NOTICE OF MEETING

NOTICE OF MEETING
NOTICE OF MEETING
This notice is to confirm that a meeting of the Program and Human Resources Committee
w ill be held on:
Monday, February 19, 2007
commencing at 7:00 p.m.
in the Board Committee Room, Education Centre
156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario
The agenda and supporting documents for this meeting are attached to this notice.
Jim Williams
Chair, Program & Human Resources Committee
Rob McGall
Superintendent of Human Resources
Teaching
Dave Rutherford
Superintendent of Human Resources
Non-teaching
Jan Montgomery
Superintendent of Education
Committee Members:
Jim Williams, Thelma Goodfellow, Mary Hall, Dwayne Inch, Harry
Marissen, Carl Pitman
REVISED
Program and Human Resources Committee
PUBLIC AGENDA
February 19, 2007 - 7:00 p.m.
Section
Item
Report
No.
A
Call to Order
Resp.
Delegations / Presentations
Approval of Agenda
Approval of Minutes: Regular Meeting January 22, 2007
B
A-1
Recommendations
Policy Amendment - C9 section 7.1 - Conditions of
Employment
B-1
RM/DR
B-2
KS
C-1
RM
Project Plan - J. Rogers
C-2
JM
Special Education Organizational Chart
C-3
JM
7:00 pm
International Student Program Report - R. Harris
C
Information
7:15 pm
Leading the Way - M. Prendergast
7:30 pm
Ontario Psychological Association (OPA) Student Assessment
D
Correspondence
None
Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: March 19, 2007
Program and Human Resources Committee
PUBLIC MOTIONS AND REPORTS
February 19, 2007
Report No. & Name
Info.
Motion
Decision
X
That the agenda be approved.
A-1: Approval of
Minutes
X
That the minutes of the public session of the
regular Program & Human Resources Committee
meeting re-scheduled to January 22, 2007 be
approved.
B-1: Amendment to
Policy C-9
X
That the Program and Human Resources
Committee recommend that the Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board amend
policy C-9 with the removal of section 7.0(i) under
“Conditions of Employment” as contained in the
Program and Human Resources Committee
public session report no. B-1 dated February 19,
2007.
B-2: International
Student Program
That the Program and Human Resources
Committee recommend that the Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board continue
with the International Student Program through
an implementation pilot year for 2007-2008 with
recommended changes as contained in the
Program and Human Resources Committee
public session report no. B-2 dated February 19,
2007.
C-1: Leading the
Way - Leadership
Guide
X
For information only.
C-2: Ministry of
Education/Ontario
Psychological
Association (OPA)
Project
X
For information only.
C-3: Special
Education Services:
2006-2007
Organization
x
For information only.
Report No. A-1
Page 1
February 19, 2007
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of the
Program & Human Resources Committee
From: Rob McGall, Superintendent of Human Resources - Teaching
Dave Rutherford, Superintendent of Human Resources - Non-teaching
Re:
Approval of Minutes
Purpose:
To approve the minutes of the public session of the regular Program & Human Resources
Committee meeting re-scheduled to January 22, 2007.
Background:
n/a
Current Situation:
n/a
Appendices:
-
public meeting minutes - January 22, 2007
Recommendation:
Moved:
Seconded:
That the minutes of the public session of the regular Program & Human
Resources Committee meeting re-scheduled to January 22, 2007 be approved.
Respectfully submitted,
Rob McGall
Superintendent of Human Resources - Teaching
Dave Rutherford
Superintendent of Human Resources - Non-teaching
Jan Montgomery
Superintendent of Education
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PROGRAM AND HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES
January 22, 2007
Present:
T. Goodfellow, M. Hall, D. Inch, H. Marissen, C. Pitman, J. Williams
Regrets:
Resource:
R. McGall, J. Montgomery, D. Rutherford, D. Fox, K. Soule
Minutes:
J. Newman
Note: Due to inclement weather, the regular meeting scheduled for January 15, 2007 was
cancelled and re-scheduled for January 22, 2007 at 5:00 p.m.
Delegations/Presentations
None
Approval of the Agenda
Moved:
Seconded:
H. Marissen
T. Goodfellow
That the agenda be approved.
Carried
Recommendations
Supervisory Officer’s Retirement
Director Soule presented a board report to acknowledge the retirement of David Fox and to
authorize the director of education to post for a superintendent of education with duties to begin
as soon as possible and no later than April 2007.
Moved:
Seconded:
D. Inch
T. Goodfellow
That the Program and Human Resources Committee recommend that the
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board acknowledge, with regret, the
resignation to retirement of Superintendent David Fox effective August 31, 2007
as outlined in the Program and Human Resources Report No. B-1, dated January
15, 2007.
Carried
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Program and Hum an Resources Com m ittee
Public Session Minutes - January 22, 2006
Moved:
Seconded:
Page 2
H. Marissen
T. Goodfellow
That the Program and Human Resources Committee recommend that the
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board authorize the director of
education to post for the position of superintendent of education with duties to
begin as soon as possible and no later than April 2007.
Carried
Information
Curriculum Services: Organization Structure Overview
Superintendent McGall presented an organizational chart and provided a quick overview of the
Curriculum Services team for the 2006-2007 school year. This information was presented as
an information item for the benefit of new trustees on the Program and Human Resources
Committee.
Student Achievement Improvement Plan
Superintendent McGall provided an update on the Student Achievement Improvement Plan for
the 2006-2007 school year as it relates to the System Strategic Plan. Superintendent McGall
reviewed goals, and pointed out key initiatives for the benefit of new trustees on the Program
and Human Resources Committee.
Superintendent McGall and Superintendent Rutherford provided an update on changes taking
place in their current portfolios as a result of the new senior administration structure.
Adjournment: 6:23 p.m.
Report No. B-1
Page 1
February 19, 2007
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of the
Program and Human Resources Committee
From: Rob McGall, Superintendent of Human Resources - Teaching
Dave Rutherford, Superintendent of Human Resources - Non-teaching
Re:
Amendment to Policy C9
Purpose:
To approve an amendment to Policy C9 removing the requirement for every prospective
employee to complete a tuberculin skin test and/or x-ray.
Background:
On October 18, 2006 Policy/Program Memorandum (PPM) No. 77 was revoked by the Ministry
of Education. With the removal of this Memorandum there is no longer a requirement to test
Ontario’s teachers or workers in a school for tuberculosis prior to employment.
Current Situation:
In January 2007 the Board received a letter from the Hastings and Prince Edward Counties
Health Unit officially notifying the Board that they will no longer be doing tuberculosis screening
for school staff as a condition of employment. Prior to making the above decision the Health
Unit consulted with the Tuberculosis Control Unit at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.
They were supportive of the decision to stop tuberculosis screening and it was their
recommendation that all public health units in Ontario discontinue the practice. As a result
there is a need for the Hastings and Prince Edward D.S.B. to update the conditions of
employment.
Appendices:
- Policy C-9, section 7.0 (i)
- Ministry of Health Long-Term Care Memo to Medical Officers of Health
- Notification letter from Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Health Unit
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Report No. B-1
Page 2
February 19, 2007
Recommendation:
Moved:
Seconded:
That the Program and Human Resources Committee recommend that the
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board amend policy C-9 with the
removal of section 7.0(i) under “Conditions of Employment” as contained in the
Program and Human Resources Committee public session report no. B-1 dated
February 19, 2007.
Respectfully submitted,
Rob McGall
Superintendent of Human Resources - Teaching
Dave Rutherford
Superintendent of Human Resources - Non-teaching
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Report No. B-2
Page 1
February 19. 2007
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of the
Program and Human Resources Committee
From: Kathy Soule, Director of Education
Re:
International Student Program
Purpose:
To approve a recommendation regarding future direction of the International Student Program.
Background:
The International Student Program (ISP) has been in place for five years, growing from initially
four secondary students to over 140 elementary and secondary students, plus three ESL
camps varying in length from two to eight weeks. In late May, 2006, a change of management
of the program occurred as Ron Harris, a secondary principal, replaced Jackie St Pierre as the
manager of the program. Questions about the size of the program, the appropriate age range
of ISP students, management practices and how the ISP fits into the overall structure and
operation of the Board, its financial viability and thus, should it continue, led to the initiation of a
program review. This report is the result of that review.
Program Overview
In today’s global world it is becoming increasingly important that individuals understand and
learn how to interact with other cultures. This program provides that opportunity for our
students to experience and appreciate diversity.
The program is managed by 4 staff: a manager/principal, two homestay coordinators and one
secretary. Currently there are 117 secondary students and 24 elementary students who pay
$11,000 tuition per year. Each student lives with one of our 125 host families while studying
with us. The host family provides a caring family environment, a private room, 3 meals a day
and basic necessities. The $700 per month each family is paid to cover their expenses results
in close to $1,000,000 being injected into the community.
Four secondary schools and 8 elementary schools currently host the students. These schools
are given a gift of $500 per student. Two itinerant elementary teachers provide 1 hour a day of
ESL instruction to the students. At the secondary level four teaching sections are added to
each of the four schools; two for ESL instruction and two for guidance support. The ISP covers
the costs of the these additional supports.
Camps for elementary aged students are held two times during the year. Winter camps host
students for a three or seven week period during January and February. This year 37 students
were hosted by eight elementary schools. A summer camp of two weeks duration is held
during July and August. Camps allow a broader range of students to be exposed to another
culture, provide an additional source of revenue and a recruiting source for full-time students.
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Report No. B-2
Page 2
February 19. 2007
Current Situation:
The program review involved an examination of all components of the program as well as
development of recommendations to ensure that the ISP is consistent with the system strategic
plan and is supportive of the system direction. This current year has been one of consolidation
as several areas of the program have been addressed with the following results:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Purpose of program clarified and aligned with the System’s AIM goals
Budget developed that allows the program to contribute resources to the system
Contractual/legal obligations clarified and addressed.
Admission criteria re-established for only grades 7 to 12
Management practices aligned with Board practices: Contract employment of English
as a Second Language (ESL) teachers, accounting, student information management.
Overdue accounts favourably resolved.
Improved information and support provided for teachers and homestay parents
Financial Status
Current:
ISP students currently pay $11,000 tuition and $7000 for homestay. In the past, returning
students and families with multiple students have been given a $1000 discount. Hosting
schools were provided with $1000 per student.
To ensure self-sufficiency for the current school year, 2006 -2007,expenditures have been
adjusted and a more aggressive and diversified recruiting campaign initiated to bring revenue
and expenditures in line. Gifts to schools have been reduced to $500 per student and
recruitment efforts have resulted in near capacity numbers. Other budget items were adjusted
to support a balanced budget and to ensure that teaching staff have received training
appropriate to second language learners.
Next Steps:
This school year, 2007 - 2008, will be viewed as an implementation year. Tuition fees will be
$12,000, with discounts discontinued for newly acquired students. Target student numbers are
120 secondary and 25 elementary (grade 7 and 8). The changes from this current year and
proposed for next year will result in a more positive and efficient organization and a clear
financial gain for the Board (see Appendix A). Additional benefits to the Board will include
additional staff, additional resources and teacher training. Students will be exposed to more
diversity as additional countries are represented.
2007 - 2008 and beyond:
The graduation of students who entered prior to 2007 and replacement by students not eligible
for discounts would result in the profit to General Revenue increasing to $100,000 per year.
The other financial supports and enhancements listed would continue for a total support value
of $260,000.
A number of new schools have expressed an interest in hosting students for short term and
long term studies to realize the goals of the program for their students. As there is great
demand from other countries for this type of program, expansion is feasible and would generate
additional revenue to the Board.
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Report No. B-2
Page 3
February 19. 2007
Summary
The International Student Program has gone through a review and re-alignment during the
2006 -2007 school year. These changes, and the implementation of recommendations, will
result in increased student understanding and appreciation of diverse cultures, a more efficient
program, and a clear financial gain for the Board.
Appendices:
Appendix A - Summary
Appendix B - Countries of Origin
ISP Budget 2007-2008
Recommendation:
Moved:
Seconded:
That the Program and Human Resources Committee recommend that the
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board continue with the International
Student Program through an implementation pilot year for 2007-2008 with
recommended changes as contained in the Program and Human Resources
Committee public session report no. B-2 dated February 19, 2007.
Respectfully submitted,
Kathy Soule, Director of Education
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
APPENDIX A
SUMMARY
2005 - 2006
2006 - 2007
2007- 2008
2008 - 2009
Review and Consolidation
Pilot
Enhancem ent
undefined
defined, articulated with
som e support
articulated, fully supported
articulated, fully supported
No. of Students
110
141
144
144+
No. of Schools
12
13
15
15+
$11,000/yr
$1000 discounts for
returning and siblings
$11,000/yr
$1000 discounts for
returning and siblings
$12,000
no discounts
$12,000
no discounts
$200
$200
$250
$250
$650 -> $700/m onth
$700/m onth
$700/m onth
$700+/m onth
Basic Hom estay Guide
Hom estay Guide with
Cultural Profiles
Resource Book for
Schools with ESL students
Guide for Teachers with
ESL Students
Refinem ent of Resource
docum ents
Refinem ent of resource
Docum ents
$1000/student
$500/student
$500/student
$500/student
$100,000
$68,750
$72,000
$72,000+
Source Countries
8
9
12
14
Revenue to Board
undeterm ined
$0
$70,000
$100,000
$100,000
School Gifts $100,000
$75,000
School Gifts $68750
$220,000
Profit to Gen. Revenue
$68,000
Support for Elementary
Staffing $75,000
Teacher Training $5000
School Gifts $72,000
$250,000
Profit to Gen. Revenue
$100,000
Support for Elementary
Staffing $75,000
Teacher Training $3000
School Gifts $72,000
Program status
Purpose
Tuition Fees
Homestay Placem ent
Hom estay Fees
Resource Docum ents
Gift to Schools
Total Gifts to Schools
Total invested in
system
Teacher training $5000
Resources $1250
APPENDIX B
COUNTRIES of ORIGIN
COUNTRY
2006 - 2007
2007- 2008
2008 - 2009
KOREA
51
43
38
JAPAN
30
25
25
TAIWAN
7
8
8
HONG KONG
22
18
18
CHINA
26
25
23
MEXICO
1
5
5
BRASIL
4
5
8
UNITED STATES
1
1
0
GERMANY
1
8
10
RUSSIA
4
4
CZECH REPUBLIC
0
2
VENEZUALA
1
1
COLUMBIA
1
KASTISTAN
1
TOTAL
143
143
144
Report No. C-1
Page 1
February 19, 2007
Decision
To:
Information X
The Chair and Members of the
Program & Human Resources Committee
From: Rob McGall, Superintendent of Education and Human Resources
Michael Prendergast, System Principal
Re:
Leading the Way - Leadership Guide
Purpose:
To provide an overview of the new leadership document “Leading the Way, A Guide for
Developing and Supporting Leaders”.
Current Situation:
The Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board is committed to providing all employees
with opportunities to enhance and practice their leadership knowledge and skills.
In alignment with our Strategic Plan Document “Achievement in Motion for Student Success”,
the attached Leadership Guide has been developed as a starting point to consolidate
information regarding leadership development for all employees.
While currently the document has a stronger emphasis on leadership development
opportunities for teaching staff, there are plans to develop the document further to include more
opportunities available for non-teaching staff.
Appendices:
- Leadership Guide “Leading the Way”
Recommendation:
For information only.
Respectfully submitted,
Rob McGall
Superintendent of Education and Human Resources
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Leadership Guide
Leading the Way
A Guide for Developing
and Supporting Leaders
Winter 2007
LEADING THE WAY
Vision
To provide excellent education which
prepares our students to meet global
challenges in a changing world.
AiM—Achievement in Motion
for Student Success
The HPEDSB strategic
plan
The Hastings and Prince Edward District
School Board serves students of Hastings
and Prince Edward counties. As a service
organization, the Board is committed to
providing a safe and supportive learning
environment for students and employees.
AiM—Achievement in Motion for Student
Success, 2005–2009, affirms the Board’s
support to provide programs and services to
help all students and employees reach their
full potential. AiM was developed
cooperatively with trustees, employees,
students and community members.
Five key goals will be the focus for 2005–
2009:
• Success for All Students
• System of Character
• Employee Excellence
• Open Communication
• Community Relationships
Embedded in each goal are focused and
measurable action plans and action steps.
These will be reviewed and evaluated
annually.
Each goal is championed by a member of
senior administration who leads a team
representing students, employees, parents
and the community. Through AiM we
recognize that incredible things can happen
when we are open to possibilities.
For more details visit: www.hpedsb.on.ca
Educational leadership overview
Our vision of educational leadership
•
•
Empowering life long-learners who strive for excellence for all.
Quality leaders exhibit a passion and commitment to learning,
excellence and community.
Our commitment to educational leadership
The Hastings and Prince Edward District School board is committed to
providing employees with opportunities to enhance and practice their
leadership knowledge and skills. This enables the system to respond
successfully to the changes and challenges of our profession. The
educational leadership program is intended to provide both
philosophical and practical direction in order to support staff in their
professional growth and guide those who are interested in enhancing
their educational leadership abilities. This leadership development is
crucial to achieving excellence within HPEDSB.
Overview of the leadership process
Dimensions of Leadership and the Leadership Profile are frameworks
for staff to use in a self-assessment process regarding areas of
strength and areas requiring development.
Dimensions of Leadership
Dimensions of Leadership provides an holistic and philosophical
approach to the topic of leadership within education.
The dimensions are used by aspiring leaders who are seeking
opportunities to become:
• Secondary department heads
• Elementary or secondary vice-principals
• Coordinators at the district level
• Department managers
• Roles within the administrative support group
Supervisors may use the document in the application process to
determine candidate readiness for leadership roles. The dimensions
can be used for the development of your professional portfolio.
Leadership Profile
The Leadership Profile is more comprehensive than Dimensions of
Leadership and was developed using a wide research base. It has
been refined and modified with reference to other models in a variety
of education, government and corporate organizations.
Five competencies are identified to organize and describe effective
leadership practices for all employee groups, including both teaching
and non-teaching staff. Each competency contains a variety of related
competencies which identify successful leadership practices and the
characteristics that contribute to superior achievement as leaders.
The performance indicators that follow describe three levels of
performance relevant to the specific competency. The Leadership
Profile is used as an evaluative tool for both formative and summative
appraisals for leaders who are currently elementary or secondary
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
1
LEADING THE WAY
Leadership roles for
educators
The classroom leader
Each school recognizes the work of
classroom leaders by facilitating the sharing
of proven instructional techniques which
enhance student achievement. At the district
level, HPEDSB provides many opportunities
for classroom leaders to share expertise with
their colleagues.
Within schools there are opportunities for
individuals to extend and refine skills and
knowledge, and demonstrate leadership
potential. In addition, these opportunities
may carry with them directions that relate to
the career path of participants, noting
particularly the skills to be learned and the
possible next steps required in the
acquisition of a formal position of added
responsibility.
administrators and senior administrators. It is also used by supervisors
as a reference of experienced leaders who are looking for
advancement in their positions (vice-principal to principal, principal to
supervisory officer). Each level reflects a progression in the level of
complexity performance creates opportunities for the professional
growth. For complete details please refer to Appendix A.
The following are examples of activities that may be considered as inservice roles for those aspiring to leadership positions. It is recognized
that these positions or activities are leadership roles in themselves and
need not be considered as training steps for another leadership
position.
School level
•
Associate teacher
•
Principal-designate
•
Committee chairperson
•
Representative on a school committee
•
Curriculum key teacher
•
Representative on a school improvement team
•
Department head-secondary
•
Representative on a staffing committee
•
Divisional leader in elementary
•
Steward or federation representative
•
Information technology site administrator
•
Lead teacher (Ministry of Education initiative)
•
Teacher representative on a school council
•
Mentor or coach
District level
“We are now at a point
where we must educate
our children in what no
one knew yesterday, and
prepare our schools for
what no one knows yet.”
– Margaret Mead
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
•
Coordinator in Curriculum Services, Special Education
Services or Information and Technology Services
•
Special events coordinator
•
Curriculum Services writing team
•
District-level committee member
•
Federation, council or association member
•
Workshop or in-service facilitator
2
LEADING THE WAY
Formal positions of
added responsibility
The Hastings and Prince Edward District
School Board recognizes the formal
positions of added responsibility as
described on the right-hand side of this page.
HPEDSB has appointed leaders to serve in
these capacities.
For each of these positions, the criteria noted
will help to measure your own strengths and
areas for improvement and will help direct
your career path. In addition, these criteria
form the basis for the selection process to be
used in appointing individuals to formal
positions of added responsibility within
HPEDSB.
School level
• Department head
• Teacher in charge
• Principal
• Vice-principal
District level
• Coordinator in Curriculum Services, Special Education Services or
Information and Technology Services
• Vice-principal or principal
• Special project assignment, i.e., system principal
• Superintendent – education or administration
• Director of education
“My interest is in the future,
because I am going to spend
the rest of my life there.”
– Charles F. Kettering
Criteria
• Understanding the job
• Academic and professional qualifications to do the job
• Personal qualities that would support success in the job
• Experience and preparation to do the job
• Evidence of excellent performance in present and past roles,
demonstrated ability to perform the job
More information is available on the HPEDSB at Leadership Connect:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/hrss/leadership.connect/
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
3
LEADING THE WAY
Introduction to growth
opportunities
From time-to-time, you may be provided
with opportunities to serve in training
experiences and to practice leadership skills.
Some will be self-directed while others will
result from counselling by mentors and
selection teams. If you are looking for such
an opportunity, you are encouraged to focus
on activities that relate to specific personal
and professional development gaps within
the context of further developing leadership
skills and/or career goals. The following list
is intended as a guide, and is not exhaustive.
Growth opportunities
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Action research
Community service
Continuing education
External presentations
Facilitation of leadership development through partnering with a
school in the other panel (i.e., job shadowing, cross-panel
committees, mentoring with an administrator in the opposite panel)
International exchange
Mentoring or coaching
Provincial experiences (secondment to community service such as
the Ministry of Education or EQAO marking)
Community service
•
Membership and/or voluntary service in outside agencies,
programs and community organizations
Continuing education
•
•
•
AQ courses, Masters, Doctorate, Supervisory Officers
Qualification Program
Training courses (i.e., mediation, safe schools, legal issues)
Action research project studies
External presentations
•
•
•
•
Presentations to outside agencies, programmes and organizations
Presenter at the Ontario Principals’ Council or Ontario Public
Supervisory Officials’ Association
Eastern Ontario Staff Development Network conferences
Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario or Ontario Secondary
School Teachers’ Federation conferences
Provincial experience
•
•
•
•
Secondment to the Ministry of Education, Ontario College of
Teachers or post-secondary institutions
EQAO marking
Curriculum or course writing
Committee work at the provincial level
Adult education
•
•
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
Centres, college, or university course work or presentations
Ministry of Education ABQ instructor
4
LEADING THE WAY
Leadership development
workshops for teachers
and administrators
The annual leadership workshops for
educators offer an opportunity for new and
experienced teachers to develop collegial
relationships of growth and support. Each
session allows for professional development,
discussion around current issues, question
and answer dialogue, and examination of
real or simulated situations to improve
problem-solving and decision-making.
This program is a very positive, dynamic
and affirming opportunity for personal
growth. The program supports both group
and one-on-one mentorship approaches with
school level administrators.
“Arriving at one goal is the
starting point to another.”
– John Dewey
Leadership Development Services
Individuals in the Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
who, through the process of self-identification and/or supervisory
identification of strengths and skills (performance appraisal), may
participate in a number of leadership development opportunities
offered by the board.
Throughout the self-identification period, a candidate is encouraged to:
• Become more familiar with the qualities and competencies
required for an exemplary leader
• Seek leadership opportunities within the school and/or district
• Work informally with a mentor or coach
• Pursue opportunities in the leadership development program
The board programs are designed to meet the differing needs of future
and current leaders. Participation in this program is considered an
asset.
More information is available on the HPEDSB at Leadership Connect:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/hrss/leadership.connect/
Leadership programs
The following are leadership programs designed to assist individuals in
developing strong leadership skills:
• Introduction to developing leadership capacity
• Effective practices for school administrators
• Leadership training
• Professional reading program or book clubs
• Mentoring or coaching
• Principal or vice-principal mentorship
• Learning groups
• Book clubs
“A mind stretched to a new
idea never goes back to its
original dimensions.”
– Oliver Wendell Holmes
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
5
LEADING THE WAY
Aspiring leader programs
Experienced leadership programs
•
•
DEVELOPING LEADERSHIP
CAPACITY: These sessions provide
the newly appointed administrators
within the district with a focus and
additional reference to current
research and government initiatives.
These sessions are intended to
introduce participants to new trends
and innovations in leadership and
provide the opportunity for further
networking.
•
COACH FOR A DAY: This structure
provides a new or novice
administrator with the opportunity for
a retired administrator to job shadow
and dialogue with, when appropriate,
throughout the school year. This may
be used during times of new
experiences such as the beginning of
the school year, to assist with budget
deliberations, or prior to the annual
IPRC dates.
•
BOOK CLUBS: These sessions offer current literature relevant to
leadership roles and responsibilities. The book list has included:
Crucial Conversations by Patterson, Grenny, McMillan and
Switzer; and Harbors of Hope by Hulley and Dier. A goal of book
clubs is to provide time to converse with colleagues about
current issues.
New/novice leadership
programs
•
LEARNING EXTENSIONS: This structure provides current leaders
with an enhanced opportunity for leadership at the district and
provincial levels. Past projects include: teacher mentoring, book
clubs, character education and provincial OPC executive
responsibilities. Participants have the opportunity to establish
broader networks and to learn system and provincial procedures
and policies.
Teacher mentoring
• This is a formal process to provide the
opportunity to work collaboratively
with a colleague in order to acquire
skills and knowledge necessary to
prepare for a position of added
responsibility.
•
201 SESSIONS: These sessions address the needs of
experienced administrators looking to develop knowledge and
skills in school improvement planning, effective instruction, data
management, professional learning communities and other
effective school practices.
“Vision is the art of seeing
things invisible.”
– Jonathan Swift
101 SESSIONS: This structure has been
designed to provide presentation and
dialogue time for new administrators
to learn exemplary practices from
their more experienced colleagues.
Topics have included teacher
performance appraisal; budget; school
improvement; school organization and
time-tabling and operational Issues.
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
6
LEADING THE WAY
Experienced leadership programs (continued)
•
MONTHLY ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY PRINCIPAL AND VICEPRINCIPAL MEETINGS AND DIRECTOR’S MEETINGS: These
meetings provide professional development to current
administrators. Program and cross-panel sessions focus on topics
such as character development, aligning school improvement
plans with budgets and school professional development plans;
school literacy plans, sharing of best practices around operational
issues for scheduling and supervision and differentiating
instruction. Meetings are focused on current issues, new policies
and procedures, and topics such as instructional leadership,
special education; student success initiatives.
•
LEARNING GROUPS: This structure is based on the need for like
culture schools to enter into professional dialogue on common
issues. Visiting and critiquing each others’ schools and practices
could be part of the conversation for continued growth.
•
MENTORING AND COACHING: New principals and vice-principals
are paired with experienced partners who converse on a regular
basis on current issues.
•
LEARNING EXTENSIONS: This structure provides current leaders
with an enhanced opportunity for leadership at the district and
provincial levels. Participants have the opportunity to establish
broader networks and to learn system and provincial procedures
and policies. An example would include participation in the
Experienced Principal’s Development ABQ course.
•
“We can talk or dream about
the glorious schools of the
future or we can create
them.”
– Marilyn Ferguson
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
PROFESSIONAL READING: Often throughout the school year,
individuals gather to discuss reading material that relates to topics
around leadership. The discussion occurs within the established
structures.
•
BOOK CLUBS: These sessions offer current literature relevant to
their role and responsibilities (Leading in A Culture of Change, The
Moral Imperative of School Leadership and Leadership and
Sustainability by Michael Fullan; Harbors of Hope by Hulley and
Dier; Whatever it Takes and On Common Ground by DuFour and
Eaker; The Literacy Principal by Booth and Rowsell). A goal of this
structure is provide time to dialogue with colleagues regarding
important current issues. Please refer to Appendix B for more
suggested reading.
7
LEADING THE WAY
Recruitment and selection
for succession planning
Selection process for vice-principals and
principals
SUCCESSION PLANNING: These sessions
The process begins with a district-wide job posting seeking qualified
applicants for vice-principal and principal positions in both the
elementary and secondary panels.
provide individuals with an opportunity to
engage in dialogue and better understand the
selection process.
Sessions include:
• Preparing the Curriculum Vitae
• Written Submission
• Portfolio
• Interview
It is also an opportunity to network with
other aspiring leaders.
A detailed application process consisting of the applicant’s résumé,
written submission, supervisor reference and two other professional
references (names and contact information only) must be included in
the resume package that each candidate submits. The interview
selection committee reviews this information. Applicants who are
successful at the interview selection committee stage move on to the
Interview stage.
Rubrics have been developed for each stage of the Dimensions of
Leadership process. The five dimensions are:
1. Vision
2. Teaching and Learning
3. School and System Management
4. Personal Professional Growth
5. Professional Development
The rubrics are described in detail within this report under the section
titled Dimensions of Leadership.
Dimensions of Leadership
The Dimensions of Leadership were developed to determine the levels
of performance of each administrative candidate. Measurable or
observable characteristics which predict effective workplace
performance include the knowledge, skills and behaviours that are
required now and in the future to achieve organizational objectives.
Completion of competency checklist by
immediate supervisor
All internal candidates who are applying for a leadership position must
have their immediate supervisor’s recommendation to proceed or the
package submitted by the candidate becomes void. The immediate
supervisor will assess the candidate to determine readiness to assume
a position of added responsibility. The supervisor will use the
Supervisor Reference Form as outlined in Appendix C (department
headships in secondary), D (vice-principal pool) or E (principal pool).
Candidates seeking promotion to the position of vice-principal or
principal must attain Level 2 in each of the five dimensions of
leadership within the Leadership Development document being
considered for an interview.
More information is available on the HPEDSB at Leadership Connect:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/hrss/leadership.connect/
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
8
LEADING THE WAY
Promotion to viceprincipal
Candidates making application for a position
of vice-principal will have:
• Experience as a teacher, system leader;
consultant or coordinator, department
head
• Other qualifications under Ministry of
Education regulations, such as
Principals’ Part 1 or currently enrolled
in Principals Part 1 and Part 2 of the
Principals’ Certification at the time of
appointment
• Proven leadership effectiveness
• Good standing with the Ontario College
of Teachers
• Recommendation by their immediate
supervisor
Promotion to principal
Candidates making application for the
position of principal will have:
• Experience as a vice-principal
• Principal qualifications in accordance
with Ministry of Education regulations
• Good standing with the Ontario College
of Teachers
• Proven leadership effectiveness at the
school level recommendation by their
immediate supervisor
Application to become an
academic supervisory
officer
Candidates making application for the
position will have:
• Experience as a vice-principal or
principal
• Supervisory Officer Qualifications in
accordance with Ministry of Education
regulations
• Good standing with the Ontario College
of Teachers
• Proven leadership effectiveness at the
school level
• Recommendation by their immediate
supervisor
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
Interview selection committee
The interview selection committee provides consistency in the
assessment of candidates who have been identified for consideration.
The committee determines an adequate number of candidates to
participate in the interview process.
Interview committee
The interview committee will also determine the individual candidates
to be recommended to the Board of Trustees for placement in the
approved vice-principal or pool, either elementary or secondary.
Debriefing
A debriefing at request of the leadership candidate will be provided for
candidates considered not yet ready. This debriefing will be conducted
by a member(s) of the interview selection committee. The debriefing
will include a recommendation to the candidates about required
professional development skills and the possible avenue to seek
growth in those skills.
Pool placement
After receiving Board approval, successful candidates will be placed
by senior administration, unranked, in the pool for a two-year period.
The two-year period commences upon Board approval. There will be
no carry-over from one school year to the next for individuals who
remain in the two-year pool of candidates who have not been placed in
a leadership position. The strength of the candidate(s) will be taken
into consideration when making a match with a school. Profiles
provided by school councils will be used to assist in the identification of
the individual needs of schools. Appointments of individuals out of the
pool and into schools will be reported to the Board of Trustees for
information purposes only. The number of candidates in the pool and
the frequency of opportunities will be determined by succession
planning needs. Opportunities for continued professional growth will be
provided to candidates in the pool within that two-year time frame.
9
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A
PERSONAL
INTERPERSONAL
EDUCATION
TEAMWORK
OPERATIONS
LEADERSHIP PROFILE
Leadership development is crucial to achieving excellence. This profile provides a framework of competencies for all staff to plan their professional growth which will result in continuous school and system
improvement. This profile is also used for preparing system leaders through professional growth planning and in the selection procedures for positions of added responsibility.
January 2001
*Adopted from TDSB model
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
10
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A – Leadership Profile
PERSONAL
Action orientation
Entry
•
The ability to translate concepts and/or
needs into concrete change processes.
•
•
Continuous growth
•
•
•
•
The practice of constantly challenging
one's own learning and risking new
behaviours to attain high levels of
performance and quality results.
Creativity
•
The incorporation of imagination and
innovation into the activities of the
workplace.
•
•
Equity perspective
•
A personal expression of fairness and
justice.
•
The application of forthrightness,
honesty, and ethics in relationships and
work.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Systems thinking
•
Integrity
Recognizes organizational needs, sets goals
and creates plans
Works to meet identified needs
Works to independently or with others as
needed
Identifies personal strengths and needs
Actively seeks opportunities to learn
Seeks feedback to improve performance
Encourages and supports others in their
professional growth
Practising
Exemplary
•
Acts decisively on own authority when timely
action is needed
Sets challenging goals to meet organizational
needs
Is persistent in overcoming obstacles
Takes initiative to enhance job results
Uses a variety of strategies to learn
Seeks and uses feedback from others
Works persistently toward agreed upon goals
despite opposition, distractions and setbacks
Supports and directs others in their professional
growth
Continuously reevaluates in order to optimize
resources
Exposes self to new ideas and trends
Reshapes ideas and information in new ways that
reveal new possibilities
•
Seeks to expand knowledge about human rights
issues
Encourages, models and expects equitable
behaviours
Challenges inequities, biases and stereotypes
•
•
Lives and works using a personal and
professional code of ethics
Demonstrates and encourages high standards of
honesty, integrity, trust and respect for others
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Makes extensive use of existing
information/resources for potential workplace
improvement
Encourages and incorporates others' ideas
Explores multiple solutions (logical, intuitive,
and innovative)
•
Treats people fairly, equitably (differentiates
between equity and equality) with dignity and
respect
Values others' perspectives and the importance
of diversity
Examines self for inequities and biases
Uses honest and direct communication
Makes promises he/she can keep
Admits and takes responsibility for mistakes
Abides by laws, regulations and policies
Protects confidential information
•
Works for the good of the whole (school,
system, community)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Applies systems thinking to improvement plans
The ability to see wholes and patterns
of inter-relationships when
implementing or effecting change.
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
•
11
Takes calculated risks to move initiatives
forward
Acts decisively even in uncertain difficult or
unpopular situations
Acts decisively and makes sound judgments
Anticipates opportunities to avoid problems
Models/coaches others to reach high levels of
achievement
Puts high priority on getting results and
displays accountability for these results
Anticipates personal and external obstacles
Fosters the idea that creativity and innovation
are part of a productive work environment and
everyone's job
Uses creative thinking as a basis for action in a
variety of situations
Nurtures and rewards innovation and creativity
in others
Is proactive in promoting equitable practices
Openly discusses and is comfortable dealing
with equity issues regarding the school,
workplace and society
Models/coaches equitable behaviours and
practices
Continuously evaluates own integrity
Exemplifies fairness and candour in staff
relations
Emulates the highest standard of personal and
professional behaviour
Actively addresses ethical issues
Engages in opportunities to influence systems
thinking
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A – Leadership Profile
INTERPERSONAL
Entry
Practising
Exemplary
Coaching
•
•
Shifts and adjusts language to suit audience and
purpose
Assesses the effectiveness of the coaching
•
Listens with the intent to understand
Adapts speaking and writing style to the target
audience and purpose
Establishes clear lines of communication within
the workplace
Communicates to others in a variety of contexts
(e.g., media)
Actively and creatively uses technology as a tool
for a variety of purposes
Anticipates conflicts and their cases, and is
proactive in seeking resolution
Deals with conflict collaboratively
Seeks to improve own conflict management style
Responds assertively to negative behaviours
•
Uses an analytical approach by considering
various factors involved
Analyzes/estimates probability and impact of
various factors
Involves others in decision making
Takes risks when appropriate and necessary
•
Identifies hidden aspects of the problems
Involves others in determining causes and
possible solutions
Willingly adopts an alternate perspective to
generate new and innovative solutions
•
•
Creates a climate of trust and respect in the
workplace
Establishes opportunities for the ongoing
exchange of ideas
•
•
A set of skills and techniques that
teach, promote reflection, and influence
decision-making and professional
behaviour.
Communications
The ability to inform and to be informed
using a variety of media.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Conflict management
•
The ability to solve interpersonal,
intra-group and inter-group differences.
•
•
Decision making
The ability to reach a firm conclusion or
resolution in a manner that is consistent
with the spirit and intent of governing
policies.
•
•
•
•
Problem-solving
•
•
The ability to analyse problems and
develop solutions.
•
Relationship building and
networking
•
•
•
The commitment to develop, maintain
and improve relationships with others
as individuals or groups.
Demonstrates effective communication skills
(listening, paraphrasing, reflecting feelings)
Builds rapport with others
Acknowledges different points of view
Monitors the impact of personal behaviours on
others
•
Listens actively
Articulates ideas/viewpoints clearly, concisely
and accurately
Makes clear and effective oral presentations
Prepares written responses
Uses technology as a communication tool
Respects confidentiality
•
•
Demonstrates effective attending skills
(listening, paraphrasing reflecting feelings,
reframing)
Understands personal conflict management
style
Mediates conflicts effectively
•
Recognizes when there is a need for a decision
to be make
Makes decisions in a fair and consistent
manner
Assumes responsibility for decisions and
commits to implementing them
Makes decisions with regard to data and other
influencing factors
Identifies problems
Articulates problem and determines likely
causes
Solves problems independently when
appropriate utilizing system goals, policies and
procedures
Treats people fairly and with respect
Is approachable
Is sensitive to the needs and concerns of
others
•
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
12
Works with others in the context of their values,
beliefs and styles
Uses coaching both effectively and
appropriately
Listens with the intent to understand and then
to be understood
Communicates information in innovative ways
Promotes and facilitates constant interchange
of ideas among colleagues
Elicits and utilizes feedback from others on an
ongoing basis
Models/coaches use of technology for a variety
of purposes
Models and coaches others in conflict
mediation/resolution processes
Works effectively with people with diverse
working styles n various tasks
Minimizes recurrent conflict
Recognizes when a collaborative/team
approach to decision making is appropriate
Anticipates emergent situations; plans and
does necessary preparation work
Manages and controls repercussions
Predicts possible future problem scenarios
Uses a collaborative/team approach to
determine possible causes and solutions
Applies problem-solving strategies to generate
creative solutions
Confronts issues rather than people
Acknowledges and values divergent points of
view
Establishes informal/formal groups to exchange
ideas and address mutual concerns
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A – Leadership Profile
TEAMWORK
Entry
Practising
Exemplary
Culture management
•
Understands the importance of workplace
culture
Identifies key elements e.g., norms, values,
traditions
Invites all to contribute to workplace success
•
Prioritizes elements of the workplace environment
as targets for change with respect to vision
Focuses on continuous improvement
Communicates high expectations
Encourages everyone to contribute to workplace
success
•
Works with others to assess and evaluate
development needs of staff
Provides orientation and training for staff
•
•
•
•
Provides ongoing training opportunities
Addresses employee performance problems
Prepares employees for advancement
Monitors all staff who display an interest in
leadership development
•
The ability to influence values, practices
and outcomes to create a rich and
rewarding learning environment or
productive workplace.
•
•
Staff growth and development
•
The ability to create conditions that
stimulate others to acquire and apply
knowledge and skills that translate into
changed behaviours to produce
increased performance and improved
results.
•
Team leadership
•
The understanding of team
requirements and the skills needed to
contribute to high-level team
performance.
Community involvement
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Works collaboratively with others to achieve a
common goal
Contributes actively and fully in team projects
Encourages team participation and manages
conflict
Values group facilitation skills
•
Participates in community level projects
•
•
•
A personal commitment to the
community beyond the school level.
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
•
•
•
•
Fosters cooperation, communication and
consensus among groups
Facilitates shared decision making
Facilitates the development and implementation
of clear and detailed work plans with teams
Knows when and how to use a team approach
•
Develops knowledge and skills about how
community
Organizations operate effectively
•
•
13
Utilizes highly collaborative approaches to
workplace improvement
Achieves continuous improvement using data
to assess results
Regularly reflects on progress and refines
goals and action plans to support continuous
improvement
Ensures that an employee development plan is
in place and working effectively so that
continuous growth of staff is evident
Encourages risk-taking and supports a variety
of strategies to improve performance and
development
Manages resources for growth for all staff
Represents and defends team decisions in
whole organization
Empowers others to initiate projects and
supports team efforts
Promotes positive relationships between the
community and the education system
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A – Leadership Profile
OPERATIONS
Entry
Practising
Exemplary
Financial management
•
Identifies funding requirements for own
activities and workplace projects
Meets the basic operational needs of
school/unit within established budget guidelines
Uses technology to access pertinent
information to make decisions
•
•
•
Bases decisions on comprehensive use of data
Engages staff in determining priorities for budget
Tracks and monitors expenses against budget to
ensure cost-effective resource management
Applies funds to school/unit priorities
Communicates budget plan and expenditures
•
Is aware of and implements relevant
requirements of various acts and regulations
(e.g. Environmental Protection Act,
Occupational Health and Safety Act)
Ensures that self and others follow employer
policies for safe work practices
Documents and reports all accidents and
incidents and conducts follow up processes as
required
•
Investigates all accidents and incidents
thoroughly; makes decisions and takes actions to
prevent accidents and incidents re-occurrence
Ensures that health and safety management
issues are priorities in staff training and
development
•
Consults others for direction and support in
policy application
Is aware of legal policy parameters that govern
human resource management
Ensures that each employee hired and
deployed has requisite skills for the job
Uses standard information technology to
access data
Obtains and manages information efficiently
Honours confidentiality where required
•
Implements the governing legislation and Board
policy requirements
Maintains and updates personal human resource
skills
•
Integrates information technology into the
workplace and uses it to solve business and
operations problems
Ensures staff are trained in information
management processes
Disseminates information effectively and
appropriately
Has in-depth knowledge of all areas of
responsibility with regard to plant management
Develops and uses a process for the solution of
concerns
Manages budget priorities for plant management
Negotiates a plan for plant improvement
•
The ability to produce and responsibly
manage budgets to satisfy the
operational needs of the unit and reflect
the school and system plans.
•
•
Healthy, safety and
environmental management
•
The ability to understand, create and
incorporate the requirements for a safe
and environmentally responsible
working and learning environment and
to integrate safety seamlessly within all
daily operations.
•
Human resource management
•
The effective use of systems to recruit,
train, deploy, retain, and promote staff
to optimize available human resources.
Information management
The application of technological tools to
manage information in order to enhance
learning and increase productivity.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Physical plant management
•
The process of ensuring that facilities
are safe, comfortable, and well
maintained.
•
Is aware of components of physical plant
management
Communicates specific concerns to appropriate
personnel
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
14
Partners with other organizations to generate
revenue, products or services
Implements a long term budgetary plan
consistent with the school/unit strategic plan
Capitalizes on the use of appropriate resources
to achieve optimum efficiency
Encourages and supports all staff in the quest
for zero accidents and incidents in all areas of
work
Thoroughly identifies documents and resolves
all safety obligations
Establishes performance goals and objectives
to measure and assess progress in all areas of
health and safety management
Mentors, empowers and supports staff in
performing human resource responsibilities
Uses human resource information systems
effectively to meet operational needs
Keeps up-to-date about recent innovations in
information technology
Accesses and uses state of the art application
and programs for optimal decisions
Coaches others in the collection, analysis and
use of data
Initiates collaborative actions and processes to
make significant positive change in one or more
areas of physical plant management
Places issues of plant management and
improvement within the context of a long term
plan
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix A – Leadership Profile
EDUCATION
Entry
Practising
Exemplary
Community development
•
•
•
•
The capacity to build inclusive school
communities in which all stakeholders
contribute to provide a nurturing
educational environment.
•
•
Special Education
The modification/accommodation of
curriculum expectations to meet the
needs of each student.
•
•
•
•
•
School improvement
•
•
The ability to apply a process of
managing change that is focussed on
improving student achievement and the
learning environment.
•
Curricular leadership
•
The ability to continuously improve and
deliver programs for improved student
learning, achievement and a sense of
accomplishment.
•
Is aware of parental and community opinions and
impact on school culture
Is knowledgeable about issues and available
community resources which address the social,
cultural, emotional and physical well-being of students
and staff
Provides parents and community with information
about the school and district board
Is knowledgeable about the demographic make-up of
the school community and sensitive to specific needs
Works effectively with school council
Identifies and monitors students who require Special
Education services
Uses specific Special Education resources to program
for all students
Uses best practices and shares practices with others
Engages in professional development to expand
instructional practices
Demonstrates continuous improvement in own practice
Demonstrates commitment toward success in
improving student achievement
Identifies areas for and commits to school-wide
improvement
Actively participates on school improvement teams
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Encourages the integration of current and new
research in teaching and learning
Uses Ministry policies, curriculum guidelines and Board
guidelines as the framework for all programs
Understands, recognizes and utilizes a variety of
teaching strategies to address various learning styles
Is familiar with models of teaching and promotes their
use
Integrates assessment with instructional expectations
and curriculum content
Ensures that a variety of curriculum-based assessment
and evaluation practices are used to monitor student
progress
Develops criteria to evaluate student performance
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
Involves parents and community when appropriate to
address the needs of the students and staff
Utilizes input from community sources, including school
council, when setting school goals
Maintains and improves communication between
school and community
Supports school culture that integrates community
norms and traditions
•
•
•
•
•
Encourages Special Education teachers to provide
leadership and professional development for other staff
Provides opportunities for professional development of
staff
Ensures individual program plans for Special Education
students are exemplary
Recognizes and supports best practices
Collects and analyses data with staff and the school
improvement teams to determine improvement needs
Sets specific goals and plans for improvement based
on Board and Ministry directions and local needs
Ensures that the budget, curriculum and staff
Development plans are aligned to school improvement
requirements
Reviews and reports progress and achievement to
staff, parents and community
Uses current research data to assess need for
curricular change
Articulates a personal vision and gives voice to a
shared vision to implement curricular change
Applies in a variety of ways the knowledge of how
students learn and how the teaching/learning process
impacts upon students
Meets regularly with leadership team regarding
curriculum issues
Assesses and identifies staff readiness for change
Directly supports teaching staff about curricular change
Is intentional about teaching staff about curricular
change, networks with the larger school community to
gain support
Recognizes and supports the match between
instructional strategy and curriculum content
Assesses staff training needs in instructional practices
Encourages staff to observe and share effective
practices from or within other schools or jurisdictions
Provides school-based opportunities to determine
expectations, benchmarks and evaluation policies
Fosters evaluation practices that empower students
Clarifies assessment and evaluation techniques and
policies with staff, students, and parents
Monitors assessment practices in the school
Manages assessment data effectively for school
improvement
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
15
Anticipates community reactions towards issues and
addresses concerns effectively
Fosters development of a school culture that
exemplifies equity and honours community diversity
Creates formal structures to involve the community,
e.g., school council and advisory committees, in setting
and achieving goals
Establishes community partnerships within
school/system programs to support the variety of
student/staff needs
Liaisons between the school and media effectively
Facilitates collaboration among system partners to
meet the needs of Special Education students
Ensures that school goals meet the needs of all
students
Ensures that school improvement governs the school
plan and critical resource allocation
Engages community members in the school
improvement plan
Initiates new and creative approaches for improved
results
Celebrates successes in the school and the community
Builds capacity for staff to assess and evaluate
capability for improvement
Provides opportunities for staff and community to
develop a shared vision
Markets the curricular change to ensure that the
community at large understands and supports the
innovation
Assesses impact of curricular change on students and
staff
Demands collegial relationships among disciplines and
divisions
Assesses the overall school program
Directly supports students and teachers as they develop
Continuous self-assessment skills insists that teachers
use a balanced approach to assessment strategies
Constantly ensures that teachers work together to
Develop, promote and refine consistent school and
system-wide standards
Compares local achievement against system
achievement
Ensures there is recognition and reward for excellence
Actively promotes a results-oriented culture
Ensures that staff and community meetings model
instructional strategies
Ensures that instructional practice is linked to curricular
expectations
Develops and supports curricular leaders
Ensures that instructional strategies that are being
implemented complement the school plan
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix B – Suggested readings
Booth, D., & Roswell, J. (2002) The Literacy Principal. Markham: Pembroke Publishers.
Eaker, R., DuFour, R., & Burnette, R. (2002). Getting started: Reculturing schools to become professional learning
communities. Bloomington, IN: National Educational Service.
Eaker, R., DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Karhanek, G. (2005). Whatever It Takes: How Professional Learning Communities
Respond When Kids Don’t Learn. Bloomington, IN: National Educational Service.
Eaker, R., DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eds. (2005). On Common Ground: The Power of Professional Learning Communities.
Bloomington, IN: National Educational Service.
Fullan, M. (2005). Leadership and Sustainability: System Thinkers in Action. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Fullan, M. (2001). Leading In a Culture of Change. San Fransisco: Josey – Bass Company.
Fullan, M. (2003). The Moral Imperative of School Leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA.: Corwin Press.
Hulley, W. & Dier, L. (2005). Harbors of Hope: The Planning for School and Student Success Process. Bloomington, IN:
National Educational Service.
Lezotte, L., & McKee, K. M. (2002). Assembly required: A continuous school improvement system. Okemos, MI: Effective
Schools Products, Ltd.
Lickona, T. (2004) Character Matter: How to Help Our Children Develop Good Judgement, Integrity, and Other Essesntail
Virtues. New York: Touchstone Books.
Marzanno. R. (2003) What Works in Schools: Translating Research Into Action. Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Schmoker, M. (1999). Results: The Key to Continuous School Improvement, 2nd Ed. Alexandria, VA: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Schmoker, M. (2001). The Results Fieldbook. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
16
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix C
Supervisor Reference Sheet for Applicant to the Department Headship
CONFIDENTIAL between the supervisor, applicant and interview team.
1.
2.
3.
Name of the employee for whom you are providing the reference: _______________
How long have you worked with the employee for whom you are providing the reference? __________If less than
one year, please refer to previous supervisor for input on referral sheet. Name of previous principal
____________and contact information if applicable ____________________________.
Prior to submitting this reference sheet, provide a copy to, and review this reference sheet with applicant.
DIMENSION
COMMENTS WITH EXAMPLES
VISION
The individual demonstrates the ability to work with
colleagues and the leadership team to develop the
school improvement plan.
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
TEAMWORK
The individual works with colleagues to support
improvement in student learning.
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
PROFESSIONAL GROWTH
The individual engages in ongoing professional
growth.
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
LEADERSHIP
The individual demonstrates leadership at the
department/school/system/OSSTF/community levels.
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
TEACHING AND LEARNING
The individual demonstrates the ability to assist
colleagues to implement effective
instructional/assessment strategies/programs which
promote pupil achievement and meet the needs of
different learners.
Please rate the readiness of this candidate to fulfil the tasks of a Teacher in Charge of an Organizational U nit as outlined
in Article 61.03.01 of the OSSTF Collective Agreement.
□ Satisfactory
□ Development needed
Name ________________________________ Signature of Supervisor ______________________ Date ____________
I, the applicant, have reviewed this reference sheet with the principal,
Signature of Applicant _______________________ Date____________
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
17
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix D
Supervisor Reference Sheet for Applicant to the Vice-Principal Pool
CONFIDENTIAL between the supervisor, applicant and interview team.
1.
2.
3.
Name of the employee for whom you are providing the reference: _______________
How long have you worked with the employee for whom you are providing the reference? __________If less than
one year, please refer to previous supervisor for input on referral sheet. Name of previous supervisor
____________ and contact information if applicable ____________________________.
Prior to submitting this reference sheet, provide a copy to, and review this reference sheet with applicant.
DIMENSION
COMMENTS WITH EXAMPLES
VISION
The individual demonstrates the ability to develop
and communicate a vision.
TEACHING AND LEARNING
The individual demonstrates the ability to use data to
implement effective strategies/programs to meet
needs of different learners.
SCHOOL/SYSTEM MANAGEMENT
The individual demonstrates the ability to manage
the organization, operations, and resources for a
safe and orderly learning environment.
PERSONAL/PROFESSIONAL GROWTH
The individual demonstrates the ability to reflect
upon one’s practice to set goals to further personal
professional growth.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The individual demonstrates the ability to plan and
implement professional development activities that
promote both individual staff and organizational
growth and lead to improved teaching and learning.
NOTE: Reference may be made to the Leadership Profile. For additional information you may wish to go to
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/hrss/leadership.connect/
Please rate the readiness of this candidate:
3. Exceeds Expectations_______
2. Meets Expectations _______
1. Needs Improvement _______
If giving less than a two (2), please provide written rationale.
Name ________________________________ Signature of Supervisor ______________________ Date ____________
I, the applicant, have reviewed this reference sheet with the principal,
Signature of Applicant _______________________ Date____________
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
18
LEADING THE WAY
Appendix E
Supervisor Reference Sheet for Applicant to Principal Pool
CONFIDENTIAL between the supervisor, applicant and interview team.
1.
2.
Name of the employee for whom you are providing the reference: _______________
How long have you worked with the employee for whom you are providing the reference __________If less than
one year, please refer to previous supervisor for input on referral sheet. Name of previous supervisor
_____________and contact information if applicable____________________________.
Prior to submitting this reference sheet, provide a copy to, and review this reference sheet with the applicant.
3.
COMPETENCIES
COMMENTS WITH EXAMPLES
9
9
9
TEAMWORK
Staff Growth & Development
Team Leadership
Community Involvement
9
9
INTERPERSONAL
Communication
Relationship Building and Networking
9
9
9
PERSONAL
Action Orientation
Equity Perspective
Integrity
9
9
EDUCATION
Curricular Leadership
School Improvement
9
9
OPERATIONS
Financial Management
Physical Plant Management
NOTE: Reference may be made to the Leadership Profile. For additional information you may wish to go to:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/hrss/leadership.connect/
Please rate the readiness of this candidate:
3. Exceeds Expectations _______
2. Meets Expectations _______
1. Needs Improvement _______
If giving less than two (2), please provide written rationale.
Name _____________________________ Signature of Supervisor___________________________ Date __________
I, the applicant, have reviewed this reference sheet with the principal,
Signature of Applicant ___________________________ Date___________
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
19
Report No. C-2
Page 1
February 19, 2007
Decision
To:
Information
X
The Chair and Members of the
Program and Human Resources Committee
From: Jan Montgomery, Superintendent of Education, Special Education Services
June Rogers, System Principal, Special Education Services
Re:
Ministry of Education / Ontario Psychological Association (OPA) Project
Purpose
To provide an update for trustees regarding the OPA Student Assessment Project Assessment Capacity Building.
Background
In June 2006 the Ministry announced a joint initiative with the Ontario Psychological
Association. Phase 1, initiated in September 2006, provided funding to school boards to assist
with the completion of professional assessments over the summer months and/or to be used
towards the development of an Assessment Capacity Building Plan. Hastings and Prince
Edward received $25,000. through Phase I which supported the completion of 110
assessments during the 2006 summer months.
Phase II, implementation of the project, provided boards with an opportunity to apply for
additional funding for the development of an Assessment Capacity Building Plan. A funding
application form detailing the planning requirements, timelines and accountability was provided
by the OPA.
Current Situation
A detailed plan, attached as Appendix A, was submitted to the OPA on January 12, 2007. The
board has received approval for funding totaling $160,000.
Respectfully submitted,
June Rogers
System Principal, Special Education Services
C :\Local D ata\Program H .R . C om \2007 Feb. 19\2007 Feb. 19 - O PA Project - R eport.w pd
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Report No. C-3
Page 1
February 19, 2007
Decision
To:
Information X
The Chair and Members of the
Program and Human Resources Committee
From: Jan Montgomery, Superintendent of Education, Special Education Services
Re:
Special Education Services: 2006-07 organization
Purpose
To provide an update for trustees regarding the organizational structure of special education
services.
Current situation
An organization chart for the 2006-07 school year, outlining the key responsibilities of staff
within special education services, is attached as Appendix A.
Respectfully submitted,
Janice Montgomery
Superintendent of Education, Special Education
C :\Local D ata\P rogram H .R . C om \2007 Feb. 19\2007 Feb. 19 - SE O rganization R eport.wpd
The Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
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