................................ 125

Creating Additional Calendars ............................................................................................................................ 126

Viewing Calendars Side-by-Side or Overlaid ..................................................................................................... 127

Printing the Calendar .......................................................................................................................................... 129

Adding a Second Time Zone .............................................................................................................................. 130

Using the Calendar Review ................................................................................................................................. 131

Collaborating with Other Users ......................................................................................................................... 134

Sharing Your Calendar ....................................................................................................................................... 135

Opening Shared Calendars ................................................................................................................................ 138

Using Schedule View .......................................................................................................................................... 139

Scheduling Meetings .......................................................................................................................................... 140

Responding to a Meeting Request ..................................................................................................................... 142

Working with Calendar Groups ........................................................................................................................... 143

Marking an Appointment as Private .................................................................................................................... 145

Publishing Your Calendar on the Internet ........................................................................................................... 147

Sharing Outlook Folders ..................................................................................................................................... 149

Giving Delegate Permissions ............................................................................................................................. 151

Taking and Tracking a Vote ................................................................................................................................ 152

Working with Public Folders ............................................................................................................................... 154

Collaborating with Other Users Review ............................................................................................................. 156

Working with Tasks ............................................................................................................................................. 159

Adding a Task ..................................................................................................................................................... 160

Changing Task Views ......................................................................................................................................... 162

Sorting Tasks ...................................................................................................................................................... 164

Updating a Task .................................................................................................................................................. 165

Creating a Recurring Task .................................................................................................................................. 166

Attaching an Item to a Task ................................................................................................................................ 167

Assigning a Task ................................................................................................................................................. 168

Printing Tasks ..................................................................................................................................................... 170

Completing a Task .............................................................................................................................................. 171

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Working with Tasks Review ................................................................................................................................ 173

Using the Journal and Notes ............................................................................................................................. 175

Displaying the Journal ........................................................................................................................................ 176

Creating a Journal Entry Manually ..................................................................................................................... 177

Relating a Journal Entry to a Contact ................................................................................................................. 178

Opening, Modifying, and Deleting a Journal Entry ............................................................................................. 179

Changing Journal Views ..................................................................................................................................... 180

Working with Notes ............................................................................................................................................. 182

Using the Journal and Notes Review ................................................................................................................. 184

Organizing and Finding Information ................................................................................................................. 186

Exploring the Folder List ..................................................................................................................................... 187

Creating and Using Folders ................................................................................................................................ 188

Managing Folders ............................................................................................................................................... 190

Using Instant Search .......................................................................................................................................... 192

Refining a Search ............................................................................................................................................... 194

Using Advanced Find.......................................................................................................................................... 196

Creating and Using Search Folders ................................................................................................................... 197

Modifying and Deleting Search Folders ............................................................................................................. 199

Sorting and Grouping Information ...................................................................................................................... 200

Filtering Information ............................................................................................................................................ 202

Using the People Pane ....................................................................................................................................... 204

Organizing and Finding Information Review..................................................................................................... 205

Automating Commands ...................................................................................................................................... 207

Managing Quick Steps ....................................................................................................................................... 208

Creating a Rule ................................................................................................................................................... 211

Creating a Rule with the Rules Wizard ............................................................................................................... 213

Managing Rules .................................................................................................................................................. 214

Automating Commands Review ......................................................................................................................... 216

Managing Outlook Data ...................................................................................................................................... 218

Using Mailbox Cleanup....................................................................................................................................... 219

Using AutoArchive .............................................................................................................................................. 220

Manually Archiving and Retrieving Information .................................................................................................. 222

Importing Information .......................................................................................................................................... 224

Exporting Information ......................................................................................................................................... 226

Working with Personal Folders Files .................................................................................................................. 228

Working with Offline Folders ............................................................................................................................... 230

Managing Outlook Data Review ......................................................................................................................... 232

Customizing Outlook .......................................................................................................................................... 234

Customizing the Ribbon ..................................................................................................................................... 235

Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar .............................................................................................................. 237

Using and Customizing AutoCorrect .................................................................................................................. 238

Customizing Outlook Today ................................................................................................................................ 240

Starting Outlook Automatically ........................................................................................................................... 241

Adding Fields to a View ...................................................................................................................................... 243

Creating a Custom View ..................................................................................................................................... 244

Using Custom Groups ........................................................................................................................................ 246

The Weather Bar ................................................................................................................................................ 247

Changing Outlook’s Default Options .................................................................................................................. 248

Managing Accounts ............................................................................................................................................ 249

Customizing Outlook Review.............................................................................................................................. 250

Advanced Topics ................................................................................................................................................. 252

Your Organization’s Name Here 5

RSS Feeds ......................................................................................................................................................... 253

Using the Tools Together .................................................................................................................................... 256

Using Outlook Web App ..................................................................................................................................... 258

Using Microsoft Lync in Outlook ......................................................................................................................... 260

Connecting to Social Networks........................................................................................................................... 261

Using the Outlook Social Connector .................................................................................................................. 263

Advanced Topics Review .................................................................................................................................... 265

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Introducing

CustomGuide

Courseware

Thank you for choosing CustomGuide courseware as the solution to your training needs. A proven leader in the computer training industry, CustomGuide has been the key to successful training for thousands of students and instructors across the globe.

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Lessons

Each chapter contains lessons on related topics. Each lesson explains a new skill or topic and contains an exercise and exercise file to give you hands-onexperience. These skills can also be practiced using

CustomGuide Online Learning.

Review

A review is included at the end of the manual. Use these quiz questions and answers to assess how much you've learned.

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Your Organization’s Name Here 7

P r o g r a m

F u n d a m e n t a l l s

Starting Outlook 2013 ......................................... 9

Windows Vista and Windows 7.................. 9

What’s New in Outlook 2013 ............................. 10

Understanding the Outlook 2013 Program

Screen ................................................................. 12

Understanding Items ......................................... 13

Understanding the Message Window .............. 14

Giving Commands in Outlook .......................... 15

Backstage view ........................................ 15

Ribbon...................................................... 16

Changing the Ribbon Display .................. 16

File tab ..................................................... 16

Quick Access Toolbar .............................. 17

Using Touch Mode ................................... 17

Using Command Shortcuts .............................. 18

Keystroke shortcuts ................................. 18

Contextual menus .................................... 18

Mini Toolbar.............................................. 18

Key Tips ................................................... 19

Using the Navigation Bar .................................. 20

Switch between views .............................. 20

Customize the Navigation Bar ................. 20

Using the Reading Pane ................................... 22

Using the To-Do Bar .......................................... 23

Minimize the To-Do Bar ........................... 23

Customize the To-Do Bar ......................... 23

Using Help .......................................................... 24

Search for help ........................................ 24

Browse for help ........................................ 24

Choose the Help source .......................... 24

Exiting Outlook 2013 ......................................... 26

Welcome to Microsoft Outlook 2013!

Microsoft Outlook lets you send and receive Email messages, schedule appointments, and organize your contacts and addresses. It also reminds you of tasks you need to complete.

This chapter introduces the Outlook fundamentals. Besides learning how to start and exit the Outlook program, you will learn how to find your way around the Outlook screen and item windows.

You will also learn how to use keyboard commands and access Outlook’s help features. Let’s get started!

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Program Fundamentals

Starting Outlook 2013

In order to use a program, you must start—or launch—it first.

Windows Vista and Windows 7

1. Click the Windows

Start

button.

The Start menu appears.

2. Click

All Programs

.

The left pane of the Start menu displays the programs and menus installed on your computer.

3. Click

Microsoft Office 2013

.

4. Select

Outlook 2013

.

The Outlook 2013 program screen appears.

Trap: Depending on how your computer is set up, the procedure for starting Outlook 2013 might be a little different from the steps described here.

Tips

 For quicker access, you might consider pinning the

Outlook program to the taskbar or Start menu. To do this, right-click

Microsoft Outlook 2013

in the All

Programs menu and select

Pin to Taskbar

or

Pin to

Start Menu

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Start the Microsoft Office Outlook 2013 program.

Figure 1-1: The Start menu in Windows 7.

Your Organization’s Name Here 9

Program Fundamentals

What’s New in Outlook 2013

Outlook 2013 offers many new functions and features.

Table 1-1: What’s New in Outlook 2013 gives you an overview of what to expect.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Review the new features in Microsoft Office

Outlook 2013.

Table 1-1: What’s New in Outlook 2013

Navigation Bar

Attachment Reminder

Weather Bar

Social Connectors

Peeks

People

Calendar Sharing

Exchange ActiveSync

Support

File tab / Backstage view

Quick Steps

Conversation View

Meeting Reply

Mail Tips

Search tab

Outlook Social Connector

Zoom Slider

Mailbox Cleanup

People Pane

Open your email, people (contacts), calendar and tasks with the new Navigation Bar, conveniently located at the bottom of your screen.

Before an email message is sent, Outlook 2013 can detect if an attachment was omitted from the message and notify the user.

In the Calendar module, weather for the next three days is displayed according to the default location or the location the user has selected.

Connect to your social networks through Outlook 2013.

You can grab a quick glance at your schedule, tasks or details about a contact you’re emailing without navigating away from what you’re busy with.

Contacts are now stored in the People View, seamlessly integrated into a single location.

Share your calendar with other approved users so that scheduling meetings and responding to invitations is easier and more convenient for everyone.

If you have Microsoft Exchange and connect your Outlook with Exchange ActiveSync, you’ll receive pushed-based email, appointments and contacts via the most popular email servers and services.

The File tab and corresponding Backstage view replace the Office Button and File menu found in previous versions. Here you can access common commands (Open, Print, Save) as well as more advanced ones (Automatic Replies, Mailbox Cleanup, Rules and Alerts).

Quick Steps allow you to perform multiple tasks with a single click. You can customize the default

Quick Steps or create your own.

Conversation View groups related messages together and displays them under a single thread in your

Inbox.

The Meeting Reply command allows you to reply to an Email by scheduling a meeting. When you use the Meeting Reply command to schedule a meeting, all the message recipients are added to a new meeting request in one click.

If you are using Outlook with Microsoft Exchange, the Mail Tips feature enables you to double-check

Email messages before you send them. For example, Mail Tips alert you when you are replying to a large distribution list, sending a message without a subject, and more.

The Search tab appears on the Ribbon every time you perform a Search, providing instant access to various search-related options.

The Outlook Social Connector keeps you informed about the activities and status of your personal and professional contacts. The Outlook Social Connector connects to third-party social networking sites and updates Outlook based on those sites.

Other Microsoft Office programs have used the Zoom Slider for years, and now it’s being included in

Outlook. The Zoom Slider allows you to control how much information you see in the Reading Pane of your Mailbox and on your Calendar.

Mailbox Cleanup makes it easier to access advanced tools to manage your Mailbox, empty deleted items, and archive older items. It also includes a visual representation of how much space is left in your

Mailbox.

The People Pane appears at the bottom of the Reading Pane and displays information about the person(s) associated with the selected item. Social media information (if applicable) is displayed for each person, as well as any related files, appointments, or notes.

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Program Fundamentals

Table 1-1: What’s New in Outlook 2013

Ribbon customization

Quick Contacts

Schedule view

Calendar groups

Now you can add/remove tabs, create your own groups, and rearrange commands on the Ribbon.

Locate contacts quickly in Outlook 2013 using the Quick Contacts feature. Simply type the first few characters of the contact you want to find in the Search People field on the Ribbon.

View the calendars of everyone in your team simultaneously using Schedule view.

Keep track of team member schedules by creating a Calendar group. A Calendar group can include multiple people and resources such as conference rooms.

Meeting Suggestions

Updated Folder Pane

To-Do Bar updates

Outlook 2007 introduced the Meeting Suggestions feature, but it’s become more prominent in Outlook

2013. Now scheduling suggestions will appear in a meeting request whenever you invite someone else to a meeting.

The items in the Folder Pane have been reorganized in Outlook 2013. The most important folders

(Inbox, Drafts, Sent Items and Deleted Items) now appear at the top of the list, with all other folders alphabetized beneath it.

The appearance of the To-Do bar has been improved in Outlook 2013. The To-Do bar now provides better access to all-day appointments and events. There are also updated visual indicators for conflicts and unanswered meeting requests and day separators. Finally, it is easier to resize the To-Do bar in

Outlook 2013.

Better Proofing Tools

Word Email Editor

Include Screenshots

Inline Replies

If you change one of several spelling checker options in one Office program, that option is now updated in all the programs. Also, the Outlook 2013 spell checker can now recognize some contextual spelling errors—for example, the use of “their” vs. “there”.

The Microsoft Word program is now Outlook’s only Email text editor. You can no longer turn it off and use a native Outlook editor.

Outlook 2013 makes it easier than ever to include a screenshot of your computer screen in an Email.

You can take a screenshot of your whole screen, or you can clip the screen and include the screen clip in an Email.

You can respond to a message quickly by replying via the Reading Pane.

Your Organization’s Name Here 11

Program Fundamentals

Understanding the Outlook

2013 Program Screen

The Outlook 2013 program screen may seem confusing and overwhelming at first. This lesson will help you become familiar with it.

Exercise Notes

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Familiarize yourself with the different parts of the Outlook 2013 program screen.

Nadine Miller

Leanne/Nadine – Catch up

Nadine Miller

Leanne/Nadine – Catch up

L

Quick Access Toolbar: Contains common commands such as

Send/Receive and Undo. You can add and remove commands as desired.

Inbox: Lists all of your Email messages and can be arranged according to your specifications.

Instant Search: Enter key words to search the current folder or location. Displays results in real-time results appear as you enter each search term.

Title bar: Displays the name of the program you are currently using (Outlook) and the item you are currently working with.

Reading Pane: Displays the contents of the selected message.

Close button: Click here to exit the Outlook program.

Help button: Click here to open the Outlook Help window.

Ribbon: The tabs on the Ribbon replace the menus and toolbars found in previous versions of Outlook.

To-Do Bar: Keep tabs on your calendar, appointments, and tasks all in one place. The To-Do Bar can also be displayed in a minimized format.

Zoom Slider: Click and drag the slider to zoom in or out of an item or view. You can also use the + and – buttons.

People Pane: Displays information regarding the person(s) associated with the selected item.

Status bar: Displays information and reminders about

Outlook items. Right-click the status bar to specify what information is shown.

Folder Pane: Contains buttons and icons you can click to move among Outlook’s folders and tools.

File tab: Click here to access common commands (Open,

Print, Save) as well as more advanced ones (Automatic

Replies, Mailbox Cleanup, Rules and Alerts).

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Program Fundamentals

Understanding Items

In Outlook, an item is the basic element that holds information. Items are used to send and view Emails, and also to organize information like tasks and contacts.

Table 1-2: Outlook Items provides an overview of the items used in Outlook.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Explore and understand the various types of items available in Outlook 2013.

Table 1-2: Outlook Items

Mail Message

Appointment

Meeting Request

Contact

Contact Group

Task

Task Request

Journal Entry

Note

Compose a message to be sent by Email.

Add an appointment to your calendar.

Set up an appointment to which you invite other people, or reserve resources such as a conference room.

Enter information about a person including their name, company, job title, and Email address.

Create a collection of contacts that allows you to quickly send mass Emails.

Enter to-do items that can be tracked until completion.

Inform someone else of a task you would like them to perform.

Keep track of interactions and files that you create—such as Emails or Word documents—in a timeline view.

Jot something quickly in a note. Can be sorted using color categories.

Your Organization’s Name Here 13

Program Fundamentals

Understanding the Message

Window

The Mail message window, like the program window, features the Ribbon in place of menus and toolbars. This lesson will help you become familiar with the basic features of the message window.

Exercise Notes

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Familiarize yourself with the different parts of the Outlook 2013 message window.

Nadine Miller;

Nadine Miller

Quick Access Toolbar: The Quick Access Toolbar contains common commands such as Save and Undo. You can add or remove commands as desired.

Ribbon: The Ribbon makes commands easily accessible instead of hiding them under menus and toolbars.

Recipients: Enter the Email addresses of recipients in the To field. Use the CC field to send a copy of the message to recipients who are not directly involved, but might be interested in the message.

Subject line: Enter a title here so that recipients quickly know the reason for your Email.

Message Area: Type your Email message here as you would using a word processor.

People Pane: Displays information about the person(s) associated with the message.

Send button: Once you’ve finished composing your message, click the Send button to send it.

File tab: Click here to access common commands (Save,

Print) as well as more advanced ones (Permissions,

Properties).

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Program Fundamentals

Giving Commands in Outlook

Outlook 2013 provides easy access to commands through the Ribbon, the File tab, and the Quick Access Toolbar.

Backstage view

By clicking on the

File

tab, you are taken to Backstage

View. There have been a few changes to it since Office

2010, which are shown in Table 1-2: Backstage View

Commands.

Tip

 The File tab replaces the File menu/Office Button found in previous versions of Outlook.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Look at the options available in Backstage view. Return to the Ribbon view and click each tab on the

Ribbon to view its commands. Collapse and Show the

Ribbon.

Inbox – [email protected] –Outlook

Figure 1-1-2: Clicking the File tab will display the

Backstage view for your document.

Table 1-3: Backstage View Commands

Save Attachments

Save attachments under a different name or location.

Save As

Save the message as a template or in other Outlook supported formats.

Open & Export

Exit

Open another calendar, Outlook data file or perform the importing/exporting of data files.

Info

Exit the Outlook program.

Excel, PowerPoint, and Word: Change document protection settings, prepare the document for sharing and view document properties, and manage versions of the file.

Outlook: View account settings, set Automatic replies (Out of Office Manager), cleanup your mailbox, create and manage rules and alerts and manage Add-ins.

Print

Options

Office Account

Preview and print the current message.

Customize how the program saves, displays, and proofs documents by setting program options.

View your Office.com account details.

Your Organization’s Name Here 15

Program Fundamentals

Ribbon

The Ribbon replaces the menus and toolbars found in previous versions of Outlook. The Ribbon keeps commands visible while you work instead of hiding them under menus or toolbars.

The Ribbon is made up of three basic components:

Tabs: Commands are organized into tabs on the

Ribbon. See Table 1-4: Tabs on the Ribbon for a description of the different types of tabs.

Groups: The commands found on each tab are organized into groups of related commands. Click the

Dialog Box Launcher

( ) in the bottom-right corner of a group to display even more commands.

Buttons: To issue a command, click its button on the

Ribbon.

Tips

 The Ribbon shrinks or expands depending on your screen resolution and the size of the program window.

Changing the Ribbon Display

To make working in an application easier, you can choose the way in which the Ribbon is displayed to better suit your needs.

1. Click the

Ribbon Display Options

button on the top right of the application. You will have three options:

Auto-hide Ribbon: The application is placed into full screen mode and the Ribbon is completely hidden

Show Tabs: Collapse the Ribbon and only the tabs are displayed

Show Tabs and Commands: This is the default view, and the entire Ribbon is displayed

2. Select the option you wish to use.

The Ribbon is displayed in the view you selected.

Another way to change the Ribbon Display:

Double-click any tab on the Ribbon to hide the

Ribbon. Repeat the action to show the Ribbon again.

File tab

Contextual tab

Command tab

Deleted Items – [email protected]

Button

Group

Dialog Box

Launcher

Figure 1-3: Elements of the Ribbon.

Table 1-4: Tabs on the Ribbon

Command

Tabs

Contextual

Tabs

Command tabs appear by default whenever you open the Outlook program. In Outlook

2013, the Home, Send/Receive, Folder, and

View tabs appear by default.

Contextual tabs appear whenever you perform a specific task and offer commands relative to only that task. For example, whenever you begin a search, the Search tab appears on the Ribbon.

Figure 1-4: Ribbon Display options on the top right of the window

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

Program Fundamentals

Quick Access Toolbar

The Quick Access Toolbar appears above the File tab and provides easy access to the commands you use most frequently. The Send/Receive and Undo buttons appear on the toolbar by default; however, you can customize this toolbar to meet your needs by adding or removing buttons. To customize the Quick Access Toolbar:

1. Click the

Customize Quick Access Toolbar

button at the end of the Quick Access Toolbar.

A list of commands appears.

2. Select the command(s) you want to add or remove.

Tips

 You can change where the Quick Access Toolbar appears in the program window. To do this, click the

Customize Quick Access Toolbar

button at the end of the Quick Access Toolbar. Select

Show Below the

Ribbon

or

Show Above the Ribbon

, depending on the toolbar’s current location.

Using Touch Mode

Office 2013 is now Touch Mode Optimized, which means that you can switch Outlook to Touch Mode to view, navigate and work in it with ease on any touch enabled device.

1. Click the

Customize Quick Access Toolbar

list arrow and select

Touch/Mouse Mode

from the list of options.

You will now be able to toggle between Mouse and Touch

Mode by clicking the

Touch/Mouse Mode

button on your

Quick Access Toolbar.

Undo / Redo

Send / Receive Customize Quick Access Toolbar

Figure 1-5: The Quick Access Toolbar.

Figure 1-6: To display the Touch Mode icon in your toolbar, select this option from the Customize Quick

Access Toolbar.

Your Organization’s Name Here 17

Program Fundamentals

Using Command Shortcuts

Command shortcuts can be used as an alternative to the

Ribbon. This lesson describes four different shortcuts, each designed to save time and increase efficiency.

Keystroke shortcuts

Without a doubt, keystroke shortcuts are the fastest way to give commands in Outlook. They’re especially great for issuing common commands, such as creating a new Mail message.

In order to issue a command using a keystroke shortcut, you simply press a combination of keys on your keyboard. For example, rather than clicking the New button on the Ribbon to create a new Email, you could press and hold the keystroke shortcut, <Ctrl> + <N>.

Table 1-5: Common Keystroke Shortcuts provides an overview of commonly used keystroke shortcuts.

Contextual menus

A contextual menu displays a list of commands related to a specific object or area. To open a contextual menu:

1. Right-click an object or area in the item window or program screen.

A contextual menu appears, displaying commands that are relevant to the object or area you clicked.

2. Select an option from the contextual menu, or click anywhere outside the contextual menu to close it without selecting anything.

Mini Toolbar

The Mini Toolbar appears when you select text in a new item window and contains common text formatting commands. To view the Mini Toolbar:

1. Select text in an item window.

The Mini Toolbar appears near the text you selected.

Trap: Sometimes the Mini Toolbar can be hard to see due to its transparency. To make the Mini

Toolbar more visible, point to it with the cursor.

2. Click the desired command on the Mini Toolbar or click anywhere outside the Mini Toolbar to close it.

Tip: If you don’t want the Mini Toolbar to appear every time, click the

File

tab and select

Options

.

Click the

General

tab, uncheck the

Show Mini

Toolbar on selection

check box, and click

OK

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Memorize some common keystroke shortcuts.

Right-click a message in the Inbox to display its contextual menu.

Table 1-5: Common Keystroke Shortcuts

<Ctrl> + <O>

<Ctrl> + <N>

<Ctrl> + <S>

<Ctrl> + <P>

<Ctrl> + <B>

<Ctrl> + <I>

<Ctrl> + <C>

<Ctrl> + <X>

<Ctrl> + <V>

Opens the selected item.

Creates a new item.

Saves the currently opened item.

Prints the selected item.

Toggles bold font formatting.

Toggles italic font formatting.

Copies the selected text or object.

Cuts the selected text or object.

Pastes the selected text or object.

Figure 1-7: A contextual menu.

Figure 1-8: The Mini Toolbar.

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Program Fundamentals

Key Tips

Key Tips appear whenever you press the <Alt> key. You can use Key Tips to perform just about any action in

Outlook without ever having to use the mouse. To issue a command using a Key Tip:

1. Press the

<Alt>

key.

Tiny letters and/or numbers, called badges, appear on the Quick Access Toolbar and all of the tabs on the

Ribbon.

2. Depending on the tab or command you want to select, press the letter or number key indicated on the badge.

3. Repeat this step as necessary until the desired command has been issued.

Key Tip badge

Figure 1-9: Press the <Alt> key to display Key Tips.

Your Organization’s Name Here 19

Program Fundamentals

Using the Navigation Bar

Outlook is made up of several Views, each with its own set of panes, tools and folders. You can switch between these views using the Navigation Bar.

Switch between views

The Mail view appears by default whenever you start

Outlook. To switch to another view, such as Calendar or

People, use the buttons on the Navigation Bar.

Click the Navigation Bar button for the view that you want to open.

The selected view appears.

Other Ways to Switch Views:

Use the shortcuts listed in Table 1-6: Navigation

Bar Shortcuts.

Customize the Navigation Bar

You can customize the Navigation Bar to display only the information you want.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Select

Navigation Options

, and adjust settings as necessary.

Tips

 To minimize or expand the Folder Pane, click the

Minimize/Expand the Folder Pane

button in the upper-right corner of the Folder Pane; or click the

View

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Folder Pane

button in the Layout group, and select an option from the list; or press

<Alt>

+

<F1>

.

 To turn off the Folder Pane, click the

View

tab on the

Ribbon, click the

Folder Pane

button in the Layout group, and select

Off

from the list; or press

<Alt>

+

<F1>

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Display and explore the Calendar, Contacts, and

Tasks panes, one at a time. Then return to the Mail pane.

Click here to minimize or expand the Folder Pane, or press <Alt> + <F1>.

Navigation Bar button

Click here to customize the Navigation Bar.

Figure 1-10: The Navigation Bar with the Mail view displayed.

Table 1-6: Navigation Bar Shortcuts*

Mail

Calendar

People

Tasks

Notes

Folder List

Shortcuts

<Ctrl> + <1>

<Ctrl> + <2>

<Ctrl> + <3>

<Ctrl> + <4>

<Ctrl> + <5>

<Ctrl> + <6>

<Ctrl> + <7>

*These shortcuts are based on the order in which buttons are

displayed in the Navigation Bar. If you have changed the order of the buttons in the Navigation Pane, the shortcuts will change, too.

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Table 1-7: The Folder Pane

Inbox

Sent Items

Deleted Items

n/a

Mailbox

Compose, manage, organize, send, and receive messages.

Contains all of your incoming Email messages.

Stores copies of messages you have sent.

Works like the Windows Recycle Bin; where you can find deleted Outlook items.

Provides a preview of your day; summarizes appointments, tasks, and new Email messages.

Drafts

Junk Email

News Feed

Stores draft messages that you haven’t yet completed.

Contains messages that Outlook considers spam. You should check this folder periodically to check for incorrectly flagged messages.

Collects status and activity updates for people who are a part of your social network using Outlook’s

Social Connector.

Temporarily stores any messages that you’ve composed that have not been sent.

Outbox

RSS Feeds

Allows you to access content that you’ve subscribed to via RSS feed, such as news and blogs.

Search Folders

Notes

Provides quick access to color categorized messages, messages flagged for follow-up, messages with large attachments, and unread messages.

Works like electronic sticky notes; allows you to jot down quick bits of information.

Folder List

Displays all the folders in Microsoft Outlook.

Shortcuts

Contains shortcuts (that you add yourself) to other folders, such as the My Documents folder.

Configure buttons

Allows you to add or remove buttons from the Navigation Pane.

Journal

Records information about items you send or receive and files you create (not shown by default).

Your Organization’s Name Here 21

Program Fundamentals

Using the Reading Pane

You can preview a message without having to open it using the Reading Pane. By default, the Reading Pane appears to the right of the Inbox, but you can move the

Reading Pane to another position in the window.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Reading Pane

button in the Layout group.

There are a few different ways to view the Reading

Pane:

Right: Display the Pane to the right of the Inbox

(default setting).

Bottom: Display the Pane below the Inbox.

Off: Hide the Pane.

Options: Change the Read/Unread settings for the

Reading Pane here

2. Select the position and settings you want to use.

The Reading Pane is positioned and set accordingly.

Tips

 Typically, the Mail folder is the only folder in which the Reading Pane is used extensively.

 You can view messages safely in the Reading Pane— potentially malicious scripts or attachments are not activated or opened automatically.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Position the Reading Pane below the Inbox.

Hide the Reading Pane. Position the Reading Pane to the right of the Inbox.

Inbox – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 1-11: Reading Pane displayed to the right of the

Inbox.

Inbox – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

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Figure 1-12: Reading Pane displayed below the Inbox.

Program Fundamentals

Using the To-Do Bar

The To-Do Bar makes it easy to keep track of your appointments, events, and tasks no matter where you are in Outlook.

Minimize the To-Do Bar

The To-Do Bar appears expanded by default, but you can minimize it to free up space in the program window.

Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon. In the Layout group, click the

To-Do Bar

button, and select

Off

from the list.

The To-Do Bar appears minimized.

Other Ways to Minimize the To-Do Bar:

Click the

Remove the Peek

button in the upperright corner of the To-Do Bar.

Customize the To-Do Bar

In Outlook 2013 you can specify how much information is displayed on the To-Do Bar.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

To-

Do Bar

button in the Layout group.

A list of items appears.

2. Click the item you want to show/hide.

Tips

 To turn off the To-Do Bar, click the

View

tab on the

Ribbon, click the

To-Do Bar

button in the Layout group, and select

Off

from the list.

 To jump to a specific date in the Calendar, click it in the Date Navigator on the To-Do Bar.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Select to view Calendar and Tasks in the To-Do

Bar, then close it again.

Click here to

Remove the

Peek button

Figure 1-13: The To-Do Bar.

Date Navigator

Events appear in the

To-Do Bar.

To view more or less information, drag the splitter.

Tasks and

To-Do items

Figure 1-14: Selecting what to display in the To-Do Bar

Your Organization’s Name Here 23

Program Fundamentals

Using Help

When you don’t know how to do something in Outlook

2013, look up your question in Outlook Help. The Help files can answer your questions and offer tips about

Outlook’s features.

Search for help

1. Click the

Microsoft Outlook Help

button ( ) on the

Ribbon.

The Outlook Help window appears.

Other Ways to Open the Help window:

Press

<F1>

.

2. Type what you want to search for in the

Search

help/Search online help b ox and press

<Enter>

.

A list of help topics appears.

3. Click the topic that best matches what you’re looking for.

Outlook displays information regarding the selected topic.

Browse for help

1. Click the

Microsoft Outlook Help

button ( ) on the

Ribbon.

The Outlook Help window appears.

Other Ways to Open the Help Window:

Press

<F1>

.

2. Click the category that you want to browse under

Popular searches.

The topics within the selected category appear.

3. Click the topic that best matches what you’re looking for.

Outlook displays information regarding the selected topic.

Choose the Help source

If you are connected to the Internet, Outlook Help retrieves its contents from the Office Online database by default. You can easily change this to meet your needs.

1. Click the

Change Help Collection

list arrow next to the Outlook Help heading.

A list of help sources appears.

2. Select an option from the list.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Search the phrase “create a new message”.

Browse topics in the “Getting Started” category of Help.

Change the help source to the Outlook Help section under

Content from your computer and search the term “create a new message” again.

Change Help

Collection

Enter search keywords here.

Browse help topic categories.

Figure 1-15: The Outlook Help window.

Program Fundamentals

Tips

 When a standard search returns too many results, try searching offline to narrow things down a bit.

 Office 2013 offers enhanced ScreenTips for many buttons on the Ribbon. You can use these ScreenTips to learn more about what a button does, and where available, view a keystroke shortcut for the command. To view a command’s ScreenTip, point to the command on the Ribbon.

 Most dialog boxes have a

Help

button ( ) in the upper right-hand corner. Click this button to open the

Outlook Help window.

Table 1-8: Help Buttons

Back

Forward

Home

Print

Change Font Size

Keep On Top/Not on Top

Click here to move back to the previous help topic.

Click here to move forward to the next help topic.

Click here to return to the Help home page.

Click here to print the current help topic.

Click here to change the size of the text in the Help window.

Click here to layer the Help window so that it appears behind or in front of all other Microsoft

Office programs.

Your Organization’s Name Here 25

Program Fundamentals

Exiting Outlook 2013

When you’re finished using Outlook 2013, you should exit it. Exiting a program closes it until you need to use it again.

Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Exit

.

The Outlook program closes.

Tips

 Having many programs open at the same time can slow down your computer, so it’s a good idea to exit programs that aren’t being used.

Other Ways to Exit Outlook:

Click the

Close

button on the Title bar. Doubleclick the

Outlook

icon on the left-hand side of the title bar or, press

<Alt>

+

<F4>

.

Inbox – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Exit the Microsoft Outlook 2013 program.

Close button [email protected]

Figure 1-16: Exiting Outlook.

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P r o g r a m F u n d a m e n t a l l s

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

Outlook automatically opens with Windows. (True or False?)

2.

Which of the following is NOT a new feature in Outlook 2013?

A. The Ribbon

B. Microsoft Online help

C. Conversation View

D. Mail Tips

3.

What is the Inbox?

A. A folder that displays Email messages you have sent.

B. A place where you can view your tasks.

C. A pane used for viewing the complete text of Email messages.

D. A folder that displays your incoming Email messages.

4.

Which of the following is NOT an item found in Outlook?

A. Mail Message

B. Worksheet

C. Appointment

D. Contact

5.

What is the Ribbon?

A. A string of code that enables XML compatibility.

B. The path name that refers to where a command is located in the program.

C. Another name for the title bar.

D. The command center that replaces the menus and toolbars found in item windows in previous versions of Outlook.

6.

The Ribbon can be hidden so that only tab names appear. (True or False?)

7.

The File tab contains basic file commands. (True or False?)

8.

The Ribbon can be hidden so that only tab names appear. (True or False?)

9.

What is the Quick Access Toolbar?

A. There are no toolbars in Outlook 2013.

B. What appears when you select text in an item window.

C. A customizable toolbar of common commands that appears above or below the Ribbon.

D. An extension of the Windows taskbar.

10.

You can use Outlook 2013 on a Touch enabled device. (True or False?)

11.

Which of the following is NOT a command keystroke shortcut in Outlook?

A. <Ctrl> + <N>

B. <Ctrl> + <O>

C. <Ctrl> + <P>

D. <Ctrl> + <Alt> + <Delete>

12.

Which of the following is NOT a Navigation Bar button?

A. Mail

Your Organization’s Name Here 27

B. People

C. Calendar

D. To-Do

13.

The Reading Pane can only be viewed on the right side of the program window. (True or False?)

14.

Which of these is NOT an element you can add or remove from the To-Do Bar?

A. Date Navigator

B. Appointments

C. Task List

D. Saved Drafts

15.

What key can you press to get help in Outlook?

A. <Esc>

B. <Ctrl> + <H>

C. <F1>

D. <F11>

16. Which of the following is NOT a way to exit Outlook 2013?

A. Press <Alt> + <F5>.

B. Click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the program window.

C. Click File on the menu bar and select Exit.

D. Double-click the Outlook icon on the title.

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Quiz Answers

1.

False. You must start Outlook to begin using it.

2.

B. Microsoft Online help is not a new feature in Outlook 2013.

3.

D. The Inbox is a folder that displays your incoming Email messages.

4.

B. A worksheet is not an item found in Outlook.

5.

D. The Ribbon is the command center that replaces the menus and toolbars found in item windows in previous versions of Outlook.

6.

True. Double-click a tab to hide the Ribbon, then double-click any tab to view commands once again.

7.

True. The File tab contains basic file commands, similar to the File menu of previous versions.

8.

True. Double-click a tab to hide the Ribbon, then double-click any tab to view commands once again.

9.

C. The Quick Access Toolbar is a customizable toolbar of common commands that appears above or below the Ribbon.

10.

True. By activating Touch mode in Outlook, you are able to use the application on any Touch enabled device.

11.

D. <Ctrl> + <Alt> + <Delete> is a Windows command, not an Outlook command.

12.

D. To-Do is not a Navigation Bar button.

13.

False. The Reading Pane can be viewed at the bottom of the window, or turned off altogether.

14.

D. Saved drafts are not something you can view in the To-Do Bar.

15.

C. Press <F1> to access help in Outlook.

16.

A. To exit Outlook, you need to press <Alt> + <F4> not <Alt> + <F5>.

Your Organization’s Name Here 29

C o m p o s i i n g a n d

S e n d i i n g E m a i i l l

Composing and Sending an Email Message .. 31

Specifying Message Options ............................ 33

Set message priority ................................ 33

Request a read or delivery receipt ........... 33

Other Options .......................................... 34

Formatting Text .................................................. 35

Change font type ..................................... 35

Change font size ...................................... 35

Change font color .................................... 35

Change font style ..................................... 36

Checking your Spelling ..................................... 37

Working with Hyperlinks ................................... 38

Insert a hyperlink ..................................... 38

Change the text of a hyperlink ................. 38

Open a hyperlink ...................................... 39

Attaching a File to a Message .......................... 40

Attach other items .................................... 40

This chapter covers two of the most-used functions in Microsoft Outlook: How to compose and send an Email message.

The steps involved in composing and sending a message are pretty basic, but there’s quite a bit you can do in between these processes to maximize the effect that your messages have. This chapter will show you how to insert a signature, attach a file to a message, and more.

2

Using Exercise Files

This chapter suggests exercises to practice the topic of each lesson. There are two ways you may follow along with the exercise files:

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and close the exercise file.

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and keep the file open to perform the remaining lesson exercises for the chapter.

The exercises are written so that you may

“build upon them,” meaning the exercises in a chapter can be performed in succession from the first lesson to the last.

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Composing and Sending Email

Composing and Sending an

Email Message

This lesson explains how to perform the most basic Email task of all: how to compose and send an Email message.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2.

Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Email

button in the New group.

An Untitled – Message window appears.

Other Ways to Create a New Message:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<N>

.

3.

Enter the recipient’s Email address in the

To

,

Cc

and/or

Bcc

field(s).

See Table 2-1: Ways to Address an Email Message below for a description of each field.

If you want to send the message to more than one person, insert a semicolon (;) between each recipient’s Email address—for example,

[email protected]; [email protected]

Other Ways to Enter a Recipient’s Address:

Click the

To

,

Cc

, or

Bcc

button, select the name of the recipient or distribution list you want to use from the Address Book and click the

To

,

Cc

, or

Bcc

button. Click

OK

when you’re finished.

Trap: If you can’t find the contact or distribution list you want to use in the Select Names dialog box, you may need to click the

Address Book

list arrow at the top of the Select Names dialog box and select a different Address Book.

Table 2-1: Ways to Address an Email Message

To

Carbon Copy

(Cc)

Blind Carbon

Copy (Bcc)

Sends the message to the recipient you specify.

Sends a copy of the message to a recipient who is not directly involved, but who might be interested in the message.

Sends a copy of the message to a recipient without any other recipients knowing.

This option is useful when you are sending a message to many recipients at once.

To display the Bcc field, click the Options tab on the Message Ribbon and click the

Bcc button in the Show Fields group.

4. Type the subject of the Email in the

Subject

field.

The Subject field lets your recipients know what the message is about.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Compose a new Email message, entering your own Email address in the To field and “FYI” in the Subject field.

Type “Today I learned how to compose and send an Email message.” in the message body area.

Send the message. [email protected]

Figure 2-1: The Untitled – Message window.

Figure 2-2: If you don’t know a recipient’s Email address, but he or she is located in your Address Book, click the To,

Cc, or Bcc button to open the Select Names dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 31

Composing and Sending Email

5. Click inside the Message Area to type your message.

Ask yourself the following questions before sending:

Have you entered the correct Email address(es) in the To field?

Have you entered an appropriate subject in the

Subject field?

Did you read through your message to make sure it’s correct?

If you answered “Yes” to all of the above questions…

6. Click the

Send

button in the Message window.

Your message is released into cyberspace and on its way to the specified recipient(s).

Other Ways to Send a Message:

Press

<Alt>

+

<S>

.

Send button

Figure 2-3: When you’re ready to send the message, click the Send button.

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Composing and Sending Email

Specifying Message Options

Just like you can assign parcel insurance or specify overnight delivery for letters and packages, Outlook lets you specify options for your Email messages. You can mark messages as urgent, specify a read receipt for all messages, or request that your messages be encoded so that they can only be read by the intended recipient(s).

Set message priority

If the intended recipient of a message receives a lot of

Email throughout the day, specify your message as important so that it will stand out in his or her Inbox.

1. In the Message window, click the

Message

tab on the

Ribbon.

2. Click the

High Importance

or

Low Importance

button in the Tags group.

High Importance: Inserts a red exclamation point next to the message subject.

Low Importance: Inserts a blue, downwardpointing arrow next to the message subject.

The specified priority is assigned to the message.

Other Ways to Set Message Priority:

Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Dialog Box Launcher

in the Tags group. Under

Settings

, click the

Importance

list arrow and select an option from the list. Click

Close

.

Request a read or delivery receipt

If you feel like your messages are being ignored, try requesting a read receipt. That way, you can track when a recipient receives and reads the message.

Trap: Read receipts only work if your recipient’s

Email program supports them.

1. In the Message window, click the

Options

tab on the

Ribbon.

2. Select

Request a Delivery Receipt

and/or

Request a

Read Receipt

in the Tracking group.

Request a Delivery Receipt: Sends a notification when the message has been successfully delivered.

Request a Read Receipt: Sends a notification when the recipient has opened the message.

Tip: Don’t rely too heavily on read receipts; the recipient has the option to deny returning a receipt.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new Email message.

Exercise:

Assign high priority to the message.

Figure 2-4: A message that has been assigned high priority has a red exclamation point next to it when it is received.

Figure 2-5: This dialog box appears when a message with a read receipt is opened.

Your Organization’s Name Here 33

Composing and Sending Email

Other Ways to Request Receipts:

Click the

Options

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Dialog Box Launcher

in the Tracking group.

Under Voting and Tracking options, select

Request a delivery receipt for this message

,

Request a read receipt for this message

, or both.

Click

Close

when you’re finished.

Other Options

You might have noticed a variety of other message options on the Ribbon or in the Properties dialog box.

See Table 2-2: Message Options for a complete list of message options and their descriptions.

Figure 2-6: The Properties dialog box.

Table 2-2: Message Options

Importance

Sensitivity

Security Settings

Use voting buttons

Specifies whether the message is of high, normal, or low importance.

Displays a tag indicating how the recipient should treat the message.

Encodes the message so it is not readable by anyone except the intended recipient(s).

Allows the recipient to quickly answer a sender’s question by use of voting buttons. Outlook can then tabulate the results of the vote for the sender.

Returns a message to you verifying the date and time the message arrived at the Inbox of the recipient.

Request a delivery receipt for this message

Request a read receipt for this message

Have replies sent to

Returns a message to you verifying the date and time the message was opened by the recipient.

Do not deliver before

Expires after

Save copy of sent message to

Contacts

Categories

Sends all replies to the message to someone else, such as an assistant. Use the Select Names button next to this field to select who you want to send replies to.

Waits to send the message until the date and time you specify.

Makes the message unavailable after a specified date and time.

Saves a copy of the sent message in the specified folder.

Track messages from selected Contacts.

Track messages in specific Categories.

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Composing and Sending Email

Formatting Text

In this lesson you will learn how to change the font type, size, style and color of the text in your Email messages.

Trap: You cannot format message text if your message format is set to Plain Text. To see which message format you are using, click the

Format

Text

tab on the Ribbon.

Change font type

One way to emphasize text in a message is by changing its font.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font

list arrow in the Basic Text group.

A list of available fonts appears.

3. Select a font type from the list.

Other Ways to Change Font Type:

Click the

Format Text

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font

list arrow in the Font group or, use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar.

Change font size

Making text

larger

is another way to emphasize text.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font Size

list arrow in the Basic Text group.

A list of font sizes appears.

3. Select a font size from the list.

Other Ways to Change Font Size:

Click the

Format Text

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font

list arrow in the Font group or, use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar.

Change font color

Changing font

color

is another way to emphasize text in an Email message.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font Color

list arrow in the Basic Text group.

A list of font colors appears.

3. Select the color you want to use.

Bold

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new Email message with the text

“Today I learned how to compose and send an Email message” in the message body area.

Exercise:

Change the font type to Arial Black in the message body area. Change the font color of the words

“create” and “send” to red.

Font Font Size

Italics

Underline

Font Color

Mini Toolbar

Figure 2-7: You can format text using the Mini Toolbar or the Basic Text group on the Message tab.

Your Organization’s Name Here 35

Composing and Sending Email

Other Ways to Change Font Color:

Click the

Format Text

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Font Color

list arrow in the Font group.

Or, use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar.

Change font style

In addition to changing font type, size and color, you can also emphasize the text in an Email message by changing its font style. The most common font styles are bold,

italic and underline.

1. Select the text you wish to format.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the appropriate button in the Basic Text group.

The formatting is applied to the selected text.

Other Ways to Change Font Style:

Click the

Format Text

tab on the Ribbon and click the appropriate button in the Font group or, use the commands found on the Mini Toolbar. You can also use the keystroke shortcuts shown in

Table 2-3: Font Style Keystroke Shortcuts.

Table 2-3: Font Style Keystroke Shortcuts

Bold

Italic

Underline

<Ctrl> + <B>

<Ctrl> + <I>

<Ctrl> + <U>

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Composing and Sending Email

Checking your Spelling

It’s a good idea to spell-check your messages before you send them. Not only do spelling errors make you look unprofessional, they also reflect poorly on your product or organization.

By default, Outlook checks for spelling errors as you type, underlining misspelled words in red. This makes it easy to correct spelling errors individually.

1. In the message window, right-click the misspelled word.

A contextual menu appears, offering suggestions for the correct spelling of the word.

2. Select the correct spelling of the word from the contextual menu.

Outlook corrects the spelling of the word and the red underline disappears.

Other Ways to Check Spelling:

In the Message window, click the

Review

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Spelling & Grammar

button in the Proofing group. Or, press

<F7>

.

Tips

 If a word is underlined in red but you know it is correctly spelled, see Table 2-4: Spelling Options.

 New in Outlook 2013, Spell Check now also checks the subject line of messages, tasks, and meeting requests.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new Email message with the text

“Today I learned how to check my spelalling” in the message body area.

Exercise:

Select a corrected option from the contextual menu.

Table 2-4: Spelling Options

Ignore Once

Ignore All

Add to Dictionary

Accepts the spelling as is and moves on to the next spelling error.

Accepts the spelling as is and ignores all future occurrences of the word in the message.

If a word cannot be found in the

Microsoft Office Dictionary, it is marked as misspelled. This option adds the word to the dictionary so that it is recognized during future spell checks.

Outlook checks for spelling errors as you type, underlining questionable words in red.

Figure 2-8: To correct a spelling error, rightclick it and select a correction from the contextual menu.

Your Organization’s Name Here 37

Composing and Sending Email

Working with Hyperlinks

A hyperlink is a dynamic word or icon that, when clicked, opens a specific file or location. You can create a hyperlink to a Web page, picture, document, and more.

Insert a hyperlink

Inserting a hyperlink is extremely easy—all you have to do is type!

1. In the body area of the message, position the insertion point where you want to insert the hyperlink.

2. Type the Web address of the page you want to link to; for example, www.customguide.com

; and press

<Enter>

.

Outlook formats the Web address as a hyperlink.

Other Ways to Insert a Hyperlink:

Copy the Web address and paste it into the message body. Or, Click the

Insert

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Hyperlink

button in the

Links group. Enter the hyperlink address and text to display and click

OK

.

Change the text of a hyperlink

If the Web address you want to link to is rather lengthy, you probably don't want the entire address to appear in the message window. When this happens, change the hyperlink's display text.

1. In the

Message

window, click the

Insert

tab on the

Ribbon.

2. Click the

Hyperlink

button in the Links group.

The Insert Hyperlink dialog box appears.

3. Type the hyperlink text in the

Text to display

text box.

The hyperlink text is the text in the message that will be clicked.

4. Type the address that you want to link to in the

Address

field and click

OK

.

The hyperlink text is inserted into the message.

Other Ways to Change Hyperlink Text:

Right-click the hyperlink, select

Edit Hyperlink

from the contextual menu, and follow the steps described above.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new Email message with the text

“Today I learned how to insert a hyperlink.” in the message body area.

Exercise:

Insert a hyperlink to “www.customguide.com”

If you are connected to the Internet, click the hyperlink to test it.

Hyperlink button

Click a hyperlink to open it.

Figure 2-9: In order to distinguish hyperlinks from normal text, Outlook underlines them and displays them in a different color.

Figure 2-10: The Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

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Composing and Sending Email

Open a hyperlink

Opening a hyperlink is extremely easy.

Click the hyperlink.

The hyperlink opens in a Web browser window.

Other Ways to Open a Hyperlink:

Right-click the hyperlink and select

Open

Hyperlink

from the contextual menu.

Tip: To open a hyperlink in a message that you have not yet sent, press and hold the

<Ctrl>

key and click the hyperlink. Once the message has been sent, the recipient can just click the hyperlink to follow it.

Tips

 If the address you want to link to, contains spaces or characters, you must enclose the entire address in chevrons. For example,

<file://C:\My

Documents\Sales Results.doc>

 If the URL begins with www, you do not need to type http://. Outlook will automatically format the URL as a link to the Web.

Your Organization’s Name Here 39

Composing and Sending Email

Attaching a File to a Message

One of the most useful features of Email is the ability to attach one or more files to a message. You can attach pictures, documents, PDFs and more in Outlook.

1. In the Message window, click the

Message

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Attach File

button in the

Include group.

The Insert File dialog box appears.

2. Navigate to and select the file you want to insert and click

Insert

.

The selected file is attached to the message.

Other Ways to Attach a File:

In the Message window, click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Attach File

button in the

Include group.

Attach other items

You can also attach other items to a new Mail message, such as another Email, an appointment, or a contact’s

Business Card.

1. In the Message window, click the

Message

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Attach Item

button in the

Include group.

A list of items appears, including:

Business Card: Select this option to include a

Business Card from your Contact list.

Calendar: Select this option to include your free/busy information.

Outlook Item: Select this option to include an

Outlook item, such as an Email, appointment, or task.

2. Select the type of item you want to attach and follow the prompts if necessary.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Certificate.docx and a new Email message.

Exercise:

Attach the Certificate.docx file to the message.

Figure 2-11: When a message contains an attachment, the name of the attached file appears in the Attached field.

Figure 2-12: Click the Attach Item button to attach a business card, calendar, or other Outlook item.

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C o m p o s i i n g a n d S e n d i i n g

E m a i i l l

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

When you want to send a blind carbon copy of an Email to someone, which field must you use?

A. Address

B. To

C. Bcc

D. Cc

2.

You want to send a carbon copy of an Email to your boss. Where should you enter your boss's Email address?

A. In the To: field

B. In the Bcc: field

C. In the Address: field

D. In the Cc: field

3.

Read receipts are supported by all Email programs. (True or False?)

4.

Which of the following is NOT a way to format text in an Email message?

A. Use the commands on the Mini Toolbar.

B. Use the commands found on the Standard toolbar.

C. Use a keyboard shortcut, such as <Ctrl> + <B>.

D. Use the commands located on the Format Text tab on the Ribbon.

5.

What should you do if a word is marked as misspelled, but is actually correct?

A. Click Change.

B. Click Add to Dictionary.

C. Click Correct.

D. Click Correct All.

6.

To insert a hyperlink to a Web site, all you have to do is type the Web address in the body area of the message. (True or

False?)

7.

Which of the following items can you attach to an Email message?

A. Pictures

B. PDFs

C. Word documents

D. All of the above

Your Organization’s Name Here 41

Quiz Answers

1.

D. When you want to send a blind carbon copy of an Email to someone, use the Cc field.

2.

D. Entering an Email address in the Cc: field sends that person a carbon copy of the message.

3.

False. Read receipts are only supported by select Email programs.

4.

B. The Standard toolbar is not available in the Outlook 2013 message window.

5.

B. Click Add to Dictionary to add the word to the dictionary. Click Ignore Once or Ignore All to simply ignore the word and move on to the next.

6.

True. You can insert a hyperlink into a message simply by entering its Web address.

7.

D. You can attach pictures, PDFs, documents and more to a message in Outlook.

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R e c e i i v i i n g E m a i i l l

Receiving and Reading Email .......................... 44

Retrieve Email manually .......................... 44

Reading Email ......................................... 44

Change automatic retrieval settings ........ 45

Reply to a message ................................. 46

Forward a message ................................. 46

Using the Inline Feature .................................... 47

Opening an Attachment .................................... 48

Preview an attachment ............................ 48

Open an attachment ................................ 48

Save an attachment ................................. 49

Deleting a Message ........................................... 50

Delete a message .................................... 50

Retrieve a message ................................. 50

Flagging a Message for Follow-up .................. 51

Flag a message ....................................... 51

Change flags ............................................ 51

Remove a flag .......................................... 52

Using Color Categories ..................................... 53

Assign a color category ........................... 53

Rename a category ................................. 53

Create a new category............................. 54

Clear a category ...................................... 54

Viewing Conversations ..................................... 55

Turn on Conversation View ..................... 55

View a Conversation ................................ 55

Change Conversation settings ................ 56

Managing Conversations .................................. 57

Ignore a Conversation ............................. 57

Clean Up a Conversations ....................... 57

Sorting Messages .............................................. 59

Changing Views ................................................. 61

Printing a Message ............................................ 62

Use the Print dialog box .......................... 62

Use Quick Print ........................................ 62

Now that you know how to compose and send Email messages, you need to know how to receive and sort them.

In this chapter, we’ll show you how to receive messages from your Email server and what to do with those messages once they appear in your Inbox. For example, you can reply to a message, forward a message on to someone else, flag a message for later follow-up, and more.

3

Using Exercise Files

This chapter suggests exercises to practice the topic of each lesson. There are two ways you may follow along with the exercise files:

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and close the exercise file.

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and keep the file open to perform the remaining lesson exercises for the chapter.

The exercises are written so that you may

“build upon them,” meaning the exercises in a chapter can be performed in succession from the first lesson to the last.

Your Organization’s Name Here 43

Receiving Email

Receiving and Reading Email

Outlook automatically checks for new messages and displays them in your Inbox every 30 minutes. But you can manually check for messages anytime.

Retrieve Email manually

If you don’t want to wait for Outlook to retrieve your messages, you can check for messages manually.

1. Click the

Mail

button in the on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Send/Receive

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Send/Receive All Folders

button in the Send &

Receive group.

Outlook checks all accounts for messages. Any new, unread messages appear in bold.

Tip: If you have Outlook configured to check multiple Email accounts, you can manually check a specific account. Click the

Send/Receive

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Send/Receive Groups

button in the Send & Receive group. Point to the account you wish to check and select

Inbox

from the list.

Reading Email

When messages arrive in your Inbox, you can read them.

Click or double-click the message that you want to read.

A selected message appears in the Reading Pane. A double-clicked message appears in its own window.

Once a message has been read, its envelope icon changes to open.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new message.

Exercise:

Send a message to yourself. Click the

Send/Receive All Folders button on the Ribbon and open the message you just sent yourself in its own window.

Inbox – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

The contents of the selected message appear in the Reading

Pane.

Figure 3-1: The main Outlook window.

Figure 3-2: A close-up of the Inbox. Unread messages appear in Bold and a paperclip icon next to the message indicates that there’s an attachment.

Table 3-1: Message Icons

Attachment

This message has one or more files attached to it.

Urgent

Flagged

Delete

This message is marked as urgent—better look at it fast!

This message has been flagged to remind you about something.

Delete the selected message

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Receiving Email

Change automatic retrieval settings

Outlook checks your Mail server for new messages every

30 minutes by default, but you can change the length of this interval.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Options

button.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Advanced

tab.

Advanced options for working with Outlook appear.

3. Click the

Send/Receive

button under the Send and receive heading.

The Send/Receive Groups dialog box appears.

4. Under “Setting for group All Accounts” make sure the

Schedule an automatic send/receive every

check box is selected.

5. Enter the number of minutes you want to elapse between downloads or use the up and down arrows in the value field to increase or decrease the time respectively.

6. Click

Close

, and then click

OK

.

Outlook will check for Mail using the new interval specified.

Tips

 You can view messages safely in the Reading Pane; potentially malicious scripts or attachments are not activated or opened automatically.

 By default, Outlook is configured to block external content, such as links to pictures or sounds in HTML messages that you receive. To unblock content, click the notification area in the Reading Pane and select

Download Pictures

.

Figure 3-3: The Send/Receive Groups dialog box.

Change how often Outlook checks for new messages.

Figure 3-4: Downloading Pictures.

Your Organization’s Name Here 45

Receiving Email

Replying to and Forwarding a

Message

Reply to a message

Replying to an Email acknowledges that you received the message and allows you to respond.

1. Click

Mail

on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Double-click the message to which you want to reply.

The message opens in its own window.

3. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Reply

or

Reply All

button in the Respond group.

Reply: Sends your reply to the author of the message only.

Reply All: Sends your reply to the author of the message and everyone else who received the message.

4. Type your reply and click the

Send

button.

Forward a message

Forwarding a message sends the message on to someone else instead of back to the original sender.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Double-click the message that you want to forward.

The message opens in its own window.

3. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Forward

button in the Respond group.

4. In the

To

field, enter the Email address(es) of the person(s) to whom you want to forward the message.

5. Type a message and click the

Send

button.

Other Ways to Reply to or Forward a Message:

In the Inbox, select the message you want to reply to or forward. Click the

Reply

,

Reply All

or

Forward

button in the Respond group on the Home tab or, right-click the message and select an option from the contextual menu.

Trap: When forwarding a message all attachments and message options are included.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

If necessary, create and send a new message to yourself and then open it in its own window.

Exercise:

Reply to a message and forward it to someone else.

Respond group

Figure 3-5: Use the buttons in the Respond group on the

Ribbon to reply to or forward a message.

Figure 3-6: When you reply to a message, the Name and Subject fields are filled in for you automatically. All you have to do is type your reply and click Send.

Type your reply here

Receiving an Email

Using the Inline Feature

Outlook 2013 also has a new Inline feature that lets you compose a reply email or forward it from within your

Reading Pane (only available for those with Microsoft exchange accounts).

Reply to an email using inline messaging

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Select the email you wish to respond to.

3. In the Reading Pane, click

Reply

,

Reply All

or

Forward

.

Your reply window is active in the Reading Pane. If you navigate away from this, it will automatically save your reply as a draft.

4. Type your reply and click

Send

.

Reply to an email using inline comments

First you’ll need to enable the inline comments feature.

1. Go to

File

Options

Mail

.

2. In the Replies and Forwards section, check the

Preface comments with

check box, and add your name or other text as a way of identifying you in the space provided. This text will appear in brackets when you reply with an inline comment.

3. Click

OK

.

You can now reply with an inline comment.

4. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

5. Select the email you wish to respond to.

6. In the Reading Pane, click

Reply

,

Reply All

or

Forward

.

Your reply window is active in the Reading Pane.

7. Click next to the sentence or word where you want to insert your comment and type your message. Your name (or identifying text) appears in brackets next to your entry.

8. Type your message and click

Send

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required

Exercise:

Reply to an email using inline messaging.

Inbox – [email protected] - Outlook [email protected]

Figure 3-3-7: By using inline messaging, you are able to quickly respond to incoming emails

Figure 3-3-8: When inserting text into the body of the original email, a prefix is inserted to allow for easy visibility.

Your Organization’s Name Here 47

Receiving Email

Opening an Attachment

Whenever you see a paper clip icon ( ) next to a message, the message contains an attachment. This lesson will show you how to preview, open, and save an attachment.

Tip

 Never open an unfamiliar or suspicious attachment.

Install a good anti-virus program on your computer and save files to your computer before opening them.

Preview an attachment

Attachment Preview lets you preview an attachment before you open it.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and click the message containing the attachment.

The message is shown in the Reading pane.

2. In the Reading Pane, click the attachment that you want to preview.

The contextual Attachment Tools tab appears on the

Ribbon, and the attachment appears in the Previewer.

A warning message may appear, reminding you that you should only preview files from a trustworthy source. If you trust the sender of the attachment, continue to the next step.

Tip: Scripts, macros, ActiveX controls, and other active content embedded in the attachment are disabled in the Previewer.

3. Click the

Message

button in the Reading Pane to exit the Previewer.

Other Ways to Preview an Attachment:

In the Inbox, double-click the message containing the attachment that you want to preview. Rightclick the attachment in the message window and click

Preview

.

Open an attachment

To open an attachment, double-click it.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select the message containing the attachment.

The message is shown in the Reading Pane.

2. Double-click the attachment that you want to open.

The attachment opens.

Tip: The Opening Mail Attachment dialog box may appear to remind you that you should only open files from a trustworthy source. If you trust

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Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new Email.

Exercise:

Address the message to yourself. Make

“Congratulations” the message Subject and attach the

Certificate.docx file to the message, then send it. When the message with the attachment appears in your Inbox, first preview and then open the attachment. Save the opened attachment as Outlook Certificate.

Carly James

Figure 3-9: Messages that contain an attachment have a tiny paper clip icon next to them.

When you’re finished previewing the attachment, click the

Message button to return to the message.

Figure 3-10: Previewing an attachment in the Reading pane.

Receiving Email the sender of the attachment, click the

Open

button in the dialog box.

Other Ways to Open an Attachment:

In the Inbox, double-click the message containing the attachment that you want to open.

Then, double-click the attachment in the message window. Or, click the attachment in the message window and click the

Open

button in the

Attachments

tab on the Ribbon.

Save an attachment

If you’re going to be making changes to an attachment, you’ll need to save it to your computer first.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select the message containing the attachment.

The message appears in the Reading Pane.

2. Click the attachment that you want to save.

The Attachments contextual tab appears on the

Ribbon.

3. Click the

Attachments

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save As

button in the Actions group.

If a message contains multiple attachments, you can click the

Save All Attachments

button to save all the attachments to the same location at the same time.

4. Enter a new name for the file, if necessary, and specify where you want to save the file.

5. Click

Save

.

Other Ways to Save an Attachment:

In the Inbox, select the message containing the attachment that you want to save. Right-click the attachment in the Reading pane and select

Save As

or

Save All Attachments

from the contextual menu.

Tip

 Outlook may block certain attachments because they are potentially unsafe file types. These include .bat,

.exe, .vbs, and .js files.

Figure 3-11: The Opening Mail Attachment dialog box. [email protected]

Figure 3-12: Blocked attachment files are listed in the

InfoBar at the top of a message.

Your Organization’s Name Here 49

Deleting a Message

When you’re finished with a message, it’s a good idea to delete it. Deleting messages as soon as you’re done with them keeps your Inbox organized and free from clutter.

Delete a message

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select the message you want to delete.

2. Press the

<Delete>

key.

The message is removed from your Inbox and placed in the Deleted Items folder.

Other Ways to Delete a Message:

Select the message you want to delete and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group on the

Home

tab or, right-click the message and select

Delete

from the contextual menu.

Retrieve a message

Just like the Windows Recycle Bin, you can retrieve an item if you accidentally delete it.

1. Click the

Deleted Items

folder in the Folder Pane and select the message you want to retrieve.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Move

button in the Move group.

A list of folders appears.

3. Select the folder to which you want to restore the message.

The message is moved to the specified folder.

Tips

 Many organizations limit how much space Outlook can acquire on the server—translation: how many messages you can have in your Inbox. Deleting a message as soon as you’re finished with it helps keep your Inbox within that limit.

 To permanently delete a single message, select the message and press

<Shift>

+

<Delete>

. To permanently delete all of the messages in your Trash folder, right-click the Deleted Items folder in the

Navigation Pane and select

Empty Folder

from the contextual menu.

 Only permanently delete a message if you are absolutely sure you won’t need the message again.

Messages that have been permanently deleted cannot be retrieved.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Any Email message.

Exercise:

Delete a message from your Inbox.

[email protected]

Deleted Items – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 3-13: You can select the folder to which you want to restore the message when you are retrieving a deleted message.

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Receiving Email

Flagging a Message for

Follow-up

Flagging a message is an easy way to remind yourself to follow up on an important Email or task. When you flag an item, a small icon appears next to the message, and a copy of the message is added to your To-Do List.

Flag a message

Flagging a message is extremely easy.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Flag

area of the message you want to flag.

The default flag—the Today flag—is applied to the message, and a copy of the message is added to your

To-Do List.

Other Ways to Flag a Message:

Click the message you want to flag, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Follow Up

button in the

Tags

group. Select a flag from the list or, right-click the message and select

Follow

Up

from the contextual menu, selecting a flag from the submenu.

Change flags

The default flag is the Today flag, but there are several others flags from which to choose.

1. Click the message containing the flag you wish to change.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Follow Up

button in the Tags group.

A list of flags appears.

3. Select a flag from the list.

The selected flag is applied to the message.

Other Ways to Change Flags:

Right-click the flag you wish to change and select a new flag from the contextual menu.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Flag a message in the Inbox.

Change this flag to the Next Week flag.

Remove the flag altogether.

Follow Up button

Flag area

Figure 3-14: Click the Flag area of a message to flag it.

Figure 3-15: To change flags, click the Follow Up button in the Tags group on the Home tab on the Ribbon.

Your Organization’s Name Here 51

Receiving Email

Remove a flag

Once you’ve followed-up on a flagged message, you can remove the flag or mark it as “Complete”.

1. Right-click the flag you want to remove.

2. Select

Mark Complete

or

Clear Flag

from the contextual menu.

Depending on the option you selected, the flag is either replaced by a checkmark ( ) or removed altogether.

Other Ways to Mark a Flag “Complete:”

Click the flag.

Tips

 You can also flag contacts and tasks.

Table 3-2: Description of Flags

Flag

Today

Start Date

Current date

Tomorrow

Current date plus one day

This week

Current date plus two days, but no later than the last work day of this week

Next week

First work day of next week

No date

Custom

No date

Current date is displayed; choose a custom date if desired

Due Date

Current date

Current date plus one day

Last work day of this week

Last work day of next week

No date

Current date is displayed; choose a custom date if desired

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Receiving Email

Using Color Categories

Color categories let you organize your Outlook items into specific groups, making the information they contain easier to distinguish. You can choose from a set of default categories, or you can create your own.

Assign a color category

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Select the message you wish to categorize

3. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group.

A list of categories appears.

4. Select a category from the list.

The selected category is applied to the message.

Tip: You can assign multiple categories to a message.

Other Ways to Categorize a Message:

Right-click the message you want to categorize, select

Categorize

from the contextual menu, and select a category from the list.

Rename a category

Outlook includes several color categories such as the

“Red Category” or “Blue Category.” You can rename these categories to meet your needs.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

All Categories

from the list.

The Color Categories dialog box appears.

4. Click the color category you wish to rename and click

Rename

.

The color category name becomes editable.

5. Type a new name for the category and click

OK

when you’re finished.

The category is renamed.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new category named “Practice” using any color you wish. Apply this category a message.

Clear the “Practice” category from the message.

Categorize button

Figure 3-16: To assign a color category to a message, click the Categorize button in the Tags group on the Home tab of the Ribbon and select a category from the list.

Click here to create a new category

Figure 3-17: The Color Categories dialog box lets you manage your categories.

Your Organization’s Name Here 53

Receiving Email

Create a new category

Outlook may contain default categories, but you can also create your own to better suit your needs.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

All Categories

from the list.

The Color Categories dialog box appears.

4. Click

New

.

The Add New Category dialog box appears. Here you can name the category, assign a new color, or create a keystroke shortcut.

5. Set the properties of the new category and click

OK

.

The new category is added to the list of categories.

Change the Quick Click category

You can also change the Quick Click category, or the category that appears by default when you click the

Category area of the message.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Set Quick Click

.

The Set Quick Click dialog box appears.

4. Click the list arrow, select the category you want to appear by default, and click

OK

.

Now every time you click the Category area of a message, the selected category will be assigned to the message.

Clear a category

If you decide you don’t want to categorize a message after all, you can clear the category.

1.

Right-click the message from which you wish to clear categories and select

Clear All Categories

.

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Figure 3-18: The Add New Category dialog box.

Figure 3-19: Set a default category using

Set Quick Click.

Receiving Email

Viewing Conversations

Keeping track of your messages can be challenging, especially when multiple people respond to the same message. In Outlook 2013, you can use Conversation

View to group related Emails into conversations.

Turn on Conversation View

When Conversation View is enabled, Outlook groups messages with the same subject into conversations.

1.

Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar

.

The Inbox appears.

2.

Select the folder where you want to apply

Conversation View.

3.

Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Show as Conversations

check box in the Messages group.

The Microsoft Outlook dialog box appears. You can apply Conversation View to the currently selected folder or to all mailboxes. Make your selection by clicking the relevant button.

Conversation View is applied.

Tips

 Conversations are grouped by subject. If any message recipient changes the subject of a message, then that message becomes a new conversation.

 If the Show Conversations check box is inactive, make sure that you have sorted your messages by

Date (Conversations).

View a Conversation

Expanding a Conversation not only lets you view all of the messages in a Conversation, but it also lets you view the relationship between messages.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar

.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the conversation you wish to view.

The most recent message in the Conversation displays in the Reading Pane.

3. Click the

Triangle

icon ( ) to the left of the

Conversation.

The Conversation expands and displays all messages in the Conversation.

4. Select the specific message you wish to view.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Turn on Conversation View.

Expand a Conversation.

Turn off Conversation View.

Figure 3-20: Turn on Conversations on the View tab of the

Ribbon.

Figure 3-21: A Conversation with multiple branches.

Figure 3-22: An expanded Conversation.

Your Organization’s Name Here 55

Receiving Email

Change Conversation settings

Changing Outlook’s Conversation settings changes how

Conversations are displayed.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Conversations Settings

button in the Messages group.

A list of options appears:

Show Messages from Other Folders

Show Senders Above the Subject

Always Expand Selected Conversation

Use Classic Indented View

3. Select an option from the list.

The selected option is applied.

Figure 3-23: Changing Conversation Settings changes how Conversation View is displayed.

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Receiving Email

Managing Conversations

Conversations can clutter your Inbox. You can keep your

Inbox tidy by ignoring conversations you don’t want to read or by cleaning up a conversation.

Ignore a Conversation

Ignoring a conversation moves all current and future messages that are part of a selected conversation directly to your Trash folder. When you receive a message from an ignored conversation, it is delivered to your Trash folder.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the conversation you wish to ignore.

The Conversation is selected.

Other Ways to Select a Conversation:

Click any message within a conversation.

3. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Ignore

button in the Delete group.

The Ignore Conversation dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Ignore a Conversation:

Right-click the conversation you wish to ignore and select

Ignore

from the contextual menu. Or, press

<Ctrl>

+

<Del>

.

4. Click the

Ignore Conversation

button.

The Conversation is moved to the Deleted Items folder and any future messages will also automatically be delivered to the Deleted Items folder.

Tips

 Conversations are grouped by subject. If any message recipient changes the subject of a message, then that message becomes a new conversation.

Clean Up a Conversation

Use Conversation Clean Up to evaluate your conversations and delete any redundant messages.

1. Click the Mail button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Select the conversation you wish to clean up.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Clean up a conversation.

Ignore

Conversation

Clean Up

Figure 3-24: Manage your conversations using the Delete group on the Home tab of the Ribbon.

Your Organization’s Name Here 57

Receiving Email

3. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Clean Up

button in the

Delete

group.

A list of Clean Up options appears.

Clean Up Conversation: Evaluates the selected conversation.

Clean Up Folder: Evaluates all conversations in the selected folder.

Clean Up Folder & Subfolders: Evaluates all conversations in the selected folder as well as in any subfolders.

4. Select the Clean Up option you wish to use.

A dialog box appears warning you that all redundant messages will be moved to the Deleted Items folder.

Other Ways to Clean Up a Conversation:

Right-click the message or conversation you wish to clean up and select

Clean Up Conversation

from the contextual menu.

5. Click

Clean Up

.

All redundant messages are moved to the Trash folder.

Tips

 Ignoring or cleaning up a conversation only moves the conversation and any related messages to the

Deleted Items folder. If you change your mind, you can retrieve messages from the Deleted Items folder.

Figure 3-25: Use the Clean Up Conversation tool to delete redundant Emails in an Email thread.

Figure 3-26: The Clean Up Conversation dialog box.

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Receiving Email

Sorting Messages

When your Inbox is jam-packed with messages, it can be difficult to find anything. When this happens, try sorting your messages using Outlook’s arrangement options. You can sort your messages by the date they were sent, who sent them, and other attributes

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and select an arrangement from the

Arrangement

group.

There are several arrangement options from which to choose. See Table 3-3: Arrangement Options, for a description of each option.

Other Ways to Sort Messages:

Right-click in the Inbox area and point to

Arrange By

, then select an option from the list.

Trap: Right-clicking in the Inbox area and the

Inbox Header row will give you different options on the contextual menu, so if you cannot locate the option you’re looking for, try right-clicking in the alternative area.

Click the More button to see additional options.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Sort the messages in your Inbox by subject.

Then, sort the messages in your Inbox by date.

Arrange By option

Reverse

Sort option

Figure 3-27: The Arrange By option in the Inbox is an easy way to sort messages.

Figure 3-28: You can also change an arrangement by clicking the View tab and selecting a new arrangement.

Your Organization’s Name Here 59

Receiving Email

Table 3-3: Arrangement Options

Arranges messages by date, starting with today.

Arranges message by sender.

Arranges messages by recipient.

Arranges messages by assigned categories.

Arranges flagged messages by their start date.

Arranges flagged messages by their due date.

Arranges messages by size, largest to smallest.

Arranges messages alphabetically by subject.

Arranges messages by type.

Arranges messages by whether or not they have an attachment.

Arranges messages by Email account.

Arranges messages by importance.

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Receiving Email

Changing Views

Changing a view lets you control the amount of information you see when you open your Inbox.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Pane

.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the Current View group.

A list of available views appears. See Table 3-4:

Inbox Views for a description of each view.

3. Select a view from the list.

The selected view is applied.

Tip

 You can select different views for each Outlook folder.

Table 3-4: Inbox Views

Compact Displays brief details about the message in the message list and displays the Reading Pane.

Single

Displays each message as one line in the message list and displays the Reading Pane.

Preview

Displays each message as one line in the message list and hides the Reading Pane.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Switch to Preview view.

Return to Compact view.

Figure 3-29: Click the Change View button for a list of views.

Figure 3-30: Single view displays a preview of the message in the Reading Pane, but displays the message information as a single line in the Inbox.

Your Organization’s Name Here 61

Receiving Email

Printing a Message

Sometimes it can be refreshing to read a message in hard copy, especially if the message is long. Printing a message in Outlook is extremely easy.

Use the Print dialog box

If you want to control certain parts of the printing process, such as the number of copies you want to print, use the

Print dialog box.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Select the message you want to print.

3. Click the

File

tab and select

Print

.

Notice that the print settings and a preview of the document appear together, with print settings on the left and a preview on the right.

Other Ways to Open Print Settings:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

4. Click the

Print Options

button.

The Print dialog box appears.

5. Specify the appropriate options in the Print dialog box and click

Print

to begin printing.

See Table 3-5: Print Options for a description of options in the Print dialog box.

Use Quick Print

If you’re in a hurry, you can use Outlook’s default print settings to Quick Print a message.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Right-click the message you want to print and select

Quick Print

from the contextual menu.

The message is sent to the default printer.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Select a message in your Inbox and open the

Print dialog box.

Figure 3-31: The Print dialog box.

Table 3-5: Print Options

Name

Properties

Select which printer you want to use.

Displays the Properties dialog box where you can specify various printer options. These options vary by printer.

Number of pages

Specify if you want to print all pages, only even-numbered pages, or only odd-numbered pages.

Number of copies

Specify how many copies of the message you want to print.

Page Setup

Displays the Page Setup dialog box, where you can add a Header/Footer, change page size, etc.

Page range

Print options

Preview

Specify which pages you want to print.

Depending on the item you are trying to print, this section offers additional options.

Click here to display a preview of the message in Backstage view.

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R e c e i i v i i n g

E m a i i l l

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

Outlook checks for new messages every ___ minutes by default.

A. 10

B. 30

C. 5

D. 3

2.

Clicking a message in the Inbox opens it in its own window. (True or False?)

3.

If you want to reply to the author of a message and everyone else who received the message, which button should you click?

A. Forward

B. Reply

C. Reply All

D. You can only send an Email to one recipient.

4.

Attachment Preview is only supported by messages that are in HTML or Plain Text format. (True or False?)

5.

If you’re going to be making changes to an attachment, you need to:

A. save the attachment.

B. open the attachment.

C. preview the attachment.

D. None of the above.

6.

Which of the following is NOT true?

A. When you delete a message in Outlook, it will never be seen again.

B. When you empty the Deleted Items folder, its contents are permanently deleted.

C. You can retrieve a message from the Deleted Items folder.

D. You can delete a message by pressing the <Delete> key.

7.

What is the default flag type?

A. Today

B. Tomorrow

C. This Week

D. Next Week

8.

Only one category can be assigned to a message at a time. (True or False?)

9.

Conversation View groups Emails with the same ____________.

A. Sender

B. Recipient

C. Attachment

D. Subject

10.

When you ignore a conversation, all current and future messages are moved to the Junk folder. (True or False?)

11.

Which of the following statements is NOT true?

A. You can sort your messages by the date they were sent, who sent them, and more.

Your Organization’s Name Here 63

B. Sorting your messages simply arranges them in different ways, making information easier to find.

C. Sorting your messages saves them in different folders.

D. You can sort messages using the Arrange By button in the Inbox.

12.

Which of these is NOT a view in Outlook 2013?

A. Compact

B. Detailed

C. Single

D. Preview

13.

The fastest way to print a message is using the Print dialog box. (True or False?)

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Quiz Answers

1.

B. Outlook checks for new messages every 30 minutes by default.

2.

False. Double-clicking a message in the Inbox opens the message in its own window.

3.

C. Click Reply All to send your reply to the author of the message as well as anyone who received the message.

4.

True. Attachment Preview is only supported by messages that are in HTML or Plain Text format.

5.

A. If you’re going to be making changes to an attachment, you need to save the attachment first.

6.

A. When you delete a message in Outlook, you can retrieve it from the Deleted Items folder. It is not permanently deleted.

7.

A. The default flag type is Today.

8.

False. You can assign as many categories as you want to a message.

9.

Conversation View groups Emails with the same subject.

10.

False. When you ignore a conversation, all current and future messages are moved to the Deleted Items folder.

11.

C. Sorting your messages simply rearranges them; it doesn’t save them in different folders.

12.

B. The three views available in Outlook 2013 are Compact, Single, and Preview; Detailed is not an available view.

13.

False. The fastest way to print a message is using Quick Print.

Your Organization’s Name Here 65

M o r e E m a i i l l

F e a t u r e s

Saving Unfinished Messages (Drafts) ............. 67

Save an unfinished message .................. 67

Open a saved message ........................... 67

Recalling a Message ......................................... 68

Resending a Message ....................................... 69

Using the Out of Office Assistant .................... 70

Delaying Sending a Message ........................... 71

Using Quick Steps ............................................. 72

Use a quick step ...................................... 72

Customize a default quick step ................ 72

Create your own quick step ..................... 73

Inserting a Signature ......................................... 74

Create a signature ................................... 74

Adjust signature defaults ......................... 75

Insert a signature manually ..................... 75

Using Stationery and Themes .......................... 76

Apply stationery and themes to all messages ................................................ 76

Apply stationery and themes to a single message .................................................. 76

Changing Message Format ............................... 77

Change the format of a single message .. 77

Change the format of all messages ......... 77

Dealing with Junk Email ................................... 78

Open the Junk Email folder ..................... 78

Change Junk Email filter settings ............ 78

Adding Addresses to the Safe and Blocked

Senders List ....................................................... 80

Add addresses to the Safe Senders List . 80

Add addresses to the Blocked Senders List

.................................................................

81

Add addresses to the Blocked Senders List

.................................................................

81

Changing Outlook’s Security Settings ............ 82

Inserting Screenshots ....................................... 83

Insert a screenshot of an open window ... 83

Insert a Screen Clipping .......................... 83

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If you’ve gotten this far, you undoubtedly know how to send and receive Emails, reply to and forward Emails, and probably even how to attach files to an Email. So, what else is there? This chapter is all about Outlook’s more advanced Email features.

In this chapter, you will learn how to save an unfinished Email message to the Drafts folder so that you can come back and finish it later. You’ll also learn how to use the Out of Office Assistant to notify people that you will be away from your computer for several days and cannot respond to their Emails immediately.

Finally, you’ll learn all about how to format your Email messages by using different message formats, signatures, and stationery.

4

More Email Features

Saving Unfinished Messages

(Drafts)

If you get interrupted while composing an Email message, all is not lost; you can save the unfinished message and return to it later.

Save an unfinished message

1. Begin writing a new message.

2. In the message window, click the

File

tab on the

Ribbon and select

Save

.

Outlook saves the unfinished message to the Drafts folder.

Other Ways to Save a Message:

Click the

Save

button on the Quick Access

Toolbar or, press

<Ctrl>

+

<S>

.

Open a saved message

It’s easy to return to an unfinished message.

1. In the Outlook program window, click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Select the

Drafts

folder.

A list of unfinished messages appears.

3. Double-click the message you want to finish.

The message opens in its own window, exactly how you left it.

Tips

 Once a draft is sent, it is removed from the Drafts folder.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new message to yourself with

“Practice” in the Subject field and the text “I’ll finish this message later” in the message body area.

Save a draft of this message, then open and send the message.

Drafts folder

Double-click the message you want to finish.

Figure 4-1: Opening an unfinished message that has been saved to the Drafts folder.

Figure 4-2: Anytime a message is closed unexpectedly, without being saved after editing, Outlook asks if you would like to save it.

Your Organization’s Name Here 67

More Email Features

Recalling a Message

Sometimes you might forget to attach a file to a message, or send a message to the wrong person(s). When this happens, you can recall the message – provided the following conditions are met:

The message is unread.

The message is sent to someone in your organization.

You cannot recall messages sent to people outside your organization.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Sent Items

folder in the Folder Pane and double-click the message that you want to recall.

The message opens in its own window.

3. On the Message tab, click the

Actions

button in the

Move group and select

Recall This Message

.

The Recall This Message dialog box appears. There are two options for recalling a message:

Delete unread copies of this message: If the message is still unread, the message is deleted. A notification that the message was recalled is left for the recipient.

Delete unread copies and replace with a new

message: The unread message is deleted and replaced with a new message.

4. Choose how you would like to recall the message and click

OK

.

The message is recalled.

5. (Optional) If you chose to replace the recalled message with a new message, make your edits as necessary and click

Send

.

The recalled message appears.

6. Click the

Close

button to close the recalled message.

To see if your recall was successful, check your

Inbox for a notification, as shown in Figure 4-4.

Exercise

Exercise File:

“Practice” message.

Exercise:

Recall the Practice message and delete unread copies of the message.

Actions button [email protected]

Figure 4-3: Recalling a message.

Figure 4-4: After you recall a message, a notification appears in your Inbox to let you know whether or not the recall was successful.

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More Email Features

Resending a Message

If someone doesn’t remember getting a message, or you find that you want to send a message to more people, you can resend a message you’ve already sent. This command also lets you revise text and change recipients.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Select the

Sent Items

folder.

All messages that you have previously sent are listed here.

3. Double-click the message you want to resend.

The message opens in its own window.

4. Click the

Actions

button in the Move group and select

Resend This Message

.

The message opens in another window where you can edit the message, or add and change recipients.

5. Finalize the message and click

Send

.

The message is sent to the specified recipients.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

Any sent message.

• Exercise:

Resend a message from the Sent Items folder.

More Move

Actions button

Figure 4-5: Resending a message.

Your Organization’s Name Here 69

More Email Features

Using the Out of Office

Assistant

If you know that you’re going to be out of the office for a few days, the Out of Office Assistant can send an automatic response to any messages you receive while you’re away.

Trap: Out of Office Assistant only works if you are using Microsoft Exchange.

Some of the Out of Office features not available in previous versions of Exchange are:

Rich text formatting: Now you can apply fonts, colors and formatting to your replies.

Customization: Now your replies can be customized for recipients both inside and outside your organization. For example, you could specify that your co-workers receive a different message than your clients.

Start and stop time: Tired of forgetting to turn off the Out of Office Assistant? Now you can apply a start and stop time in advance.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon.

Info is selected by default.

2. Click the

Automatic Replies

button.

The Out of Office Assistant dialog box appears.

3. Select the

Send automatic replies

option.

4. (Optional) Click the

Only send during this time range

check box and specify the time range to which you want messages to be replied.

If you don’t specify a time range, the automatic replies will begin immediately upon closing the dialog box.

5. Type your auto-reply on the

Inside My

Organization

and/or

Outside My Organization

tab.

Common auto-reply messages include information about the amount of time you are out, and who can be reached with questions.

6. Click

OK

. The Out of Office Assistant will begin to reply to your messages when Outlook is closed.

To switch the Automatic Replies off, navigate to the

Out of Office Assistant dialog box, select the Do no sent automatic replies option and click OK.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open the Out of Office Assistant dialog box.

Take a look at the options available in this dialog box, and then close it. [email protected]

Anything you type here will appear in your auto-reply.

Figure 4-6: The Automatic Replies dialog box.

More Email Features

Delaying Sending a Message

Your message is written, but you don’t want it to go out quite yet. Maybe you’re waiting for a check to clear, or you want to send a message on someone’s birthday, or want your co-workers to think you really did come in to work on Saturday. Whatever the reason, you don’t have to wait by the clock to hit the Send button; instead, delay sending the message.

If you have a single message ready to go, but you don’t want to deliver it until tomorrow, you can tell Outlook exactly when it needs to be sent.

1. Create a new message.

A new message window appears.

2. Click the

Options

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delay Delivery

button in the More Options group.

The Properties dialog box appears.

3. Make sure the

Do not deliver before

check box is selected in the Delivery options area.

This should be selected for you.

4. Click the

Date

and

Time

list arrows and select when the message should be sent.

Tip: If you’d like the message to expire after a certain amount of time, click the

Expires After

check box and set a date and time for the message to expire.

5. Click

Close

.

The message closes and will be sent after the prescribed delay.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Delay a single message so it does not go out for three days.

Delay Delivery button

Figure 4-7: The Delay Delivery button is in the Options tab on the Ribbon.

Figure 4-8: Choose a date and time to send a message in the Message Options dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 71

More Email Features

Using Quick Steps

New in Outlook 2013, quick steps allow you to perform multiple tasks with a single click. You can customize the default quick steps or create your own.

Use a quick step

Quick steps are a great way to quickly work on common tasks, such as Emailing a manager or team!

1. Click the

Home

tab of the Ribbon and click the quick step you want to use in the

Quick Steps

group.

The quick step is applied.

Tips

 If this is your first time using a particular quick step, the First Time Setup dialog box appears.

Customize a default quick step

Outlook comes with several default quick steps, as described in the table to the left, Default Quick Steps.

Some of these steps require additional set up, such as designating a folder to store items or a manager to receive

Emails.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the

Navigation Bar

.

The Inbox folder appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

More

button in the Quick Steps group.

3. Click the

Manage Quick Steps

option from the list.

Other Ways to Open the Manage Quick Steps

dialog box:

Click the

Dialog Box Launcher

in the Quick

Steps group on the Home tab of the Ribbon.

4. Select the

Quick Step

you want to change in the

Quick Step box and click the

Edit

button.

The Edit Quick Step dialog box appears. You can modify existing actions or add additional actions to a

Quick Step in the Edit Quick Step dialog box.

5. Edit the quick step as necessary and click

Save

. Then click

OK

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Customize the “Move to” Quick Step to move messages to the Deleted Items folder.

Table 4-1: Default Quick Steps

Move to

Moves the selected message to a folder that you specify and marks the message as read.

Team Email

Creates a new message and automatically inserts specified team members in the “To” field.

Reply &

Delete

Replies to the sender and deletes the original message.

To Manager

Forwards the selected message to a person that you specify.

Done

Marks the selected message as complete / read and moves it to a folder that you specify.

Create New

Select this option to create your own

Quick Step.

Click the More button to view additional options.

Figure 4-9: Select a Quick Step or manage your quick steps from the Quick Steps group on the Home tab of the

Ribbon.

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More Email Features

Create your own quick step

If you maintain multiple folders, correspond with multiple teams, or have multiple people with whom you regularly communicate, you can create additional quick steps for each action.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and select

Create

New

in the

Quick Steps

group.

The Edit Quick Step dialog box appears.

3. Enter a name for the Quick Step.

It can be helpful to name a Quick Step based on the task it performs; for example, the name for a Quick

Step that automatically forwards an Email to your manager might be “To Manager”.

4. Click the

Actions

list arrow and select the action you want the quick step to do.

There are several kinds of actions you can take with a message, as explained in Table 4-2: Quick Step

Actions.

5. Enter additional options for the quick step and click

Save

.

The new quick step has been created and appears in the Quick Steps group on the Home tab of the

Ribbon.

Figure 4-10: You can further specify an action in the Edit

Quick Step dialog box.

Table 4-2: Quick Step Actions

Filing

Specify the folder where you wish to store messages, move messages to the Deleted

Items folder, or permanently delete messages.

Change

Status

Categories,

Tasks and

Flags

Respond

Mark a message as read or unread, or change the importance of a message.

Categorize a message, clear a message of pre-set categories, flag a message for followup, or create a task.

Create a new message, reply to a message, reply to all recipients of a message, or forward a message.

Appointment

Create a meeting or appointment.

Conversation

Move or ignore all messages in a particular conversation.

Your Organization’s Name Here 73

More Email Features

Inserting a Signature

A signature is text or a file that can be attached to an

Email message. Your signature appears at the bottom of any new messages you compose and can include such things as:

Your name, title, and organization

Your phone and fax number

Your address

A link to your Web page

Your organization’s mission statement, a witty one- liner, or your favorite quote

Create a signature

1. Open a new message.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon. Click the

Signature

button in the Include group and select

Signatures

.

The E-mail Signature tab of the Signatures and

Stationery dialog box appears.

3. Click the

New

button.

The New Signature dialog box appears.

4. Enter a name for the new signature and click

OK

.

Now create the signature as you want it to appear.

5. Type the text that you want to appear in the signature in the

Edit signature

area.

6. Format the signature as desired.

Use the toolbar of common text formatting commands to change text. You can also add a picture or hyperlink to the signature using the Picture and

Insert Hyperlink buttons.

7. (Optional) Insert pictures or hyperlinks.

8. Click

OK

.

The next time you create a new message, your signature will appear at the bottom of the message.

Tip: You can create more than one signature in

Microsoft Outlook. For example, you might want to use one signature for professional correspondence and another for personal.

Exercise

Exercise File:

CustomGuide Logo.jpg

Exercise:

Create a new signature named “Practice”.

Use the logo and the following details for Jeanne Trudeau,

Director of Business Development. Tel: 888-903-2432, website: www.customguide.com

Apply boldface formatting to “Jeanne Trudeau,” and italicize “Director of Business Development.”

Close the dialog boxes to finish creating the signature.

Set the default signature to Practice for New messages.

Insert

Picture

Insert

Hyperlink

Figure 4-11: The Signatures and Stationery dialog box.

Signature

Figure 4-12: An example of what a professional signature might look like.

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More Email Features

Set signature defaults

If you want your signature to appear at the bottom of every message, set it as your default signature.

1. Open a new message.

A new message window appears.

2. Click the

Message

tab on the Ribbon. Click the

Signature

button in the Include group and select

Signatures

.

The Signatures and Stationery dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Open the Signatures and

Stationery Dialog Box:

In the message window, click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Signature

button in the

Include group. Select

Signatures

from the menu.

3. Specify how you want to use the signature in the

“Choose default signature” section.

Take a look at Table 4-3: Choose Default Signature

Options for a description of each option.

4. Click

OK

, to save your changes.

Insert a signature manually

If you want to insert a different signature, or you don’t have a default signature, you can also insert signatures manually.

1. Open a new message.

A new message window appears.

2. In the Message window, click the

Insert

tab on the

Ribbon.

3. Click the

Signature

button in the Include group and select the signature you want to insert from the list.

The signature is inserted into the message.

Table 4-3: Choose Default Signature Options

Email account

New messages

Select the account for which you want to assign the signature.

If you have created multiple signatures, click this list arrow to select the signature you want to include in new messages.

Select

(none)

if you don’t want to insert a signature automatically.

Replies/forwards

If you would like your signature to appear at the bottom of forwarded messages and replies, click the list arrow and select the signature you want to use.

Signature button

Figure 4-13: To manually insert a signature, click the

Signature button in the Include group of the Message tab and select a signature from the list.

Your Organization’s Name Here 75

More Email Features

Using Stationery and Themes

You can customize your Email messages in Outlook using stationery and themes. Below is a quick description of each.

Stationery: A pattern or design that can be applied to the background of a message.

Themes: A theme is a set of unified design elements

(background color, bullet style, font type, etc.) that you can apply to a message.

Tips

 You can only use stationery and themes if your Email messages are in HTML format.

Apply stationery and themes to all messages

1. Click the

File

tab and select

Options

from the menu.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Mail

tab and click the

Stationery and

Fonts

button.

The Signatures and Stationery dialog box appears.

3. Click

Theme

.

The Theme or Stationery dialog box appears.

4. Select the stationery or theme you want to use. Click

OK

for all open dialog boxes.

All future messages you compose will use the selected stationery or theme.

Tip: To remove a stationery or theme, select (

No

Theme)

in the

Theme or Stationery

dialog box.

Apply stationery and themes to a single message

1. In the main view of Outlook, click the

New Items

button in the New group on the

Home

tab and select

Email Message Using

More Stationery

from the list.

The Theme or Stationery dialog box appears.

2. Select the stationery or theme you want to use and click

OK

.

A new message, with the selected stationery or theme applied, appears.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None.

Exercise:

Create a new message with the Notebook stationery.

Select the stationery or theme you want to use.

Figure 4-14: The Theme or Stationery dialog box.

Figure 4-15: A message with the “Notebook” stationery applied.

More Email Features

Changing Message Format

Microsoft Outlook can read and create messages in three different formats: HTML, Rich Text, and Plain Text. This lesson will explain each of these three formats and show you how to change formats.

Change the format of a single message

If you want to change the format of an individual message, change the message format manually.

1. Create a new Mail message.

A message window opens.

2. Click the

Format Text

tab on the Ribbon.

The three message formats are displayed in the

Format group. See Table 4-4: Message Formats for a description of each format.

3. Select the message format you want to use.

The format is applied to the message.

Trap: Once you’ve changed a message to Plain

Text, you will not be able to change it back to

HTML.

Change the format of all messages

If you want to change the format of all future messages, change the default message format.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Mail

tab.

3. Under the Compose Message section, click the

Compose messages in this format

list arrow.

A list of message formats appears. See Table 4-4:

Message Formats for a description of each format.

4. Select a message format from the list and click

OK

.

Now every new message will be created in the selected format.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Make sure HTML is the default format of

Outlook messages.

Table 4-4: Message Formats

HTML

HTML messages can contain formatting and are compatible with most Email programs.

Pros: Compatible with most Email programs.

Cons: Some recipients may not be able to handle HTML formatting. For example, the formatted text you see in your message window will appear as plain text or unrecognizable characters to your recipients.

Rich Text

Rich Text messages can contain formatting but are only compatible with Microsoft

Outlook and Microsoft Exchange.

Pros: Allows for some formatting.

Cons: Rich-formatted messages are only compatible with Microsoft Outlook and

Microsoft Exchange.

Plain Text

Plain Text messages can be read by everyone but can’t contain formatting.

Pros: Understood by all Email programs.

Cons: No formatting options.

Click here to change the default message format.

Figure 4-16: Changing the default message format.

Your Organization’s Name Here 77

More Email Features

Dealing with Junk Email

Tried and true real estate and/or love secrets from the world’s foremost expert!

$3.2 Billion gift card from your favorite restaurant for completing our survey!

tHoUsAnDz of XXX pHoToZ and vIdEoZ –

FREE!!!

Unsolicited Mail, known as spam, is easily the most annoying aspect of Email, and it’s increasing at an alarming rate. When you get unwanted Mail, Outlook

2013 will automatically filter it into a separate folder, based on the content and structure of the message. It doesn’t catch all spam, and occasionally a good message will end up in the Junk Email folder, so it’s a good idea to understand how Outlook deals with spam.

Open the Junk Email folder

All junk Email is sent to this folder. Even if your junk

Email filter is set to low, it’s a good idea to check this folder from time to time to make sure messages that you want aren’t accidentally sent here.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select the

Junk Email

folder.

The contents of the folder are displayed. All the messages in this folder are flagged as junk Email.

Change Junk Email filter settings

The Junk Email filter determines which messages are junk. If the filter is set to high, anything that is remotely suspicious is considered junk. If the filter is turned off, you will probably get loads of junk messages in your

Inbox.

1. In the program window, click the

Home

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Junk

button in the

Delete

group.

A list of options for setting junk Email appears.

2. Select

Junk E-mail Options

from the list.

The Junk Email Options dialog box appears. There are four levels of junk Email protection available.

No Automatic Filtering: All Email is moved to the Junk Email folder, including Email from blocked senders.

Low: Only the most obvious junk Email messages are moved to the Junk Email folder.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Change the junk Email filter settings to High. [email protected]

Figure 4-17: The Junk Email Options dialog box

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More Email Features

High: Most junk Email is sent to the junk Email folder, but some regular Mail may be caught as well.

Safe Lists Only: All Mail that does not come from your Safe Senders list will be sent to the junk Email folder.

3. Select the level of Junk Email protection that you want.

You can also use the check boxes here to specify how

Outlook deals with junk Email:

Permanently Delete Junk Email: Delete all junk

Mail without viewing it, although this would mean there was no way for you to know if good

Mail was deleted as well,

Disable Phishing Links: Disable links from messages that appear fraudulent so you don’t give your personal information to the wrong person,

Warn About Suspicious Domain Names:

Receive warnings when you receive Mail from suspicious addresses, and

Postmark Messages: Add postmarks to help verify that the messages you send are authentic.

4. Click

OK

.

The dialog boxes close and the changes are applied to junk Email protection.

Tips

 The junk Email filter is a good way to deal with spam, but you can also use the tips in Table 4-5:

Techniques for Avoiding Spam to reduce the amount of spam you receive in the first place.

Table 4-5: Techniques for Avoiding Spam

Use a disposable

Email address for mass Mailings, like newsletters or advertisements.

Look out for newsletter offers.

Use AntiSpam software.

Get a free Email address from

HotMail, Yahoo, or another service and use that for making online purchases and registering web accounts.

When you sign up for a product or service, look out for pre-checked boxes that say “Yes, send me more information” and uncheck them.

Third-party commercial products like

McAfee SpamKiller, Norton

AntiSpam, Vipre, and SpamNet can be more effective than Windows Mail for filtering out junk Email.

Don’t publish your

Email address as a link online.

If you include spaces around the @ in your Email address, it will not automatically become a hyperlink, and address-seeking programs will be less likely to find it.

Never reply to spam. Unless you are removing yourself from a Mailing list that you personally signed up for, any response will only tell spammers that your address is valid, making you a target for more spam.

Your Organization’s Name Here 79

More Email Features

Adding Addresses to the Safe and Blocked Senders List

The filtering system in Outlook 2013 is good, but it’s not perfect. Sometimes spam finds its way into your inbox and sometimes Email from Mom gets kicked into the

Junk folder. You can minimize these instances with the

Safe Senders List and the Blocked Senders List.

Add addresses to the Safe Senders List

When an address or domain is added to the Safe Senders list, none of the messages from that address or domain will be sent to the Junk Email folder.

1. In the program window, click the

Home

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Junk

button in the Delete group.

2. Select

Junk E-mail Options

from the list.

The Junk Email Options dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Safe Senders

tab.

The Safe Senders tab appears.

Tip: By default, all addresses listed in your

Address Book are regarded as Safe Senders so you don’t need to add them here. If you don’t want this to be the case, you can clear the “Also trust Email from my Contacts” check box.

4. Click

Add

.

The Add Address or Domain dialog box appears.

You can add an individual Email address, or a domain name. If you add a domain name (i.e.

@acme.com), all Email sent from that domain is safe.

5. Type an Email address or domain name and click

OK

.

The address or domain name is added to the Safe

Senders List.

Other Ways to Add Addresses to the Safe

Senders List:

Right-click the message and select

Junk

Never Block Sender

or

Never Block Sender’s

Domain (@example.com)

from the contextual menu. Or, select the message, click the

Junk

button in the Delete group and select

Never Block

Sender

or

Never Block Sender’s Domain

(@example.com)

from the list.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add the following Email addresses to your

Safe Senders list: [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Click the Import from File button to choose a .txt document that lists Email addresses you’d like to add (separated by commas). [email protected]

Select this check box to add anyone you Email to the Safe

Senders List.

Figure 4-18: The Safe Senders tab in the Junk Email dialog box.

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More Email Features

Add addresses to the Blocked Senders List

If you continue to get unwanted Email from the same addresses, add them to the Blocked Senders List.

Messages from the address or domain immediately end up in the Junk Mail folder.

1. In the program window, click the

Home

tab and click the

Junk

button in the

Delete

group.

2. Select

Junk E-mail Options

from the list and click the

Blocked Senders

tab.

4. Click

Add

.

5. Type in an Email address or domain name and click

OK

.

The address or domain name is added to the Blocked

Senders List.

Other Ways to Add Addresses to the Blocked

Senders List:

Right-click the message and select

Junk

Block

Sender

from the contextual menu. Or, select the message, click the

Junk

button in the Delete group and select

Block Sender

from the list.

Add addresses to the Safe Recipients List

If you belong to Mailing lists or distribution lists, you can add the list sender to your Safe Recipients List so that any messages sent to these Email addresses or domain names will never be treated as junk.

1. In the program window, click the

Home

tab and click the

Junk

button in the

Delete

group.

2. Select

Junk Email Options

from the list and click the

Safe Recipients

tab.

3. Click

Add

.

4. Type an Email address or domain name and click

OK

.

The address or domain name is added to the Safe

Recipients List.

Figure 4-19: The Blocked Senders tab in the Junk Email

Options dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 81

More Email Features

Changing Outlook’s Security

Settings

Spam isn’t just a nuisance, it can be dangerous to your computer if it carries a virus, or dangerous to you if the spammer acquires your personal information. You can use the Trust Center both to check for dangerous Email and to reassure your recipients that you are not trying to send dangerous Email to them.

1. In the program window, click the

File

tab and select

Options

from the menu.

2. Click the

Trust Center

tab. Click the

Trust Center

Settings

button.

The Trust Center dialog box appears. The left column lists seven categories for setting options. See Table

4-6: Tabs in the Trust Center for more information on these categories.

3. Click

E-mail Security

in the left column.

The Email Security tab appears. There are four topics listed:

Encrypted e-mail: Encodes your message so that only the intended recipient can read it.

Digital IDs (Certificates): Documentation that helps prove your identity when you send Email.

Read as Plain Text: Disables HTML in incoming

Email. Dangerous code won’t be hidden in the message, but you’ll be unable to view images.

Script in Folders: If you share folders with other people, you may not want to allow script which could contain viruses or spyware in the folders.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open the Trust Center and explore the tabs.

Figure 4-20: The Email Security tab of the Trust Center.

Table 4-6: Tabs in the Trust Center

Trusted Publishers

Privacy Options

Email Security

Attachment Handling

Automatic Download

Macro Settings

Programmatic Access

Bar individuals from publishing information from your computer unless they are given permission to do so.

Determine which ways Microsoft is allowed to use the Internet to help solve problems with your computer.

Set security levels for encrypted Email, using digital IDs, reading Email as plain text, and allowing script.

Set the level of security for viewing attachments or opening messages that include attachments.

Control whether Outlook automatically downloads and displays pictures when you open a message in

HTML format.

Receive a warning when a macro that you did not create is run or disable them completely.

Receive a warning about suspicious activity when someone tries to access your Email address information or send messages on your behalf.

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More Email Features

Inserting Screenshots

A screenshot is an image of something on your monitor.

Insert a screenshot of an open window

1. Create a new message and click in the Message Area.

2. Click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Screenshot

button list arrow in the

Illustrations

group.

A gallery of all open program windows appears.

Tip: If the program window is minimized to the taskbar, it will not appear in the gallery.

3. Click an image.

The screenshot is inserted into the message window.

Insert a screen clipping

Rather than insert an entire window, use the Screen

Clipping tool to take a screenshot of part of the window.

1. Make active the window from which you want to take a screen clipping.

Tip: Minimize all program windows to the taskbar, except for Outlook and the one from which you want to take a screen clipping.

2. Create a new message.

3. In the Message window, click the

Insert

tab on the

Ribbon and click the

Screenshot

button list arrow in the Illustrations group.

A gallery of all open program windows appears.

4. Select

Screen Clipping

.

The Outlook window minimizes to the taskbar, the desktop fades, and the cursor changes to a crosshair.

Tip: To cancel a screen clipping, press the

<Esc>

key while screen clipping mode is active.

5. Move the cursor to the corner of the area you want to clip.

6. Click and drag the cursor around the area you want to clip.

As you drag around the area, note that the area to be captured is not grayed out. When you release the mouse, the screen clipping is inserted into the message.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Open a new message window

Exercise:

Take a screen clipping of the desktop and insert it in a message.

Figure 4-21: The Screenshot gallery is populated with thumbnails of all open program windows.

Figure 4-22: A screen clipping in progress.

Your Organization’s Name Here 83

M o r e E m a i i l l F e a t u r e s R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

Where are unfinished messages stored?

A. The Drafts folder.

B. The Sent Items folder.

C. The Saved Items folder.

D. The Unfinished Items folder.

2.

You cannot recall a message if it has already been read or opened. (True or False?)

3.

When resending a message, you can change or add recipients and change the body of the message. (True or False?)

4.

The Out of Office Assistant temporarily disables your Email account. (True or False?)

5.

If you want to delay a single message for two days, you should:

A. Use the Rules Wizard to create a rule that would only work on one message.

B. Click the Delay Delivery button on the Options tab of the message window.

C. Change the internal calendar on your computer by two days.

D. Click the Delay by two days hyperlink in the subject line of your Email.

6.

You cannot customize a default quick step. (True or False?)

7.

How do you access Outlook’s Signature settings?

A. Open the Options dialog box and click Signatures on the Mail Format tab.

B. Open the Options dialog box and click Signatures on the Mail Setup tab.

C. Open the Format Signature dialog box and click the Signatures button.

D. Click the Signatures and Stationery button on the Standard toolbar.

8.

You cannot use stationery and themes if your messages are formatted in Plain Text. (True or False?)

9.

HTML format is compatible with all Email programs. (True or False?)

10.

Which of these tasks can NOT be accomplished from the Junk Email Options dialog box?

A. Send a postmark with your outgoing Email.

B. Send junk Email back to the sender.

C. Receive a warning about suspicious domain names in Email addresses.

D. Permanently delete suspected junk Email immediately.

11.

Setting the Junk Email filter to High may move regular mail to the Junk Email filter. (True or False?)

12.

Email messages from the addresses in the Safe Senders list:

A. Will never go to the Junk Email folder.

B. Will always go to the Junk Email folder.

C. Will occasionally go to the Junk Email folder depending on the subject.

D. Will be automatically flagged.

13.

You can automatically add the addresses of every person you send Email to to the Safe Senders list. (True or False?)

14.

Which of the following is NOT an option in the Email Security tab of the Trust Center?

84

© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

A. Use a Digital ID to prove that mail is being sent by you.

B. Block HTML and read standard mail as plain text.

C. Send encrypted mail

D. Save secure copies of all messages in your Inbox.

15.

Viruses and spyware can be hidden in messages that use HTML code. (True or False?)

16.

To insert a screenshot of a window, you must ensure that the window is NOT minimized to the Windows taskbar. (True or False?)

Your Organization’s Name Here 85

Quiz Answers

1.

A. Unfinished messages are stored in the Drafts folder.

2.

True. If the recipient has read or opened the message, it cannot be recalled.

3. True. Resending a message lets you open the message that was sent so you can change recipients or body text before resending.

4.

False. The Out of Office Assistant does not disable your Email account in any way.

5.

B. If you want to delay a single message for two days, you should click the Delay Delivery button on the Options tab of the message window.

6.

False. You can customize a default quick step.

7.

A. To access Outlook’s Signature settings, open the Options dialog box and click Signatures on the Mail Format tab.

8.

True. You can only use stationery and themes if your messages are formatted in HTML.

9.

False. The only message format that is compatible with all Email programs is Plain Text.

10.

B. You cannot send junk Email back to the sender using the Junk Email Options dialog box.

11.

True. Although most junk Email is caught when the Junk Email filter is set to high, regular Email may be caught as well.

12.

A. Email messages from the addresses in the Safe Senders list will never go to the Junk Email folder.

13.

True. You can automatically add the addresses of everyone you send an Email message to by clicking the check box that says ‘Automatically add people I Email to the Safe Senders List’.

14.

D. The Email Security tab of the Trust Center lets you encrypt Email, use Digital IDs, read mail as plain text, and limit the use of script in folders.

15.

True. Viruses and spyware can be hidden in messages that use HTML code.

16.

True. To insert a screenshot of another window, the window must NOT be minimized to the Windows taskbar.

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W o r k i i n g w i i t h

C o n t a c t s

Introduction to the Address Book ................... 88

Open the Address Book ........................... 88

Adding a Contact ............................................... 89

Adding a Contact from an Email ...................... 90

Editing and Deleting Contacts ......................... 91

Delete a contact ....................................... 91

Viewing and Sorting Contacts .......................... 92

Change Contacts list view ....................... 92

Sort contacts ............................................ 92

Mapping a Contact’s Address .......................... 94

Working in a Contact Window .......................... 95

Show different pages ............................... 95

Communicate with a contact ................... 95

Finding and Organizing Contacts .................... 97

Find contacts ........................................... 97

Add a contacts folder ............................... 98

Creating a Contact Group ................................. 99

Printing the Contacts List ............................... 101

As you may recall, people used to keep track of their contacts in a Rolodex, which was basically a small box filled with note cards. Contact information was typed or scribbled on each card, and the cards were arranged alphabetically by the contact’s name. You would then spin a knob on the side of the box to rotate the cards to find a person. A Rolodex seems like a primitive way to manage contact information, but this was the best option until computers came along.

Outlook’s Contacts list is a “technological

Rolodex” database that keeps track of names, addresses, phone numbers, and lots of other information. Once you have entered a person’s name and details into

Outlook, the possibilities are endless.

You can instantly find, Email or print contact information, or even create a map to a contact’s business or home address.

5

Your Organization’s Name Here 87

Working with Contacts

Introduction to the Address

Book

Unless you communicate with only two or three different people, it’s almost impossible to memorize all of the phone numbers, addresses, and Emails of everyone who you know. Fortunately, when you use Outlook’s Address

Book, you don’t have to.

The Address Book can get its information from one or more sources, including Internet directory services and third party address books. Here are the two most common sources that the Address Book uses:

Global Address List: If you use Outlook in a networked environment, the Global Address List contains your organization’s users, groups, and contact groups. The Global Address List is similar to a large telephone directory that is available for everyone to use. A network administrator usually manages the Global Address List, so you can’t make any changes to it.

Outlook Address Book: The Outlook Address Book is similar to a personal address book.

There is a subcategory in the Outlook Address Book: the Contacts folder. Both personal contacts and contact groups are stored in the Contacts folder.

Open the Address Book

It doesn’t matter if you’re working with Email or the calendar—you can always find the Address Book.

1. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Address Book

button in the

Find

group.

The Address Book appears. By default, names from your organization are displayed from the Global

Address List.

2. Click the

Close

button.

The Address Book closes.

Tips

 Most of the time, you will only want to add contacts and contact groups to your Contacts folder, so you won’t need to use the Address Book very often.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open the Address Book.

View the list of sources under the Address Book list arrow.

Close the Address Book.

The Address Book can contain information from…

The Global Address

List, which is stored on a network server and contains your organization’s users, groups, and contact groups.

The Outlook

Address Book, which contains the

Contacts folder.

Figure 5-1: The Address Book can contain several types of information.

Click the Address Book list arrow to view a different contact source.

Figure 5-2: Selecting Names from the Global Address

Book.

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Working with Contacts

Adding a Contact

The Contacts list contains information about people and organizations with whom you interact. You can enter as much or as little information about your contacts as you want in the Contacts list, including names, phone numbers, Email accounts, and addresses.

You can use the Contacts list with other Outlook tools.

For example, you can schedule an appointment with or send an Email to a contact. You can even use the

Contacts list with other programs, such as software for an electronic organizer.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

By default, the Contacts list appears in Business

Cards view. In this view, your contacts are displayed as Electronic Business Cards, which look like actual paper business cards on the screen.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Contact

button in the New group.

The Untitled – Contact window appears. You can enter the contact’s name, company, job title, Email address, Web page address, phone numbers, and/or addresses.

Other Ways to Add a Contact:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<N>

. Or, right-click the

Contacts

list and select

New Contact

from the contextual menu.

Tip: If you create a contact with the same name as another contact, the Duplicate Contact Detected dialog box appears. Here, you can add a new record if the contact is a new contact or update the contact’s existing record.

3. Enter as much contact information as you want in the window.

Tip: Several of the fields in the Contact window have buttons and list arrows next to them. The buttons display dialog boxes to assist you with the fields, while the arrows are used if a contact has multiple phone numbers, Email accounts, or addresses.

Tip: To add a picture of a contact, click the

Add

Contact Picture

button (located next to the

Name and Company fields).

4. Click the

Contact

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group.

The Contact window closes and the new contact appears in the Contacts list.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add Jeanne Trudeau to your Contacts list using the following information:

Name: Jeanne Trudeau;

Company: CustomGuide, Inc.

Email: student’s email address

Business Phone Number: 888-903-2432

Business Address: 3387 Brownlow Ave., Saint Louis Park,

MN 55426.

Figure 5-3: The Outlook Contacts list, displayed in

Business Cards view.

Figure 5-4: A Contact window.

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Working with Contacts

Adding a Contact from an

Email

You can add someone to your Contacts list using an Email you’ve received. To add an Email sender’s name and

Email address to your Contacts list, simply drag the Email to the People button in the Navigation Bar. Outlook will add the sender’s name and Email address to the Contacts list—and you can add any additional information yourself.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click and drag an Email to the

People

button in the

Navigation Bar.

The Contact window opens, and the person’s name and Email address are filled in automatically.

Other Ways to Add an Email Sender to the

Contacts List:

Open an Email message (or just view it in the

Preview pane), right-click the name in the From line, and select

Add to Outlook Contacts

from the contextual menu.

Tip: If you create a contact with the same name as another contact, the Duplicate Contact Detected dialog box appears. You can add a new record if the contact is a new contact or update the contact’s existing record.

3. Enter any additional information for the contact.

4. Click the

Contact

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group.

The Contact window closes, and the new contact appears in the Contacts list.

Exercise

Exercise File:

A message from someone not saved in your Contacts list.

Exercise:

Add the sender’s Email address to the Contacts list using the click and drag method.

If you have any additional information about the contact, such as phone numbers or addresses, enter those items in the Contact window as well.

[email protected]

Figure 5-5: Click and drag a message to add the sender’s

Email address to your Contacts folder.

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Working with Contacts

Editing and Deleting Contacts

It’s easy to view and change information about your contacts. You can edit contact information by doubleclicking a contact to open it in the Contact window, or you can edit information about a contact directly in the

Contacts list. The latter method is more efficient; simply select the entry you wish to edit and make your changes.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

Outlook displays the Contacts list.

2. Double-click the contact you want to edit in the

Contacts list.

That person’s contact window appears.

3. Make the necessary changes.

4. Click

Save

.

The window closes and the changes to the contact’s information are saved.

Other Ways to Edit a Contact:

If you are using a view other than Business Cards, or have the Reading Pane displayed, modify the information right there without opening the

Contact window.

Tip: You can also attach files or other Outlook items to contact records. Open a contact’s window, click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon, and click the

Attach File

or

Outlook Item

button in the Include group.

Delete a contact

You can also delete contacts if you no longer need them.

1. Double-click the contact you want to delete in the

Contacts list.

That person’s contact window appears.

2. Click the

Contact

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group.

The contact is moved to the Deleted Items folder in your Mailbox.

Other Ways to Delete a Contact:

Select the contact, click the

Home

tab on the

Ribbon, and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group, or, press the

<Delete>

key.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new contact with this information:

Name: Brad Miller

Address: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington,

DC 50403.

Create another contact with this information:

Name: Ron Dean

Exercise:

Edit the Brad Miller contact to change the zip code to 55403 and delete the Ron Dean contact.

Figure 5-6: Edit a Contact in the Contact’s window.

Figure 5-7: The Delete button on the Home tab of the

Ribbon.

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Working with Contacts

Viewing and Sorting Contacts

Outlook is flexible enough to keep all of your contacts in one place, yet display them differently depending on the type of work you’re doing.

Like other folders in Outlook, the Contacts list has several different ways to look at the same information. These different views are very useful when it comes to organizing the Contacts list.

Change Contacts list view

By default, contacts appear in Outlook in People view. In this view, your contacts are displayed as an alphabetical list.

Changing the Contacts view changes how much information is displayed about your contacts in the

Contacts list. You can display more detailed information about each contact, such as with the Business Cards or

Cards view. Or, you can display more contacts on the screen at once, such as with the Phone or List view.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

Outlook displays the Contacts list.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon.

See Table 5-1: Contacts List Views for a description

of each view.

3. Select the view you want to use from the

Current

View

group.

The new view is applied.

Other Ways to Change Contact Views:

Display the Contacts list and click the

View

tab on the Ribbon. Click the

Change View

button in the

Current View

group and select the view you want to use from the list.

Sort contacts

If you are working in Phone or List view, you can further sort your contacts by categories, company, or location.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

Outlook displays the Contacts list.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

View your contacts in each of the different views, then return to Business Cards view.

Figure 5-8: All views appear in the Current View group on the Home tab of the Ribbon.

Table 5-1: Contacts List Views

People

Business

Card

Card

Phone

List

Displays your contacts in a list with their full name and a photo. Letters of the alphabet on the left allow you to find the name you’re looking for.

Displays contacts as electronic business cards.

This is the default view for the Contacts list.

This is the most detailed view of the Contacts list. Everything is displayed on individual cards: business and home addresses, phone numbers, and other information.

Displays contacts in a list with company name, business phone number, business fax number, and home phone number. Phone view displays more contacts on the screen at a time but has less detailed information.

Displays your contacts in a table and sorts them alphabetically.

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Working with Contacts

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon.

There are three options for sorting your contacts:

Categories: Organizes and sorts contacts by color category (if categories have been assigned to contacts).

Company: Organizes and sorts contacts by company (if a company has been assigned to contacts).

Location: Organizes and sorts contacts by location (if a location has been assigned to contacts).

3. Select an arrangement from the

Arrangement

group.

The arrangement is applied.

Figure 5-9: Sort contacts using the Arrangement group on the View tab of the Ribbon.

Your Organization’s Name Here 93

Working with Contacts

Mapping a Contact’s Address

Are you good at finding addresses that you have never visited before? No? Don’t worry—if you’re connected to the Internet, Outlook can pinpoint the U.S. or Canadian address of any contact on a detailed map.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears. Make sure your Contacts list is displayed in Business Card view. Now you need to select the contact whose address you want to map.

2. Double-click the contact you want to map.

The contact’s window opens.

3. Click the

Map It

button under the Addresses heading.

Outlook launches a Web browser, navigates to the

Bing Web site, and displays an interactive map of the contact’s location.

Other Ways Map a Contact’s Address:

Click the

Contact

tab on the Ribbon, click the

More

button in the Communicate group, and select

Map It

from the list.

Tip

 Click the

Contact

tab on the Ribbon, click the

More

button in the Communicate group, and select

Web

Page

to launch the contact’s Web site.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Use Brad Miller’s Contact card.

Exercise:

Map Brad Miller’s address using Outlook’s mapping feature.

Figure 5-10: Click the Map It button in the Contact window to map an address.

Figure 5-11: A map of a contact’s address.

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Working with Contacts

Working in a Contact Window

When you open a contact, you have access to useful tools for viewing and entering information, and for communicating with the contact.

Show different pages

The Show group on the Contact tab allows you to display different pages of information related to the contact. You can enter detailed contact information on each page and track activities and communications related to the contact.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears. Now you need to select the contact with which you want to work.

2. Double-click a contact.

The contact’s window opens.

By default, the General page appears in the window, but you can display different pages of information.

See Table 5-2: Contact Pages for an overview of all the pages.

3. Click a button in the

Show

group on the Contact tab.

The selected page appears in the window.

4. Select the page you’d like to view.

Communicate with a contact

The Communicate group on the Contact tab allows you to communicate directly with a contact by Email or phone, or to schedule a meeting or task.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears. Now you need to select a contact.

2. Double-click a contact.

The contact’s window opens. You can communicate with a contact directly from this window by using one of the following buttons in the Communicate group:

Email: Send an Email to the contact.

Meeting: Send a meeting request to the contact.

Reply with IM: Send an instant message to the contact using Microsoft Lync (if you have

Microsoft Lync installed on your computer).

Call: Make a phone call (if your modem is connected to a phone line).

Exercise

Exercise File:

Jeanne Trudeau contact card

Exercise:

Open the Jeanne Trudeau contact and explore each of the pages you can show for the contact.

Send an Email to Jeanne Trudeau from the contact window.

Table 5-2: Contact Pages

General

Shows primary contact information: the contact’s name, phone number(s), address, and

Email.

Details

Shows secondary contact information: the contact’s spouse, manager, birthday, etc.

Certificates

Stores digital IDs for the contact so that you can send him or her encrypted Email.

All Fields

Here you can edit all information contained in the contact and create your own custom fields for the contact.

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Working with Contacts

Web page: View the contact’s Web page.

Assign Task: Assign a task to the contact.

Map It: View a map of the contact’s location.

3. Click a button in the Communicate group on the

Ribbon, and if necessary, select the option you would like to use.

A window opens to help you execute the selected form of communication. For example, if you clicked the Email button, a new message window appears, addressed to the contact.

4. Modify and send the communication.

Display different pages in the Contact window.

Communicate directly with a contact.

Figure 5-12: Groups in the Contact tab on the Ribbon.

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Working with Contacts

Finding and Organizing

Contacts

Once you start to accumulate a large number of contacts, you can use Outlook’s search features to find contact information. You also can use folders to organize your contacts.

Find contacts

There are several ways to search for information in your contacts.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears. To find a contact or contact information, choose from the following search methods:

Search address books: Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, enter a contact’s name or company name in the Search People box in the Find group, and press

<Enter>

.

Instant Search (Search Contacts): Just as you can search Email messages using keywords, you can also search contacts. Enter search keywords

(or even a phone number) in the

Search Contacts

box at the top of the Contacts list.

Alphabetical index: If you are viewing your contacts in Business Cards or Cards view, click a letter button in the index that appears by the cards to display contacts beginning with that letter.

Sort table: If you are viewing your contacts in a table view such as Phone view, click a column heading to sort the contacts by that column’s criteria.

2. Select a search method and complete your search.

If you choose either the Search address books or

Search Contacts method, the Search contextual tab appears on the Ribbon. Here you can further adjust your search using the following groups:

Scope: Change which Outlook folders are searched.

Refine: Search for items based on category, phone number, address, or information in other contact fields.

Options: Review and reuse previous searches or change advanced search options.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Jeanne Trudeau contact

Exercise:

Search for “Jeanne” using the Search People box.

Add a folder named “Office” and move the Jeanne

Trudeau contact into it.

Alphabetical index

Search

Contacts

Search

Address

Book

Figure 5-13: Finding Contacts in Business Cards view.

Click a column heading to sort the list by that column.

Figure 5-14: Finding Contacts in Phone view.

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Working with Contacts

Add a contacts folder

You can organize your contacts by creating folders for specific categories of contacts.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Folder

button in the New group.

The Create New Folder dialog box appears.

3. Enter a name for the new folder and make sure

Contact Items is selected under the “Folder contains” list arrow.

4. Click

OK

.

The new folder appears in the Folder Pane under My

Contacts.

Now you can move contacts into the new folder.

5. Click and drag a contact from the Contacts list to the new folder’s icon in the Folder Pane.

The contact is moved to the new folder.

Tip

 You can also organize contacts by assigning them to color categories. Right-click a contact in the

Contacts list, point to

Categorize

, and select a category.

Figure 5-15: The Create New Folder dialog box. [email protected]

MyMail somewhere.com

Figure 5-16: The new “Office” contacts folder appears in the Folder Pane.

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Working with Contacts

Creating a Contact Group

A contact group, known in previous versions of Outlook as a distribution list, lets you group Email addresses together. A contact group can save you time when you have to send Email to:

All employees in the same department or organization

Colleagues on the same project or committee

A group of friends

Contact groups appear in your Contacts list the same way that a person’s name does. To address an Email message using a contact group, follow the same steps that you would with any other message.

Before you can send Emails to recipients in a contact group, you need to create the group.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Contact Group

button in the New group.

The Untitled – Contact Group window appears.

3. Enter a name for the contact group in the Name text box.

For example, you could name the contact group

“Family” or “Management Team”.

Now you’re ready to choose which recipients you want to include in the contact group.

4. Click the

Contact Group

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Add Members

button in the Members group.

There are three sources you can use to add recipients to a contact group:

From Outlook Contacts: Use this option to add a recipient already in your Outlook Contacts list.

From Address Book: Use this option to add a recipient from the Address Book, including any recipients in the Global Address List.

New Email Contact: Use this option to add a recipient who has not been entered as an Email contact.

5. Select an option from the list.

Depending on the option you select, either the Select

Members or Add New Member dialog box appears.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a contact group named “Friends” and add several contacts to the group.

Figure 5-17: The Untitled – Contact Group window

Your Organization’s Name Here 99

Working with Contacts

6. Select or enter the recipients you wish to add.

Click

OK

.

As you add recipients, you return to the Contact

Group window. The name you entered for the contact group now appears in the title bar, and the names of the recipients are listed in the window.

7. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

The window closes and the new contact group is saved.

Tip

 In addition to Email messages, you can use contact groups to create task requests, create meeting requests, and create other contact groups.

Figure 5-18: The Contact Group window displays a list of contact group members.

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Working with Contacts

Printing the Contacts List

Even though we live in a digital world with paperless offices, some people like to print a copy of their Contacts list. Printing your Contacts list is no different from printing anything else in Outlook, except for a few unique options. You can customize the Contacts list print settings so that your printed list looks exactly how you want it to.

1. Click the

People

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Contacts list appears.

2. Click the

File

tab and select

Print

.

Backstage View appears. Notice that the print settings and a preview of the document appear together, with print settings on the left and a preview on the right.

Here you can select a Print style. The styles that are available depend on the view that is displaying the contacts. See Table 5-3: Contact Print Styles for more information.

Other Ways to Print:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

3. Select a print style from the

Settings

list.

4. Specify other desired print options and click

Print

.

Tip

 The Print dialog box gives you additional printing options. To open the Print dialog box, click the

Print

Options

button.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Preview and print your contacts in Card Style.

Figure 5-19: Backstage View allows you to preview Print styles.

Your Organization’s Name Here 101

Working with Contacts

Table 5-3: Contact Print Styles

Card Style

Prints all cards one at a time from top to bottom on the page, two columns wide, and with alphabetical letter tabs and headings on a standard 8.5 x 11-inch piece of paper.

Small Booklet Style

This is a printout arranged in a way that can be cut and stapled to form a small-sized paper booklet.

When you print a booklet, the page layout and page numbering are arranged automatically.

Contains contact name, phone number, and address information. Should be printed double-sided

(you may receive a message that recommends you turn on your printer’s double-sided printing option).

Medium Booklet Style

This is a printout arranged in a way that can be cut and stapled to form a medium-sized paper booklet. Contains contact name, phone number, and address information.

Memo Style

This is a printout with detailed information about only the currently selected contact.

Phone Directory Style

This is a nicely condensed directory that shows only the contacts’ names and phone numbers.

Table Style

This is a no-nonsense format that lists the contacts in table rows and columns. This is the only view available when the Contacts list is displayed in Phone or List views.

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W o r k i i n g w i i t h C o n t a c t s

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

The Global Address List is like your personal address book. You can add contacts as necessary. (True or False?)

2.

When you add an entry to the Contacts list, you are required to include at least the following: First Name, Last Name,

Address, City, and State. (True or False?)

3.

To add a contact from an Email, click and drag the Email message to the _______ button in the Navigation Pane.

A. Create Contact

B. Contacts

C. New Contact

D. Contact List

4.

To edit a contact, you must add the contact again with the updated information. (True or False?)

5.

When you delete a contact, it is sent to ________.

A. the Deleted Items folder in your Mailbox

B. your Windows desktop

C. the Recycle Bin

D. an online Outlook folder

6.

Which of the following is NOT a Contacts list view.

A. Business Cards

B. Cards

C. Phone

D. Message

7.

You must be connected to the Internet to display a map of a contact's address. (True or False?)

8.

Which of the following is NOT a page you can show in a contact window?

A. Tasks

B. General

C. Details

D. Activities

9.

To send an Email or meeting request directly from a contact window, use a command in the _______ group.

A. Contact

B. Show

C. Communicate

D. Options

10.

Which of the following is NOT a way to search for a contact?

A. Click the Find tab on the Ribbon

B. Search address books

C. Use the Search Contacts box

D. Use the alphabetical index

11.

You cannot add folders to organize your contacts. (True or False?)

Your Organization’s Name Here 103

12.

You regularly send Emails to your department. To make this quicker, you can create a ___________?

A. meeting request

B. contact group

C. contact

D. There is no way to make this quicker.

13.

Which of the following is NOT a contact print style?

A. Card

B. List

C. Small Booklet

D. Memo

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Quiz Answers

1.

False. The Global Address List is similar to a large telephone directory that is available for everyone to use. A network administrator usually manages the Global Address List, so you can’t make any changes to it.

2.

False. You can include as much or as little information as you want in a contact.

3. B. To add a contact from an Email, click and drag the Email message to the Contacts button in the Navigation Pane.

4.

False. You can easily edit existing contact information - you don't need to add the contact again.

5.

A. When you delete a contact, it is sent to the Deleted Items folder in your Mailbox.

6.

D. Message is not one of the views available for the Contacts list view.

7.

True. You must be connected to the Internet to display a map of a contact's address.

8.

A. Tasks is not a page you can show in a contact window.

9.

C. To send an Email or meeting request directly from a contact window, use a command in the Communicate group.

10.

A. There is no Find tab on the Ribbon.

11.

False. You can add folders to organize your contacts.

12.

B. You can create a contact group to group multiple Email addresses in one entry.

13. B. List is not a contact print style.

Your Organization’s Name Here 105

U s i i n g t h e

C a l l e n d a r

Viewing the Calendar ...................................... 108

Change the amount of time displayed ... 108

View the next seven days ...................... 108

Increase the calendar area .................... 109

Navigating the Calendar ................................. 110

Scroll to the next day, week, or month ... 110

Move to the next or previous appointment

...............................................................

110

Jump to a specific date .......................... 110

Jump to today ........................................ 110

Search for a calendar item...................... 111

Scheduling Appointments .............................. 112

Create an appointment .......................... 112

Copy an appointment ............................. 113

Scheduling an Event ....................................... 114

Editing and Rescheduling Appointments and

Events ............................................................... 115

Edit an appointment or event ................. 115

Reschedule an appointment or event .... 115

Delete an appointment or event ............ 115

Working with Recurring Appointments ......... 116

Create a recurring appointment ............. 116

Edit a recurring appointment ................. 116

Delete a recurring appointment ............. 117

Setting Availability ........................................... 118

Color-coding Appointments ........................... 119

Assign a color category ......................... 119

Rename a color category....................... 119

Create a new category ........................... 120

Setting Reminders ........................................... 121

For existing appointments, meetings, or events .................................................... 121

Change the default reminder settings .... 121

Viewing Calendar Items .................................. 123

Changing the Appearance of a Calendar ...... 124

Change the time scale ........................... 124

Change the emphasis color ................... 124

Change the calendar font ...................... 124

Changing Work Days and Times .................... 125

Creating Additional Calendars ....................... 126

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Coming in at a close second to Email, the

Calendar is one of the most-used tools in

Microsoft Outlook. The Calendar lets you keep track of appointments, such as a visit to the dentist; and events, such as a vacation. It’s easy to add or reschedule an appointment or event in the Calendar.

Once you’ve entered your schedule into the Calendar, you can display it in a variety of different views.

In this chapter, you’ll learn how to create and reschedule appointments and events, how to add a reminder to your appointments so that you don’t forget about them, and how to view your schedule using the various Calendar views. You will also learn how to create a recurring appointment, such as a weekly staff meeting.

6

Using Exercise Files

This chapter suggests exercises to practice the topic of each lesson. There are two ways you may follow along with the exercise files:

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and close the exercise file.

Open the exercise file for a lesson, perform the lesson exercise, and keep the file open to perform the remaining lesson exercises for the chapter.

The exercises are written so that you may

“build upon them,” meaning the exercises in a chapter can be performed in succession from the first lesson to the last.

Viewing Calendars Side-by-Side or Overlaid 127

View calendars side-by-side .................. 127

Remove a calendar from side-by-side ... 127

Overlay the calendars ............................ 127

Remove a calendar from the overlay mode

...............................................................

128

Printing the Calendar ...................................... 129

Adding a Second Time Zone .......................... 130

Your Organization’s Name Here 107

Using the Calendar

Viewing the Calendar

Outlook’s Calendar is a very useful tool. Use it to keep track of events and appointments in your schedule.

First, to display the Outlook Calendar:

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar appears.

Change the amount of time displayed

There are five ways to display the calendar:

Day: Day view gives you an hour-by-hour breakdown of your daily schedule.

Work Week: Work Week view displays your schedule Monday through Friday.

Week: Week view displays the full seven-day week.

Month: Month view is the default view in the

Calendar. Month view shows your schedule for the entire month.

Schedule View: Displays multiple calendars in vertical orientation so it’s easy to compare schedules and appointments between calendars.

1. Click the button for the calendar arrangement you wish to use in the Arrange group on the Home tab.

The calendar changes to the selected arrangement.

Other Ways to Change the Amount of Time

Displayed:

Press the keystroke for the arrangement you want to see. Refer to Table 6-1: Arrangement Shortcuts for the keystroke shortcuts of each arrangement.

View the next seven days

Want to see what’s going on over the next seven days?

Here’s how to do it:

1. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Next

7 Days

button in the Go To group.

The next seven days, starting with the current day, are displayed.

Tip: The date navigator at the top of the Folder

Pane displays which days are currently displayed by adding gray shading to each date.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open the Calendar and display it in Day view.

Switch to Month view.

View the next 7 days.

Minimize the Folder Pane and any To-Do panes. Expand the Folder Pane so it is visible again.

Click a view to change the amount of time displayed.

Figure 6-1: The Calendar displayed in Month view.

Table 6-1: Arrangement Shortcuts

Day

Ctrl + Alt + 1 Month Ctrl + Alt + 4

Week

Ctrl + Alt + 2 Schedule

Work Week

Ctrl + Alt + 3 0-9 day

week

Ctrl + Alt + 5

Alt + (0-9)

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Using the Calendar

Increase the calendar area

You can increase the area in which the calendar is displayed by hiding the Navigation Pane and the Tasks pane.

1. To hide the Folder Pane, click the

Minimize the

Folder Pane

button .

The Folder Pane is minimized. Click the button again to expand the Folder Pane.

2. To close To-Do Panes, click the

Remove the Peek

button in the top right of the Pane.

The Pane is closed.

Calendar – [email protected] – Outlook

View After minimizing other panes.

Figure 6-2: Closing other panes to view more of the calendar.

Your Organization’s Name Here 109

Using the Calendar

Navigating the Calendar

There are many ways to navigate between items and dates in the calendar. This lesson covers some of the most common ways to do this.

Scroll to the next day, week, or month

As you view the calendar in different arrangements, you can navigate between days, weeks, or months, depending on how the calendar is arranged.

1. Click the

Back

or

Forward

buttons.

Outlook goes back or forward one day, week, or month, depending on the arrangement currently being viewed.

Move to the next or previous appointment

As you navigate between days and weeks in your calendar, you may find some stretches of time where there are no appointments. In these instances, you can jump between appointments and skip over empty dates.

1. Click the

Previous Appointment

or

Next

Appointment

buttons.

Outlook jumps to the appointment.

Trap: These buttons only appear if the current

Calendar view does not contain any appointments.

Jump to a specific date

To see what is happening on a specific date, you can quickly jump to that date and see if anything is planned.

1. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Dialog Box Launcher

in the Go To group.

The Go To Date dialog box appears.

2. Enter or select the date you want to jump to and select the view in which to display the date.

3. Click

OK

.

Jump to today

Wherever you are in the calendar, it’s easy to jump back to today.

1. Click the

Today

button in the Go To group on the

Ribbon.

The calendar jumps to today.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

In Monthly view, scroll ahead two months.

Scroll back to the current month.

Use the Go To Date dialog box to jump to your birthday and select Month View. Then jump back to today.

Navigation buttons

Appointment navigation buttons

Calendar – [email protected]omewhere.com – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 6-3: If the current Calendar view does not contain any appointments, one or both appointment navigation buttons appear on either side of the Calendar. Click these buttons to jump to the next or previous appointment.

(These buttons appear smaller if the program screen is smaller.)

Select the view in which you want to display the selected date.

Figure 6-4: Go To Date dialog box.

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Using the Calendar

Search for a calendar item

If you need to find a calendar item in the past or the future, searching is an easy way to find it.

1. Click the

Search Calendar

text box.

Other Ways to Search the Calendar:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

< E >

.

2. Enter keywords for the item you want to find and press

<Enter>

.

The most relevant items matching the search are displayed.

3. Click the

Close Search

button to return to the

Calendar view.

Click to search for a calendar item.

Figure 6-5: Use the Search box to find an item in the

Calendar.

Your Organization’s Name Here 111

Using the Calendar

Scheduling Appointments

Outlook’s Calendar is great for keeping track of your appointments.

Create an appointment

An appointment is any scheduled activity that takes place within a one-day time period. When you schedule an appointment, the Calendar blocks off the specified time span—for example, from 10 a.m. to noon.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

New Appointment

button in the New group on the Home tab.

An Untitled—Appointment window appears.

Other Ways to Create a New Appointment:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<N>

.

3. Type a description of the appointment in the

Subject

field (for example, Lunch with Julie ).

4. (Optional) Enter the appointment’s location in the

Location

field.

5. Specify the date of the appointment and its start and end time.

You can use the

Start

and

End time

list arrows to select a date and time, or you can enter the date and time manually.

6. Enter additional information about the appointment as desired.

For example, you could include notes about the appointment in the body area of the appointment window.

7. Click the

Save & Close

button in the

Actions

group on the Ribbon.

The Appointment window closes and the appointment appears in your calendar.

Other Ways to Create an Appointment:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<Shift>

+

<A>

. Or, click in the

Calendar where you want to insert an appointment and type the appointment’s description.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

If necessary, jump back to the today.

Create a two-hour appointment for tomorrow called

“Training,” and schedule it so that it begins at 2 p.m. and lasts until 5 p.m.

An appointment that takes place from 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

To add a new appointment, click the timeslot and type the appointment name.

Figure 6-6: An appointment is any scheduled activity that takes place within a one-day time period.

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Using the Calendar

Copy an appointment

There may be times that you have several appointments at the same place, but on different days and at different times. For example, perhaps your son has a football game at 5:00 PM on Tuesday and 4:30 PM on Friday. Instead of creating two or more individual appointments, save yourself some time by creating one appointment and then copying it to another day and/or time.

1. Select the appointment you want to copy.

2. Press and hold down the

<Ctrl>

key, and click and drag the appointment to another day and/or time.

The appointment is copied.

Other Ways to Copy an Appointment:

Select the appointment and press

<Ctrl>

+

<C>

to copy it. Click the destination of the appointment and press

<Ctrl>

+

<V>

.

Your Organization’s Name Here 113

Using the Calendar

Scheduling an Event

An event is any appointment that lasts a day or more, such as conferences or vacation. Events are not displayed as blocked-out time periods; they appear as banners. An allday appointment displays your time as busy, but an event displays your time as free.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

New Items

button in the New group on the

Home tab and select

All Day Event

from the list.

An Untitled—Event window appears.

Other Ways to Create a New Event:

Create a new appointment and click the

All day event

check box or, in Day/Week/Month view, double-click the block containing the date.

3. Type a description of the event in the

Subject

field

(for example,

Tradeshow in Atlanta

).

4. Enter the event’s location in the

Location

field.

5. If the event lasts longer than one day, specify the values in the

Start time

and

End time

date fields.

You can use the Start and End time calendar icons to select a date, or you can enter the date manually.

6. To change the status of the event, click the

Show As

list arrow and select your status for the event.

7. Enter any additional information about the event.

For example, you could enter a note about the event in the message area of the window. You can also use the commands in the Options group to make other specifications.

8. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group.

The Appointment window closes and the event appears in your calendar.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

Schedule an all-day event on your birthday named “My Birthday”.

Click here to save the event.

Click here to specify that this is an all-day event.

Figure 6-7: Creating a new event.

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 6-8: Events that take place over several days appear as banners in the Calendar.

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Using the Calendar

Editing and Rescheduling

Appointments and Events

Having to edit and reschedule appointments and events is an unavoidable task in today’s busy world. Co-workers cancel at the last minute, meeting locations change, etc.

This lesson shows you just how easy it is to edit or reschedule your appointments and events in Outlook.

Edit an appointment or event

To edit an appointment or event, open it in its own window.

1. Double-click the appointment or event you want to edit.

The appointment or event opens in its own window.

2. Edit the appointment or event as necessary.

3. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group.

Outlook saves your changes.

Reschedule an appointment or event

Rescheduling an appointment or event is easy.

1. Click and drag the appointment or event to a new date and/or time.

You can click and drag in Day, Week, or Month view.

Other Ways to Reschedule an Appointment or

Event:

Double-click the appointment or event you want to reschedule and specify a new date and/or time using the

Start time

and

End time

controls.

Delete an appointment or event

If an appointment or event has been canceled indefinitely, delete it.

1. In the Calendar, click the item you want to delete.

2. Press the

<Delete>

key.

The appointment or event is removed from the

Calendar.

Other Ways to Delete an Appointment or

Event:

Open the item and click the

Delete

button in the

Actions

group on the Ribbon. Or, right-click the appointment or event and select

Delete

from the contextual menu.

Exercise

Exercise File:

If necessary, create a two-hour appointment that occurs tomorrow called “Training,” and schedule it to begin at 2 p.m. and end at 5 p.m.

Exercise:

Reschedule this appointment so that it begins in two days instead of tomorrow.

Figure 6-9: To reschedule an appointment, click and drag the appointment in the Calendar.

Your Organization’s Name Here 115

Using the Calendar

Working with Recurring

Appointments

A recurring appointment is an appointment that occurs at regular intervals; for example, every Friday at 10 a.m.

Create a recurring appointment

1. Click the

New Items

button in the New group on the

Ribbon and select

New Appointment

from the drop- down.

An Untitled—Appointment window appears.

2. Type a description of the appointment in the

Subject

field (for example, Staff Meeting ).

3. Click the

Recurrence

button in the Options group.

The Appointment Recurrence dialog box appears.

Here you need to specify the time of the appointment, how often the appointment should recur (for example, every Friday), and the start and end date of the recurrence.

4. Make your specifications in the Appointment

Recurrence dialog box and click

OK

.

5. Click the

Save & Close

button in the

Actions

group.

Edit a recurring appointment

1. Double-click the appointment you want to edit.

The Open Recurring Item dialog box appears. You have two options here:

Open this occurrence: Edits only the selected occurrence of the recurring appointment.

Open the series: Edits every occurrence of the recurring appointment.

2. Select the appropriate option and click

OK

.

The appointment opens in its own window.

3. Edit the appointment as necessary.

4. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group.

Outlook saves your changes.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a recurring appointment named

“Marathon Training” that occurs every Monday from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and ends after 10 occurrences.

Recurrence button

Figure 6-10: Scheduling a recurring appointment.

Figure 6-11: The Appointment Recurrence dialog box.

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Using the Calendar

Delete a recurring appointment

1. In the Calendar, click the appointment that you want to delete.

2. Press the

<Delete>

key.

The Confirm Delete dialog box appears. You have two options here:

Delete this occurrence: Deletes only the selected occurrence of the recurring appointment.

Delete the series: Deletes every occurrence of the recurring appointment.

3. Select the appropriate option and click

OK

.

Outlook removes the recurring appointment from your Calendar.

Other Ways to Delete a Recurring

Appointment:

Select the item and click the

Delete

button in the

Actions group on the Ribbon. Or, right-click the appointment you want to delete and select

Delete

from the contextual menu. Select the appropriate option and click

OK

.

Figure 6-12: The Confirm Delete dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 117

Using the Calendar

Setting Availability

Adding free/busy information to your appointments helps people know when you are available.

When you make an appointment, the schedule is automatically set to Busy. When you create an event, the availability is set to Free. You can change your status so that is correctly reflects your availability for those who can view your calendar.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The calendar appears.

2. Create a new appointment or event, or open an appointment or event you have already created.

The applicable window appears.

3. Click the

Show As

list arrow in the Options group of the

Appointment, Event, Task

tab on the Ribbon.

You can select Busy, Tentative, Free, or Out of

Office. See Table 6-2: Show Time As Options for a description of these options.

4. Select a status from the list.

The status of the appointment will be shown accordingly when your calendar is viewed.

5. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

The availability for the appointment or event is set.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Change the availability for an event to Out of

Office.

Figure 6-13: Setting the availability for an event.

Table 6-2: Show Time As Options

Free

Working

Elsewhere

Designates that you are available for a meeting.

Designates that you are working in a different location as opposed to at the office.

Tentative

Busy

Designates that you have a tentative meeting and may not be available.

Designates that you are busy and are not available for a meeting.

Out of Office

Designates that you are out of the office and are not available for a meeting.

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Using the Calendar

Color-coding Appointments

Color categories let you organize your Outlook items by color, making it easier to distinguish between different types of information. In the Calendar, you can color-code your appointments, meetings, and events.

Assign a color category

By default, six color categories are available. You can apply one or more categories to an item at a time.

1. Select the appointment, meeting, or event you want to color-code.

The relevant contextual tab appears (Appointment

Series, Meeting Series etc.) under Calendar Tools on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group of the relevant tab on the Ribbon.

A list of color categories appears.

3. Select a color category from the list.

The selected color is applied to the appointment.

Other Ways to Color-code an Item:

Right-click the item you want to color-code, point to

Categorize

in the contextual menu, and select a color category from the list or, open the appointment and click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group of the applicable tab on the

Ribbon.

Rename a color category

You can rename Outlook’s color categories to make them more meaningful.

1. Select an appointment, meeting, or event.

The Calendar Tools contextual tab appears.

2. Click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group of the applicable contextual tab on the Ribbon.

3. Select

All Categories

.

The Color Categories dialog box appears.

4. Click the color category you wish to rename, and click the

Rename

button.

5. Type a new name for the category and click

OK

when you’re finished.

Exercise

Exercise File:

If necessary, create a recurring appointment named “Marathon Training” that occurs every

Monday from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and ends after 10 occurrences.

Exercise:

Color-code the Marathon Training appointments using the Orange Category color and then rename the category to Marathon Training.

Calendar – [email protected]

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 6-14: Color-coding an appointment.

Your Organization’s Name Here 119

Using the Calendar

Tip

 The same categories are used throughout Outlook, so a renamed category in the Calendar appears the same way under Mail.

Create a new category

If find you need more categories, you can create your own from scratch.

1. Select an appointment, meeting, or event.

The relevant tab appears (Appointment Series,

Meeting Series etc.) under Calendar Tools on the

Ribbon.

2. Click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group of the relevant tab on the Ribbon.

3. Select

All Categories

.

The Color Categories dialog box appears.

4. Click

New

.

The Add New Category dialog box appears. Here you can give the category a name, assign a new color to the category, or create a keystroke shortcut for the category.

5. Type a new name for the category, specify any other options as necessary, and click

OK

.

The new category is added to the list of categories.

Tip

 You can also control color categories from inside the

Appointment window. To do so, click the

Categorize

button in the Tags group on the Ribbon and select a category from the menu.

Figure 6-15: The Color Categories dialog box.

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Using the Calendar

Setting Reminders

To make sure you don’t forget about an important appointment or event, you can set reminders in Outlook.

You can specify when you want the reminder to appear

(for example, an hour before the scheduled appointment) and you can even select a sound to play during the reminder.

For existing appointments, meetings, or events

By default, a reminder will appear 15 minutes before a scheduled appointment or meeting, and 18 hours before an all-day event. However, you can change when a reminder appears.

1. In the Calendar, double-click the item for which you want to set a reminder.

If the item is already open, you can skip this step.

2. Click the

Reminder

list arrow in the Options group on the Ribbon.

A list of reminder options appears. You can schedule a reminder to appear as many as two weeks or as little as five minutes before the appointment, meeting, or event.

3. Select an option from the list.

Tip: If you don’t want a reminder to appear for the item, select

None

from the list.

4. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

Change the default reminder settings

If you want to change the default Reminder settings for all new appointments and meetings, use the Options dialog box.

1. In the program window, click the

File

tab on the

Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Calendar

tab.

3. In the Calendar options section, select a new default option from the list provided, or deselect the

Default reminder

check box.

If the check box is selected, the visible value will be used for all new appointments. If the check box is deselected, you will have to manually set reminders for all your new appointments.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Create a new appointment called “Break” that occurs in 10 minutes and lasts for half an hour.

Exercise:

Set a 5 minute reminder for the appointment.

When the reminder appears, dismiss it.

Figure 6-16: Setting a reminder time.

Reminder list arrow

Click Snooze to be reminded of the appointment again before it begins

Figure 6-17: What a reminder looks like.

Your Organization’s Name Here 121

Using the Calendar

4. Click the

Default time

list arrow and select when you want the reminder to appear.

The time refers to the amount of time before the appointment. So by default, a reminder will appear

15 minutes before an appointment. If you need more time, say an hour, select 1 hour instead.

5. Click

OK

.

The Options dialog box closes. Now every new appointment or meeting will have the selected settings applied.

Tips

 You cannot change the default Reminder settings for events.

 To change the sound that plays when a Reminder appears, click the

Advanced

tab on the Outlook

Options window. In the Reminders section, click the

Browse

button, find and select the file you want to use, and click

Open

. Then, click

OK

.

Figure 6-18: The Options dialog box. Click the Reminder list arrow to select a new reminder time.

122

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Using the Calendar

Viewing Calendar Items

When your Calendar is jam-packed with appointments, meetings, and events, it can be difficult to separate the forest from the trees. Fortunately, Outlook lets you view your Calendar by item, such as active appointments or annual events.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Change View

button in the Current View group on the Ribbon.

A list of views appears. Take a look at Table 6-3:

Calendar Views for a description of each view.

3. Select a view from the list.

The Calendar changes to the selected view.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Switch to Active view.

Switch back to Calendar view.

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 6-19: The Calendar displayed in Active view. Active view lists all of your current and future appointments.

Table 6-3: Calendar Views

Calendar

Preview

List

Active

The default view. Each arrangement (Day/Week/Month) has its own button in the Calendar grid.

Same as above, except the first few lines of text for each item are included.

Displays all appointments you have set in the Calendar, both past and present. Click a column heading to change the how the calendar items are sorted.

Lists all current and future appointments. Click a column heading to change the how the calendar items are sorted.

Your Organization’s Name Here 123

Using the Calendar

Changing the Appearance of a

Calendar

Changing the appearance of a calendar can help you distinguish it from other calendars or let you view critical information in a way that is useful to your working style.

Change the time scale

By default, the calendar grid shows a time interval of 30 minutes. You can increase or decrease this interval to show more or less detail in the calendar. The time scale cannot be changed in Month view.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Time

Scale

button in the

Arrangement

group.

A list of interval options appears. The 5 minute interval shows the most detail, while the 60 minute interval shows the least detail.

2. Select the grid interval that you want to show in the calendar.

Change the emphasis color

You can change the emphasis or trim color of a calendar to help you distinguish it from other calendars, or just to have it in your favorite color.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Color

button in the Color group and select the color you want.

Change the calendar font

You can also change the font that the Calendar uses. For example, you could increase the style and size of the font to make it easier to read.

1. In the Calendar, click the

View

tab on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

View Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings: Calendar dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Other Settings

button.

The Format View dialog box appears.

4. Use the buttons to choose the fonts and sizes that you want to use. Click

OK

. Click

OK

again.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

View the calendar in 10 minute intervals.

Change the emphasis color of the calendar to gray.

Return the calendar to display the time scale in 30 minute intervals and the background color to the default blue.

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 6-20: Day view displayed in 10 minute intervals.

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Using the Calendar

Changing Work Days and

Times

The Outlook calendar is set up for an employee who works Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. But in today’s world of flexible schedules, many people work different days and hours. This lesson shows you how to customize the work schedule to meet your specifications.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon.

Backstage view appears.

2. Click the

Options

button.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Calendar

tab in the dialog box.

The options available for changing the calendar are displayed in the Work time section.

Set the beginning and end of the work day:

Click the

Start time

and

End time

list arrows and select the correct time.

Set work days: Select the check boxes next to the days of the week that you want to be work days.

Set the first day of the week: Click the

First day of week

list arrow and select the day that you want.

Set the first week of the year: Click the

First week of year

list arrow and select the option that you want.

4. Change the work time settings as needed and click

OK

.

The changes are reflected in the Calendar.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

Change the work week to Monday through

Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Change back to the default settings: Monday through

Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Daily work hours

Days in the work week

Figure 6-21: Changing Work Time settings.

Your Organization’s Name Here 125

Using the Calendar

Creating Additional Calendars

A great way to keep your appointments organized is to create separate calendars for separate types of appointments. For example, you can have one calendar that is strictly for work, and another that is strictly for personal items.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Calendar

button in the New group.

The Create New Folder dialog box appears.

Note that Calendar Items is already selected under the Folder contains and in the folder contains option.

3. Type a name for the new name for the calendar in the

Name box. Click

OK

.

The new calendar appears listed in the Folder Pane under My Calendars.

Tips

 To delete a calendar, right-click the calendar name in the Folder Pane, and then select

Delete Calendar

from the contextual menu.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

Create a new calendar named “Personal”.

Figure 6-22: The Create New Folder dialog box.

126

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Figure 6-23: The new Personal calendar.

Using the Calendar

Viewing Calendars Side-by-

Side or Overlaid

A valuable aspect of calendars is the ability to view them side-by-side so it’s easy to compare their schedules. You can also lay them on top of one another so that you can see any overlapping appointments.

View calendars side-by-side

When multiple calendar check boxes are selected, the calendars are displayed side-by-side.

1. In the Folder Pane, click the check boxes of the calendars you wish to view.

The calendars that you selected appear side-by-side.

Remove a calendar from side-by-side

1. Uncheck the check box of the calendar you no longer wish to view in the Calendar Folder Pane.

The calendar is hidden from view, and the remaining calendar is displayed.

Other Ways to Remove a Calendar from Side-

by-Side: Click the

Close Calendar

button on the

Calendar Name tab.

Overlay the calendars

Overlaying calendars lets you see exactly where appointments overlap between calendars.

1. Click the check boxes of calendars that you want to overlay in the Calendar Folder Pane.

The calendars are displayed side-by-side.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Overlay

button in the Arrangement group.

That calendar is now in overlay mode with the one you opened first.

Tip

 To add another calendar to the overlay, right-click the calendar you want to add in the Folder Pane and select

Overlay

from the contextual menu.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

Personal calendar

• Exercise:

View the Personal calendar side-by-side with the default calendar.

To the Personal calendar, add an appointment for tomorrow with these details:

Subject: Soccer game

Location: Meeker Field

Start time: 3 p.m.

End time: 5 p.m.

Overlay the calendars. Note how appointments from both calendars are displayed.

Hide the Personal calendar.

View in Overlay

Mode button

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 6-24: The calendars displayed side-by-side.

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 6-25: The calendars displayed in overlay mode.

Your Organization’s Name Here 127

Using the Calendar

Remove a calendar from the overlay mode

1. Click the

Calendar

tab you want to remove from the overlay mode.

2. Click the

Overlay

button in the Arrangement group on the View tab.

This turns the Overlay off and the calendar moves back to the right, displayed side-by-side.

Other Ways to switch between Side-by-Side

and Overlay views:

Click the

View in Overlay Mode /View in

Side-By-Side Mode

buttons on the Calendar

Name tab.

128

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Using the Calendar

Printing the Calendar

Printing the Calendar is no different than printing anything else in Outlook, except for a few unique

Calendar-related options that you need to be aware of.

You can customize the Calendar print settings so your printed calendar looks the way you want it to. For example, you can specify Daily, Weekly, or Monthly formats and the range of dates you want print.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Print

.

Backstage View appears with a preview of the currently selected print style. There are several different ways to print the calendar. Check out Table

6-4: Calendar Print Styles for descriptions of different print styles.

2. Select the print style you wish to use and click

Print

to begin printing.

Other Ways to Print the Calendar:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

Tip

 Click the

Print Options

button to change other settings for the print.

Table 6-4: Calendar Print Styles

Daily

Prints one day per page, from 7:00 AM to 7:00

PM, with tasks and notes areas for the next month. This is the most detailed calendar style.

Prints the schedule of one week on one page with space for notes and tasks.

Weekly

Agenda

Style

Weekly

Calendar

Style

Monthly

Style

Prints the schedule of one week on one page in a calendar/time slot arrangement.

Tri-fold

Style

Calendar

Details

Style

Prints a calendar similar to the type you hang on your wall: one month per page without tasks and notes areas.

This is a printout broken into three parts: One section that displays the hours and appointments in the selected day, one section that displays the task list, and one section that displays the appointments in a selected week.

This is a printout of all calendar items that are currently displayed, arranged in a list.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Preview and print the current week in Weekly

Calendar Style.

Figure 6-26: The Print Settings in Backstage View.

Figure 6-27: A preview of the Monthly Style.

Your Organization’s Name Here 129

Using the Calendar

Adding a Second Time Zone

If you frequently travel to a different time zone, or you work with a colleague in another time zone, it can be very helpful to be able to reference that time zone when making arrangements for appointments.

A second time zone does not affect how appointments or other calendar items are saved or displayed, it is only a reference for planning your schedule.

1. In the program window, click the

File

tab on the

Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Calendar

tab.

3. Scroll down to view the Time zones section.

Tip: If you need to change the default time zone in Outlook, click the

Time zone

list arrow and select the time zone you want to switch to. All

Calendar items and views are updated to the new time zone.

4. Click the

Show a second time zone

check box.

Tip: To clear the time zone, uncheck the

Show a second time zone

check box.

5. Click the

Label

text box and enter a name for the second time zone.

6. Click the

Time zone

list arrow and select the time zone that you want to add.

7. Click

OK

.

The second time zone is now displayed to the left of the default time zone in the Day and Week views of the calendar.

Tips

 The second time zone is used only to show a second time bar in Calendar view and does not affect the way in which calendar items are stored or displayed.

 Click

Swap Time Zones

to switch the time zones’ position in the Calendar.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

Add a second time zone of your choosing to the Outlook Calendar.

Figure 6-28: Adding a second time zone in the Outlook

Options dialog box.

Figure 6-29: The two time zones displayed in the

Calendar.

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U s i i n g t h e C a l l e n d a r

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

Which view displays the seven days of the current week?

A. Week view

B. Work Week view

C. Next 7 Days

D. Schedule View

2.

When do the Previous and Next Appointment buttons appear?

A. They are always displayed.

B. When the navigation buttons are hidden.

C. When no results appear for a search.

D. When no appointments are scheduled for the current day or week.

3.

An appointment is any scheduled activity that takes place within a one-day time period. (True or False?)

4.

At what time of the day do events start?

A. Events do not have a start or end time. An event is a day-long affair.

B. 8 a.m., or the start of the work day.

C. At the time of the first appointment scheduled for the same day.

D. None of these.

5.

The fastest way to reschedule an appointment is by clicking and dragging. (True or False?)

6.

Which of the following appointments could NOT be scheduled using Outlook’s recurring appointment feature?

A. An appointment held on the first Monday of every month.

B. A mystical ceremony that occurs during each full moon.

C. A status meeting held every other Thursday.

D. A birthday that falls on April 7th of every year.

7.

You cannot edit a single occurrence of a recurring appointment; you have to edit the entire series. (True or False?)

8.

Which of the following is not an availability option in Outlook?

A .Busy

B. Out of Office

C. Tentative

D. Be Right Back

9.

The preset color categories can be edited to meet your needs. (True or False?)

10.

Appointment reminders are set at 15 minutes by default. (True or False?)

11.

Active view displays all of the appointments in your Calendar. (True or False?)

12.

Calendars can only display time in 30 minute intervals. (True or False?)

13.

You can change the start and end time of the calendar but not work days. (True or False?)

14.

You can only have one calendar at a time in Outlook. (True or False?)

Your Organization’s Name Here 131

15.

What happens when you click the check box of a another calendar in the Navigation Pane?

A. The calendar is displayed on top of the current calendar.

B. The calendars are overlaid.

C. The calendar is displayed and the current calendar is closed.

D. The calendar appears next to the current calendar.

16.

Which of the following is NOT a Calendar Print Style?

A. Daily

B. Monthly

C. Calendar Details

D. Appointments

17.

When you add a second time zone, it appears in Monthly view of the calendar. (True or False?)

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Quiz Answers

1.

A. Week view displays the seven days of the current week.

2.

D. The Previous and Next Appointment buttons only appear when no appointments are scheduled for the current day or week.

3.

True. An appointment is any scheduled activity that takes place within a one-day time period.

4.

A. Events do not have a start or end time. They last the entire day.

5.

True. The fastest way to reschedule an appointment is by clicking and dragging, but you can also reschedule an appointment using the Appointment window.

6.

B. The current version of Outlook does not support recurring appointments based on lunar cycles.

7.

False. You can edit a single occurrence or the entire series of a recurring appointment.

8.

D. You can select Busy, Tentative, Free, or Out of Office for your availability in Outlook.

9.

True. Outlook’s default color categories can be edited to meet your needs.

10.

True. Appointment reminders are set at 15 minutes by default, and event reminders are set at 18 hours by default.

11.

False. List view displays all of the appointments in your Calendar.

12.

False. Calendars can display time from 5 minute to 60 minute intervals.

13.

False. You can change the start and end time of the calendar.

14.

False. You can create additional calendars in Outlook.

15. D. When more than one calendar check box is selected, the calendars are displayed next to each other, side by side.

16.

D. Appointments is not a Print Style.

17.

False. Times are not displayed in Monthly view, but views like Day, Work Week, and Week do display the second time zone.

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C o l l l l a b o r a t i i n g w i i t h O t h e r

U s e r s

Sharing Your Calendar .................................... 135

Share your calendar .............................. 135

Email your calendar ............................... 136

Change other people’s access to your calendar ................................................. 137

Opening Shared Calendars ............................ 138

Using Schedule View ...................................... 139

Scheduling Meetings ....................................... 140

Create a meeting request ...................... 140

Check responses to a meeting request . 141

More about time zones in Outlook ......... 141

Responding to a Meeting Request ................ 142

Working with Calendar Groups ...................... 143

Create a calendar group ........................ 143

Add a calendar to a calendar group ...... 144

Viewing a calendar group ...................... 144

Marking an Appointment as Private .............. 145

Mark an appointment as private ............ 145

Avoid printing private appointments ...... 146

Publishing Your Calendar on the Internet ..... 147

Publish your calendar to Office.com ...... 147

Remove your calendar from Office.com 148

Sharing Outlook Folders ................................. 149

Share a folder ........................................ 149

Open a shared folder ............................. 149

Giving Delegate Permissions ......................... 151

Taking and Tracking a Vote............................. 152

Send a message to be voted on ............ 152

Respond to a vote .................................. 153

Track votes ............................................ 153

Working with Public Folders .......................... 154

Open a public folder ............................... 154

Add new items to a public folder ............ 154

Reply to items in a public folder ............. 155

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With Microsoft Outlook, you can keep track of your committee’s next meeting on your calendar, lay out the all tasks you need to finish, and use Email to communicate with people outside your committee. Wouldn’t it be nice if the rest of your committee had access to all of that information?

Fortunately, they do. Outlook lets you share your appointment schedule, send out polls, and even add content to other people’s folders. A few of these options require Microsoft Exchange Server, but more and more of them are becoming available just using an Internet connection.

If part of your job is getting large groups of people to agree on anything, read this chapter carefully.

7

Collaborating with Other Users

Sharing Your Calendar

If you’re not the person in the office who schedules meetings, count your blessings. Then share your calendar to make things easier for the poor soul saddled with that responsibility. Outlook 2013 provides a few ways to share your calendar with others. This lesson will show you how to share your calendar with coworkers using

Microsoft Exchange

Share your calendar

Exchange users can share their own calendars with other users on the server. This lets other people view your schedule.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The calendar appears. Links to other calendars are displayed in the Folder Pane.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Share Calendar

button in the Share group.

A Sharing invitation message window appears.

3. Enter the people you would like to share your calendar with in the

To

box.

4. Type information into the

Subject

line and

Message

body.

5. (Optional) If you would like permission to view the calendars of the people to whom you are sending an invitation, select the

Request permission to view recipient’s calendar

check box.

Tip: You can only request access to the recipient’s default calendar. If you would like permission to view a different calendar, you must send a separate request.

6. Click

Send

.

A dialog box appears, asking you to confirm the invitation.

7. Click

Yes

.

The invitation is sent. The recipient can now access your calendar.

Other Ways to Share Your Calendar:

If someone sends you a sharing request via

Email, click

Allow

, and then click

Yes

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Share your calendar with a colleague and

Email your calendar for the next 7 days to one other person.

Share

Calendar

Publish

Online

Share

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 7-1: The Share group on the Ribbon. [email protected]

Figure 7-2: A Sharing invitation for others to view your calendar.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Email your calendar

1. To email your calendar to a contact, click

Calendar

on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon.

3. In the Share group, select

Email Calendar .

The Send a Calendar via Email dialogue box appears.

4. Specify exactly which calendar you want to share by clicking the

Calendar

list arrow and selecting the correct one.

5. Click the

Date Range

list arrow and select a date range.

6. Click the

Detail

list arrow and indicate how much detail on the calendar you want to share.

7. Click

OK

.

Your calendar will appear in your new email window.

8. Type the contacts in the

To

field of the email window and click

Send

.

Figure 7-3: Selecting to Email your calendar.

[email protected]

Figure 7-4: An email is generated showing your availabilty which can be sent to a recipient.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Change other people’s access to your calendar

Committees change, people move on, and that weird guy from accounting is scheduling his breaks so he can talk to you about his medical problems. It’s a good thing that you can change or revoke someone’s access permissions to your calendar.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar is displayed.

2. Right-click the calendar for which you’d like to change in the Folder Pane and select

Properties

from the contextual menu.

The General tab of the Calendar Properties dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Change Calendar Access:

Select the calendar for which you’d like to change permissions in the Folder Pane. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Calendar

Permissions

button in the Share group.

3. The Permissions tab of the Calendar Properties dialog box appears.

4. In the Name box, select the name of the person whose access you want to change.

Tip: To remove or change access permissions for everyone, click

Default

in the Name box.

5. Click the

Permission Level

list arrow and select the permission level you want to assign as the Default option or to a specific person.

When you select different permission levels, the options that are selected in the Read, Write, Delete items, and Other sections will change accordingly.

6. Click

OK

when you are finished.

The access permissions for this user have been changed.

Figure 7-5: The Permissions tab of the Calendar

Properties dialog box.

Table 7-1: Access Permission Roles

Owner

Publishing Editor Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files, and create subfolders.

Editor

Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files.

Publishing

Author

Author

Nonediting

Author

Reviewer

Contributor

Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files, and create subfolders. As the folder owner, you can change the permission levels others have for the folder.

Create and read items and files, create subfolders, and modify and delete items and files you create.

Create and read items and files, and modify and delete items and files you create.

Create, read, and delete items and files you create. Cannot modify items.

Read items and files only.

Free/Busy time, subject, location

Free/Busy time

None

Create items and files only. The contents of the folder do not appear.

View free and busy times along with the subject and location of busy times.

View free time and busy time.

Cannot open the folder; you have no permission.

Your Organization’s Name Here 137

Collaborating with Other Users

Opening Shared Calendars

Getting several people to coordinate schedules can feel like herding butterflies. Outlook makes the process easier by letting you view other people’s calendars and share your calendar with them. When your company uses

Microsoft Exchange, you can view the calendars that your coworkers have opted to share, provided you have their permission to do so.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar opens.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Open

Calendar

button in the Manage Calendars group, and select

Open Shared Calendar

from the list.

The Open a Shared Calendar dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Name

button.

The Select Name dialog box appears.

4. Select the contact whose calendar you want to view and click

OK

.

The Select Name dialog box closes, and the contact’s name appears in the Open a Shared Calendar dialog box.

5. Click

OK

.

If you have been given permission to view the calendar, it now appears in the Outlook window.

Also, the contact’s name appears in the Shared

Calendars area of the Navigation Pane.

Tip: If you have not received permission to view a calendar, a dialog box asking if you would like to request permission to view the calendar appears. Click

Yes

, then complete the Email permissions request and click

Send

. If you are granted permission to view the calendar, you will receive an Email from the contact.

Tips

 You can view up to 30 calendars side-by-side.

 Display or hide shared calendars by clicking the check box of a shared calendar you have opened previously in the Shared Calendars area of the Folder

Pane.

 When you request permission to view other people’s calendars, you can send them a sharing invitation to view yours.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open a shared calendar.

Carly James …

Carly James

Carly James - Calendar

Carly James ([email protected]) has invited you to view his or her Calendar.

Click the open button above.

Carly James - Calendar

Figure 7-6: A Sharing request to view someone else’s calendar. [email protected] [email protected]

Figure 7-7: Viewing calendars side-by-side.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Using Schedule View

In the past, you could only view multiple calendars sideby-side in Outlook. Outlook 2013 makes it easier to view multiple calendars with Schedule view. Schedule view displays multiple calendars stacked on top of one another, so you can easily compare calendars.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Schedule View

button in the Arrange group.

The Calendar changes to Schedule view.

3. Select the other calendars you wish to view in the

Folder Pane.

The calendars display stacked on top of one another in the Calendar pane.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

View additional calendars in Schedule view. [email protected]

Figure 7-8: Unlike Outlook’s other views, Schedule view stacks multiple calendars on top of one another.

Your Organization’s Name Here 139

Collaborating with Other Users

Scheduling Meetings

Organizing meetings can be difficult when dealing with many different schedules. Using Outlook, you can check invitee schedules before picking a meeting time. You can also track responses to your meeting request.

Create a meeting request

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

Trap: Your calendar needs to be in

Schedule

View

in order to create a meeting request this way.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Meeting

button in the New group.

An Untitled – Meeting window appears.

Other Ways to Create a Meeting Request:

Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, click the

New Item

button in the New group, and select

Meeting

from the list. Or, press

<Ctrl>

+

<Shift>

+

<Q>

.

Tip: You can also respond to an Email with a meeting request. In the Inbox, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Meeting

button in the

Respond group.

3. Click the

To

button.

Specify who you want to invite to the meeting.

4. Select name of the person you want to invite to the meeting, and then click one of the following buttons:

Required: These people are required to attend.

Optional: These people are not required to attend the meeting.

Resources: These are items needed for the meeting. A resource can be a conference room, a laptop, a projector, or other equipment.

5. When all attendees have been selected, click

OK

.

The selected attendees appear in the To field.

6. Enter a description of the meeting in the

Subject

field.

7. Enter the meeting place in the

Location

field.

8. Click the

Scheduling Assistant

button in the Show group on the Ribbon.

The schedules of the selected attendees are displayed.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new meeting request called “Lunch” for 12:00 PM next Tuesday at the Highway 7 Applebee’s.

Send the request to several contacts.

Figure 7-9: The Select Attendees and Resources dialog box.

Outlook suggests meeting times based on the schedules of attendees.

Figure 7-10: Use the Scheduling Assistant to determine which times are best for all meeting attendees.

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Collaborating with Other Users

There are two ways to select your preferred meeting time:

By clicking the timeline at the top of the Attendee

Availability list.

By entering the meeting start and end time in the

Start time and End time controls.

Tip: Instead of scrolling through the Scheduling

Assistant, you can also find suggested meeting times at the bottom of the Room Finder pane.

9. Select a preferred meeting time and click the

Send

button.

Your meeting request is sent.

Check responses to a meeting request

1. In the Calendar, select the meeting you want to track.

The Meeting contextual tab appears on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Meeting

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Tracking

button in the Attendees group.

A list of meeting invitees appears, along with their responses.

Tip

 You can only track responses for meetings that you have scheduled.

More about time zones in Outlook

The start and end times for items in the Outlook Calendar are saved in the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) format, an international time standard similar to

Greenwich Mean Time.

When you send a meeting request to an attendee in a different time zone, the meeting item is displayed at the respective local times on each person's calendar, but saved in UTC.

For example, a meeting organizer in the United States

Pacific time zone sends a meeting request for 2:00 P.M.

Pacific time to an attendee in the United States Central time zone. The attendee sees the meeting as starting at

4:00 P.M. Mountain time. In both cases, Outlook saves the meeting at the UTC time of 10:00 P.M.

If two time zones are shown, the meeting organizer's time zone is used as the reference point. If you organize a meeting and display free/busy time for invitees from other time zones, their busy times are adjusted so that they appear correctly in your time zone. The second time zone is visible only when you view the calendar in day or week view.

Figure 7-11: A completed meeting request.

Click the Tracking button to view meeting request responses.

Figure 7-12: The Attendees group on Meeting tab of the

Ribbon.

Your Organization’s Name Here 141

Collaborating with Other Users

Responding to a Meeting

Request

When you receive a meeting request, you should respond to it. The meeting request window has some useful tools that let you respond to a meeting request.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears. A tiny icon next to a message indicates a meeting request.

2. Double-click the meeting request.

The meeting request window appears with Quick

View displayed, as shown in the example to the right.

Quick View provides a brief snapshot of your calendar so you can review your schedule without leaving the meeting request window.

Once you’ve determined if you are attending the meeting, you can respond to the meeting request from the meeting request window. See the table below,

Response Buttons, for information about the options to respond to a meeting request.

3. On the open Meeting window, click the

Meeting

tab on the Ribbon and click the appropriate button in the

Respond group.

A list of options appears. The options displayed depend on the response you selected.

Other Ways to Respond to a Meeting Request:

Select the meeting request in the Inbox and click a response button in the Reading Pane, or rightclick on the Meeting Request and select a response from the contextual menu.

4. Select an option from the list and follow the instructions to respond to the meeting request.

Your response is sent.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Accept a meeting request that has been sent to you.

Click a button in the

Respond group to respond to a meeting request

Figure 7-13: Responding to a meeting request.

Table 7-2: Response Buttons

Accept Outlook adds the meeting to your Calendar. You can choose to send a response to the meeting organizer or not.

Tentative

Outlook adds the meeting to your Calendar and marks it as tentative. You can choose to send a response to the meeting organizer or not.

Decline

Propose

New

Time

Outlook declines the meeting request. You can choose to send a response to the meeting organizer or not.

Choose to add the meeting to your calendar as a tentative appointment and propose a new time to the meeting organizer, or decline the meeting and propose a new time to the meeting organizer.

Respond

Allows you to respond to the meeting request without accepting or declining the invitation.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Working with Calendar

Groups

If you find yourself looking at the same set of calendars frequently, consider creating a calendar group. Calendar groups combine calendars so you can view multiple schedules with one click. Anything with a calendar can be a part of a calendar group. You can also add SharePoint and Internet calendars to a calendar group.

 To use calendar groups, you must have a Microsoft

Exchange Server account.

Create a calendar group

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar

.

The Calendar appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Calendar Groups

button in the Manage Calendar group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Create New Calendar Group

from the list.

The Create New Calendar Group dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Create a Calendar Group:

If the calendars you want to save as a calendar group are already open, select

Save as New

Calendar Group

.

4. Enter a name in the “Type a name for the new calendar group” text box and click

OK

.

The Address Book appears.

5. Click the

Address Book

list arrow and select the address book you wish to use.

You can create calendar groups using any address book you would like.

6. Browse for members you wish to add, select the member, and click the

Group Members

button.

Repeat this step until you have selected every entry you want to add to your calendar group.

7. Click

OK

.

The calendars in the new calendar group are displayed in Schedule View, and the calendar group is added to the Navigation Pane.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required.

• Exercise:

Create a calendar group.

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 7-14: The Manage Calendars group.

Figure 7-15: The Create New Calendar Group dialog box.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Add a calendar to a calendar group

You can always add another calendar to an existing calendar group.

1. In the Calendar, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Open Calendar

button in the Manage

Calendars group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select the type of calendar you wish to add.

Follow the prompts to open the calendar. This new calendar will also appear in the Folder Pane under

Shared Calendars.

3. In the Folder Pane, click and drag the calendar into the calendar group to which you want to add it.

The new calendar is added to the previously saved calendar group.

View a calendar group

1. In the Folder Pane of the Calendar, select the calendar group you wish to view.

The calendar group opens.

Calendar – [email protected] – Microsoft Outlook Preview

Figure 7-16: A calendar group.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Marking an Appointment as

Private

Many people use Outlook to organize their personal and professional lives. However, you don’t want your colleagues to know every dentist appointment, doctor’s visit, or soccer game you attend. You can mark appointments as private so the time is shown as busy on your calendar, but others cannot see extra details such as the subject, location, or meeting organizer.

Mark an appointment as private

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar appears.

Trap: You can mark a series of appointments as private, but you cannot mark a single occurrence of a recurring appointment, meeting, or event as private.

2. Select the meeting or appointment which you want to mark as private.

3. Click the

Appointment

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Private

button in the Tags group.

A lock icon ( ) appears in the lower right corner of the appointment.

Other people who view your calendar can see an appointment titled “Private Appointment,” but they cannot view any appointment details.

Other Ways to Mark an Appointment as

Private:

Right-click the appointment or meeting and select

Private

from the contextual menu.

Tip

 It’s easy make an appointment or meeting public again. Simply select the appointment or meeting you wish to make public, click the

Appointment

tab on the Ribbon, and click the

Private

button in the Tags group, or right-click the appointment and select

Private

from the contextual menu.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Change the status of an appointment to Private.

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 7-17: A lock icon indicates an appointment has been marked as private.

Figure 7-18: If someone else views your calendar, they can only see that you have a Private Appointment.

Your Organization’s Name Here 145

Collaborating with Other Users

Avoid printing private appointments

If you print a copy of your calendar, make sure to avoid printing details about private appointments.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Print

.

Options for printing your calendar appear.

Other Ways to Print a Calendar:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

2. Click the

Print Options

button.

The Print dialog box appears.

3. Select the

Hide details of private appointments

check box under Print Range.

Your appointment details will appear as a Private

Appointment on the printed calendar.

4. Select any other printing options and click

Print

.

Your calendar prints.

Click the check box to hide details of private appointments on printed calendars.

Figure 7-19: The Print dialog box.

Indicates a private appointment

Figure 7-20: A printed calendar.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Publishing Your Calendar on the Internet

If you don’t use Microsoft Exchange, you can still share your calendar with other people by publishing it on

Office.com. You will need a Microsoft Associated or

Organizational Account to do this.

Publish your calendar to Office.com

You can grant access to your calendar to coworkers and friends by publishing it on Office.com.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar

.

The Calendar appears, with calendar sharing links displayed in the Folder Pane.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Publish Online

button in the Share group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Publish This Calendar

.

You will be re-directed to your Microsoft

Organizational Account Sign in page.

4.

Enter your Username and Password, and click

Sign in

.

5.

Click the

Publishing Detail

list arrow to select the amount of detail you want to share.

Availability Only: Other users can only see if you are Free, Busy, Tentative, or Out of Office.

Limited Details: Other users can see availability as well as the subject of the appointment.

Full Details: Other users will be able to view all of the details for each appointment.

6. Under

Publish my calendar

, select the time frame you want to publish your calendar for.

You can make up to 180 days of your calendar available.

7. Select an

Access Level

option to restrict access to your calendar or make it accessible to everyone.

There are two permissions options:

Restricted: If your calendar is restricted to certain users, Outlook will let you send a sharing invitation.

Public: This allows anyone in the Office.com community to subscribe to your calendar. You can also send a sharing invitation to specific users.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Publish your calendar, for Public Availability

Only during the next 3 months to the Internet. Cancel the published calendar.

Calendar – [email protected]

Figure 7-21: Publishing your Calendar.

Figure 7-22: Office 365.com Publishing Details.

Your Organization’s Name Here 147

Collaborating with Other Users

8. Click

Start Publishing

.

The calendar is published online.

Tip

 If you chose to restrict your calendar to invited users, you will be asked to send a sharing invitation. Click

Yes

, then complete the Email message by adding recipients’ names and other information. Click

Send

.

Remove your calendar from Office.com

You can remove your calendar from Office.com at any time.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Calendar appears.

2.

Right-click the calendar you wish to remove from

Office.com in the Folder Pane and select

Share

Configure This Published Calendar

from the contextual menu.

Other Ways to Delete the Calendar:

Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Publish

Online

button in the Share group, and select

Configure This Published Calendar

from the list.

3.

Your Office 365 Sign in page will open in your browser. Sign in.

4.

On the Calendar Publishing page, click

Stop

Publishing

.

Tip

 Once a calendar has been removed from the server, you will not be able to view it from Office.com. To share the calendar again, you must re-publish it.

Figure 7-23: Removing a calendar from Office.com.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Sharing Outlook Folders

This lesson discusses how to share Outlook folders, such as Contacts or Tasks, with others on your Exchange network.

Trap

 These options are only available to people using

Microsoft Exchange Server. If you are using a home version of Outlook, or if your organization does not use Exchange Server, you won’t be able to complete these tasks.

Share a folder

Allow other people in your office to read the contents of your Contacts, Calendar, Journal, Notes, and Tasks folders.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Select

Folders

.

3. Right-click the folder you want to share, select

Share

from the contextual menu, and select the item you wish to share from the submenu.

A Sharing invitation window appears.

4. Click the

To

button and select the contact(s), and the

To

button as you add contacts. Click

OK

when you’re done.

Once the contacts you want to share the folder with are entered, you’re ready to send the message.

5. Click

Send

.

A dialog box appears, asking you to confirm the invitation.

6. Click

Yes

.

The folder has been shared.

Open a shared folder

You can open other people’s folders if they have given you permission to open them.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Open &

Export

.

Options for opening files appear.

2. Click

Other User’s Folder

.

The Open Other User’s Folder dialog box appears.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Share your Contacts folder with someone and open the contacts folder shared with you.

Figure 7-24: A Sharing Folders invitation.

Table 7-3: Access Permission Roles

Owner

Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files, and create subfolders.

As the folder owner, you can change the permission levels others have for the folder.

Publishing Editor

Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files, and create subfolders.

Editor

Create, read, modify, and delete all items and files.

Publishing Author Create and read items and files, create subfolders, and modify and delete items and files you create.

Author

Non-editing

Author

Create and read items and files, and modify and delete items and files you create.

Create and read items and files, and delete items and files you create.

Cannot modify items.

Reviewer

Contributor

None

Read items and files only.

Create items and files only. The contents of the folder do not appear.

Not open the folder; you have no permission.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Other Ways to Open a Shared Folder:

Click the

Open this folder

button in a sharing invitation that you receive from the individual sharing their folder with you.

3. Click the

Name

button.

The Select Name dialog box appears with a list of names from your Address Book.

4. Double-click the contact who owns the folder you want to open.

The contact’s name appears in the Open Other User’s

Folder dialog box, and the available folders appear under the Folder type list arrow.

5. Click the

Folder type

list arrow and select the folder you want to open.

6. Click

OK

.

You can now view another user’s folder.

Tip:

If you have not received permission to view a folder, a dialog box asking if you would like to request permission to view the folder appears.

Click

Yes

, then complete the Email permissions request and click

Send

. If you are granted permission to view the folder, you will receive an

Email from the contact.

Carly James

Figure 7-25: The Open Other User’s Folder dialog box.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Giving Delegate Permissions

Busy managers may delegate the management of their calendar, schedule, and even Email, to an assistant using delegate permissions. Delegate permissions allow the selected individual(s) to send and receive items on your behalf. The most common reason for doing this is to help manage someone else’s schedule for them, although you can also let someone else manage your Inbox, Tasks list,

Contacts list, Notes, and Journal.

You can assign different permissions to different delegates. For example, you could give your assistant permission to view, create, and modify items in both your

Calendar and Inbox, while giving another coworker permission to view your Calendar—but not to add or modify any appointments.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

.

Information about your account appears.

2. Click the

Account Settings

button and select

Delegate Access

.

The Delegates dialog box appears.

Notice that you can choose how meeting requests are handled here. The default option sends meeting requests to the delegate and a copy to you.

3. Click

Add

.

The Add Users dialog box appears.

4. Double-click the name(s) of the people you’d like to assign as delegates. Click

OK

.

The Delegate Permissions dialog box appears. There are three permissions available for delegates:

Editor: This is the most powerful permission option. The delegate can read items, create new items, and modify existing items.

Author: Delegate can view existing items and create new ones. The delegate cannot modify.

Reviewer: Delegate can view existing items. The delegate cannot create or modify items.

5. Select delegate permissions as desired and click

OK

.

The Delegate Permissions dialog box closes. The default settings will allow your delegate to create and modify items in your calendar and tasks.

6. Click

OK

.

The delegates’ permissions are set.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Delegate Editor status of your Calendar and

Tasks folders, and delegate Reviewer status to the Inbox.

Choose how you want meeting requests to be handled by a delegate.

Figure 7-26: The Delegates dialog box.

Figure 7-27: Choose Permission levels for the folders in

Outlook.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Taking and Tracking a Vote

Outlook lets you create your own ballots without having to worry about exit polls, the Electoral College, or the dreaded recount. Get your coworkers’ opinions on issues by adding voting buttons to an Email message.

Send a message to be voted on

Compose your own question and use either the default responses or your own responses.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Email

button in the New group.

The Message window appears.

3. Create an Email message.

This message should contain the query you’d like people to vote on, either in the Subject line or the message body.

4. Click the

Options

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Use Voting Buttons

button in the Tracking group.

A list appears with suggested responses to your query. They include:

Approve; Reject

Yes; No

Yes; No; Maybe

Custom: this option lets you create your own response, such as Karen; Andy; Jim.

5. Select the response option you want to use.

Your selection will appear in the recipients’ message.

Tip: If none of the suggested responses works for your query, select

Custom

and enter your own voting options separated by a semicolon (for example, Mondays; Wednesdays; Fridays).

6. Click the

Send

button.

The message is sent.

Tip: You can also track when the message is sent or when it is read by clicking

Request a Delivery

Receipt

or

Request a Read Receipt

in the

Tracking group.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Take a vote and send it to at least three people, including you.

Respond to the vote and track the results.

Options tab

Figure 7-28: The Use Voting Buttons feature is located in the Options tab of the Message window.

Figure 7-29: Customize the voting buttons in the

Properties dialog box.

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Respond to a vote

Responding to an Email message with voting buttons is very easy.

1. Open the Email and click the

Message

tab on the

Ribbon.

2. Click the

Vote

button in the Response group and select your response.

3. Click

OK

to send the response.

Track votes

After the question has been sent out, check the responses to your question. Outlook totals them for you automatically.

1. Click the

Sent Items

folder on the Folder Pane.

The list of sent messages is displayed.

2. Double-click the message whose votes you’d like to track.

The message appears in a new window.

3. Right-click the

Info

bar and select

View voting responses

.

The Email addresses of the people who responded, the time and date they responded, and the responses are all listed in the table with the totals tallied on the

Info bar at the top of the mail.

Carly James

Carly James

Figure 7-30: Voting in the Message window.

Carly James

Figure 7-31: The Tracking button on the Message tab.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Working with Public Folders

A public folder is an Outlook folder that can be viewed and accessed by many people on the network. Public folders look just like any other folders. They may contain a list of Contacts used by the entire company or a task list used by an entire department. Public Folders need to be set up on the Exchange Server, so unless this has been set up on your Exchange, you will not have Public Folders listed.

Open a public folder

Public folders are stored on your organization’s Microsoft

Exchange server. Anyone on the network who uses the

Mail server can read and post to the server's public folders—but only if they have the proper access permissions.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar and select

Folders

.

2. Click the

expand

button next to Public Folders.

Public Folders expands and displays the subfolders nested within it.

3. Select the public folder you want to view.

The contents of the public folder appear.

Add new items to a public folder

Public folders are similar to Internet bulletin boards.

Most of the time, anyone with access and permission can contribute to them.

1. Select a public folder in the Folder List.

The contents of the public folder appear.

Trap: You may not have permission to access some public folders.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Post

group in the New group.

A new discussion window appears.

3. Type your subject and message.

4. Click the

Post

button.

Your message is saved and joins the list of items in the folder.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add a new post to a public folder.

Public folders

Figure 7-32: Public folders in the Folder List.

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Collaborating with Other Users

Reply to items in a public folder

If someone has started a topic and you’d like to contribute to the discussion, you can post your reply in a public folder.

1. Select a public folder in the

Folder

list.

The contents of the folder are displayed. All discussions threads are collapsed. Click the

Triangle

icon ( ) to view all posts in a discussion.

2. Double-click the message to which you want to reply.

The message opens.

3. Click the

Discussion

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Post Reply

button in the Respond group.

A Discussion reply window appears. The original message appears below your reply.

Other Ways to Reply to a Post:

Select the message you wish to reply to in the public folder, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, and click the

Post Reply

button in the Respond group.

4. Type a subject and message.

Your reply will appear in a different color than the original text.

5. Click the

Post

button.

Your reply appears in the topic’s folder.

Tip

 Don’t forget that public folders are read by a lot of people, so it’s important to be courteous and double check what you’ve written before posting.

Figure 7-33: Posting a message to a public folder.

Click the Triangle icon to view all messages in a discussion.

Figure 7-34: Expanding a discussion in a public folder.

Your Organization’s Name Here 155

C o l l l l a b o r a t i i n g w i i t h

O t h e r

U s e r s

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

When you click the Share Calendar button:

A. Your calendar is instantly shared with everyone in your Contacts.

B. You will no longer be able to make changes to your calendar without permission.

C. A sharing invitation appears for you to fill out.

D. Your calendar is instantly shared with your network administrator, who can assign it to other people.

2.

You can revoke or change someone's permission to view your calendar even after 30 days. (True or False?)

3.

You can revoke or change someone's permission to view your calendar even after 30 days. (True or False?)

4.

In order to access a shared calendar in Outlook, you need:

A. Permission from the owner of the calendar.

B. Permission from your Internet Service Provider.

C. At least 15 gigabytes of free space on your computer.

D. To share your own calendar first

5.

Schedule view displays multiple calendars side-by-side. (True or False?)

6.

You cannot invite multiple people to a meeting. (True or False?)

7.

Which of the following is NOT a valid response to a meeting request?

A. Accept

B. Ignore

C. Propose New Time

D. Tentative

8.

You cannot add a calendar to a pre-existing calendar group. (True or False?)

9.

A _______ icon indicates a private appointment.

A. calendar

B. lock

C. clock

D. envelope

10.

You need a Microsoft Windows Live ID to publish your calendar on Office.com. (True or False?)

11.

You need Microsoft Exchange Server to publish your calendar on Office.com. (True or False?)

12.

When you share a folder with someone, they are able to:

A. Read the folder's contents.

B. Make changes to the folder's contents.

C. Delete the folder's contents.

D. Read, delete, and make changes to the folder's contents.

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13.

You can use a delegate to send Email from your own Email address. (True or False?)

14.

When entering custom responses, they must be separated by

A. a single space.

B. a colon.

C. a semicolon.

D. a backslash.

15.

Which of the following is NOT available when you track votes?

A. The addresses of the people who responded.

B. The number of messages a person has responded to.

C. The time and date of a response.

D. The response itself.

16.

Public folders can be accessed by anyone at any time. (True or False?)

17.

At what point will other people be able to see your reply to a post?

A. After you click Post Reply.

B. After you click the Post Reply button, compose a message, then click Post.

C. After you click the Post Reply button, compose a message, click Post, then click Make Message Viewable to Others.

D. Replies are private, and cannot be viewed by other people.

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Quiz Answers

1.

C. When you click the Share Calendar button, a sharing invitation appears for you to fill out

2.

True. You can revoke or change someone's permission to view your calendar at any time.

3.

True. You can revoke or change someone's permission to view your calendar at any time.

4.

A. In order to access a shared calendar in Outlook you need permission from the owner of the calendar

5.

False. Schedule view displays multiple calendars stacked on top of one another.

6.

False. Of course you can invite multiple people to a meeting.

7.

B. Ignore is not a valid response to a meeting request.

8.

False. You can add a calendar to a calendar group at any time.

9.

B. A lock icon indicates a private appointment.

10.

True. You need a Microsoft Windows Live ID to publish your calendar on Office.com.

11.

False. You can publish your calendar on Office.com without Microsoft Exchange Server.

12.

A. When you share a folder with someone, they are able to read the folder's contents.

13.

True. You can use a delegate to send Email from your own Email address.

14.

C. When entering custom responses, they must be separated by a semicolon.

15.

B. When you track votes, you can see the addresses of the people who responded, the time and date of a response, and the response itself.

16.

False. Public folders can be accessed by anyone on your Microsoft Exchange server, provided they have permission to view them.

17.

B. Other people will be able to see your reply to a post after you click the Post Reply button, compose a message, then click Post.

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W o r k i i n g w i i t h

T a s k s

Adding a Task .................................................. 160

Add a task .............................................. 160

Create a to-do item ................................ 161

Changing Task Views ...................................... 162

View tasks in Tasks ................................ 162

View tasks in the To-Do Bar ................... 163

View tasks in Calendar .......................... 163

Sorting Tasks ................................................... 164

Updating a Task ............................................... 165

Update a task ......................................... 165

Send a status report .............................. 165

Creating a Recurring Task .............................. 166

Attaching an Item to a Task ............................ 167

Attach an Outlook item .......................... 167

Attach a file ............................................ 167

Assigning a Task ............................................. 168

Assign a task ......................................... 168

Assign a task ......................................... 168

Accept or decline an assigned task ....... 168

Forward a task ....................................... 169

Printing Tasks .................................................. 170

Print a task list ....................................... 170

Print a task item ..................................... 170

Completing a Task ........................................... 171

Mark as complete .................................. 171

Clear a follow-up flag ............................. 171

Delete a task .......................................... 172

Even if you’re not an organized person, you’ve probably scrawled a to-do list on a piece of paper to help you remember everything that you have to do. The problem with paper to-do lists is that they’re easy to misplace and often not in front of you when you need them.

You can throw away your paper to-do lists, because Outlook’s To-Do List is difficult to misplace (when was last time you couldn’t find your computer?) and is always right in front of you.

Creating tasks and to-do items in Outlook is almost easier than writing them on paper. In this chapter, you will learn skills like how to create a task or to-do item, view them in different ways, mark a task as complete once it’s finished, assign and forward tasks. You will also learn how to create a recurring task that appears at a specified interval, such as a reminder to get a weekly report in to your boss.

8

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Working with Tasks

Adding a Task

Recording your tasks makes them easier to remember and manage. Outlook tasks provide a great way to organize what you need to get done.

In Outlook, you can create a task item that you can track until completion, or you can create a to-do item. A to-do item is an Email message or contact that has been flagged for follow-up. All these items appear in the To-Do List.

In this lesson, we’ll look at how to add a task or create a to-do item from a message or contact.

Add a task

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears in Tasks.

Tip: To view a list of tasks only—instead of all to-do items—select the

Tasks

folder in the

My

Tasks

area of the Folder Pane. The Tasks list appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Task

button in the New group.

A Task item window appears.

3. Enter a subject and other information about the task.

The table to the right provides an overview of the fields available in the task item window.

You can add detail about the task in the text area.

4. Enter task details in the text area.

Tip: Click the

Details

button in the Show group on the Ribbon to access the Details page. Here you can enter secondary information about the task.

5. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save

& Close

button in the Actions group.

The task is added to your list.

Other Ways to Add a Task:

Double-click in an open area of the Tasks list or the To-Do List to display a Task item window.

Or, click in the

Click here to add a new Task

text box in the Tasks list or the To-Do List and type a subject for the task. Or, double-click in the

Tasks area of the Calendar.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add a new task with the subject “New

Marketing Plan”. Enter today as the start date and make the due date a week later. Select In Progress as the status and enter this description in the text area: “Develop guidelines for first phase of new marketing plan.”

Select an Email in your Inbox and flag it for follow-up.

View the new task and the flagged Email in the To-Do

List.

Figure 8-1: A new Task item window.

Table 8-1: Task Item Window Fields

Start date

Due date

Status

Priority

% Complete

Reminder

Owner

Specifies the date when the task will appear in the Tasks list as a reminder.

Specifies the when the task must be completed.

Specifies the status of the task: Not Started,

In Progress, Completed, Waiting on

Someone else, or Deferred.

Specifies the importance level of the task:

Low, Normal, or High.

Specifies the percentage of the task that is finished.

Displays a reminder for the item.

Specifies the name of the person who created the task. If the task is sent to another person, that person becomes the owner of the task.

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Working with Tasks

Create a to-do item

A to-do item is any Outlook item, such as a task, Email, or contact that has been flagged for follow-up. Tasks are automatically flagged as to-do items when you create them, while you must flag Emails and contacts yourself.

Right-click an Email message or contact, point to

Follow-up

, and select a follow-up flag.

The item is marked for follow-up, as shown in the example to the right, and will appear in Tasks, as shown in the example below.

Other Ways to Create a To-Do Item:

In the Inbox, click an Email’s flag icon. Or, add a task (a task is automatically flagged as a to-do item).

Tip

 Flagging an Email message or contact creates a to-do item, but doesn’t create a new task.

Because the to-do item is still an Email message or contact after being flagged, you can’t assign it as a task to someone else or track its progress or percentage of completeness.

Figure 8-2: An Email message flagged for follow-up.

Tasks and To-Do items

Figure 8-3: The To-Do List in Tasks.

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Working with Tasks

Changing Task Views

In Outlook 2013 you can view tasks and to-do items in several different places: in Tasks (using the To-Do List or

Tasks list), in the To-Do Bar, and in the Daily Task List in

Calendar.

View tasks in Tasks

The main place to keep track of tasks and to-do items is in the Tasks area.

1. Click the

Tasks

button in the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears in Tasks. Here you can see all your tasks and flagged to-do items.

Tip: When you first open Tasks, the To-Do List appears, showing all your tasks and to-do items, such as Emails flagged for follow-up. To display task items only—without Emails or contacts marked for follow-up—select the

Tasks

folder in the My Tasks area of the Folder Pane. This makes the Tasks list appear.

You can see the To-Do List or Tasks list using several different views.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and select a different view from the

Current View

group.

Table 8-2: Current View Options in Tasks, provides an overview of the views available in Tasks.

Other Ways to Change Views:

Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the Current View group.

3. Select the view you want to use.

The To-Do List or Tasks list appears in the desired view.

4. Double-click a task to view it.

Tip

 In Tasks, you can use the Instant Search feature to find tasks and to-do items. Simply enter search keywords in the

Search Tasks

box at the top of the

Tasks list screen or in the Search To-Do List box at the top of the To-Do List screen.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

View tasks in the To-Do List and the Tasks list in Tasks.

View tasks in the expanded (Normal) To-Do Bar.

View tasks in the Calendar.

Table 8-2: Current View Options in Tasks

Detailed

Simple List

To-Do List

Prioritized

Active

Completed

Today

Next 7 Days

Overdue

Assigned

Server Tasks

Displays many details about each task, including color category and percentage complete.

Displays a few details so you can see your tasks at a quick glance. The In Folder column tells you whether the to-do item is a flagged Email item or a task.

Displays all tasks and to-do items with very little detail. Also displays Reading Pane.

Displays all tasks in order of priority in a list

Displays tasks that are incomplete

(including overdue ones) in a list.

Lists all tasks that have been marked complete.

Displays a list of all tasks due today.

Displays tasks that are due in the next seven days in a list.

Displays tasks that are overdue in a list.

Shows only the tasks that have been assigned to others, sorted by the task owner's name and due date.

Displays a lists of tasks stored on the server.

Use the Instant

Search feature to find tasks and to-do items

Click to create a new task

Task item

Email to-do item

Figure 8-4: The To-Do List in Simple List view.

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Working with Tasks

View tasks in the To-Do Bar

You can also keep tabs on your tasks and to-do items using the To-Do Bar.

1. Click the

View

tab and click the

To-Do Bar

button in the Layout group.

2. Select

Tasks

from the list.

The expanded To-Do Bar appears on the right side of the screen. At the bottom of the To-Do Bar, below the calendar and appointments, you can see all your tasks and flagged to-do items.

Tip: To close the To-Do Bar, click the

Remove the peek

button. You can also click the

View

tab on the Ribbon, click the

To-Do Bar

button in the

Layout group, and select

Tasks

or

Off

from the list.

3. Double-click a task to view it.

View tasks in Calendar

You can also access your tasks in the Daily Task List in

Calendar.

1. Click the

Calendar

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Daily Task List

button in the

Layout

group on the

View

tab.

3. Select Normal or Minimized from the list.

Your Daily Tasks will appear below your Calendar.

4. Double-click a task to view it.

Figure 8-5: The To-Do Bar

Remove the peek button

Tasks and to-do items

Figure 8-6: Viewing Tasks in Calendar.

Tasks and to-do items.

Tasks can only be viewed in Day, Work Week, or

Week views.

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Working with Tasks

Sorting Tasks

Figuring out where to start on your task list can be difficult. Use Outlook’s sorting options to put your list in order. You’ll soon be on your way to completing your todo list!

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears in Tasks. Here you can see all your tasks and flagged to-do items.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon.

There are several options to arrange your tasks. See

Table 8-3: Arrangement Options below for more information on each arrangement.

3. Select an arrangement from the Arrangement group.

The arrangement is applied.

Table 8-3: Arrangement Options

Categories

Start Date

Due Date

Folder

Type

Importance

Arranges tasks by assigned categories.

Arranges tasks by the date which they were to have been started.

Arranges tasks by the date which they are due.

Arranges tasks by the folder in which they are stored.

Arranges tasks by type.

Arranges tasks by priority.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Arrange tasks by Due Date.

Figure 8-7: Use the arrangement options to sort your tasks.

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Working with Tasks

Updating a Task

Once you’ve created a task, you can edit or update it to show your progress. You can even send a status report to others.

Update a task

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar

The To-Do List appears.

2. Double-click the task that you want to update.

Here in the Task item window you can make changes to the task. You can do things like change the start or due date, select a new status or priority, or update the

% Complete.

3. Enter updated percentage of completion information, or other information, as desired.

Tip: Remember, you can only enter start and completion dates and percentage of completion information in Task items—not in Email messages or contacts flagged as to-do items.

4. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save

& Close

button in the Actions group.

The task is updated.

Send a status report

You can send an Email to inform someone else of the progress you’re making on a task.

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears.

2. Double-click the task you want to work with.

The Task item window appears.

3. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Send

Status Report

button in the

Manage Task

group.

An Email message containing a report about the task item appears. It includes the start and due dates, current status, % Complete, the Date completed (if it has been completed), and the number of hours spent on the task.

4. Enter a recipient in the To box, type a message, and click the

Send

button.

The message is sent.

Exercise

Exercise File:

“New Marketing Plan” task.

Exercise:

Open the New Marketing Plan task. Change the

Status to “Waiting on someone else”.

Email yourself a status report about the task.

Send a status report

Figure 8-8: Updating a task in the Task’s item window.

Your Organization’s Name Here 165

Working with Tasks

Creating a Recurring Task

If you have a task that you do on a regular basis you can create a recurring task that automatically repeats.

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Task

button in the New group.

A Task item window appears.

3. Enter the task information.

4. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Recurrence

button in the Recurrence group.

The Task Recurrence dialog box appears.

In the “Recurrence pattern” area, you tell Outlook when and how often the task recurs. You have several choices here:

Daily: Tasks that recur every day or every work day.

Weekly: Tasks that recur on the same day(s) of the week, such as a report due every Friday or a payroll due every other Thursday.

Monthly: Tasks that recur on every month, such as an inventory audit that occurs on the 5th of every month.

Yearly: Tasks that recur annually, such as tax filing days.

5. Select a recurrence pattern.

The options to the right will change based on whether you selected Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or Yearly.

6. Select additional recurrence options from the options that appear, then set the start and end date in the

“Range of recurrence” area.

7. Click

OK

.

Tips

 To stop the task from recurring, open the task, click the

Recurrence

button in the Recurrence group on the Ribbon, and select

Remove Recurrence

.

 To skip just the current occurrence of a recurring task, open the task and click the

Skip Occurrence

button in the Recurrence group on the Ribbon.

 If you set a reminder for a recurring task, you will be reminded again every time the task recurs.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new task with “Write newsletter” as the subject and set it to recur every second Friday of the month.

Set a recurring pattern for the task.

Figure 8-9: Setting up a task to recur.

Figure 8-10: The Task Recurrence dialog box.

Working with Tasks

Attaching an Item to a Task

You can attach an Outlook item—such as an Email or contact—or another file to a task in Outlook.

Attach an Outlook item

1. Open a task item.

2. Click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon.

3. Click the

Outlook Item

button in the Include group.

Use the Insert Item dialog box to attach Mail messages, contacts, calendar items, or even other task items.

4. Select a folder in the Look in list, then select an item from that folder in the Items: list.

5. Select to Insert as Text or an Attachment and click

OK

.

The item is inserted into the task item.

Tip: Click the

Business Card

button in the

Include group on the Ribbon to attach someone’s business card.

6. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save

& Close

button in the Actions group.

The task is saved with the item attached.

Attach a file

You can also attach other types of files to a task.

1. Open a task item.

The Task item window appears.

2. Click the

Insert

tab on the Ribbon.

The Insert tab commands appear.

3. Click the

Attach File

button in the Include group.

The Insert File dialog box appears.

4. Browse to the file you want to attach and select it.

5. Click the

Insert

button.

The file is attached to the task.

6. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Save

& Close

button in the Actions group.

The task is saved with the file attached.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Marketing Plan.docx and the “New

Marketing Plan” task.

Exercise:

Send yourself an Email with the subject “Plan update”.

Attach the “Plan update” Email to the New Marketing Plan task. Then attach the Marketing Plan.docx file to the task.

Attach a file

Attach an

Outlook item

Figure 8-11: A new Task item window with the Insert tab displayed. [email protected]

Figure 8-12: The Insert Outlook Item dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 167

Working with Tasks

Assigning a Task

Besides creating tasks for yourself, you can assign a task to someone else. A task request is sent by Email, and the recipient can accept or decline it.

Assign a task

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do list appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Items

button list arrow in the

New

group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Task Request

.

A Task window appears.

4. Enter the desired task information.

Be sure you enter at least the assignee’s Email address in the To box and a description of the task in the Subject box.

5. Make sure the

Keep an updated copy of this task on my task list

and

Send me a status report when this task is complete

check boxes are selected.

Outlook will display the assigned task on your own task list so you can keep tabs on it, and you will be notified when the task is completed.

6. When you are finished entering task information, click the

Send

button.

The task is sent, and a copy appears in your Sent

Items folder.

Tip

 You can also pass along a task that you’ve previously created or been assigned. Open the task and click the

Assign Task

button in the Manage Task group on the

Ribbon. Enter the new assignee’s Email address and send.

Accept or decline an assigned task

If you receive a task request, you need to accept or decline the task.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Double-click the task request.

The message window opens.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new task request with the subject

“This is a test” and send it to a coworker (make sure you keep a copy in your task list).

Forward that task to yourself. [email protected]

Figure 8-13: Assigning a task using a task request.

Figure 8-14: A task request in the Inbox.

Working with Tasks

Other Ways to Accept or Decline a Task:

If the Reading Pane is displayed, you can select the message in the Inbox and then click

Accept

or

Decline

in the Reading Pane.

3. Click the

Task

tab on the Ribbon and click

Accept

or

Decline

in the Respond group.

A message appears, asking if you want to edit the response that will be sent to the person who assigned you the task.

4. Select how you would like to respond to the task request and click

OK

.

If you accept a task, it is moved to your Tasks folder.

If you decline a task, it is moved to your Deleted

Items folder. Either way, an Email is sent to the person who assigned the task informing him or her of your action.

Tip

 Once you mark the task’s status as Complete, an

Email will be sent to the person who assigned the task, notifying him or her of the task’s completion.

Forward a task

If you just want to send a copy of a task to someone without assigning it to that person, you can forward the task.

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears.

2. Right-click the task you want to forward and select

Forward

from the contextual menu.

An Email message appears with the task included as an Email attachment.

3. Enter the Email address of the person you want to send the task to and click the

Send

button.

The task is sent.

Figure 8-15: Accepting or declining a task request in the

Reading Pane.

Your Organization’s Name Here 169

Working with Tasks

Printing Tasks

You can print a list of your tasks or just individual tasks.

Print a task list

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

Whichever list is visible will be the one that is printed. If you want only tasks to be printed, make sure the Tasks list is displayed. If you’d rather print all your to-do items, make sure the To-Do List is displayed.

Tip: To print selected tasks from the list, press and hold the

<Ctrl>

key while you select the items you want to print.

2. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Print

.

Options for printing your Tasks appear.

Other Ways to Print:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

3. Click the

Print

button.

The list prints.

Tip: Only Table Style is available for printing tasks. The exceptions are the Active and

Assigned views, which also have Memo Style.

Tip: You can select additional printing options in the Print dialog box. Click the

Print Options

button to open the Print dialog box.

Print a task item

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears.

2. Double-click the task you want to print.

The Task item window appears.

3. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Print

.

Options for printing your Tasks appear.

Other Ways to Print:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<P>

.

4. Click the

Print

button.

The task prints.

Tip: You can select additional printing options in the Print dialog box. Click the

Print Options

button to open the Print dialog box.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Print your entire To-Do List.

Open one task of your choice and print it.

Figure 8-16: Click the File tab on the Ribbon and select

Print to preview and print tasks.

Working with Tasks

Completing a Task

Whether you’ve completed a task, given up on it, or are otherwise through with it, at some point you’re going to want to clear some tasks off your list. In this lesson, we’ll look at how to go about completing, clearing, and deleting tasks.

Mark as complete

You can mark tasks and to-do items as complete once you’re done with them.

1. Click the

Tasks

button on the Navigation Bar.

The To-Do List appears.

Tip: To make it easy to mark a task as complete in the To-Do List, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Change View

button in the Current

View group, and select

Simple List

.

2. In Simple List view, click the

Complete

check box next to the completed task.

The task appears with a line through it to let you know it is complete.

Other Ways to Mark a Task as Complete:

Right-click a task anywhere it’s displayed and select

Mark Complete

from the contextual menu.

Click the item’s

flag

. Or, open the task’s item window, click the

Status

list arrow, and select

Completed

or enter 100% in the % Complete box.

Clear a follow-up flag

You can remove to-do items that are not tasks—such as

Email messages marked with a flag for follow-up—from the To-Do List by clearing the item’s flag.

Right-click the to-do item and select

Follow Up

Clear Flag

from the contextual menu.

The item is no longer flagged and is not included on

To-Do List.

Tip

 You can clear a to-do item’s follow-up flag anywhere it is displayed—in the To-Do List, To-Do Bar,

Calendar, or even in the Inbox if it is an Email.

Trap: Note the difference between clearing a flag and marking it as complete. Marking a to-do item as complete is better for your records because it still appears in the to-do list. By clearing a flag, it’s as though the item was never flagged, which may cause confusion in the future.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new task with the subject “Quick

Project”, then mark it as complete in the To-Do List.

Send yourself an Email with the subject “Flagged” and flag it for follow-up in the Inbox. Then go into Tasks and clear the flag on the “Flagged” to-do item.

Mark a task as complete.

Figure 8-17: Marking a task as complete in the To-Do List in Simple List view.

Figure 8-18: Clearing a follow-up flag from an Email to-do item.

Your Organization’s Name Here 171

Working with Tasks

Delete a task

You can also delete a task whether it’s completed or not.

1. Select the task.

You can select the task in the To-Do List, Task list,

To-Do Bar, or Calendar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group.

The task is deleted.

Other Ways to Delete a Task:

Select the task and press

<Delete>

.

Trap: If you try to delete an Email that has been flagged as a to-do item, you will see a message warning you that the Email will also be deleted from the Inbox.

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W o r k i i n g w i i t h T a s k s R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

You can add a new task in all of the following places except the ________.

A. To-Do Bar

B. To-Do List

C. Tasks list

D. New Task Pane

2.

Which of the following types of items can be a to-do item?

A. Contact item

B. Email message item

C. Task item

D. All of the above.

3.

Which of the following is NOT a place you can view tasks in Outlook?

A. Tasks

B. Calendar

C. To-Do dialog box

D. To-Do Bar

4.

Which of the following is not an arrangement option for Tasks?

A. Categories

B. Start Date

C. Creator

D. Type

5.

Once you create a task, you cannot update it. (True or False?)

6.

Which of the following is not a recurrence pattern option?

A. Daily

B. Hourly

C. Weekly

D. Monthly

7.

To attach an item or file to a task, use the commands on the _______ tab in the task's item window.

A. Insert

B. Attach

C. Item

D. File

8.

Assigning a task and forwarding a task are the same thing. (True or False?)

9.

You can print a list of tasks, but not an individual task. (True or False?)

10.

When you mark a task as Complete, a line appears through the task. (True or False?)

Your Organization’s Name Here 173

Quiz Answers

1.

D. There isn't a New Task Pane, so you can't add a task there.

2.

D. All of these items can be to-do items. Tasks are to-do items by default, while the others must be flagged for followup.

3.

C. You can’t view tasks in a To-Do dialog box

4.

C. Creator is not an arrangement option for Tasks.

5.

False. You can always update a task.

6.

B. Hourly is not a recurrence option.

7. A. Use the commands on the Insert tab to attach an item or file to a task.

8.

False. When you forward a task you are not assigning it.

9.

False. You can print either a task list or an individual task.

10.

True. When you mark a task as Complete, a line appears through the task.

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U s i i n g t h e

J o u r n a l l a n d

N o t e s

Displaying the Journal .................................... 176

Display the Journal ................................ 176

Creating a Journal Entry Manually ................ 177

Relating a Journal Entry to a Contact ........... 178

Create a journal entry related to a Contact

...............................................................

178

Opening, Modifying, and Deleting a Journal

Entry .................................................................. 179

Open and modify a journal entry ........... 179

Delete a journal entry............................. 179

Changing Journal Views ................................. 180

Change time scale ................................. 180

Change views ........................................ 180

Working with Notes ......................................... 182

View Notes ............................................. 182

Create a note ......................................... 182

Open a note ........................................... 182

Print a note ............................................ 182

Delete a note ......................................... 183

You can use Outlook’s Journal to keep a log of your important daily activities.

Then, when you’re famous, future historians and students will look back and read about your exciting daily activities at the office!

In a nutshell, there are two ways to track events in the Journal:

Manually: You can manually create a

journal entry, just like you would create an Email or task. Manually created journal entries can be about any type of activity you can think of: phone calls, meetings, important conversations, faxes, etc.

Automatically: Outlook can

automatically record certain activities and relate them to a particular contact. For example, you could configure the Journal to automatically track any Emails sent to or received from Bob Smith.

You will learn how to create and work with journal entries using both of these methods in this chapter. You will also learn how to attach a file to a journal entry, how to use the Journal with the

Contacts list to perform basic contact management, and how to display the

Journal using the available preset views.

9

Your Organization’s Name Here 175

Using the Journal and Notes

Displaying the Journal

The Journal is a tool for recording your actions. The

Journal can track Outlook items like Email, Microsoft

Office files like Word documents or Excel spreadsheets, and interactions outside your computer—such as phone calls and postal Mail. You can even track your interactions with your contacts. Journal entries can be created either automatically or manually.

The Journal normally displays its information on a timeline. A timeline makes it easy to view the chronological order of your activities. For example, perhaps you can’t find an Excel spreadsheet that you worked on last week. You could use Outlook’s Journal to view everything you’ve worked on in Microsoft Excel during the past week to find the spreadsheet.

Display the Journal

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar.

Select

Folders

.

The Journal folder should now display in the Folder

Pane. Select the

Journal

folder.

Other Ways to Display the Journal:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<8>

.

2. The Journal is displayed as a timeline. Use the scroll bars to navigate Journal.

Tip

 The Journal normally displays its information in a

grouped view, meaning items are organized into groups that you can then expand or collapse to display or hide the items they contain. Use the expand and collapse buttons to expand or collapse the groups.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Open the Journal.

Figure 9-1: Selecting Folders from the Navigation Bar.

[email protected]

Figure 9-2: The Journal displayed in Outlook.

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Using the Journal and Notes

Creating a Journal Entry

Manually

You can manually create journal entries to record your phone calls, meetings, and work on documents.

1. Display the Journal and select the

Journal

folder in the Folder Pane.

The Journal appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Journal Entry

button in the New group.

A new journal entry window appears.

3. Enter the subject in the

Subject

box.

Next you need to select an entry type. You can choose from different Outlook items like a task or meeting, a Word document, or a phone call.

4. Click the

Entry type

list arrow and select an entry type.

5. Enter a start time and duration, descriptive text, and other information, as desired.

6. Select additional options in the Tags group on the

Ribbon.

These options include:

Categorize: Click the

Categorize

button to apply a color category to the journal entry.

Private: Click the

Private

button to hide the details of the entry from others.

Once you’ve entered all the information you want, you can save and close the entry.

7. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

Tips

 To record the amount of time spent on an event, click the

Start Timer

button in the

Timer

group on the

Ribbon, open a document associated with the entry, and when you’re done working on the document, and click

Pause Timer

. The Journal records the time you spent working on it.

 Use the commands in the Include group on the Insert tab to attach files, Outlook items, or a business card to the journal entry.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Marketing Plan.docx.

Exercise:

Create a new journal entry for “Marketing plan” in the Subject box. Select Microsoft Word as the entry type, select the current time as the start time, and make the Duration 30 minutes. Enter “Created rough draft of new marketing plan” in the text area.

Attach the Marketing Plan.docx file from your Practice folder.

Save and close the journal entry.

Figure 9-3: A new journal entry window.

Your Organization’s Name Here 177

Using the Journal and Notes

Relating a Journal Entry to a

Contact

When you set up automatic journal entries, not only can you select which contacts you want to track items for, but you can also manually relate a contact to a journal entry.

Create a journal entry related to a Contact

When you create a journal entry, such as for a phone call, you can choose to relate it to a particular contact.

1. Display the Journal and select the

Journal

folder in the Folder Pane.

The Journal appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Journal Entry

button in the New group.

A new journal entry window appears.

3. Enter the subject in the Subject box, select an Entry type, and enter any other desired information.

Now you’re ready to relate the entry to a contact.

4. Click the

Address Book

button in the Names group on the Ribbon.

The Select Contacts dialog box appears.

5. Select a contact from the list at the bottom of the dialog box. Click

OK

.

The Select Contacts dialog box closes. In the journal entry window you won’t see any sign of the fact that you just associated the entry with the contact.

6. Click the

Save & Close

button in the Actions group on the Ribbon.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new manual journal entry with this information:

Subject: Marketing update call call Start time: 10:00 AM

Entry type: Phone

Duration: 5 minutes

Associate the journal entry with one of your contacts.

Open the

Address Book to relate a journal entry to a contact.

Figure 9-4: The Names group on the Journal Entry tab of the Ribbon.

Select a name to associate with the journal entry. [email protected]

Figure 9-5: The Select Contacts dialog box.

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Using the Journal and Notes

Opening, Modifying, and

Deleting a Journal Entry

Journal entries are easy to open, modify, move, or delete.

Open and modify a journal entry

When you modify a journal entry, its associated item or document is not affected. Likewise, when you modify an item or document, related journal entries are unaffected.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Journal appears. You may need to scroll down to view all your entries for a particular day.

2. Double-click the journal entry you want to open.

The journal entry window appears. Here you can modify the entry any way you want.

3. Make changes to the journal entry. Click

Save &

Close

on the Actions group on the Journal Entry tab when you’re finished.

The entry is updated accordingly.

Delete a journal entry

1. Select the journal entry you want to delete, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group.

The entry is deleted.

Other Ways to Delete a Journal Entry:

Select the journal entry and press

<Delete>

or, open the Journal Entry and click

Delete

in the

Actions group.

Exercise

Exercise File:

A journal entry.

Exercise:

Open a journal entry and make a change to the entry’s subject text. Save and close the entry.

Delete the journal entry.

Figure 9-6: Journal Entry

Your Organization’s Name Here 179

Using the Journal and Notes

Changing Journal Views

Like many other Outlook tools, there are several ways to view your Journal. You can also select the time period you want to view—day, week, or month.

So which view is the best? That depends on the situation and your own personal preference. Maybe you want to view only those activities that have occurred during the past week, or maybe you want to see a list of phone calltype journal entries. Let’s look at the different views.

Change time scale

One way you can change what the Journal displays is by changing which dates are displayed.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar and select Folders.

2. Select the

Journal

folder.

3. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and select the

Timeline

option in the Current View group.

4. Now select the time scale you require from the

Arrangement group.

See Table 9-1: Time Scale Buttons for a description

of each time scale.

Change views

You can also alter the look of the Journal by using the view options in the Current View group.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar and select

Folders

.

2. Select the

Journal

folder.

3. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and select the view you would like to use in the

Current View

group on the Ribbon.

A list of options appears. Table 9-2: Journal Views provides a description of different views.

Other Ways to Change a View:

Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the

Current View

group.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

View the Journal in Day, Week, and then

Month time scales.

Try out the different views in the Current View group on the Ribbon.

Table 9-1: Time Scale Buttons

Select if you wish to view today’s journal entries.

Can select regardless of the time scale selected.

View one day at time.

View one week at a time.

View one month a time.

[email protected]

Figure 9-7: The Journal displayed in Phone Call view.

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Using the Journal and Notes

Table 9-2: Journal Views

Timeline

Entry List

Phone Calls

Last Seven Days

Displays journal entries in a timeline.

Displays all journal entries in a list.

Displays phone call-type journal entries in a list.

Displays the most recent journal entries in a list.

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Using the Journal and Notes

Working with Notes

Outlook’s Notes are the electronic equivalent of sticky notes—but they won’t clutter up your desk. Notes are handy when you need to create a quick note, such as the directions to a meeting or a shipping address.

This lesson explains the quick and easy process of creating and working with notes.

View Notes

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar and select

Notes

.

Your notes appear.

Create a note

1. In Notes, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Note

button in the New group.

A note appears.

Other Ways to Create a Note:

In Notes, press

<Ctrl>

+

<N>

.

2. Enter the note text.

3. Click the note’s

Close

button.

Outlook automatically saves and closes the note, and the new note appears in Notes.

Open a note

In Notes, double-click a note to open it.

You can edit note text as desired.

Print a note

1. In Notes, select the note you want to print.

2. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Print

.

Options for printing appear.

3. Click the

Print

button.

The note prints.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new note and enter the note text “This is my first note!” Close the note.

Open the note and change the text to “This is my second note!” Close the note.

Delete the note.

Notes button

Figure 9-8: Viewing Notes and creating a new note.

Close button

Resizing Handle

Figure 9-9: Working with a note.

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Using the Journal and Notes

Delete a note

1. In Notes, select the note you want to delete.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delete

button in the Delete group.

The note is deleted.

Other Ways to Delete a Note:

Select the Note you want to delete and Press

<Delete>

.

Tips

 You can change the way Notes are displayed by clicking the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and selecting a different view option in the Current View group.

 To resize a note window, click and drag the bottomright corner of the note window.

 Click and drag a note onto the Windows desktop to place a copy of it there.

Your Organization’s Name Here 183

U s i i n g t h e J o u r n a l l a n d

N o t e s

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

You must add the Journal to the Navigation Pane; it does not appear by default. (True or False?)

2.

Which tab on the Ribbon allows you to attach an Outlook item or a file to a journal entry?

A. Journal

B. Memo

C. Insert

D. Entry

3.

You can relate a Journal entry to a Contact. (True or False?)

4.

Once you create a journal entry, you can't edit it. (True or False?)

5.

Which of the following is not a time scale option for viewing the Journal?

A. Year

B. Day

C. Week

D. Month

6.

You can't print a note from Outlook. (True or False?)

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Quiz Answers

1.

True. You must add the Journal to the Navigation Pane; it does not appear by default.

2.

C. The Insert tab features the Include group of commands, which allow you to attach items to a journal entry.

3.

True. You can relate a Journal entry to a Contact.

4.

False. You can edit a journal entry, as well as delete it.

5.

A. Year is not a time scale option for viewing the Journal

6.

False. You can print Outlook notes.

Your Organization’s Name Here 185

O r g a n i i z i i n g a n d

F i i n d i i n g

I

I n f f o r m a t i i o n

Exploring the Folder List ................................ 187

Creating and Using Folders ............................ 188

Create a new folder ............................... 188

Move messages between folders .......... 188

Create a Move to Folder quick step ....... 189

Managing Folders ............................................ 190

Rename a folder .................................... 190

Move a folder ......................................... 190

Delete a folder ....................................... 191

Using Instant Search ....................................... 192

Find a message or item ......................... 192

Use recent searches .............................. 193

Refining a Search ............................................ 194

Expand a search .................................... 194

Refine a search ...................................... 195

Change search options .......................... 195

Using Advanced Find ...................................... 196

Creating and Using Search Folders .............. 197

Create Search Folders ........................... 197

Create custom Search Folders .............. 198

Modifying and Deleting Search Folders ........ 199

Modify a Search Folder.......................... 199

Delete a Search Folder .......................... 199

Sorting and Grouping Information ................ 200

Sort by one field ..................................... 200

Sort by multiple fields ............................. 200

Arrange by groups ................................. 201

Expand or collapse a group ................... 201

Filtering Information ........................................ 202

Filter using common criteria................... 202

Filter using additional criteria ................. 202

Filter using custom criteria ..................... 203

Remove a filter ....................................... 203

Using the People Pane .................................... 204

Find information about a contact ........... 204

Hide the People Pane ............................ 204

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10

When you work at your desk for a while, papers and files can pile up into a mess.

The same thing happens after you’ve worked with Outlook for a while—your

Emails become disorganized and harder to find.

In this chapter, you’ll learn how to take control and organize your Outlook Email messages. You’ll learn how to search for items and manage data in folders.

If you wish, a file is available to you that you can use to practice the methods described in this chapter. Instructions on opening and using the file will be provided. See the lesson on “Working with Outlook Personal Folders Files” for more information.

Organizing and Finding Information

Exploring the Folder List

Just like folders are used to organize papers in a filing cabinet, Windows uses folders to organize files and programs. You can copy, move, and delete files to and from the folders on your computer.

Outlook also uses folders to store the items you create in various modules: Email messages, appointments, contacts, and so on. Each Outlook tool stores its information in its own folders. These folders can be viewed in the Folder List in the Folder Pane.

When you open Outlook you see only your Mail folders in the Folder Pane; however, you can display all your

Outlook folders (including folders such as the Calendar and Contacts folders) with the click of a button.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation bar.

Select

Folders

.

The Folder List appears in the Folder Pane, showing you where all of your Outlook items are stored.

2. Click any folder in the list to display that folder’s contents.

Tip

 If one of your Outlook folders is getting too big to manage, you can organize and move its information into several new folders or subfolders. For example, you could create a “Personal” folder to store your personal Email.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Display the Folder List.

[email protected]

Folder List button

Figure 10-1: The Folder List.

Your Organization’s Name Here 187

Organizing and Finding Information

Creating and Using Folders

Outlook normally saves all your Email messages in the

Inbox folder, but sooner or later you may need to create your own folders to organize your Email messages and other Outlook items more effectively.

This lesson shows you how to create a new folder for storing and organizing your Outlook items.

Create a new folder

1. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Folder

button in the New group.

The Create New Folder dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Create a New Folder:

Right-click in the

Folder List

and select

New

Folder

from the contextual menu.

2. Type a name for the folder in the Name text box.

3. Click the

Folder contains

list arrow and select the type of item the new folder will contain.

For example, you would select Mail and Post Items if you were creating a new folder to hold Email messages.

Next, you need to decide whether you want the folder to be a subfolder of another folder or not.

4. Select a folder in the “Select where to place the folder” list and click

OK

.

The new folder appears as a subfolder within the folder you selected.

Tip

 If you don’t want the new folder to be a subfolder, make sure you select the Mailbox folder at the top of the list when you’re creating the new folder—in which case the new folder will appear alphabetically with the other folders in the list.

Move messages between folders

Once you set up the folders you want, you can organize your messages by moving them into the desired folders.

1. Select the folder in the Folder List that contains the message(s) you want to move.

Tip: To move multiple messages at once, press and hold the

<Ctrl>

key while you select the messages.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Create a new Mail folder under the Practice

Inbox and name it “Training”.

Move the message with the subject Training from your

Inbox into the Training folder. [email protected]

Figure 10-2: The Create New Folder dialog box.

Figure 10-3: Moving a message from the Inbox folder to the Training folder.

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Organizing and Finding Information

2. Click and drag the message(s) to a different folder in the Folder List.

Other Ways to Move Messages Between

Folders:

Right-click the message(s) you want to move and select

Move > “Folder Name”

. Or, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Move

button in the Move group, click

Move

again and select a folder from the list.

Create a Move to Folder quick step

In Outlook 2013, you can create quick steps, which are shortcuts for common Outlook actions. If you find yourself constantly moving messages to a particular folder, you can create a Move to Folder quick step and save yourself some time.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

Trap: Quick steps are only available in Outlook’s

Mail module.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Create New

button in the Quick Steps group.

The Edit Quick Step dialog box appears.

3. Type a name for your new quick step in the Name box.

Now you need to indicate to that the action is to move an item to a folder.

4. Click the

Actions

list arrow and select

Move to folder

from the list.

Once you’ve specified the action, you need to select which folder you’d like to move messages to.

5. Click the next

list arrow

and select the folder you would like to move items to.

6. (Optional) you can also select a Shortcut key if you wish by selecting one from the Shortcut key dropdown list.

7. Click

Finish

.

The new quick step appears in the Quick Steps group.

Figure 10-4: The Move Items dialog box.

Figure 10-5: The Edit Quick Step dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 189

Organizing and Finding Information

Managing Folders

You can reorganize your folders by renaming them, moving them, and even deleting them.

Tips

 To rename, move, or delete a folder, you need to first display either the Folder List or the Mail view.

 If a folder in the Folder List has subfolders, it will have a Triangle icon next to it. Click the

Triangle icon to expand the folder and view the subfolders. Click the Triangle icon to collapse them again.

Rename a folder

1. Select the folder you want to rename in the Folder

List.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rename Folder

button in the Actions group.

The folder name becomes editable.

Other Ways to Rename a Folder:

Right-click the folder and select

Rename folder

from the contextual menu.

Trap: Not all Folders can be renamed.

3. Enter a new name and press

<Enter>

.

The folder is renamed.

Move a folder

1. Select the folder you want to move in the Folder List.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Move Folder

button in the Actions group.

The Move Folder dialog box appears.

3. Select the desired location and click

OK

.

If you move a folder into another folder, it becomes a subfolder of that folder.

Other Ways to Move a Folder:

Click and drag the folder to the desired location.

Tip: If multiple folders are at the same folder level in the Folder List, they are arranged alphabetically.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Rename the Rename Me folder to “Recipes”.

Move the Recipes folder so that it is a subfolder of the

Inbox.

Delete the Recipes folder.

Figure 10-6: Renaming a folder.

Figure 10-7: Moving the Marketing folder so it becomes a subfolder of the Inbox folder.

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Delete a folder

1. Select the folder you want to delete in the Folder List.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delete Folder

button in the Actions group.

A warning message appears, asking if you’re sure you want to delete the folder.

Other Ways to Delete a Folder:

Right-click the folder and select

Delete Folder

from the contextual menu. Or, select the folder and press

<Delete>

.

Trap: Not all Folders can be deleted.

3. Click

Yes

to confirm the deletion.

The folder and its contents are moved to the Deleted

Items folder.

Figure 10-8: Deletion Confirmation dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 191

Organizing and Finding Information

Using Instant Search

The Instant Search feature helps you find messages and other types of items in Outlook. Although you’re most likely to use it to search for Email messages, you can use the Instant Search feature in Calendar, Contacts, Tasks,

Notes, Folder List, and Journal as well.

Find a message or item

Instant Search is very easy to use. Simply enter keywords or phrases into the Instant Search box to find messages or other Outlook items that contain that text.

1. Select the main folder you want to search in. Click the

Instant Search

box and enter the keyword or phrase you are searching for.

If you are searching Mail or Calendar items, the

Search Suggestions list appears.

Keyword: Searches the text of the Email or calendar item for the word or phrase.

From (Mail) or Organizer (Calendar): Searches by who sent the message or calendar item.

Subject: Searches the subject of Email messages or calendar items to match the search terms.

Tip: The Search Suggestions list does not appear in Contacts, Tasks, Notes, and Journal. These modules continue to use keyword search.

2. If you are searching Mail or Calendar items, select the search option you wish to use, or do not select a search option to use the default keyword search.

Outlook displays any items that contain the previously entered text. It isn’t necessary to click the

Search button to start searching—items that contain the text you entered automatically appear in the

Search Results pane with the search text highlighted.

Tip: The items you find depend on where you are searching. If you are searching your Inbox folder in Mail, for example, messages appear in the search results. If you are searching the Calendar, calendar items like appointments appear.

3. Open the item that you are looking for.

If you find the item you need, you can clear the search so all items are displayed again.

4. Click the

Clear Search

button.

All the items are displayed, and the Instant Search box is empty.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Search the Practice Inbox for the “staff meeting” message. Clear the search.

Enter text you want to search for here. Instant Search returns results as you type. You don’t need to press

<Enter> to return results.

[email protected]

Clear

Search button

Figure 10-9: Using Instant Search in the Outlook program window.

Figure 10-10: Use the Search Suggestions list to search by keyword, sender, or subject.

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Organizing and Finding Information

Use recent searches

Outlook keeps track of recent searches you’ve performed so you can reuse them.

1. Click the

Instant Search

box.

The Search tab appears on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Search

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Recent Searches

button in the

Options

group.

A list of your 10 most recent searches appears.

3. Select the search you want to use.

Outlook returns the results that match the search criteria.

[email protected]

Figure 10-11: Using the Recent Searches feature.

Your Organization’s Name Here 193

Organizing and Finding Information

Refining a Search

Outlook’s Instant Search feature is powerful, but sometimes the results aren’t quite what you were looking for. You can easily refine your search by changing the search criteria. The Search tab, a feature new to Outlook

2013, makes it simpler than ever to customize your search.

Expand a search

By default, only the selected folder is searched when you use Instant Search, but you can easily expand your search to additional folders.

1. Click the

Instant Search

box and enter the text you are searching for.

2. Click the contextual

Search

tab on the Ribbon.

The Scope group contains a few options to expand your search:

Current Folder: Restricts your search to the currently select folder. This is the default setting.

Subfolders: Searches the selected folder as well as any of its subfolders.

All Outlook Items: Searches all Outlook items, including Calendar items, Contacts, and Tasks.

3. Click the appropriate button in the

Scope

group.

The search is expanded or restricted depending on the selected option.

Other Ways to Expand a Search:

Click the

Current Folder

list arrow to the left of the Clear Search button and select an expansion option.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Search for the Training message from Jared in the Inbox, then expand the search to Current Mailbox.

Clear the search.

[email protected]

Figure 10-12: The Search tab includes many options for expanding and refining your searches.

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Refine a search

If your search returns too many results, you can narrow it down. The Search tab displays all criteria for filtering a search, making it easier to find exactly what you need.

1. Click the

Instant Search

box and enter the text you are searching for.

2. Click the

Search

tab on the Ribbon.

The Refine group features several options to narrow your search. The options that appear depend on the

Outlook module you are searching.

3. Click the appropriate button in the

Refine

group and follow the prompts to refine your search.

You may need to select additional options or enter additional text in the Instant Search box depending on how you refine your search.

Change search options

If you don’t like how Instant Search is working, you can change the search options.

1. Click the

Insert Search

box on the Ribbon.

2. Click the

Search

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Search Tools

button in the Options group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Search Options

from the list.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears. You can change how Outlook indexes your items as well as how Instant Search works.

Other Ways to Change Search Options:

Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon, select

Options

, and click the

Search

tab in the Outlook Options dialog box.

Tip: Click the

Indexing Options

button to modify how Outlook indexes your items.

Figure 10-13: Refine group

Figure 10-14: The Search tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 195

Organizing and Finding Information

Using Advanced Find

The Advanced Find feature in Outlook helps you if you need to widen your search. It is more complicated than

Instant Search, but

Advanced Find can search through all Outlook folders at once. For example, Advanced Find could retrieve appointments, Emails, and tasks that contain the word “squash”.

Advanced Find can search for items based on their category, flag type, or importance level.

Advanced Find can look for a word or phrase in all fields.

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the feature.

Most of the Advanced Find options are self-explanatory, and you won’t need a reference guide to use them.

1. Click the

Instant Search

box.

2. Click the contextual

Search

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Search Tools

button in the Options group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Advanced Find

from the list.

The Advanced Find dialog box appears. Search by all types of criteria using a word or phrase, messages to and/or from a particular person, read or unread messages, and many more.

Each tab in the Advanced Find dialog box provides different options:

Messages: Search for a word or phrase, specify which fields to search, and specify who sent or received the message(s).

More Choices: Lets you specify the category of the item(s) you want to find. You can also specify to find only read or unread messages, items with or without attachments, or items whose importance is high, normal, or low.

Advanced: Lets you find items by specifying advanced search criteria, such as specific fields to search.

Other Ways to Open Advanced Find:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<Shift>

+

<F>

.

4. Specify your search criteria and click the

Find Now

button.

Outlook searches for matching items and displays the results at the bottom of the dialog box. Click the

Close

button to close the Advanced Find dialog box when you’re done.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Open Advanced Find and search for the word

“Friday” in Messages.

Select the type of item you want to find. To search all item types, select “Any type of Outlook item”.

Click to open the Address

Book and select either a sender or recipient.

Specify the field(s) you want to search. The more fields you specify, the longer the search will take.

Figure 10-15: The Advanced Find dialog box.

Organizing and Finding Information

Creating and Using Search

Folders

Search Folders are valuable Email organization tools.

Unlike the other Outlook folders, Search Folders are virtual folders that display messages that match specific criteria. The message themselves are stored in other

Outlook folders, such as the Inbox.

Search Folders are easy to use and are more effective for sorting and organizing than standard folders however they need to be setup in order to be used.

The four most popular Folders to use are:

Categorized Mail: All messages that have been assigned a category appear here.

For Follow Up: Flagged Email messages appear here.

Large Mail: Email items larger than 100 KB appear here.

Unread Mail: All messages that haven’t been read appear here.

Create Search Folders

You will need to first set up Search Folders.

1. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Search Folder

button in the New group.

The New Search Folder dialog box appears. You can create a new Search Folder using one of the options in the list. All you need to do is select an option and enter any additional criteria.

Other Ways to Create a New Search Folder:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<Shift>

+

<P>

or, click the

Search Folders

folder in the Folder Pane and select

New Search Folder

.

2. Select an option from the list.

3. Select the Mailbox you want the folder to be created in from the Search mail in drop-down list and click

OK

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.

Exercise:

Setup an Unread mail Search Folder and then create a custom Search Folder called “Staff Meetings” and set its criteria to search only the Inbox folder for messages that contain “staff meeting” in the subject or message body.

Figure 10-16: Search Folders in the Folder Pane.

Select a pre-set Search

Folder from the dialog box for a quick way to add a Search Folder.

Figure 10-17: The New Search Folder dialog box.

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Organizing and Finding Information

Create custom Search Folders

You can also create a custom Search Folder to meet more specific criteria.

1. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New Search Folder

button in the New group.

2. Scroll down the list and select

Create a custom

Search Folder

.

3. Click

Choose

.

4. Type a name for the Search Folder in the

Name

box.

Choose a name that describes the Search Folder.

5. Click the

Criteria

button.

The Search Folder Criteria dialog box appears. Here you can select criteria on the Messages, More

Choices, and Advanced tabs.

6. Enter criteria for the Search Folder and click

OK

.

Now you need to select which folders you want to search using those criteria.

7. Click the

Browse

button.

The Select Folder(s) dialog box appears.

8. Select the folders you want to search and click

OK

.

Your Search Folder is created; you simply need to exit the dialog boxes.

9. Click

OK

twice.

The dialog boxes closes, and your new Search Folder now appears as a sub-folder under Search Folders in the Folder Pane.

Figure 10-18: The Custom Search Folder dialog box.

Figure 10-19: The Search Folder Criteria dialog box.

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Modifying and Deleting Search

Folders

Like any other set of folders, you can keep your Search

Folders organized by modifying and deleting them.

Modify a Search Folder

If a Search Folder isn’t displaying the results you want to see, you can modify its criteria.

1. Select a Search Folder in the Folder Pane.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Customize this Search Folder

button in the Actions group.

The Customize “Search Folder name” dialog box appears. There are three ways to modify the Search

Folder:

Name: Enter a new name for the Search Folder in the Name text box.

Criteria: Click the

Criteria

button to change the search criteria. You can only change criteria for custom Search Folders, not pre-set folders.

Location: Click the

Browse

button to change the folders included in the Search Folder.

Other Ways to Modify a Search Folder:

Right-click the Search Folder and select

Customize this Search Folder

from the contextual menu.

3. Modify the name, criteria, or folders included in the search and click

OK

.

Delete a Search Folder

Because Search Folders do not store items, you can delete them without losing information.

1. Select a Search Folder in the Folder Pane.

2. Click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Delete Folder

button in the

Actions

group.

A warning message appears.

Other Ways to Delete a Search Folder:

Right-click the Search Folder and select

Delete

Folder

from the contextual menu.

3. Click

Yes

to confirm the deletion.

The Search Folder is deleted.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Change the Staff Meetings Search Folder criteria so it also searches for messages in the Red category.

Delete the Staff Meetings Search Folder.

Figure 10-20: Modifying a Search Folder.

Your Organization’s Name Here 199

Organizing and Finding Information

Sorting and Grouping

Information

You can use Outlook’s sorting and grouping options to make finding information much easier. For example, if you need to find a message that’s buried in a folder, you can sort the folder so the oldest messages are displayed at the top of the Message list.

Sort by one field

1. Select the

Inbox

and click the

View

tab.

A list of fields by which you can arrange the view appears in the Arrangement group.

2. Select the option you want to use to sort the folder.

The items are arranged by the selected field.

Sort by multiple fields

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the

Current View

group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

The field that is currently used to sort the view is displayed next to the Sort button. To change this setting, open the Sort dialog box.

2. Click the

Sort

button.

The Sort dialog box appears. You can sort by up to four different fields. You can also choose whether to sort by the field in Ascending or Descending order.

Refer to Table 10-1: Sort Examples for some guidance on choosing fields by which to sort.

Tip: The fields you can choose from in the dialog box are not limited to the fields currently displayed in the view.

3. Specify the fields you want to use to sort and click

OK

.

The view is sorted accordingly.

Table 10-1: Sort Examples

Ascending

Descending

Alphabetic

A, B, C

C, B, A

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Arrange the Inbox by Subject in descending order. Return the Inbox to the default view and order.

Arrange By button (this button appears when the screen is made smaller.

Ascending/

Descending button

Figure 10-21: Choosing a field by which to sort.

Figure 10-22: The Sort dialog box.

Numeric

1, 2, 3

3, 2, 1

Date

1/1/10, 1/15/10, 2/1/10

2/1/10, 1/15/10, 1/1/10

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Arrange by groups

Outlook automatically groups items in a folder, which makes it easier to find things. For example, when items are arranged by date, they are grouped by the individual days from the past week, then they are grouped by week, then by month. To ungroup items, turn this feature off.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

More

button in the Arrangement group.

A list of options appears.

Trap: A standard size window will display the

Arrangement group but if you have resized your window to be smaller, you will only see the

Arrange By button.

2. Select the

Show in Groups

option.

The checkmark is cleared or selected depending on the feature’s status, and the message group headings are hidden or grouped respectively.

Other Ways to Toggle Grouped Views:

Right-click the column heading, point to

Arrange By

and select

Show in Groups

from the contextual menu.

Expand or collapse a group

Notice the Triangle icon next to each group. The

Triangle icon indicates that the group is collapsed. The

Triangle icon means that the group is expanded.

Click the group’s

Triangle

icon.

The group’s contents are either expanded or collapsed.

[email protected]

Figure 10-23: Click the More button in the Arrangement group and select the Show in Groups to group and ungroup Outlook items.

Grouped messages Ungrouped messages

Figure 10-24: Grouping and ungrouping messages doesn’t change how the items are sorted, but rather how the items are displayed.

Your Organization’s Name Here 201

Organizing and Finding Information

Filtering Information

Filters let you see information based on criteria you specify. You can apply a filter to a folder or view in

Outlook to display the information you need. For example, you could filter the Contacts list to display only those clients who live in California.

Filter using common criteria

The most basic way to filter information is using common criteria.

1. Navigate to the folder to which you want to apply a filter.

For example, click the

People

button on the

Navigation Bar

to display the

Contacts

folder.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Filter

button.

The Filter dialog box appears. The tab that appears depends on the type of folder being filtered.

4. On the tab that is displayed by default, specify the options you want to use and click

OK

,

OK

when you’re finished.

The selected folder is filtered according to the criteria you specified.

Filter using additional criteria

You can also filter using additional criteria, such as category or importance level.

1. Navigate to the folder to which you want to apply a filter.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Filter

button.

The Filter dialog box appears.

4. Click the

More Choices

tab.

You can filter by category, read and unread items, items that include attachments, assigned importance, flag, or the size of the item.

5. Select the filter options you want to use and click

OK, OK when you’re finished.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Apply a filter to the Contacts folder to display only contacts with NE in the Address field. Clear the filter.

Figure 10-25: The Filter dialog box, as it appears when filtering the Inbox.

Organizing and Finding Information

Filter using custom criteria

You can create a custom filter to filter information by field.

1. Navigate to the folder to which you want to apply a filter.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Filter

button.

The Filter dialog box appears.

4. Click the

Advanced

tab and click the

Field

list arrow.

5. Point to the field set you want, and then click the field you want to use in the search criteria.

6. Click the

Condition

list arrow and select the condition you want to use with the selected field.

The conditions that are available depend on the field that is selected.

7. If the condition requires a value, click the

Value

text box and enter a value.

For example, if you want to filter the Contacts list to display only those contacts who live in California, you would type “CA” in the Value text box.

8. Click

OK

,

OK

when you’re finished.

Remove a filter

1. Navigate to the folder from which you want to remove the filter.

2. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Filter

button.

The Filter dialog box appears.

4. Click the

Clear All

button in the bottom-right corner of the dialog box and click

OK

,

OK

.

The filter is removed.

Figure 10-26: The Advanced tab of the Filter dialog box.

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Organizing and Finding Information

Using the People Pane

Your co-worker just asked if you've reviewed the presentation she emailed you yesterday; however, you can't find her message. Lucky for you, Outlook 2013 added the People Pane. Now you can view all your correspondence with a contact, as well as other information in one place.

Find information about a contact

The People Pane consolidates your correspondence with a contact.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select a message.

The People Pane is displayed below the Reading

Pane.

2. Hover your mouse over the Contact’s name or photo and click the

Open Contact Card

arrow to view more information about the contact.

More information about the contact is displayed.

Change the People Pane display

The People Pane takes up valuable screen space, so you may want to minimize it or even turn it off.

1. In the Outlook program window, click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group.

A list of options appears. There are three display options:

Normal: Displays an expanded People Pane at the bottom of the Reading Pane or item window.

Minimized: Displays a collapsed People Pane at the bottom of the Reading Pane or item window.

Off: Disables the Reading Pane.

2. Select

Normal, Minimized

or

Off

.

The People Pane closes.

Other Ways to Minimize/Expand the People

Pane:

Click the

Collapse/Expand

button in the People

Pane to toggle between an expanded or minimized view.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Select a contact and view his or her information in the People Pane.

[email protected]

Open Contact Card arrow

Figure 10-27: The People Pane displays more information about a contact.

Figure 10-28: Select to view more details about the contact or select to edit their details.

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O r g a n i i z i i n g a n d F i i n d i i n g

I

I n f f o r m a t i i o n

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

You can view all your Outlook folders in the _____ List.

A. Folder

B. Mail

C. Inbox

D. Message

2.

You cannot move messages between folders in Outlook. (True or False?)

3.

Click the _____ icon next to a folder to expand it and view its subfolders.

A. Minus

B. Triangle

C. Envelope

D. Magnifying Glass

4.

You can reuse recent searches. (True or False?)

5.

Click the _________ tab to refine your search.

A. Home

B. Folder

C. Search

D. View

6.

What command could you use to search all Outlook items (Emails, appointments, tasks, etc.) for the phrase money laundering?

A. Find

B. You can’t; Outlook can only search the current folder.

C. Search Folders

D. Advanced Find

7.

You need to move and copy items to Search Folders in order to view them. (True or False?)

8.

You cannot modify the criteria of a Search Folder that you created. (True or False?)

9.

Items can be sorted by multiple fields. (True or False?)

10.

Messages are organized into groups by default. (True or False?)

11.

When a filter is applied, items that do not meet the filter's criteria are deleted. (True or False?)

12.

Which of the following is NOT a tab in the People Pane?

A. Contacts

B. Mail

C. Attachments

D. Meetings

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Quiz Answers

1.

A. The Folder List displays all your Outlook folders.

2.

False. You can easily move messages between different folders in Outlook.

3.

B. Click the Triangle icon next to a folder to expand it and view its subfolders.

4.

True. You can reuse recent searches.

5.

C. Click the Search tab to refine your search.

6.

D. The Advanced Find command lets you search all Outlook items for a word or phrase.

7.

False. Search Folders are virtual folders that provide views of Emails that match specific criteria. They do not store messages.

8.

False. You can modify the criteria of a Search Folder that you created.

9.

True. The quickest way to sort is using column headings, but you can customize the view to be sorted by multiple fields.

10.

True. Groups make it easier to find messages that fall under the same Arrange By criteria.

11.

False. Items that do not meet the filter's criteria are temporarily hidden until the filter is removed; they are not deleted.

12.

A. There is no Contacts tab in the People Pane.

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A u t o m a t i i n g

C o m m a n d s

Managing Quick Steps .................................... 208

Create your own quick step ................... 208

Modify a Quick Step............................... 209

Delete a quick step ................................ 209

Reset quick steps .................................. 210

Creating a Rule ................................................ 211

Creating a Rule with the Rules Wizard .......... 213

Managing Rules ............................................... 214

Edit a rule ............................................... 214

Disable a rule ......................................... 214

Delete a rule .......................................... 215

11

Outlook has many useful tools to keep you organized, but using those tools themselves can be time-consuming. It takes time to read through the mountain of Emails you receive every day and make sure they’re assigned to the correct folder, given the correct priority, or put on your task list.

Outlook includes two useful tools, quick steps and rules, which allow you to act on messages quickly. Quick steps cut down the number of clicks it takes to move a message to a folder, or to forward or reply to a message. Rules are a bit different; they can sort through your messages automatically. This chapter teaches you how to set up both tools and manage them so you can work more efficiently.

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Automating Commands

Managing Quick Steps

Quick steps are great tools new in Outlook 2013. They allow you to act on your Email using only a mouse click.

There are two ways you can create quick steps: you can customize a default quick step, or you can create a custom quick step.

Create your own quick step

If you maintain multiple folders, correspond with multiple teams, or have multiple people with whom you regularly communicate, you can create additional quick steps for each action.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and select

Create

New

in the

Quick Steps

group.

The Edit Quick Step dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Open the Edit Quick Step

Dialog Box:

Click the

More

button in the Quick Steps group, select

New Quick Step

from the list, and select the type of quick step you want to create.

3. Enter a name for the quick step.

You should name a quick step based on the task it performs; for example, “To Manager” is a good name for a quick step that automatically forwards an Email to your manager.

4. Click the

Choose an Action

list arrow and select the action you want the quick step to do.

Actions are grouped together into six sections. These sections are explained in the Table 11-1: Quick Step

Actions.

5. (Optional) choose a Shortcut key in the

Choose a shortcut

drop-down list if you wish. Enter any additional options for the quick step and click

Finish

.

The new quick step has been created and appears in the Quick Steps group.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Modify the “To Manager” quick step to forward Emails to someone else.

Duplicate the To Manager quick step and modify it so it creates a new message. Rename it “Email Manager”.

Delete the Email Manager quick step and reset Quick

Steps.

Click the More button to view additional options.

Figure 11-1: The Quick Steps group.

Table 11-1: Quick Step Actions

Filing

Specify the folder where you wish to store messages, move messages to the Deleted

Items folder, or permanently delete messages.

Mark a message as read or unread, or change the importance of a message.

Change

Status

Categories,

Tasks and

Flags

Categorize a message, clear a message of pre-set categories, flag a message for followup, or create a task.

Respond

Create a new message, reply to a message, reply to all recipients of a message, or forward a message.

Appointment

Create a meeting or appointment.

Conversation

Move or ignore all messages in a particular conversation.

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Modify a quick step

Outlook has several default quick steps based on common actions. You can customize these quick steps to meet your needs.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

The Inbox folder appears.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

More

button in the Quick Steps group.

A list of quick step options appears.

3. Select

Manage Quick Steps

from the list.

The Manage Quick Steps dialog box appears.

4. Select the quick step you want to change in the Quick

Step box and click the

Edit

button.

The Edit Quick Step dialog box appears. You can modify existing actions or add additional actions to a quick step in the Edit Quick Step dialog box.

5. Edit the quick step as necessary, click

Save

and then

OK

.

Delete a quick step

Delete quick steps you no longer use to keep your list of quick steps tidy.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

More

button in the Quick Steps group.

A list of options appears.

3. Select

Manage Quick Steps

.

The Manage Quick Steps dialog box appears.

4. Select the quick step you want to delete in the Quick step section and click the

Delete

button.

The quick step is deleted.

Other Ways to Delete a Quick Step:

Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and right-click the quick step you want to delete in the Quick

Steps group. Select

Delete

from the contextual menu.

Figure 11-2: You can further specify an action in the Edit

Quick Step dialog box.

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Automating Commands

Reset quick steps

You can always restore Outlook’s default quick steps.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

More

button in the Quick Steps group.

A list of quick step options appears.

3. Select

Manage Quick Steps

.

The Manage Quick Steps dialog box appears.

4. Click the

Reset to Defaults

button.

The Microsoft Outlook dialog box appears, asking you if you want to restore defaults.

5. Click

Yes

.

6. Click

OK

.

The original quick steps appear in the Quick Steps group on the Ribbon.

Figure 11-3: The Microsoft Outlook dialog box appears when you restore default quick steps.

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Automating Commands

Creating a Rule

Rules are powerful tools that help you manage your Email messages by performing specific actions automatically.

When you create a rule, Outlook takes the action specified in the rule when a message arrives in your Inbox or when you send a message. You can apply rules to:

Organize your messages: For example, move all incoming messages that have the word “Picnic” in the subject to a Picnic folder.

Create a notification: Play a sound when you receive an Email from your boss.

There are two different ways to create a rule:

By example: Create a rule based on an Email message. Simply select the message that contains the sender, subject, or recipient you want to use in the rule.

Using the Rules Wizard: You can create a rule based on a template from the Stay Organized or Stay

Up to Date collections of templates. Or, you can start with a blank rule and let Outlook walk you through the entire process of creating a rule using all your own conditions and actions.

First let’s look at the easiest way to create a rule—by example.

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rules

button in the Move group.

A list of options for creating rules appears. In

Outlook 2013, options for creating Always Move rules based on sender or recipient appear by default.

If you want to create a different kind of rule, you can use the Create Rule dialog box.

3. Select

Create Rule

.

The Create Rule dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Create a Rule:

Right-click the message you want to base the rule on, select

Rules

from the contextual menu, and select the appropriate option or

Create Rule

.

4. Select condition(s) for the rule.

Choose from From, Subject contains, or Sent To conditions. The rule will apply only when you receive Email that satisfies all the selected conditions.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Create a new Mail folder called “Personal”.

Use the “Soccer practice” message in the Inbox to create a rule that sends messages with Soccer practice in the subject to the Personal folder.

Run this rule now on messages already in the Inbox folder under Practice.

Click for options to create a rule.

Figure 11-4: The Rules button in the Move group on the

Ribbon.

Figure 11-5: The Create Rule dialog box.

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Automating Commands

5. Specify the action you want to take if the condition(s) are met.

Choose from displaying an alert, playing a selected sound, or automatically moving the item to a specified folder.

Tip: Click the

Advanced Options

button for even more condition and action options.

6. Click

OK

.

Outlook asks you to confirm the creation of the new rule.

Tip: To apply the rule to messages you’ve already received, select the

Run this rule now on messages already in the current folder

check box.

7. Click

OK

.

The rule is active.

Select this check box to run the rule on messages you have already received.

Figure 11-6: The Success dialog box.

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Automating Commands

Creating a Rule with the Rules

Wizard

The Rules Wizard can help you create a rule from a template or by starting with a blank rule.

1. In Mail, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rules

button in the Move group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Rules & Alerts

.

The Email Rules tab of the Rules and Alerts dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Open the Rules and Alerts

Dialog Box:

Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

.

Click the

Manage Rules & Alerts

button.

3. Click the

New Rule

button.

The Rules Wizard takes you through several steps to help you establish your new rule.

First you will see “Step 1: Select a template.” Here you can choose from templates in different categories like, Stay Organized, Stay Up to Date or Start from a blank rule.

4. Select a template or blank rule option and click

Next

.

5. Select the condition(s) you want to check.

You may also need to edit rule descriptions in the

“Step 2: Edit the rule description” area at the bottom of the dialog box. For example, if the rule is going to play a sound, you need to select which sound to use.

6. If necessary, click the underlined values at the bottom of the dialog box and edit the rule descriptions.

When you’re finished, click

Next

in the Rules Wizard dialog box.

Next you need to indicate what you want to do with the messages that meet the specified conditions.

7. Select the actions you want Outlook to perform. If necessary, define the actions at the bottom of the dialog box. Click

Next

when you’re finished.

8. Specify any exceptions to the condition(s). If necessary, define the exceptions at the bottom of the dialog box. Click

Next

when you’re finished.

9. Enter a name for the new rule and click

Finish

.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Create a new Mail folder called “Meetings”.

Create a rule from scratch that will move incoming messages with the word “meeting” in the subject line into the Meetings folder.

Existing rules

Figure 11-7: The Rules and Alerts dialog box.

Figure 11-8: The Rules Wizard dialog box.

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Automating Commands

Managing Rules

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

If you have set up several rules, it’s likely that eventually you will want to change or delete some of them. You can add, delete, and manage Outlook’s rules using the Rules and Alerts dialog box.

Exercise:

Display the Rules and Alerts dialog box and change the “meeting” rule so it includes messages that are marked as High Priority.

Delete the “meeting” rule.

Edit a rule

1. In Mail, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rules

button in the Move group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Rules & Alerts

.

The Email Rules tab of the Rules and Alerts dialog box appears.

3. Select the existing rule you want to edit and click the

Change Rule

button.

A list of editing options appears. Here you can edit the rule settings, rename the rule, or change the action that is associated with the rule.

4. Select an option and edit the rule as required.

Disable a rule

Disabling a rule is different from deleting a rule because it only inactivates the rule without removing it from

Outlook.

1. In Mail, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rules

button in the Move group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Rules & Alerts

.

The Rules and Alerts dialog box appears, displaying the Email Rules tab.

3. Uncheck the box next to a rule to disable it.

Tip: Simply check the box next to a rule to enable it again.

Disable/enable a rule

Edit a rule

Delete a rule

Figure 11-9: Managing rules in the Rules and Alerts dialog box.

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Automating Commands

Delete a rule

You can also completely delete a rule if you no longer need it.

1. In Mail, click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Rules

button in the

Move

group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Rules & Alerts

.

The Rules and Alerts dialog box appears, displaying the Email Rules tab.

3. Select a rule and click the

Delete

button.

Outlook deletes the selected rule.

Table 11-2: Commands Available in the Rules and

Alerts Dialog Box below provides an overview of all the commands that are available in the Rules and

Alerts dialog box.

Table 11-2: Commands Available in the Rules and Alerts Dialog Box

Creates a new rule.

Modifies the conditions, actions, and exceptions of the selected rule.

Copies the selected rule to use as a template for a new rule.

Deletes the selected rule.

Move Up: If you have multiple rules this command will change the order in which rules are evaluated.

Move Down: If you have multiple rules this command will change the order in which rules are evaluated.

Runs selected rules on messages already in the Inbox or other folders.

Allows you to import and export your rules. Very useful for backing up your rules and transferring them to another computer.

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A u t o m a t i i n g C o m m a n d s R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

You cannot create custom quick steps. (True or False?)

2.

What should you do if you want to restore your quick step defaults?

A. Delete all the quick steps you created and recreate the default quick steps.

B. Click the Reset to Defaults button in the Manage Quick Steps dialog box.

C. You cannot reset quick steps to defaults.

D. Download an add-in from Office.com.

3.

The only way to create a rule is using the Rules Wizard. (True or False?)

4.

You can use the Rules Wizard to create a rule using a template or from scratch. (True or False?)

5.

You can disable a rule without deleting it. (True or False?)

6.

You can manage rules using the _________ dialog box.

A. Rule Manager

B. Manage Rules

C. Rules and Alerts

D. Rule Options

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Quiz Answers

1.

False. You can create custom quick steps.

2.

B. You can restore your default quick steps by clicking the Reset to Defaults button in the Manage Quick Steps dialog box.

3.

False. You can create rules by example using the Create Rule dialog box, or you can create a rule based on a template using the Rules Wizard.

4.

True. You can use the Rules Wizard to create a rule using a template or from scratch.

5.

True. You can disable a rule without deleting it.

6.

C. You can manage rules using the Rules and Alerts dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 217

M a n a g i i n g

O u t l l o o k D a t a

Using Mailbox Cleanup ................................... 219

Check your mailbox ............................... 219

Clean up your mailbox ........................... 219

Using AutoArchive .......................................... 220

Change AutoArchive settings for a single folder ...................................................... 221

Manually Archiving and Retrieving Information

...........................................................................

222

Access archived items ........................... 223

Importing Information ..................................... 224

Exporting Information ..................................... 226

Working with Personal Folders Files............. 228

Create a Personal Folders file ............... 228

Open a Personal Folders file ................. 228

Close a Personal Folders file ................. 229

Working with Offline Folders .......................... 230

Work offline ............................................ 230

Change folders available to edit offline .. 230

12

Where would you be if, all of a sudden, you couldn’t access your Outlook files?

For many people, Outlook is an essential office tool containing a lot of precious data. Losing Email messages, contact information, and appointments from the calendar could be a catastrophe. If you find yourself in that category, you’ll want to make sure that you can access that data even if your computer crashes.

Managing your Outlook data also means working with other programs. If you have contact names and addresses scattered throughout your Web Email accounts,

Outlook lets you import them all into your

Contacts list (or export your Contacts list to your Email programs).

This chapter focuses on some different ways to backup your data, as well as ways to import and export data between

Outlook and other programs.

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Using Mailbox Cleanup

Like a physical Mailbox, your Outlook Mailbox fills up over time. Knowing the size of your Mailbox, the amount of free space you have, and how to clean up your Mailbox helps keep things organized.

Check your Mailbox

Many organizations have a limit on the size of your

Mailbox. The Quota Thermometer can help you manage your Mailbox more effectively.

Trap: The Quota Thermometer is only available to organizations using Microsoft Exchange Server.

Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

.

The Quota Thermometer appears under the

Cleanup Tools heading. It shows:

The size of your Mailbox.

How much free space you currently have in your

Mailbox.

Clean up your Mailbox

Use the Mailbox Cleanup to help you empty Outlook of unnecessary or duplicate items.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

.

2. Click the

Cleanup Tools

button and select

Mailbox

Cleanup

.

There are a few methods available here to reduce the size of your Mailbox:

View Mailbox size: Click the

View Mailbox Size

button to view the total size of your Mailbox and folders.

Find items: Search for items to delete based on their age or size.

AutoArchive items: Archive old items to Archive

Folders.

Empty the Deleted Items folder: Permanently delete items.

Delete conflicts: Delete any alternative versions of items in your Mailbox.

3. Select the options you wish to use and follow the prompts.

4. When you’re finished, click the

Close

button in the

Mailbox Cleanup dialog box.

Your changes are applied.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

View the Quota Thermometer.

Figure 12-1: The Quota Thermometer appears on the Info tab.

Figure 12-2: The Mailbox Cleanup dialog box.

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Managing Outlook Data

Using AutoArchive

Outlook can automatically keep your Inbox and other folders from growing too unwieldy. AutoArchive automatically archives your Outlook data based on your settings. For example, you might specify that

AutoArchive archives any appointments in your Calendar folder that are over four months old.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Advanced

tab.

Advanced options for working with Outlook appear.

3. Click the

AutoArchive Settings

button.

The AutoArchive dialog box appears.

4. Make sure the

Run AutoArchive every

check box is checked.

When AutoArchive is activated, you can specify how often you want it to archive your items. For a list of what each setting means, see Table 12-1:

AutoArchive Options.

5. Choose your preferences for AutoArchive notification and deletions using the available check boxes.

Trap: If you specify a new name and location for the archive file, make sure you use the same file when you archive information in the future.

Newly archived messages are just added to the existing messages, so you’ll want to make sure they’re all in the same place.

6. Click

OK

.

The AutoArchive dialog box closes.

7. Click

OK

.

The Outlook Options dialog box closes.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Review the AutoArchive settings in Outlook.

Figure 12-3: The AutoArchive dialog box

Table 12-1: AutoArchive Options

Prompt before

AutoArchive runs

Delete expired items

Archive or delete old items

Show archive folder in folder list

Clean out items older than

Move old items to

Permanently delete old items

You can receive a message every time AutoArchive is about to run.

If an Email message has an expiration date, it can be deleted instead of archived.

Clear this check box if you do not want to move items to the archive during AutoArchive.

You can show or hide the archive folder in Outlook’s folder list.

Choose how long an item must be sitting in Outlook before it is archived.

Choose a location for archived items other than the default location.

Rather than moving old items to an archive, you can delete them permanently.

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Change AutoArchive settings for a single folder

You can also change the AutoArchive settings for a single folder.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

on the Navigation Bar and select

Folders

.

The Folder List appears in the Folder Pane.

2. Right-click the folder you want to change and select

Properties

from the contextual menu.

The Properties dialog box for the selected folder appears.

3. Click the

AutoArchive

tab.

The AutoArchive tab appears.

Other Ways to Change AutoArchive Settings

for a Single Folder:

Select the folder you want to change in the Folder

Pane, click the

Folder

tab on the Ribbon, click the

Folder Properties

button in the Properties group and select the

AutoArchive

tab.

4. Change the settings to meet your needs and click

OK

/

Apply

.

Your settings are saved for that folder. Table 12-2:

AutoArchive Folder Settings, lists the settings used if you change the AutoArchive settings in the

AutoArchive tab of the Properties dialog box.

Table 12-2: AutoArchive Folder Settings

Calendar

Deleted Items

Inbox

Journal

Sent Items

Tasks

Notes, Contacts, and Drafts

6 months

2 months

6 months

6 months

2 months

6 months

AutoArchive does not normally archive information in these folders.

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Managing Outlook Data

Manually Archiving and

Retrieving Information

As your folders become larger, Outlook becomes slower, and finding items can become increasingly difficult. That is where archiving becomes useful. When you archive

Outlook information, you transfer old items to a storage file. The items are then deleted from their original folder in Outlook.

Because archived items are copied to the archive file and then removed from Outlook, be cautious about what you archive. This lesson explains how to archive Outlook information manually.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and under Info, click the

Cleanup Tools

button.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Archive

from the list.

The Archive dialog box appears.

3. Make sure that the

Archive This Folder and all subfolders

option is selected.

This option will let you specify which folder you want to archive. If you choose the other option,

“Archive all folders according to their AutoArchive settings”, every folder in Outlook (except those not set to archive) will be archived.

4. Select the folder that you want to archive.

If you want to archive everything, select the

Mailbox

and all the folders will be archived.

Now choose the date at which you want to begin archiving.

5. Click the

Archive items older than

list arrow and select the how old an item must be in order to be archived.

All items older than the date specified will be moved into the archive file. Items that are newer remain in

Outlook.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Archive the data in your Inbox folder. Open the

Archive folder.

C:\Users\CarlyJ\Documents\Outlook Files\arsyte

Figure 12-4: The Archive dialog box.

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Managing Outlook Data

6. (Optional) Specify the name and location of the archive file in the

Archive File

box.

The default location is a folder called Archive, and the archive is saved as an Outlook Data File (.pst).

Trap: If you specify a new name and location for the archive file, make sure you use the same file when you archive information in the future.

Newly archived items are just added to the archive, so you’ll want to make sure they’re all in the same place.

7. Click

OK

.

The items you specified are archived.

Tips

 Messages that are archived are not saved within

Outlook, so they are more difficult to find. Be sure that you don’t archive any items that you need immediately.

Access archived items

Your archiving system is working great. Unfortunately, you need to find an Email message archived two years ago. No problem – the archived items are just a few clicks away.

1. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button on the Navigation Bar and select

Folders

.

The Folder List appears in the Folder Pane.

2. Select

Archive Folders

(or the name you specified for your archived items) in the Folder List.

The archive appears.

Figure 12-5: Archive Folders appear in the Folder List.

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Managing Outlook Data

Importing Information

People from different countries speak different languages, just as computer programs save files in different formats.

Fortunately, just like some people can speak several languages, Outlook can read and write in other file formats. For example, if you want to import contacts from another program, importing the file is the easiest way to do it.

Here’s how to import an external file into Outlook.

Tip

 It is easier working from the Folders List when importing or exporting data

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Open &

Export

.

Options for opening files appear.

2. Click the

Import/Export

button.

The Import and Export Wizard opens.

3. Select

Import from another program or file

and click

Next

.

The Import a File dialog box opens and asks which type of file to import.

4. Select the appropriate file format from the list and click

Next

.

The Import a File dialog box asks you to locate the file you wish to import.

5. Click the

Browse

button.

The Browse dialog box appears.

6. Browse to the file you’d like to import. Select the file and click

OK

.

The file path appears in the “File to import” text box.

7. Click

Next

.

The Import a File dialog box asks you to choose a destination for the file.

Tip: The most common reason to import a file is to import contact information from another source, so you’ll probably want to import information into your Contacts folder.

8. Choose a destination folder from the list and click

Next

.

The last step is to make sure the information will be imported correctly.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

contactaddresses.csv

Exercise:

Import the contactaddresses.csv file into your contact list.

Figure 12-6: The Import and Export Wizard [email protected]

Figure 12-7: Select a location to save your imported file in the Import and Export Wizard.

Managing Outlook Data

9. Select the

Import

check box for the file you want to import and click the

Map Custom Fields

button.

The Map Custom Fields dialog box opens. The values in the From section are values from the file to be imported. The fields in the To section are used to categorize data in the destination folder you selected.

To make sure the values are imported correctly, you must click and drag a value from the left into the field on the right.

10. Click and drag a value in the From area to a field in the To area of the dialog box.

Mapping the value for one record from the source file should automatically map the data from other records in the file.

Tip: Use the Previous and Next buttons in the

From section to make sure the values are being imported correctly into Outlook.

11. Click

OK

.

The Map Custom Fields dialog box closes.

If the values are mapped to the correct destination folder, you are ready to import.

12. Click

Finish

.

The information is imported to the location you specified.

Tip

 The file formats that Outlook can import and export depends on which options were selected when you installed Outlook. You can always add more file formats later—just make sure you have your installation disc handy!

Figure 12-8: The Map Custom Fields dialog box lets you match fields from the imported file to the fields in the destination folder.

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Managing Outlook Data

Exporting Information

When you export Outlook information, you save it in a different format so that it can be understood and opened by different programs. For example, you might export your Contact list to an Excel worksheet.

In this lesson, you will learn how to export information in an Outlook folder to an external file.

Tip

 It is easier working from the Folders List when importing or exporting data.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Open &

Export.

Options for opening files appear.

2. Click the

Import/Export

button.

The Import and Export Wizard opens.

Other Ways to Open the Import and Export

Wizard:

Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

. In the Outlook Options dialog box, click the

Advanced

tab and click the

Export

button under the Export heading.

3. Select

Export to a file

and click

Next

.

The Export to a File dialog box appears, listing the formats you can export a file to.

4. Select the format you would like to save the file as and click

Next

.

A list of the folders from which you can export information appears.

5. Select the folder whose contents you’d like to export and click

Next

.

The Export a File dialog box asks you where you want to save your new file.

6. Click the

Browse

button.

The Browse dialog box appears.

7. Browse to a different location for the file, enter a name for the file if necessary, and click

OK

.

The file path appears in the “Save exported file as” text box.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Export your contact list as a Comma Separated

Values (.csv) file.

Figure 12-9: Exporting to a file using the Import and

Export wizard.

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8. Click

Finish

.

The steps to finish exporting your file depend on the type of file you are exporting:

A Create Outlook Data File dialog box may appear, prompting you to add an additional password.

The Export to a File dialog box may prompt you to map the export file’s fields.

9. Follow the instructions and export your file.

Outlook exports the values to the file.

Figure 12-10: Click the Export checkbox and click finish to perform the export.

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Managing Outlook Data

Working with Personal

Folders Files

Although you may never need to do it, Outlook can open and save files. .Outlook files are called Personal Folders files, have a .pst extension, and can store any kind of

Outlook item—Emails, appointments, contacts, and so on.

Create a Personal Folders file

You can use these files to back up your Outlook information or to transfer information to another computer. But first you need to create the file.

1. Click the

Home

tab on the Ribbon and click the

New

Items

button in the New group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

More Items

from the list and select

Outlook

Data File

.

The Create or Open Outlook Data File dialog box appears.

Tip: Select the

Add Optional Password

check box if you would like to add a password to the data file.

3. Type a name for the file in the File Name text box and click

OK

.

The data file is saved.

Open a Personal Folders file

Personal Folders files open pretty much the same was as any other file. If you need to make changes to an Outlook

Data file or transfer it to another computer, here’s how to open it.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Open &

Export

.

Options for opening files appear.

2. Select

Open Outlook Data File

.

The Open Outlook Data File dialog box appears.

3. Navigate to the folder that contains the file and double-click the file.

The Personal Folders file appears in the Folder List.

You might have to scroll down to the bottom of the list to see the Personal Folders file.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Close the Practice.pst file. Open the

Practice.pst file and view it in the Folder List.

Click to add a password.

Figure 12-11: The Create Open Outlook Data File dialog box.

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Managing Outlook Data

Close a Personal Folders file

When you’re done working with a Personal Folders file in

Outlook, it’s a good idea to close it. Keeping additional files open in Outlook will slow down the program. When the data file is closed, the data will not be deleted. Here’s how to close it.

1. Right-click the file in the Folder List.

A contextual menu appears.

2. Select

Close “File Name”

from the contextual menu.

The file closes and no longer appears in the Folder

List.

Figure 12-12: Right-click the file to close a Personal

Folders file.

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Managing Outlook Data

Working with Offline Folders

Outlook uses a second kind of data file, called an Offline

Folders file (.ost). A Personal Folders File (.pst) stores your data on your hard drive. An Offline Folders file lets you make changes to Outlook while you're offline. Any changes you make to an Offline Folders file while the folders are offline are updated as soon as an Internet or network connection becomes available.

Work offline

You can use Outlook without an Internet or network connection. When you do connect, Outlook syncs the changes with the network.

Click the

Send/Receive

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Work Offline

button in the Preferences group.

The status bar indicates that you are working offline.

Your changes will not be saved onto the network until you reconnect.

Tip

 To switch back to working online, click the

Work

Offline

button again.

Change folders available to edit offline

Here’s how to change the folders that are updated whenever you connect to the network. The Inbox,

Outbox, Deleted Items, Sent Items, Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks folders are chosen by default.

1. Click the

Send/Receive

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Send/Receive Groups

button in the Send &

Receive group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Define Send/Receive Groups

.

The Send/Receive Groups dialog box appears.

Other Ways to Open the Send/Receive Groups

Dialog Box:

Press

<Ctrl>

+

<Alt>

+

<S>

.

3. Select the Send/Receive group that includes your

Exchange account, and then click

Edit

.

The Send/Receive Settings dialog box appears.

4. Select your Exchange account from the

Accounts

list along the left side of the dialog box.

The folder options for your account are displayed.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Understand how to work offline in Outlook.

Figure 12-13: Click the Work Offline button in the

Preferences group to work offline.

Figure 12-14: The Send/Receive Groups dialog box.

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5. Select the

Include the selected account in this group

check box.

You can now select the folders you want to edit offline.

6. Click the check boxes next to the folders you would like to edit offline.

There are two ways you can work with a folder offline:

Download headers only: When working offline, you will only download the subject headers of the appointment, message, or entry that you are working with.

Download complete item including

attachments: When working offline, you will download all available information for the appointment, message, or entry you are working with.

7. Select how you want new Mail to be delivered and click

OK

.

Your new settings are applied. [email protected] [email protected]

Figure 12-15: Send/Receive Settings dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 231

M a n a g i i n g O u t l l o o k D a t a R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

The Quota Thermometer only tells you the size of your mailbox, not how much data it contains. (True or False?)

2.

The AutoArchive button is located in the:

A. Preferences tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

B. Mail Setup tab of the Trust Center

C. AutoArchive tab of the Trust Center.

D. Advanced tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

3.

In which folder can you find archived items?

A. Archive

B. Deleted Items

C. Journal

D. Archived items are removed from Outlook

4.

When would you use the Import function?

A. To move contact information from another source into your Contacts.

B. To read incoming Email in other languages.

C. To send your contact information from Contacts into another source.

D. To send an Email message overseas.

5.

When you export information from Outlook:

A. The information is automatically deleted from Outlook.

B. You can use the Outlook information in other programs.

C. The information can only be viewed when Outlook is running on the computer.

D. You need to pay an exporting fee.

6.

What kind of files can be saved as Outlook data files?

A. All files in Outlook, including Email messages, tasks, appointments, and journal entries.

B. Just journal entries and Email messages.

C. Journal entries only

D. Just Email messages.

7.

You can assign a password to protect a new Outlook Data file. (True or False?)

8.

When you use Outlook offline, your changes are updated when you reconnect. (True or False?)

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Quiz Answers

1.

False. The Quota Thermomter tells you the size of your mailbox and how much data it contains.

2.

D. The AutoArchive button is located in the Advanced tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

3. A. Archived items are stored in the Archive folder.

4.

A. The most common reason to import a file is to move contact information from another source into your Contacts.

5.

B. When you export information from Outlook, you can use the Outlook information in other programs.

6.

A. All files in Outlook, including Email messages, tasks, appointments, and journal entries, can be saved as Outlook

Data files.

7. True. You can choose to assign a password to protect a new Outlook Data file.

8.

True. When you use Outlook offline, your changes are updated when you reconnect.

Your Organization’s Name Here 233

C u s t o m i i z i i n g

O u t l l o o k

Customizing the Ribbon ................................. 235

Create a new group ............................... 235

Rename a tab or group .......................... 235

Add a command to a group ................... 236

Restore the default Ribbon .................... 236

Remove a tab or group .......................... 236

Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar ........ 237

Using and Customizing AutoCorrect ............. 238

How AutoCorrect works ......................... 238

Create an AutoCorrect entry .................. 238

Customizing Outlook Today ........................... 240

Open Outlook Today .............................. 240

Customize Outlook Today ...................... 240

Starting Outlook Automatically ...................... 241

Change the folder that Outlook starts in 242

Adding Fields to a View .................................. 243

Add a field .............................................. 243

Remove a field ....................................... 243

Creating a Custom View ................................. 244

Create a custom view ............................ 244

Apply a custom view .............................. 245

Delete a custom view ............................. 245

Using Custom Groups .................................... 246

Group items in a view ............................ 246

The Weather Bar .............................................. 247

Changing Outlook’s Default Options ............. 248

Managing Accounts ......................................... 249

13

If you’d like to wield a little more control over the way things work in Outlook, this is your chapter. You can change the way things look and the way things work in

Outlook, including creating your own menus, buttons, methods for sorting, and

Email options. You can even make

Outlook start automatically every time you turn on your computer. This chapter goes through a variety of ways to tweak

Outlook so it works exactly how you want it to.

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Customizing the Ribbon

One of the most useful features in Office 2013 is that you can customize the Ribbon. Add your own tabs and groups, or rearrange the Ribbon to better fit your work style.

Create a new tab or group

You can add new groups to existing tabs, or you can create new tabs with new groups.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Customize Ribbon

tab.

The left column displays commands that you can add to the Ribbon.

The right column displays the tabs on the Ribbon, and the groups and commands in each tab.

Tip: Click the plus sign next to a tab or group to expand it.

3. In the right column, select the tab where you wish to add the new tab or group.

A new tab, which automatically includes a new group, will be inserted below the selected tab.

Trap: Each Outlook module has its own Home tab.

4. Click the

New Tab

or the

New Group

button.

The new tab or group is added.

Rename a tab or group

Once you’ve created a tab or group, give it a name.

1. Select the tab or group you want to rename and click the

Rename

button.

The Rename dialog box appears.

2. Enter a name for the selected tab or group in the

Display Name text box.

The tab or group is renamed. For a group, also select a symbol to represent the group.

3. Click

OK

.

The tab or group is renamed.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create a new group on the Home tab of the

Ribbon in the Mail module called “Printing” and include the Print command.

Restore the Ribbon defaults.

Click to reorder the selected tab or group.

Click to create a new tab.

Click to create a new group.

Click to rename the selected tab or group.

Figure 13-1: Use the buttons in the Options dialog box to add a new tab or group to the Ribbon.

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Customizing Outlook

Add a command to a group

Once you have created a new tab or group, you can add commands to the group. You can also add commands to groups that already appear on the Ribbon.

1. In the right column, select the group to which you want to add a command.

This could be a group you’ve created from scratch or a group that appears by default.

2. In the left column, select the command you want to add to the Ribbon. Click the

Add

button.

The command is added to the group.

Tip: Not finding the command you want to add?

Click the

Choose commands from

list arrow and select the group of commands you want to view.

Restore the default Ribbon

If you no longer want to use the customizations you’ve added to the Ribbon, you can restore the Ribbon to its original, default settings.

1. Click the

Reset

button.

Two options appear:

Reset only selected Ribbon tab: Restores the default settings for the selected tab.

Reset all customizations: Removes all Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar customizations, restoring them to the default arrangement and appearance.

2. Select the reset option you wish to use.

The Ribbon is restored to its default settings.

Remove a tab or group

You can also remove a specific tab or group from the

Ribbon.

1. In the right column, right-click the tab or group you wish to use.

2. Select

Remove

from the contextual menu.

The tab or group is removed from the Ribbon.

Tips

 Any changes you make to a program’s Ribbon will appear only in that program.

 To hide a tab on the Ribbon, deselect its check box.

Click to view another group of commands.

Click to add the command on the left to the selected group on the right.

Click to view all the tabs on the Ribbon.

Figure 13-2: Adding commands to groups on the Ribbon.

The Print command added to the Printing group.

The Printing group, added to the Home tab of the Ribbon.

Figure 13-3: The Home tab on the Ribbon, customized with a new group.

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Customizing the Quick Access

Toolbar

The Quick Access Toolbar is a shortcut for commands that are used often. If the Quick Access Toolbar doesn’t contain enough of your frequently used commands, you can customize it by adding or deleting commands.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Quick Access Toolbar

tab.

This tab displays options for customizing the Quick

Access Toolbar.

The left column displays commands you can add to the Quick Access Toolbar. The right column displays commands that appear there.

Other Ways to Customize the Quick Access

Toolbar:

Click the

More

button on the Quick Access

Toolbar and add commands from the list provided or, if the command you’re looking for is not listed, select

More Commands

from the list.

3. In the left column, select the command you want to add to the Quick Access Toolbar.

4. Click the

Add

button.

The command is added to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Tips

 Arrange the order in which the commands are displayed by clicking the

Move Up

and

Move Down

buttons next to the right of the column.

 Click the

Reset

button and select

Reset only Quick

Access Toolbar

to return the Quick Access Toolbar to its default commands.

 Select a command in the Quick Access Toolbar column and click the

Remove

button to remove it from the Quick Access Toolbar.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add the Print command from the Popular

Commands group to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Move the Quick Access Toolbar below the Ribbon and move it back to the top again.

Click to view another group of commands.

Commands on the

Quick Access Toolbar are listed here.

Click to move the Quick

Access Toolbar below the

Ribbon.

Click to reset the Quick

Access Toolbar to its default settings.

Figure 13-4: Adding a command to the Quick Access

Toolbar.

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Customizing Outlook

Using and Customizing

AutoCorrect

AutoCorrect automatically corrects many common typing and spelling errors as you type. It is also a great way to use shorthand for longer words, phrases, or symbols.

AutoCorrect is a feature that is shared across the

Microsoft Office suite—so any additions or changes you make to AutoCorrect in one program, such as Outlook, will appear in all Microsoft Office programs, like Excel,

PowerPoint, and Word.

How AutoCorrect works

You may have already noticed that sometimes your typos are corrected as you enter text in Outlook. When you type an AutoCorrect entry and then press the <Spacebar> key, AutoCorrect replaces that text with the correct text.

For example, AutoCorrect will change the mistyped words “hte” to “the”, or “adn” to “and”. AutoCorrect also corrects simple grammar mistakes, such as capitalization problems. For example, it would change “GOing” to

“Going,” or capitalize the first letter in sentences.

Create an AutoCorrect entry

Outlook already has many entries in AutoCorrect, but you can add your own entries to correct habitual misspellings, quickly insert a symbol, or insert a shorthand version of a long phrase that you frequently use.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Mail

tab.

Options for working with Mail appear.

3. Under

Compose messages

, click the

Editor Options

button.

The Editor Options dialog box appears, displaying options for how Outlook corrects and formats text.

Other Ways to Open the Editor Options Dialog

Box:

Click the

Spelling and Autocorrect

button under

Compose messages.

4. Click the

AutoCorrect Options

button.

The AutoCorrect dialog box appears with the

AutoCorrect tab in front.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Create an AutoCorrect entry that replaces “ot” with “to”.

Try the AutoCorrect entry with this phrase, “He was going ot the store.”

He was going ot

Press

<Spacebar>

He was going to

Figure 13-5: An example of how AutoCorrect works.

Figure 13-6: The AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

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5. Type the word or phrase you want to correct or use as shorthand in the

Replace

text box.

This is the text that AutoCorrect will recognize when you type.

6. Type the word or phrase you prefer in the

With

text box.

When the text in the “Replace” text box is typed with a space, the text in the “With” text box will appear.

7. Click

Add

.

The entry is added to the AutoCorrect list.

8. Click

OK

to close the AutoCorrect dialog box. Click

OK

to close the Editor Options dialog box and click

OK

to close the Outlook Options dialog box.

The dialog boxes closes, and the entry will now be available in all Outlook items as well as in all other

Office applications.

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Customizing Outlook

Customizing Outlook Today

Outlook Today is a useful view that summarizes your

Email messages, upcoming Calendar events, and tasks.

Although Outlook Today is not the default view for

Outlook, it is easy to access and customize.

Open Outlook Today

You can open Outlook Today from the Folder List in the

Folder Pane.

Select your

Email address

or

Mailbox Name

at the top of the Folder List.

Outlook Today appears.

Customize Outlook Today

You can customize Outlook Today by changing when it opens, what kind of information it displays, and how the information is displayed.

1. Select your

Email address

or

Mailbox Name

at the top of the Folder List.

Outlook Today appears, as shown in the example to the right.

2. Click the

Customize Outlook Today

link on the top right.

The Customize Outlook Today settings appear. You can customize Outlook today using the settings explained in Table 13-1: Outlook Today Settings.

3. Change your Outlook Today settings as necessary and click the

Save Changes

link.

Outlook Today updates to reflect your changes.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Change the Outlook Today settings so that

Outlook Today only displays Today’s tasks.

[email protected]

Figure 13-7: Outlook Today displays a brief summary of messages, appointments and meetings, and tasks.

Table 13-1: Outlook Today Settings

Startup

Messages

Calendar

Tasks

Styles

Select this check box if you want to see

Outlook Today when you open Outlook.

Change the folders that Outlook Today displays.

Increase or decrease the number of days

Outlook displays appointments and Calendar events.

Specify if you want all tasks displayed or only the current day’s tasks. Also specify how you want Outlook Today to sort your tasks.

Select the style you want Outlook Today to use.

This includes changing the number of columns

Outlook Today uses to display information as well as the color scheme.

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Starting Outlook

Automatically

Every time you turn on your computer, day or night, your automatic reaction is to open Outlook. Sound familiar?

If you’re tired of waiting the extra time for Outlook to load, you can make it run automatically whenever you start your computer.

1. Click the

Start

button and select

All Programs

from the menu.

The list of programs and program folders that are available on your computer appears.

2. Right-click the

Start-up

folder and select

Open

from the contextual menu.

The Startup folder window appears, displaying shortcuts to any programs that appear when the computer starts.

3. Click the

Start

button and select

All Programs

Microsoft Office 2013

from the menu.

The contents of the Microsoft Office folder appear in the left pane of the menu.

Tip: If the Outlook 2013 shortcut is not visible, it may have been placed into a subfolder by someone else. Talk to your instructor or network administrator if you cannot see the shortcut.

4. Press the

<Ctrl>

key, and click and drag the

Microsoft Outlook 2013

shortcut to the Startup folder window.

The Microsoft Outlook 2013 shortcut appears in the

Startup folder. Outlook will now open automatically when the next time you start your computer.

Tips

 Use this feature sparingly. The more programs that load automatically during startup, the longer it will take your computer to start.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Move Outlook into the Startup folder so it starts automatically when you turn on your computer.

Change the folder Outlook opens when starting to

Calendar.

Figure 13-8: The Microsoft Outlook 2013 shortcut appears in the Startup folder.

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Customizing Outlook

Change the folder that Outlook starts in

If you use Outlook as a day planner more than as an

Email service, you may want Outlook to open right to the

Calendar folder instead of to your Inbox. It’s easy to change the folder Outlook opens when you start the program.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Advanced

tab.

Advanced options for working with Outlook appear.

3. Click the

Browse

button under the “Outlook start and exit” heading.

The Select Folder dialog box opens.

4. Select the folder you want Outlook to open to.

The folder is highlighted.

5. Click

OK

.

The Select Folder dialog box closes.

6. Click

OK

.

The Outlook Options dialog box closes.

The next time you start Outlook, the folder you selected will be displayed immediately.

Browse button

Figure 13-9: The Advanced tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

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Adding Fields to a View

When you’re viewing items in any of Outlook’s tools, you may need to see additional information that isn’t normally displayed. For example, the Tasks’s Simple List view displays the Task Subject, Due Date, Categories, In

Folder, and Flag fields. If you want to see additional fields, such as the % complete field, you would have to do one of the following:

Open the item you want to view by double-clicking it. The problem with this approach is that you can view only one item at a time.

Select a different view. The problem with this approach is there may not be a view that includes the field(s) you want to view.

Add the field to the current view.

This lesson focuses on the last option—adding and removing fields to and from a view.

Add a field

1. Right-click a column heading and select

Field

Chooser

from the contextual menu.

The Field Chooser appears.

Trap: The Field Chooser is not available for all views.

2. Click and drag the desired field from the Field

Chooser onto the column heading bar.

The view is updated to include data from the added field.

Remove a field

You can easily remove a field that you previously added.

Click and drag the field from the column heading.

The field is removed from the view and the column heading.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Add the % Complete field to Simple List view in Tasks.

Remove the % Complete field.

Figure 13-10: Click and drag a field from the Field

Chooser to add it to the current view.

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Customizing Outlook

Creating a Custom View

Changing fields, sorting options, and filtering a particular folder can get very old, very fast. You can save the displayed fields, grouping and sorting options, and filter criteria so you don’t have to change them manually by creating a custom view.

Create a custom view

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the Current View group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Views

from the list.

The Manage All Views dialog box appears. Here you can create, modify, rename, and delete views.

Tip: You can also copy an existing view and modify it. Select the view you want to copy and click the

Copy

button. Once you’ve copied the view, click the

Modify

button to edit your new view.

3. Click the

New

button.

The Create a New View dialog box appears.

4. Enter a name for the view in the “Name of new view” text box.

You should now decide what type of view you want to create. This will determine if the information is displayed in a table, in a timeline, as cards, as business cards, in a calendar (Day/Week/Month), or as icons.

5. Select the type of view you want to use.

Now select if you want the view to be available to anyone using the folder, to only you when you use the folder, or in all folders.

6. Select what folders this view can be used on and click

OK

.

The Advanced View settings dialog box appears.

Here you can further customize your view by adding columns, grouping items, specifying how you want information to be sorted, and more.

Trap: The buttons available in the Advanced View

Settings dialog box depend on the type of view previously selected.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Create a new view in Contacts and apply the view.

Name: TDS

Type of view: Table

Filter: “TDS Telecom” in company field only

Delete the view after applying it.

Figure 13-11: The Manage All Views dialog box.

Figure 13-12: The Create a New View dialog box.

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Customizing Outlook

7. Use the customize buttons to determine what appears in your custom view and how it is displayed. Click

OK

.

The Advanced View settings dialog box closes, and you return to the Manage All Views dialog box.

8. Click

Apply View

.

The custom view is applied.

Apply a custom view

Once a custom view has been created, applying it is just like applying any other view.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the Current View group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select the view you want to use.

Outlook displays the items in the selected custom view.

Delete a custom view

You can delete a view if you no longer need to use it.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Change View

button in the Current View group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Manage Views

.

The Manage All Views dialog box appears.

3. Select the view you want to delete and click the

Delete

button.

A dialog box appears asking you to confirm the deletion.

4. Click

Yes

.

The dialog box closes, and you return to the Manage

All Views dialog box.

5. Click

Close

.

The view is deleted.

Figure 13-13: Use the Advanced View Settings to customize a new view.

Figure 13-14: Click “Yes” to confirm the deletion of the view.

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Customizing Outlook

Using Custom Groups

Grouping items organizes them into a grouped outline.

You can expand or collapse a group to display or hide its items.

Many views already have default groupings, but you can change those groupings to meet your needs.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

View

Settings

button in the Current View group.

The Advanced View Settings dialog box appears.

2. Click the

Group By

button.

The Group By dialog box appears. You can now specify how you would like items in a view to be grouped.

Tip: Some views automatically group items. If necessary, deselect the

Automatically group according to arrangement

check box to manually group items in a view.

3. Click the

Group items by

list arrow and select how you would like to view items.

You can add additional criteria to make groups even more specific.

4. If necessary, continue editing the options in the

Group By dialog box to refine your view.

5. Click

OK

.

The Group By dialog box closes, and you return to the Advanced View Settings dialog box.

6. Click

OK

.

The new arrangement is applied to the view.

Tips

 If you will reuse your custom grouping, save it as a new view.

 You can only group items in a table or timeline.

Exercise

Exercise File:

Practice.pst

Exercise:

Group the Tasks list by Categories in Detailed

List view.

Figure 13-15: Edit groups using the Advanced View

Settings dialog box.

Figure 13-16: Specify how you want to group items in a view in the Group By dialog box.

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Customizing Outlook

The Weather Bar

A quirky new feature to the Outlook calendar is the

Weather Bar. On it you can view weather information for the next three days and switch between different locations.

1. Click

Calendar

on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

from the menu.

3. Click the

Calendar

tab on the left, and once the menu appears, scroll down to the Weather section.

Check the

Show weather on the calendar

check box.

4. Select

Celsius

or

Fahrenheit

, and click

OK

.

The weather bar is now visible at the top of your calendar.

5. To add a location to your weather bar, click the

location list arrow

and select

Add location

.

6. Search for a location in the

search

box provided and press

enter

.

7. Select the desired locations from the search results.

Your chosen location is displayed.

Tip

 To switch between locations, you can click on the location list arrow next to the weather bar and choose the one you want to view.

Exercise

• Exercise File:

None required

• Exercise:

Enable the Weather bar and your location.

Figure 13-17: Selecting to view the Weather bar

Figure 13-18: The Weather bar is visible at the top of your Calendar

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Customizing Outlook

Changing Outlook’s Default

Options

Microsoft spent a lot of time and research when it decided what the default settings for Outlook should be.

However, you may find that the default settings don’t always fit your own needs.

1. Click the

File

tab and select

Options

.

The Outlook Options dialog box appears.

2. Click the tabs on the left to view different option categories.

See Table 13-2: Tabs in the Outlook Options

Dialog Box, for more information on these options.

3. Change the options as you see fit. Click

OK

to confirm the changes.

The changes are applied to the Outlook program.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Explore the tabs in the Outlook Options dialog box.

Figure 13-19: The Advanced tab of the Outlook Options dialog box.

Table 13-2: Tabs in the Outlook Options Dialog Box

General

Mail

Calendar

Change the most commonly modified options in Outlook. This includes enabling the Mini Toolbar and Live

Preview. Change the color scheme, control ScreenTips, and change the user name. Also designate Outlook as the default program for Email, Contacts, and Calendar.

Change the options for outgoing messages, including new messages, replies, and forwards; specify Outlook’s

Conversation Clean Up and message alert settings; change how Outlook saves messages and tracks messages.

Change the default work time and week; configure how the calendar handles appointments, meeting requests and reminders; change how the Calendar is displayed; change the time zone and add alternate time zones.

People

Indicate how you want Outlook to file your contacts, if you want pictures and online status displayed when viewing contacts, and if you want Outlook to automatically add Email addresses for recipients not in your

Outlook Address Book to your Contacts list.

Change the default reminder time and how tasks appear.

Tasks

Search

Language

Advanced

Configure the Outlook stores indexed by Windows Search. Change how results display.

Add additional languages to edit your items. Also set the language priority order for added languages.

Advanced options for working with Outlook. Customize the Navigation Pane, Reading Pane, and To-Do Bar; specify the folder Outlook should open to when starting, and what should happen to items in the Deleted Items

Folders when you exit Outlook; update AutoArchive settings; configure reminders; create an export file; manage RSS feeds; configure send and receive settings for incoming and outgoing items; work with custom forms options; specify how you want Outlook to work with a dial-up connection; select international options.

Customize Ribbon

Create custom tabs and groups for the Ribbon.

Quick Access Toolbar

Add commands to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Add-Ins

Trust Center

View and manage Microsoft Office add-ins, such Acrobat PDFMaker and custom XML data.

Help keep your document safe and your computer secure and healthy. Read privacy statements and change

Trust Center Settings to control how Outlook works with macros, add-ins, trusted publishers and locations.

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Customizing Outlook

Managing Accounts

You can use Outlook 2013 to work with multiple Email accounts, organize your RSS feeds, subscribe to Internet calendars, and even publish your own calendar to the

Internet. You can use the Account Settings dialog box to manage all these accounts and more.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and click the

Account Settings

button.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Account Settings

.

The Email tab of the Account Settings dialog box appears.

There are a few options here that you can use to change how your accounts are used. See Table 13-3:

Account Settings Options, for a brief description of your options.

3. Select the options you want to apply and click

OK

.

The dialog box closes, and the changes are applied.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Explore the tabs in the Account Settings dialog box. [email protected] [email protected]\Inbox

In data file C:\Users\...\[email protected] – Exchange.ost

Figure 13-20: The Account Settings dialog box.

Table 13-3: Account Settings Options

Email Accounts

Set up a new Email account.

Data Files

Change settings for data files.

RSS Feeds

Add or remove Really Simple Syndicated

(RSS) feeds.

SharePoint

Lists

Internet

Calendars

Manage your SharePoint lists.

Add or remove subscriptions from Internet calendars.

Publish

Calendars

Manage any calendared published to the

Internet.

Address Books

Add or remove any directories or address books.

Your Organization’s Name Here 249

C u s t o m i i z i i n g O u t l l o o k R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

You can only add custom groups to custom tabs. (True or False?)

2.

What is the purpose of the Quick Access Toolbar?

A. To provide quick access to the commands you use most frequently.

B. To make Outlook 2013 look more like previous versions.

C. To provide Microsoft Access commands in the Outlook program.

D. To provide a backup in case the Ribbon fails

3.

AutoCorrect changes:

A. Spelling errors

B. Grammar errors

C. Capitalization errors

D. All of these.

4.

AutoCorrect entries created in Outlook will not appear in any other programs. (True or False?)

5.

You cannot change the folder Outlook opens when starting. (True or False?)

6.

Which folder do you need to drag a shortcut into to make it start automatically whenever you turn on your computer?

A. Autostart

B. Maintenance

C. Startup

D. Microsoft Office

7.

Microsoft Outlook is the only program that can be started automatically whenever you turn your computer on. (True or

False?)

8.

You cannot add fields to a view. (True or False?)

9.

You can copy, modify, rename, and delete views in the Advanced View Settings dialog box. (True or False?)

10.

The Group By dialog box allows you to group a view using any field displayed in the view. (True or False?)

11.

Which of the following is NOT a tab in the Outlook Options dialog box?

A. Calendar, which allows you to configure the Calendar tool.

B. Attachments, which lets you configure how Outlook opens attachments.

C. General, which lists the most commonly modified options in Outlook

D. Trust Center, which changes your privacy options.

12.

Using Outlook, you can view multiple ____________.

A. Email accounts

B. Internet calendars

C. RSS feeds

D. all of the above

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Quiz Answers

1.

False. You can add custom groups to default tabs or to custom tabs.

2.

A. The purpose of the Quick Access Toolbar is to provide quick access to the commands you use most frequently.

3. D. AutoCorrect changes spelling errors, grammar errors, and capitalization errors.

4.

False. AutoCorrect entries created in Outlook will appear in all other Microsoft Office programs.

5.

False. You can change the folder Outlook opens when starting.

6.

C. Drag a shortcut into the Startup folder to make it start automatically whenever you turn on your computer.

7.

False. Any program, file, or folder can be started automatically, as long as its shortcut is in the Startup folder.

8.

False. You can add fields to a view using the Field Chooser.

9.

False. You can copy, modify, rename, and delete views in the Manage All Views dialog box.

10.

True. The Group By dialog box allows you to group by any field displayed in the view.

11.

B. There is no Attachments tab in the Outlook Options dialog box.

12.

D. Using Outlook, you can view multiple Email accounts, Internet calendars, and RSS feeds.

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A d v a n c e d

T o p i i c s

RSS Feeds ........................................................ 253

Add an RSS feed from a Web page ...... 253

Add an RSS feed in Outlook’s Account

Settings .................................................. 254

Add an RSS feed from an Email invitation

...............................................................

254

View an RSS feed .................................. 255

Cancel an RSS feed .............................. 255

Using the Tools Together ................................ 256

Using Outlook Web App .................................. 258

Connect to Outlook Web App ................ 258

Check Email ........................................... 258

Send Email ............................................ 259

Use other Outlook folders ...................... 259

Using Instant Messaging in Outlook ............. 260

Connecting to Social Networks...................... 261

Download a social network provider add-in

...............................................................

261

Connect to a social network .................. 261

Disconnect from a social network .......... 262

Using the Outlook Social Connector ............. 263

View social network updates in Outlook 263

Add a contact to a social network .......... 263

Hide the People Pane ............................ 264

14

The deeper you dig into Outlook, the more features you’ll find. If you’re up to the challenge, you can find a lot of great features in Outlook that you may not have known about. Outlook was designed to be a multipurpose communication tool, and offers options far beyond Email and shared folders.

This chapter details features including using Outlook for Instant Messaging,

Accessing a Web version of Outlook from any computer, sending Internet faxes, subscribing to RSS feeds, and more.

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Advanced Topics

RSS Feeds

Instead of skipping from one Web site to another, you can use an RSS feed to receive notifications whenever your favorite Web sites are updated. RSS stands for Really

Simple Syndication, and true to its name, adding an RSS feed is easy.

Add an RSS feed from a Web page

RSS feeds consist of a headline or summary with a link to visit the original source. You can browse the headlines and decide which ones you want to read.

1. In Internet Explorer, look for a Web page with a highlighted RSS button.

The RSS button is located near the Home button.

2. Click the

RSS

button list arrow.

A list of available feeds for the Web page appears.

3. Select the RSS feed to which you’d like to subscribe.

You will be sent to an RSS feed page.

4. Click the

Subscribe to this RSS feed

link.

A dialog box appears with the name of the feed. You can change the name of the feed if you wish.

5. Click

Subscribe

.

The RSS content is now sent to your computer’s

Common Feed list.

Trap: If you cannot view your RSS feed, Outlook may not be configured to view the Common Feed

List. To view items from the Common Feed List in Outlook, click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Options

. Click the

Advanced

tab and select the

Synchronize RSS Feeds to the

Common Feed List (CFL) in Windows

check box.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add an RSS feed from ABC News – Top

Stories, view the Feed and then cancel it.

Subscribe button

Figure 14-1: Subscribing to an RSS in Internet Explorer.

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Advanced Topics

Add an RSS feed in Outlook’s Account

Settings

If you already know which Web site you’d like to receive updates from, you can enter it directly into Outlook.

1. Click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

.

Information about your account appears.

2. Click the

Account Settings

button and select

Account Settings

.

The Account Settings dialog box opens.

3. Click the

RSS FEEDS

tab, then click the

New

button.

The New RSS Feed dialog box opens.

4. Enter the URL of the RSS feed to which you’d like to subscribe.

Use the URL for the feed and not the Web site itself.

For example the RSS feed for Slate magazine is http://feeds.slate.com/slate.

5. Click the

Add

button.

The RSS feed appears in the Account Settings dialog box under Feed Name.

6. Click

Close

.

Add an RSS feed from an Email invitation

You may also receive an Email invitation to subscribe to an RSS feed, and you can add it to your feed list.

1. When you receive an RSS feed invitation, click

Add this RSS Feed

.

2. Click

OK

.

The feed is added, and the RSS content is sent to your computer.

Figure 14-2: The RSS Feeds tab of the Account Settings dialog box.

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Advanced Topics

View an RSS feed

1. Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar.

2. Click the

Expand

button to the left of the RSS Feeds folder in the Folder Pane.

All the RSS feeds you subscribe to appear organized as folders.

3. Select the folder you would like to view.

RSS notifications are listed in the Reading Pane.

4. Select a message to view in the Reading Pane.

The full text of the notification is displayed in the message area.

5. Click the

View Article

link below the message to view the full article in your default Web browser.

Tip: You can forward, delete, and flag an RSS item, but you cannot reply to the sender.

Cancel an RSS feed

You can cancel an RSS feed any time.

1. Click the

Expand

button next to the RSS Feeds folder in the Folder Pane.

The RSS feeds you subscribe to appear.

2. Right-click the RSS feed you want to delete and select

Delete Folder

from the contextual menu.

A dialog box appears, asking if you want to delete the feed.

3. Click

Yes

.

The feed is cancelled, and all content is removed.

Tip: To cancel your subscription without deleting content from the feed, click the

File

tab on the Ribbon and select

Info

. Click the

Account Settings

button and select

Account Settings

. In the Account Settings dialog box, click the

RSS Feeds

tab. Select the RSS feed you wish to cancel and click the

Remove

button.

The subscription ends, but the content is not deleted.

Click the Expand button to see folders for RSS feeds to which you currently subscribe.

Figure 14-3: RSS Feeds in the

Mail folder.

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Advanced Topics

Using the Tools Together

One of the easiest ways to use the Outlook tools together is to create a new item by dragging an item onto a button on the Navigation Bar. For example, you can drag a new email message to People in order to add the sender as a new contact. See more uses for this in Table 14-1: Using

Click and Drag in Microsoft Outlook

Table 14-1: Using Click and Drag in Microsoft Outlook

Drag this… Here…

Email Message

Appointment

Contact

Task

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Understand how clicking and dragging items is a powerful shortcut in Outlook.

To Create…

A new appointment with the content of the Email message included as the appointment’s description.

A new contact that contains the name and Email address of the

Email’s sender (Useful!).

A new task with the content of the Email message included as the task’s description.

A new Email message with information about the appointment.

A new contact with information about the appointment in the contact’s notes (Seldom Used).

A new task based on the appointment.

A new Email message addressed to the contact (Useful!).

A new meeting request with the contact (Useful!).

A new task request assigned to the contact (Useful!).

A new Email message with information about the task.

A new appointment based on the task.

A new contact with information about the task in the contacts notes (Seldom Used).

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Advanced Topics

Table 14-2: Using Click and Drag in Microsoft Outlook

Note

Journal Entry

A new Email message based on the content of the note.

A new appointment based on the content of the note.

A new contact based on the content of the note (Seldom

Used).

A new task based on the content of the note.

A new Email message with information about the journal entry.

A new appointment with information about the journal entry.

A new contact with information about the journal entry

(Seldom Used).

A new task with information about the journal entry.

Your Organization’s Name Here 257

Advanced Topics

Using Outlook Web App

Most people don’t just work at one computer, so it’s important that you can access Outlook from anywhere. If your organization has set up an Outlook Web App account

(formerly known as Outlook Web Access), all you’ll need is your Email address and password, and you can access your Outlook account, including Email, calendar, and other features from anywhere.

Connect to Outlook Web App

Your administrator needs to set up your Outlook Web App account for you. Once it has been set up, you can access your Outlook account from any computer with an Internet connection. Here’s how:

1. Open a browser window and enter the URL of the organization’s Outlook Web App account in the

Address Bar.

The Outlook Web App login page appears. Contact your network administrator for your organization’s

Outlook Web App URL.

Trap: You may see a security certificate page.

Make sure you have typed in the correct address and click

Continue to current web page

.

2. Enter your Email address and password and click the

Sign in

button.

Your Outlook Web App account appears.

Tip: If you are accessing Outlook Web App from a library or other public space, don’t forget to log out when you’re finished.

Check Email

Although Outlook Web App looks a little different than your full Outlook program, the two programs work pretty much the same way. If you know your way around

Outlook, you won’t have much difficulty navigating

Outlook Web App.

Tip

 Outlook Web App has been optimized for Microsoft’s

Internet Explorer. If you use another Web browser, the buttons may look very different.

1. Log on to Outlook Web App.

The Inbox folder of Outlook Web App appears.

2. Select a message in the Message Pane.

The full text of the message appears in the Reading

Pane.

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Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Check your Email using Web App.

Figure 14-4: The Login page for Outlook Web App.

Table 14-3: Inbox Options in Outlook Web App

Create a new Email or meeting request.

Delete a message.

Move or copy a message to a folder.

Show or hide messages based on predefined criteria.

Show or hide the Reading Pane.

Check your messages.

Table 14-4: Reading Pane Options

Reply to sender.

Reply to sender and all recipients.

Forward the message itself or forward it as an attachment.

Advanced Topics

Send e-mail

Your options for sending Email in Outlook Web App are very similar to your options in Outlook 2013. You can reply to or forward a message or you can create a new one. Here’s how to create a new message.

1. Click the

New

button on the toolbar.

A blank message appears in a new browser window.

2. Type the name or names of your recipients.

Other Ways to Add Recipient Addresses:

Click the

To

button to add names from your

Outlook Web App Contacts list.

3. Enter a subject and message text.

Other message options are available. See Table 14-

4: Message Commands, for a list of commands available on the message toolbar.

4. Click the

Send

button.

Use other Outlook folders

All of the available folders in Outlook Web App are listed in the Navigation Pane. See Table 14-5: Folders in

Outlook Web App, for a list of available folders. Each folder has its own toolbar. Accessing a new folder is simple.

Click the button in the Folder Pane for the folder you wish to open.

The folder appears.

Table 14-5: Message Commands

Send message.

Save a draft.

Insert attachment.

Open Address Book.

Name check.

Set importance.

Insert signature.

Spell check.

Table 14-6: Folders in Outlook Web App

Check or send Email.

Check or schedule appointments.

View or change address book.

Check or schedule tasks.

Open or edit public folders.

Carly James – Outlook Web…

Carly James

Figure 14-5: Outlook Web App looks similar to Outlook.

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Using Microsoft Lync in

Outlook

Microsoft Lync is an instant messaging application that lets you type quick conversations back and forth with someone in your Contacts. As long as the other person is online, you can chat with them in real time, meaning you won’t need to wait long for a response. This can be a great way to schedule meetings or just shoot the breeze with someone. Best of all, you can access instant messaging from within Outlook.

Outlook can now detect when people from your Contacts

List are online. If they are, you can chat with them.

1. Locate a contact’s name.

You can find names and online statuses in three locations.

An open Email message

The message window

The Reading Pane

An online status indicator appears next to the contact’s name. This indicator tells you if the person is online, away, busy, or offline.

Available:

Busy:

Be Right Back:

Off Work:

Appear Away:

2. Click the contact’s name to see their Contact Card.

See Table 14-6: Contact Card Buttons on the left for a list of actions you can take using the contact card.

3. Click the

Send an instant message to

button on the contact card.

A Microsoft Lync message window appears.

4. Type a message in the window.

5. Press

<Enter>

.

The message appears in the upper pane. A response should appear shortly.

6. When your conversation is finished, click the

Close

button.

The conversation closes. You remain signed in to

Microsoft Lync.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Understand how instant messaging works with

Outlook.

Carly James

Figure 14-6: Microsoft Lync window

Figure 14-7: Online status indicator

Table 14-7: Contact Card Buttons

Send an instant message to a contact.

Call a contact.

Start a video call

Send an Email message to a contact.

View Contact Card

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Advanced Topics

Connecting to Social

Networks

Electronic communication is not just Email. We now have friends on Facebook, contacts on LinkedIn, and other connections through social networking Web sites.

Outlook 2013 lets you track all your contacts using the

Outlook Social Connector.

Download a social network provider add-in

The Outlook Social Connector lets you view information about your personal and business social networks.

Although Outlook 2013 includes the Outlook Social

Connector, you still need to download add-ins for each of your social networks.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Account Settings

.

3. Click

Next

. The Social Network Accounts window lists all social network providers that provide Outlook

Social Connector add-ins.

4. If you don’t see the provider you want, click

More

to open the Outlook Social Connector web page.

You may have to restart Outlook to successfully complete the installation and may be prompted to download certain add-ins.

Connect to a social network

You need to log in to your social network add-in through

Outlook once you’ve added downloaded the add-in.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Account Settings

.

3. Select the check box for the social network to which you wish to connect.

You will need to sign in to the social network using your user name and password.

Tip: To edit your log in information at any time, click the

Edit

button next to the social network in the Microsoft Outlook dialog box.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Download a social network provider add-in and use your account log in information to connect to that social network account.

Table 14-8: Available Social Network Providers as of

January 2013*

*View the Outlook Social Network Provider Listing Web page for the most current list of social network providers.

Click to edit your login information.

Click to disconnect from a social network account.

Figure 14-8: Manage your social network accounts in the

Microsoft Outlook dialog box.

Your Organization’s Name Here 261

Advanced Topics

4. Enter any credentials necessary to log in and click the

Connect

button.

Outlook verifies your credentials and connects you to the social network.

5. Click the

Finish

button.

6. Click the

Close

button.

The Microsoft Outlook dialog box closes.

Disconnect from a social network

If you don’t want to view updates from a particular site, you can disconnect from a social network.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Account Settings

.

The Microsoft Outlook dialog box appears.

3. Click the

Remove

button next to the social network from which you wish to disconnect.

A dialog box appears warning you that not only will information no longer be shared between Outlook and the social network, but also previously downloaded information will be deleted.

4. Click

Yes

.

You are now disconnected from the social network.

You can reconnect at any time.

Figure 14-9: Successful connection to social network account

Figure 14-10: When you disconnect from a social network, you will lose information about your contacts.

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Advanced Topics

Using the Outlook Social

Connector

The Outlook Social Connector lets you view information about your contacts and add contacts to your social network without leaving Outlook.

View social network updates in Outlook

You can view information about contacts, including those you are connected to via a social networking site, using the People Pane.

Click the

Mail

button on the Navigation Bar and select the item you would like to view.

Information about your contact appears in the People

Pane at the bottom of the Reading Pane. Click a tab to view specific information about a contact, such as a list of Email messages they have sent you. See

Table 14-8: People Pane Tabs, for more information about what the People Pane can display.

Other Ways to View Social Network Updates:

Open an Email message or calendar item. The

People Pane displays at the bottom of the item window.

Invite a contact to a social network

You can invite any of your Outlook contacts to join your social network without ever leaving Outlook.

1. Click the contact name and click the

Open Contact

Card

arrow.

The contact card appears.

2. Click the

Ellipsis (…)

button and then select

Add to a Social Network

.

A list of your selected social networks is displayed.

3. Click the relevant social network and click

Continue

.

An Email is sent to the contact asking him or her to connect with you on the selected social network.

Exercise

Exercise File:

None required.

Exercise:

Add a contact to your social network.

Carly James

Carly James - Calendar

Nadine Miller

Carly James ([email protected]) has invited you to view his or her Calendar. Click the Open button above.

Carly James - Calendar

Carly James

Figure 14-11: The People Pane appears at the bottom of the Reading Pane and any social network updates will appear in this pane.

Carly James

Figure 14-12: In the expanded Contact Card, click the ellipsis button to add this contact to your social network.

Table 14-9: People Pane Tabs

ALL

WHAT’S NEW

MAIL

Displays Email, meetings, and other activity for the contact.

Displays news feed updates and

RSS articles about the contact.

Displays Email messages that you have received from the contact.

ATTACHMENTS

Displays attachments you have received from the contact.

MEETINGS

Displays meetings requests from the contact.

Your Organization’s Name Here 263

Advanced Topics

Hide the People Pane

If the constant status updates are distracting you, hide the

People Pane.

1. Click the

View

tab on the Ribbon and click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group.

A list of options appears.

2. Select

Off

.

The People Pane closes.

Tip: To display the People Pane again, click the

People Pane

button in the People Pane group and select

Normal

or

Minimized

.

Figure 14-13: Turning the People Pane off.

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

A d v a n c e d T o p i i c s

R e v i i e w

Quiz Questions

1.

How can you tell if you can subscribe to an RSS feed on a page?

A. The RSS button above that page is highlighted in orange.

B. You are able to Email a link to that page.

C. There is an RSS Stamp of Approval somewhere on the Web page.

D. The Web page appears on the list in Outlook's Account Settings.

2.

What should you do if you wish to stop receiving RSS notifications but want to keep the ones you have already received?

A. In Account Settings, click the RSS Feeds tab, select the feed, and click the Remove button.

B. In the Folder Pane, expand the RSS Feeds folder, select the feed, and click the Delete button.

C. In Internet Explorer, click the RSS Feeds button and press <Delete>.

D. Drag the RSS Feeds folder into the Recycle bin.

3.

You’ve just received an Email from someone you want to add to your Contacts list. What's the fastest way to do this?

A. Click the Contacts button in the Navigation Bar, click the Home tab on the Ribbon, click the New Contact button on the in the New group, and manually enter the contact.

B. Select the Email and press <Ctrl> + <A>.

C. Drag the Email to the Contacts button in the Navigation Bar.

D. Select the Email, click the Home tab on the Ribbon, click the New Items button, and select Contacts.

4.

When you use Outlook Web App, you can only access your Outlook account from:

A. The computer you installed Outlook Web App on.

B. Computers that have been approved by your administrator.

C. Computers that are running Outlook 2013.

D. Computers with Internet access.

5.

Mail, Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks folders are all available in Outlook Web App. (True or False?)

6.

Downloading a social network provider add-in automatically connects you to that social network. (True or False?)

7.

Which of the following can you NOT view in the People Pane?

A. Status updates from the contact.

B. Emails you have received from the contact.

C. The names of everyone in the contact’s social network.

D. Attachments the contact has sent you.

Your Organization’s Name Here 265

Quiz Answers

1.

A. If the RSS button above a Web page is highlighted in orange, you can subscribe to the feed on that page.

2.

A. If you wish to stop receiving RSS notifications but keep the ones you have already received, click the RSS Feeds tab in Account Settings, select the feed, and click the Remove button.

3.

C. You can add an Email sender to your Contacts List by dragging any Email from them to the Contacts button in the

Navigation Bar.

4.

D. When you use Outlook Web App, you can only access your Outlook account from computers with Internet access.

5.

True. Mail, Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks folders are all available in Outlook Web App.

6.

False. After you download a social network provider add-in, you must connect to the social network.

7.

C. You cannot view the names of everyone else in the contact’s social network from the People Pane.

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© 2013 CustomGuide, Inc.

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