Programme Specification Undergraduate Programmes Programme Title: Awarding Body/Institution

Programme Specification Undergraduate Programmes Programme Title: Awarding Body/Institution

Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Programme Specification

Undergraduate Programmes

Awarding Body/Institution

Teaching Institution

University of London

Goldsmiths, University of London

Name of Final Award and Programme Title BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Name of Interim Award(s) N/A

Duration of Study / Period of Registration

3 years full-time / 4 years full-time (incl placement) / 4-6 years part-time

UCAS Code(s)

WG34

QAA Benchmark Group

FHEQ Level of Award

Computing

Level 6

Programme Accredited by

N/A

Date Programme Specification Approved March 2010

Date of this Version 28 Feb 2014

Primary Department / Institute

Music

Departments which will also be involved in teaching part of the programme

Computing

Programme Overview

The BMus/BSc programme accords with Goldsmiths’ aims to pursue intellectual curiosity, work beyond the “boundaries of preconceptions” and provide “a unique and creative approach” to subjects. This programme, a collaboration between the

Departments of Computing and Music, is an innovative synthesis of contemporary musical practice and musicology with the creative and analytical applications of computer science. It builds upon well-established research collaborations that link the two departments, in areas such as interactive performance, computer-based analysis and music cognition.

The programme is designed to meet the opportunities, challenges and intellectual demands presented by careers in the culture industries, in music technology and in audio, music and media related computing. You will encounter the most up-to-date technologies and programming methods, and explore current issues in programme design, sonic art, contemporary composition and musicology.

The programme meets the demands of the rapidly evolving and innovative subject area of music computing. It fosters further development of our interdisciplinary understandings across the broad fields of computer science, creative practice and musical research. You will study how computers listen and analyse sound and music, how they can derive, generate or ‘invent’ processes and structures for music, and how such processes are rendered into music in the form of audio or printed musical text.

This programme is informed by the Departments of Computing and Music Learning and Teaching Strategies, as well as by external guidelines and frameworks, including the QAA Computing and Music subject benchmark statements and the QAA

1

Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing qualifications framework.

What are the Entry Requirements?

You will be expected to have at least ABB or BBB at A2 level, BTEC DDM/D*MM or IB 34/32 points or Access: Pass with 45 Level 3 credits including 30 at Distinction & 15 at Merit or equivalent.

An A2 level, or equivalent, qualification in Music or Music Technology is preferred. However we encourage applications from those without a formal qualification in music who can demonstrate relevant knowledge and experience.

At the interview stage you may be asked to present a portfolio of recent work relevant to your knowledge and experience of computing and/or music (for example: creative work in music technology or other media, musical scores and recordings, written work).

Applicants whose first language is not English must have received a score of 6.0 or more in the IELTS (or equivalent) examination for written English.

Aims of the Programme

You develop the critical, technical and intellectual skills needed to be able to analyse problems, design and implement solutions on computers and communicate your ideas in a variety of forms.

You develop awareness of diversity in music and the diversity of values, critical stances and analytical methods, in their historical and cultural contexts. The programme encompasses a wide range of repertoires of music, offering modules that reference various aspects of film music, Western art and contemporary music, popular music, ‘world’ music, sound art and electronic music. By exploring the interrelationships between theories of music and computing, and between theoretical understanding and creative practice, you develop the knowledge and skills to create your own independent research project in your final year.

What Will You Be Expected to Achieve?

Students who successfully complete the programme will be able to:

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Knowledge & Understanding: Taught by:

A 1

A 2

A 3

A 4

A 5

A 6

A 7 demonstrate knowledge of the interrelationships between computer science, musicology and creative practice.

The knowledge should be sufficient to produce substantial creative musical work with computers.

Music Computing 1, 2, Major Project in Music

Computing demonstrate knowledge of a wide range of topics underlying computers and software design, as relevant to music computing. A broad range of topics will be known to a basic level and some will be known in depth.

Year 1 and Year 2 core Computing modules demonstrate knowledge of advanced theoretical models and abstractions that underpin reasoning about computing systems. This knowledge will be sufficient to understand and implement substantial software systems.

Level 5 and 6 programming modules demonstrate knowledge of key concepts and technical strategies evident in a range of musical repertoires, which may include contemporary music and sonic art, Western art music, popular and ‘world’ music.

Approaches to Contemporary Music, first, second and third year options in Music demonstrate knowledge of critical approaches and analytical methods that can be applied to music, appraised in aural and written form, to the standard of academic discourse.

Core and optional modules in Music demonstrate knowledge of selected musical discourses and practices in their historical, societal and cultural context.

demonstrate knowledge of theoretical and contextual systems that inform creative practice in software design, musical interpretation and composition.

Second and third level Music options

Perception and Multimedia Computing, Music

Computing 2, Major Project in Computing

Cognitive & Thinking Skills: Taught by:

B 1

B 2

B 3 analyse moderately complex computing systems to verify they are correct and well designed.

critically self-evaluate creative and technical work, and evaluate the work of others assess effectively a user’s requirements and specifications, in order to design and realise a solution to a moderately complex problem.

Introduction to Programming

Creative Computing 1 and 2

Major Project in Computing

B 4 solve problems in a systematic, logical manner.

B 5 apply intuitive and experimental methods in the production of creative work

All core and optional Computing modules

Music Computing 1, 2, Major Project in Music

Computing, Introduction to Audiovisual

Processing

Subject Specific Skills and Professional Behaviours and Attitudes:

Taught by:

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

C 1

C 2

C 3

C 4

C 5 apply current analytical and musicological methods to assimilate, assess and interpret music in notated form and/ or aurally.

Core and optional Music modules compose music to a professional level in the form of notated score, studio-based media and/or live performance

Music Computing 1, 2; Music options in Years

1, 2 and 3 apply different algorithms and data structures, both wellestablished and innovative, with particular reference to musical applications.

implement a moderately complex functional specification from generalised requirements, demonstrating an understanding of correct processes and their concomitant problems.

undertake a substantial independent project in which you design, implement, test (realise or perform with, as appropriate) and evaluate a software system for musical application

OR undertake a substantial independent project in which you design and carry out a creative project by using appropriate research and computing methods and by synthesizing relevant compositional techniques, source materials and contextual writing.

Music Computing 2

Music Computing 1, 2, Major Project in Music

Computing

Major Project in Music Computing

Transferable Skills: Taught by:

D 1

D 2

D 3

D 4 use library resources, databases, and other research tools to Many modules in Music and Computing involve projectidentify, collect and reference primary and secondary material, to academic standards.

style assessments in which the student is expected to undertake independent research.

use information technology effectively, including musicwriting and word processing programmes.

all modules structure and communicate ideas effectively and persuasively, both orally and writing to a professional level.

Many modules in Music and Computing require the submission of essays, critical evaluation and technical reports. There will oral presentations of ideas and work in

Music Computing 1, 2 and Major Project in Computing.

work independently and effectively, and sustain work in the production of a substantial project.

Major Project in Computing

How Will You Learn?

The Departments of Computing and Music are committed to a diverse and stimulating range of learning and teaching methods that ensure the programme outcomes are addressed rigorously and effectively. Learning emphasises a close synthesis between theoretical understanding and practical application that helps you develop an advanced, critical approach to the interdisciplinary subject of music computing. Knowledge of the interrelationships between computer science, musicology and creative practice is consistently fostered and developed through independent and collaborative projects across years 1 and 2, in both music or computing specialist modules and the core music computing modules themselves. This is fully integrated in the supervision of final year project that will draw together programme elements. In addition, the College’s Gold Award scheme and personal tutoring system are opportunities to develop coherent links between seemingly disparate elements in the programme.

New and existing modules provide network of cross-referenced and cumulative knowledge across modules; this is further developed through your independent research and learning activities directed towards course assignments and the large-scale project component. You achieve the outcomes relevant to your individual pathway, that combines core and optional modules, through the experience of interconnected teaching and learning strategies across the various elements of the programme. All

4

Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing modules provide a weekly lecture-seminar or other session, which reinforces preparatory or follow-up reading, and other related learning activities in both group and individual settings to foster new understandings and skills.

Programme outcomes that emphasise knowledge and understanding are developed in lecture seminar sessions, supported by tutorials, and where relevant, lab/workshop sessions. Practical and subject-related skills are developed through class-based tasks, either individually or in groups, (including analytic, listening-based, or discursive exercises) or by setting up or reviewing followup tasks undertaken outside of class. Lab sessions, practical workshops (e.g. composition workshops) and music studio sessions provide opportunity for you to develop and present the wide range of skills in computing and music necessary. Cognitive and transferable skills are integral to your learning experiences across all elements of the programme.

The relative extent of a lecture, seminar or task-based component in any individual module or session depends on the learning outcomes and material at hand. Class discussion and debate, whether staff- or student-led, encourages collaborative engagement with questions, issues, problems and exercises that help develop your individual learning. Independent learning requires close and rigorous engagement with primary and secondary sources, as directed by module materials and online resources, including instructional ‘off-the-shelf’ software modules and other online resources, musical scores, recordings, film, historical documents and a range of other relevant materials. The relevant library resources are referenced to help develop research-based and ITC related skills. Your learning development is supported and reviewed in tutorial meetings that occur across the academic year. Learning and teaching is supported by a wide variety of practical activities that pertain to various aspects of the programme, including the Music Department’s concert series, masterclasses, guest lectures, events run by the

Music Research Forum, Digital Studios and Unit for Sound Practice Research.

Options: The programme offers a degree of flexibility at levels 5 and 6, in order to offer learning opportunities across the broad range of theoretical and practical subjects encompassed by music and computing. You will select your options with the advice and agreement of your personal tutor and the programme convener at various stages in the degree programme. You will be advised about Level 1 choices at interview and/or enrolment.

How Will You Be Assessed?

Summative and formative assessment of the programme outcomes occurs across the selection of modules offered by the

Departments of Computing and Music. Individual modules deploy the most effective and appropriate assessment method(s) according to the topic and learning outcomes.

The methods comprise:

1) a 3,000-word essay that demonstrates ability to apply reasoning to a set question, comparative or analytical task, conduct independent research and produce an academic argument that can be supported by evidence and examples.

2) a coursework portfolio that demonstrates ability to undertake one or more practical or creative task(s) in response to explicit criteria (e.g. a composition, a musical performance, a transcription) and write a short self-evaluation.

3) an unseen examination that demonstrates ability to apply reasoning to set question(s), comparative or analytical task(s) and produce reasoned solutions and/or academic argument supported by evidence.

4) oral presentation that demonstrates ability to articulate and present coherent solutions, arguments and understandings relevant to tasks set, and respond to feedback in discussion with peers and tutors.

The programme outcomes are achieved and demonstrated in their most extensive and comprehensive form in the final year project component that is compulsory for the programme.

The methods are:

1) a software application project based upon an independent area of theoretical and practical research, in which you design, implement, test (realise or perform with, as appropriate) and evaluate a software system for musical application. Accompanied by a research essay c.3,000 words.

2) a creative project based upon an independent area of theoretical and practical research, in which you design and carry out a creative project (e.g. substantial composition, improvisations, sound installation) by using appropriate research and computing methods and by synthesizing relevant compositional techniques, source materials and contextual writing. Appropriate media accompanied by a research essay c.3,000 words.

3) formative assessment occurs in class discussion of tasks set, tutorial review of your progress as well as through written and oral feedback.

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Marking Criteria

Mark Descriptor

80-100%

70-79%

I: First

(Exceptional)

I: First

(Excellent)

Specific Marking Criteria

Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to an exceptionally accomplished level. Overall the work demonstrates the conceptualisation, coherency, contextual appropriateness, theoretical sophistication, critical evaluation, accuracy and, above all, originality. Any omissions that occur arise as a result of a deliberate, justified focus, rather than through any lack of awareness or incompetence.

Text-based assessment: the text is structured with exceptional clarity and cogency, the argument is compelling and the presentation and scholarly procedures employed are flawless.

Creative work: Works will demonstrate a fluency of approach and outstanding qualities with strong evidence of originality, individuality and conceptual coherence. They will demonstrate a sophisticated synthesis of technique, theoretical understanding and imagination. Works will be clearly address well articulated aims of contemporary relevance, and will demonstrate an incisive exploration of aesthetic and technical issues. Relevant materials will be produced to a professional standard, with written commentaries that evidence a sophisticated and critical approach to contextual frameworks.

Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to an excellent level. Overall the work shows evidence of rigorous analytical research in its conceptualisation of the project; an excellent level of response to the set tasks; the conceptual coherency of the work/project is strong and ideas are deployed within a clearly defined contextual framework. There is evidence of a thorough grasp of relevant concepts, methods and contents appropriate to the assessed work, and demonstrate originality in application of ideas, in synthesis of material and/or in design and implementation of systems.

Text-based assessment: the text is extremely well structured, ideas are developed, articulated and synthesised to a high standard through cogent argument throughout. Correct scholarly procedures and theoretical frameworks are consistently employed with care, accuracy and an understanding of their purpose

Creative and technical work: Creative works and computer systems will demonstrate an excellent standard with strong evidence of originality, individuality and conceptual coherence. They will demonstrate a convincing synthesis of technique, theoretical understanding and imagination. Creative works and computer systems will be well conceived and will demonstrate an incisive exploration of technical, conceptual and aesthetic issues, as relevant. Relevant materials will be produced to a professional standard, with written commentaries that evidence a sophisticated and critical approach to contextual frameworks.

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Mark

60-69%

50-59%

40-49%

Descriptor

IIi: Upper Second

(Very good)

IIii: Lower Second

(Good)

III: Third

(Pass)

Specific Marking Criteria

Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to a very good level. Overall evidence of good analytical research in the conceptualisation of the project; a very good level of response to the set tasks; the conceptual coherency of the work/project is good and ideas deployed within a defined contextual framework. The candidate must also demonstrate good skills in application of ideas, in synthesis of material and/or in design and implementation of systems. Such work is generally missing the sense of originality that is sought from first class work.

Text-based assessment: the text is well organised, the main argument is clearly focused and constructed. Correct scholarly procedures are employed throughout with accuracy.

Creative and technical work: Creative works and computer systems will demonstrate a high standard with clear signs of conceptual coherence and individuality. They will demonstrate the confident and effective use of a range of techniques, informed by theoretical understanding and imagination. Scores,

CDs, data or other relevant materials will be produced to a high standard, with written commentaries that demonstrate individual insight and assimilation of contextual frameworks.

Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to a good level. There is evidence of an adequate level of understanding of relevant tasks, concepts, methods, and context and of sufficient skill to tackle the problem at hand. Such work is likely to demonstrate a lower level of competence and less insight in analysis than upper second class work.

Text-based assessment: the text is structured around an argument, though not consistently focussed; scholarly procedures are employed throughout and are largely correct though routinely applied.

Creative and technical work: Creative works and computer systems will demonstrate an overall satisfactory standard showing some degree of originality or potential. They will demonstrate technical competence, relevant knowledge and understanding, a degree of imaginative thinking and conceptual coherency.

Scores, CDs, data or other relevant materials will be adequately produced, with written commentaries that show some awareness of context.

Represents the overall achievement of the appropriate learning outcomes to an adequate level. Overall mainly adequate level of response to the set task; the conceptual coherency of the work/project is largely adequate. There is some recognition of the problem and attempt at a solution, however, the work falls short of the expectations in terms of understanding and/or skills or technical ability. Such work is generally differentiated from failure by a sense of a positive, if limited, engagement by the candidate.

Text-based assessment: The text evidences some structure and / or sound argument and the focus; there are minor inconsistencies and mistakes in the usage of scholarly procedures and their presentation.

Creative and technical work: Creative works and computer systems will demonstrate some merit: they will demonstrate adequate technical competence, and conceptual coherence. Scores, CDs, data or other relevant materials will be adequate.

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Mark

25-39%

10-24%

1-9%

0%

Descriptor

Fail

Bad fail

Very bad fail

Non submission or plagiarised

Specific Marking Criteria

Represents an overall failure to achieve the appropriate learning outcomes. The work is deficient in some respects, revealing insufficient grasp of material and poor organisation and an inability to identify and address the task required. There is some evidence of reading of recommended texts and/or attempt to solve a problem at hand, but only limited evidence understanding and competence at designing and implementing a problem solution.

Text-based assessment: The text lacks structure and / or sound argument; the focus is not clear; there are major inconsistencies and mistakes in the usage of scholarly procedures and their presentation.

Creative and technical work: Creative works and computer systems will demonstrate some engagement with the task set but will fail to meet honours standards: they will demonstrate inadequate technical competence, imaginative thinking or conceptual coherency. Scores, CDs, data or other relevant materials may be poorly produced.

Represents an overall failure to achieve the appropriate learning outcomes. The work is deficient in most respects, revealing insufficient grasp of material and poor organisation and an inability to identify and address the task required.

Text-based assessment: The text entirely lacks structure and focus; there are major inconsistencies and mistakes in the usage of scholarly procedures and their presentation.

Creative and technical work: This will demonstrate inadequate technical competence, imaginative thinking or conceptual coherency. Relevant materials will be inadequately produced.

Represents a significant overall failure to achieve the appropriate learning outcomes (shall be deemed a valid attempt and not necessarily required to be re-sat).

A submission that does not even attempt to address the specified learning outcomes (shall be deemed a non valid attempt and must be re-sat).

A categorical mark representing either the failure to submit an assessment or a mark assigned for a plagiarised assessment.

How is the Programme Structured?

In the first year all students study the fundamentals of computer programming, contemporary music and music technology. Core modules establish all the key areas of this innovative subject; these culminate in a final year Music Computing Major Project. The programme also allows students to identify and develop strengths and interests by choosing various specialist options in the

Departments of Music and Computing. The project topic will determine the award of either BMus (Hons) or BSc (Hons).

Module lists in years 2 and 3 are indicative. Some modules may not be available in some years.

At level 5 (year 2) students take the following compulsory module:

MU52047A Music Computing 2 (TERMS 1 & 2) 30 CATS

Modules are selected from Groups A and B to the value of 90 CATS (credits), containing a minimum of 45 CATS from Group A and

30 CATS from Group B. A further 15 CATS may be taken from wither group. Students must take 60 CATS in each term to balance workload.

At level 6 (year 3) students take one of these two core modules: this choice determines the name of the final award, either B.Mus. or BSc.

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

MU53043A Major Project: Music (Terms 1 & 2) 60CATS

IS53043A Major Project: Computing (Terms 1 & 2) 60CATS

You also select a total of 60CATS from Groups C & D. Students must take 60 CATS in each term to balance workload.

Academic Year of Study 1

Module Title

Music Computing 1

Live Performance Systems

Introduction to Programming

Module

Code

Credits Level

MU51047B

MU51057A

IS51008B

IS51***A

30

15

30

15

4

4

4

4

Module

Selection

Status

Module Assessment

Compulsory 40% exam; 60% coursework

Term

1 & 2

Compulsory

Compulsory

2 x short performances with accompanying 500 word commentary (20% each)

1 x public performance with accompanying 1000 word commentary (60%)

Term 1

Forum participation 15%.

Assessed on contributions to the mahara forums in terms of: asking and answering questions, presenting work, feeding back about the work of others

Quizzes 5%. Multiple choice quizzes that test knowledge and understanding of different subject areas

Extended exercise 10%

Submission of an extended version of one of the exercises submitted this term. It will be marked on the work itself and your ability to present it.

Term 2

A single piece of project work that will take up the entire term. The mark will be broken up between a the final hand in and intermediary presentations of work. 30%

Term 3

Written examination 40%

1 & 2

1 & 2

Compulsory 40% coursework, 60% exam 1 Numerical Mathematics

Introduction to Audiovisual

Computing

IS51012A 15 4 Compulsory 40% coursework, 60% exam 2

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Module Title

Module

Code

Credits Level

Approaches to Contemporary

Music

MU51024A 15 4

Module

Selection

Status

Module Assessment

Compulsory 100% Essay (3,000 words)

Term

2

Academic Year of Study

Module Title

Music Computing 2

2

MU modules Group A / IS modules Group B

Module

Code

Credits Level

MU52047A 30 5

Module

Selection

Status

Module Assessment Term

Compulsory

A coursework portfolio of practical assignments, comprising:

Four technical, creative and analytical tasks with documented evidence of realisation (e.g. audio, video, as relevant).

A self-evaluation and working process journal, with additional software code, pseudo code and related data as relevant, (c.

1,500 words).

1 & 2

Aesthetics, Meaning and Culture MU52026B 15 5 Optional 100% Essay (3,000 words) 1

Music, Communication and

Identity

MU52020A 15 5 Optional 100% Essay (3,000 words) 1

Music of Africa and Asia

Musicians, Commerce and

Commodification

MU52046A

MU52016B

15

15

5

5

Optional

Optional

70% Essay (2000 words)

30% Listening Test (1 hour)

100% Essay (3,000 words)

2

2

Music in Film MU52037B 15 5 Optional

100% Cuesheet and analytical essay (3,000 words)

1

Music and Modernism MU52014B 15 5 Optional 100% Essay (3,000 words) 1

Music and Postmodernism MU52022B 15 5 Optional 100% Essay (3,000 words) 2

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Module Title

Popular Music Production

Techniques of Contemporary

Composition

MU52061A 15

Media Composition

Sonic Art Techniques

Sonic Art Practice

Techniques in Jazz and Popular

Music

MU52036B 15

Arranging in Jazz and Popular

Music

MU52040B 15

Perception & Multimedia

Computing

Principles & Applications of

Programming 1

Module

Code

Credits Level

MU52025B 15

Composition: Creative Strategies MU52023B 15

MU52029C 15

MU52024B 15

MU52028B 15

IS52020B

IS52028A

30

30

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Module

Selection

Status

Optional

Optional

Optional

Optional

Optional

Optional

Optional

Optional

Module Assessment

A. 40% – Mini portfolio of small sketches.

B. 60% – Final portfolio of a single production of their choice accompanied by reflective commentary of approximately 1500 words.

A. 60% Portfolio of short pieces and exercises

B. 40% Piece of 3 – 5 minutes duration for a specified small chamber ensemble, intended for performance by L2 Classical

Performance students in Term 2

A. 60% Two compositional tasks, submitted as a portfolio.

B. 40% Two compositional tasks, submitted as a portfolio.

100% Portfolio/showreel of exercises, with accompanying commentary (500–1000 words).

A. 33.3% Studio-based Skills &

Compositional Assignment 1

B. 33.3% Studio-based Skills &

Compositional Assignment 2

C. 33.3% Listening Assignment

A. 70% Studio Composition portfolio

B. 30% Commentary

50% Course workbook - a number of short exercises to be submitted through Term 1.

50% Rhythm chart assignment

A. 50% Full score and selected parts of a 3/5 minute arrangement for a recording session.

B. 50% Course Workbook of exercises to be submitted through the period of study.

Term

2

1

2

2

1

2

1

2

Optional 70% Coursework; 30% Exam 1 & 2

Optional coursework (50%) and an unseen examination (50%).

1 & 2

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Module Title

Principles & Applications of

Programming 2

Programming for Dynamic

Websites

Creative Projects

Module

Code

Credits Level

IS52028B 15 5

IS52031A

IS52030A

15

30

5

5

Module

Selection

Status

Optional

Optional

Optional

Module Assessment Term coursework (50%) and an unseen examination (50%).

Assignments

• A1 Practical Coursework worth

20% of the overall mark

Examination

• E1 3 hour no-choice unseen examination. Worth 80% of overall mark.

1. A project proposal comprising of a minimum 2000 word description of project, a separate budget, a separate statement on proposed audience, user research relevant to that audience, a separate statement on proposed method of evaluating responses to the work, and a separate proposal for documenting/archiving the work and the technical implementation thereof. 30% of the mark.

2. A project implementation.

The submission will consist of: one website and DVD of a competed individual software project with evaluation materials, an individual final report on the project and a group oral presentation of the project. 70% of the mark.

2

2

1 & 2

Academic Year of Study

Module Title

3

IS modules Group C / MU modules Group D

Module

Code

Optional modules to the value of

60 CATS from Group C

Computing, or Group D Music modules from an annually available list.

Major Project: Computing IS53043A

Credits Level

60

60

6

6

Module

Selection

Status

Optional

Core

Module Assessment

As prescribed by each module outline

Term

1-2

1-2

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Module Title

Major Project: Music

Module

Code

Credits Level

MU53034A 60 6

Module

Selection

Status

Core

Module Assessment Term

1) a software application project based upon an independent area of theoretical and practical study, in which students design, implement, test (realise or perform with, as appropriate) and evaluate a software system for musical application. Accompanied by a research essay c.3,000 words.

2) a creative project based upon an independent area of theoretical and practical study, in which students design and carry out a creative project (e.g. substantial composition, improvisations, sound installation) by using appropriate research and computing methods and by synthesizing relevant compositional techniques, source materials and contextual writing. Appropriate media accompanied by a research essay c.3,000 words.

1-2

Academic Support

The Departments are committed to making any reasonable adjustment that allows, as far as possible, for equality of opportunity and access, and to ensuring that students are not substantially disadvantaged because of specific learning difficulties or disability.

Expertise is provided by the Departments’ resident staff who are dedicated and experienced teachers, but also distinguished practitioners and researchers in their own right, working in national and international contexts. The Departments also draw on a large pool of visiting tutors and researchers, to provide a breadth of expertise and contact with current research and practice.

Student learning is supported by the Rutherford Information Services Building, which houses extensive book, score, CD/DVD and electronic resources. All registered students also have access to the University of London libraries network. In addition, the Music

Department has its own dedicated specialist facilities, including an Audio Library and studio facilities for music processing, recording and digital film editing. The Department of Computing has extensive computer lab facilities. Both Departments make extensive use of the VLE learn.gold online facility, in order to support student learning in a number of ways, including the dissemination of learning resources and to provide an electronic forum for the exchange ideas and debate.

The BMus/BSc curriculum is supported by a wide range of activities that encourage awareness and involvement in the

Departments’ high profile practical, performance and research activities, including termly postgraduate conferences, the Music

Research Forum, the Digital Studios’ ‘Thursday Club’, a large number of regular performance ensembles and concert events, masterclasses, workshops, visiting speakers, and various other activities of the Digital Studios, the Centre for Contemporary

Musical Cultures, the Intelligent Sound and Music Systems group and the Unit for Sound Practice Research. Further information about these groups can be found from the Departments’ web pages www.gold.ac.uk.

You are allocated a personal tutor during your period of study who offer advice, guidance or clarification of courses, options, requirements and regulations; and to monitor your progress through the programme. The Personal Tutor can also offer support in cases of academic difficulty.

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

Should further advice be necessary, the Senior Tutor, the Chair of the Sub-Board of Examiners can also be consulted. If you encounter difficulties at any time with your studies, the programme convenor and other course tutors can provide additional academic support whilst the Senior Tutor is available by appointment to discuss welfare-centred issues. Staff members have office hours each week to discuss any matters; outside these hours students may arrange an appointment with staff via email or telephone.

Both Departments take advantage of and pursue the College's Disability Awareness policies. Students with specific needs in this regard are considered on an individual basis. The College also actively supports students with specific learning difficulties (e.g. dyslexia), and provisions are made to ensure that all students, regardless of specific difficulty/disability, derive full benefit from the learning environment. In addition to specialist advice and assistance within the College, both Departments ensure that course materials are suitable for all students and, where necessary, these are altered to meet the requirements of individual students.

You will develop and maintain a personal development plan, run by the Goldsmiths Gold Award scheme, during your course of study. This plan helps you record aspirations, plans and goals, record your achievements, and enables progress to be monitored, in order to help achieve your individual aims. The Senior Tutor is available to discuss the Gold Award scheme with students, and

Departments will advise you about how best to approach this task.

The medical, counselling and financial services provide support for students when necessary, and in the case of students with special needs (including dyslexia), the Student Support Office will provide sympathetic advice and help. Goldsmiths also provides a wide range of other support services for students, which can be found on its web site at www.gold.ac.uk. Overseas students whose first language is not English may seek assistance from the Goldsmiths Centre for English Language and Academic Writing.

Links With Employers, Placement Opportunities and Career Prospects

The programme is designed with careful consideration of the opportunities, challenges and intellectual demands presented by careers in music technology and music computing, and the various professions involving computing in the cultural sector, such as the sonic arts and performance, film and TV composition, sound design, web design, broadcasting, systems analysis and management, IT consultancy, librarianship, arts administration, and music record production.

In addition the course acts as a gateway to further study at Masters and PhD level, creating opportunities in computer music research and music software development.

What are the Requirements of a Goldsmiths Degree?

Undergraduate degrees have a total value of 360 credits. They are composed of individual modules, each of which has its own credit value. Full-time students take modules to the value of 120 credits each year and part-time students not less than 45 credits and not more than 90 credits each year. Each full–time year corresponds to a level of the Framework for Higher Education

Qualifications.

Year 1 = Level 4

Year 2 = Level 5

Year 3 = Level 6

Modules:

Modules are defined as:

“Optional” – which can be chosen from a group of modules

“Compulsory” – which must be taken as part of the degree

“Core” – which must be taken as part of the degree and passed with a mark of at least 40%.

Progression:

Full-time students are required to have passed modules to a minimum of 90 credits before proceeding to the next year.

Part-time students normally must pass new modules to a minimum value of 45 credits before proceeding to the next year.

In addition, some programmes may specify particular modules which must be passed, irrespective of the minimum requirements, before proceeding to the next year.

Award of the degree:

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

In order to graduate with a classified degree, students must successfully complete modules to the value of 360 credits. However if a module which has not be defined as “core” has been failed with a mark of 35-39% and all three permitted attempts have been used, this module may be compensated (treated as if it has been passed) so long as the average mean mark for all 120 credits at that level is 45% or above. No more than 60 credits may be compensated this way across a programme and no more than 30 at any one level.

Classification:

Final degree classification will be calculated on the basis of a student's best marks for modules equivalent to 90 credits at Level 4,

105 credits at level 5 and 105 credits at level 6, applying a relative weighting of 1:3:5 to modules at level 4, 5 and 6 respectively

Degrees are awarded with the following classifications:

First Class – 70%+

Upper Second – 60-69%

Lower Second – 50-59%

Third – 40-49%

Students who, following the application of compensation and having used all their permitted resit attempts, have passed modules to the value of 300-345 credits, at least 60 of which are at level 6 may be awarded a pass degree

Intermediate Exit Points:

Some programmes incorporate intermediate exit points of Certificate of Higher Education and Diploma of Higher Education, which may be awarded on the successful completion of modules to the value of 120 credits at level 4 or 240 (120 of which at level

5) credits respectively. The awards are made without classification.

The above information is intended as a guide. For further information, please refer to the Regulations for Undergraduate

Students, which may be found here: http://www.gold.ac.uk/regulations/approved-by-academic-board/undergraduate/

Programme-specific Rules and Facts

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How will Teaching Quality be Monitored?

Goldsmiths employs a number of methods to ensure and enhance the quality of learning and teaching on its programmes.

Programmes and modules must be formally approved against national standards and are monitored throughout the year in departmental staff / student forums and through the completion of module evaluation questionnaires. Every programme also has at least one External Examiner who produces an annual report which comments on the standards of awards and student achievement.

This output is considered with other relevant data in the process of Annual Programme Review, to which all programmes are subject, and which aims to identify both good practice and issues which require resolution.

Every six years all programmes within a department are also subject to a broader periodic review. This aims to ensure that they remain current, that the procedures to maintain the standards of the awards are working effectively and the quality of the learning opportunities and information provided to students and applicants is appropriate.

Detailed information on all of these procedures are published on the webpages of the Quality Office (http://www.gold.ac.uk/ quality/).

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Programme Title: BMus/BSc (Hons) Music Computing

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