Toshiba 14.1 TFT XGA LCD MODULE - TECRA S1 (V00002008006) PC Notebook

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Toshiba 14.1 TFT XGA LCD MODULE - TECRA S1 (V00002008006) PC Notebook | Manualzz

188

Troubleshooting Guide

Resolving a hardware conflict

Three consecutive mistakes in entering the password turns off the computer.

The computer is not accessing the hard disk or the diskette drive.

If the Boot Priority option in Hardware Setup is set to

HDD

FDD and you have a hard disk problem, you will not be able to start the computer. Insert a system diskette into the diskette drive and press

F12 while you turn on the power.

The computer displays the

Non-system disk

or

disk error

message.

Make sure there is no diskette in the diskette drive. If there is one, remove it and press any key to continue. If pressing any key does not work, press

Ctrl, Alt,

and

Del

simultaneously or press the reset button to restart the computer.

Resolving a hardware conflict

Using the Windows XP troubleshooting feature

If you receive an error message telling you there is a device driver conflict or a general hardware problem, try using

Windows Help to troubleshoot the problem first.

1

From the Windows

Help

menu, click the

Contents

tab and select

Troubleshooting

.

2

Click

If you have a hardware conflict

and follow the steps.

If there is still a problem, Windows XP should display a message that explains what the conflict is. For further assistance, contact your system administrator.

A plan of action

The smooth operation of the system depends on the interaction of all devices, programs and features.

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The recommended procedure for getting multiple devices to work together is to add and configure one device at a time.

After you add each device, test it to make sure it and all previously connected devices work.

The device most recently connected to the system is the one most likely to be causing a hardware conflict.

Resolving hardware conflicts on your own

Computer components need resources to accomplish a task.

A device, such as a CD-ROM drive or a modem, needs a channel to the computer’s Central Processing Unit (CPU). It also needs a direct channel to the computer’s memory to store information as it works. These channels of communication are commonly referred to as system resources.

Interrupt Request channel

The channel to the CPU is called an Interrupt Request (IRQ) because it interrupts what the processor is doing and requests some of the processor’s time.

Direct Memory Access

Similarly, the data required by the device is stored in a specific place or address in memory called the Direct

Memory Access (DMA). The DMA provides a dedicated channel for adapter cards to bypass the microprocessor and access memory directly. If two or more devices use the same

DMA, the data required by one device overwrites the data required by the other, causing a hardware conflict.

Plug and Play

With Plug and Play and Windows XP, avoiding hardware conflicts is easy. Plug and Play is a computer standard that helps the system BIOS (basic input/output system) and

Windows XP to automatically assign system resources to

Plug and Play-compliant devices. In theory, if every device connected to the computer is Plug and Play-compliant, no

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two devices will compete for the same system resources. You simply plug in the device and turn on your computer. Your operating system automatically configures your system to accommodate the new device.

However, if you install an older (legacy) device that Windows cannot detect, Windows may have difficulty assigning system resources to it. As a result, a hardware conflict can occur. To find out what resources Windows has assigned to the legacy device, refer to the section “Checking device properties.”

Checking device properties

Device Manager provides a way to view the properties of a device. Properties include the name of the manufacturer, the type of device, the drivers installed, and the system resources assigned to the device.

To check a device’s properties:

1

Click

Start

, then

Control Panel

.

2

Click

Performance and Maintenance

.

3

Click the

System

icon.

Windows XP displays the System Properties dialog box.

4

Click the

Hardware

tab.

5

Click the

Device Manager

button.

6

Double-click the device type.

7

To view the properties, double-click the device.

Windows XP displays the Device Properties dialog box, which provides various tabs to choose from. Some of the common ones are:

The General tab, which provides basic information about the device.

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The Resources tab, which lists the resources assigned to the device. If you have a device conflict, it is shown in the

Conflicting device list.

The Drivers tab, which displays the drivers being used by the device.

For further information about Device Manager, refer to

Windows XP online help.

Memory module problems

Incorrectly connected or faulty memory module may cause errors that seem to be device-related, so it’s worthwhile checking for these first:

1

Click

Start

, then click

Shut Down

.

Windows displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

2

Select

Shut down

, then click

OK

.

Windows shuts down and turns off the computer automatically.

3

Remove the memory module following the instructions in

“Removing a memory module” on page 76 .

4

Reinstall the memory module following the instructions in

“Installing a memory module” on page 74 , and make

sure it’s seated properly.

5

Replace the memory expansion slot cover.

6

Check for the error again.

7

If the error recurs, remove the memory module entirely and check for the error again.

NOTE

This procedure can only be followed if there is more than one memory module in the computer. If there is only one memory card, removing will prevent the computer from booting up.

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If removing the memory module eliminates the error, the memory module may be faulty. If the error recurs without the memory module installed, the error is not caused by the memory module.

Power and the batteries

Your computer receives its power through the AC adapter and power cable or from the system batteries (main battery, realtime clock (RTC) battery and backup battery). Power problems are interrelated. For example, a faulty power cable will neither power the computer nor recharge the batteries.

Here are some typical problems and how to solve them:

The AC power light does not come on when you plug in the AC adapter.

Make sure the AC adapter is firmly connected to both the power cable and the computer, and that the power cable is plugged into the electrical outlet.

If the AC power light still does not come on, check that the electrical outlet is working properly by plugging in a lamp or other appliance.

The power cable and AC adapter work correctly, but the battery will not charge.

The main battery may not be making a good electrical connection. Turn off the computer, remove the battery and confirm that its contacts are clean. If they are dirty, clean the contacts with a soft, dry cloth and replace the battery.

The battery may be too hot or too cold to charge properly. Its temperature needs to be in the range 5 degrees to 35 degrees

Celsius. If you think this is the probable cause, let the battery reach room temperature and try again.

If the battery has completely discharged, it will not begin charging immediately. Leave the AC adapter connected, wait

20 minutes and see whether the battery is charging.

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If the battery icon is glowing after 20 minutes, let the computer continue charging the battery for at least another 20 minutes before you turn on the computer.

If the battery icon does not glow after 20 minutes, the battery may have reached the end of its useful life. Try replacing it.

The battery appears not to power the computer for as long as it usually does.

If you frequently recharge a partially charged battery, it may not charge fully. Let the battery discharge completely, then try charging it again.

Check the power-saving features in Power Saver. Have you added a device, such as a PC Card or memory module, that takes its power from the battery? Is your software using the hard disk more? Is the display power set to turn off automatically? Is the battery fully charged to begin with? All these conditions affect how long the charge lasts.

For more information on maximizing battery power, refer to

“Taking care of your battery” on page 131 and

“Conserving power” on page 134

.

Keyboard problems

If, when you type, strange things happen or nothing happens, the problem may be related to the keyboard itself.

The keyboard produces unexpected characters.

A keypad overlay may be on. If the numlock light or cursor control mode light is on, press

Fn

and

F10 simultaneously to turn off the cursor control mode light or

Fn

and

F11 simultaneously to turn off the numlock light.

If the problem occurs when both the keypad overlays are off, make sure the software you are using is not remapping the keyboard. Refer to the software documentation and check that the program does not assign different meanings to any of the keys.

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You’ve connected an external keyboard and Windows displays one or more keyboard error messages.

The keyboard you connected may be defective or incompatible with the computer. Try using a different make of keyboard.

Nothing happens when you press the keys on the external keyboard.

You may have plugged the external PS/2 keyboard in while the computer was turned on. Click

Start

,

Shut Down,

and

Restart the computer

using the Dual Point device on the internal keyboard. The computer will restart and recognize the device.

AccuPoint II problems

Some of the keyboard problems already listed may affect the

AccuPoint II. In addition:

Your finger slides off the AccuPoint II easily.

If the AccuPoint II cap is oily, remove the cap and clean it with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol.

To remove the cap:

1

Firmly grasp the cap and pull it straight up.

Removing the AccuPoint II cap

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2

After cleaning the cap, position it on the peg and press it into place.

NOTE

The peg is square, so be careful to align the cap’s hole with the peg.

Display problems

The screen is blank.

Display Auto Off may have taken effect. Press any key to reactivate the screen.

You may have activated the instant password feature by pressing

Fn and

F1 simultaneously. If you have registered a user-level password, press the

Enter

key, type the password, and press

Enter

to return to work.

If you are using the built-in screen, try changing the display priority to make sure it is not set for an external monitor. To do this, press

Fn and

F5

simultaneously.

If you are using an external monitor:

Check that the monitor is turned on.

Check that the monitor’s power cable is firmly plugged into a working electrical outlet.

Check that the cable connecting the external monitor to the computer is firmly attached.

Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls on the external monitor.

Press

Fn and

F5

simultaneously to make sure that the display priority is not set for the built-in LCD screen.

The built-in screen flickers.

Some flickering is a normal result of the way the screen produces colors. To reduce the amount of flickering, try using fewer colors.

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Windows displays a message that there is a problem with your display settings and that the adapter type is incorrect or the current settings do not work with your hardware.

Reduce the size of the color palette to one that is supported by the computer’s internal display.

The display is set to a simultaneous display mode (LCD/

CRT or LCD/TV) and the external display device does not work.

Make sure the resolution of the external display device and the internal display match. For example, if the external device is only capable of displaying resolutions up to 800 x 600, you’ll need to change the resolution of the internal display to

800 x 600.

You are using an external display device and part of the desktop is not visible.

If the desktop area is set to a resolution greater than 640 x

480, the external device goes into “virtual” display mode.

This means that part of the desktop will not display on the screen. You can view the “lost” area by scrolling to it.

Even if your desktop area is set to 640 x 480, some of the desktop will be outside of the viewing area. This is because most televisions and video projectors overscan by 15 to 20 percent. You can view the edge of the desktop by scrolling to it.

Small bright dots appear on your TFT display when you turn on your computer.

Your display contains an extremely large number of thin-film transistors (TFT) and is manufactured using high-precision technology. The small bright dots that appear on your display are an intrinsic characteristic of the TFT manufacturing technology.

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Disk drive problems

Problems with the hard disk or with a diskette drive usually show up as an inability to access the disk or as sector errors.

Sometimes a disk problem may cause one or more files to appear to have garbage in them. Typical disk problems are:

You are having trouble accessing a disk, or some of the data appears to be missing.

Make sure you’re identifying the drive by its correct name

(A for the diskette drive or C for the primary hard disk).

Run Windows XP Check Disk, which analyzes the directories, files and File Allocation Table (FAT) on the disk and repairs any damage it finds.

To run Check Disk:

1

Open

My Computer

and right-click on the drive you wish to check.

2

Click

Properties

.

3

Click the

Tools

tab.

4

Click

Check Now

.

Windows opens the Check Disk window.

Your hard disk seems very slow.

If you have been using your computer for some time, your files may have become fragmented. Run Disk Defragmenter in Windows XP:

1

Click

Start

, then point to

All Programs

.

2

Point to

Accessories

, then point to

System Tools

.

3

Click

Disk Defragmenter

.

Your data files are damaged or corrupted.

Refer to your software documentation for file recovery procedures. Many software packages automatically create backup files.

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You may also be able to recover lost data by using utility software, which is available from your network administrator.

Some programs run correctly but others do not.

This is probably a configuration problem. When a program does not run properly, refer to its documentation and check that the hardware configuration meets its needs.

A diskette will not go into the diskette drive.

You may already have a diskette in the drive. Make sure the drive is empty.

You may be inserting the diskette incorrectly. Hold the diskette by its label with the hub side facing down, and insert it so that the metal head window cover goes into the drive first.

The metal cover or loose labels may be obstructing the path into the drive. Carefully inspect the diskette. If the metal cover is loose, replace the diskette. If the label is loose, replace the label and try inserting the diskette again.

The computer displays the

Non-system disk

or

disk error

message.

If you’re starting the computer from the hard disk, make sure there’s no diskette in the diskette drive.

If you’re starting the computer from a diskette, the diskette in the drive does not have the files necessary to start the computer. Replace it with a bootable diskette.

The drive cannot read a diskette.

Try another diskette. If you can access the second diskette, the first diskette (not the diskette drive) is probably causing the problem. Run Check Disk on the faulty diskette.

If you’re using the diskette drive externally, unplug the cable and plug it back in to make sure the connection between the diskette drive cable and the port is secure.

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199

Modem problems

The modem dials the line but does not connect, or cannot maintain the connection.

You may be connected to a noisy telephone line. To check this, connect an ordinary telephone to the telephone line and try placing a phone call. If you hear an unusual amount of noise or static, try connecting the modem to a different telephone line or connecting at a later time.

There may be an incorrect setting in the communications software. Refer to the communications software documentation to customize the modem settings.

The modem will not receive or transmit properly.

Make sure the RJ-11 cable (the one that goes from the modem to the telephone line) is firmly connected to the modem’s RJ-11 jack and the telephone line socket.

Check the serial port settings to make sure the hardware and software are referring to the same COM port.

Check the communications parameters (baud rate, parity, data bits, and stop bits) specified in the communications program.

The modem is on, configured properly, and still will not transmit or receive data.

Make sure the line has a dial tone. Connect a telephone handset to the line to check this.

The other system may be busy or off line. Try making a test transmission to someone else.

Problems with the DVD-ROM or multi-function drive

You cannot access a disc in the drive.

Make sure the tray which holds the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM is closed properly. Press gently until it clicks into place.

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Open the tray and remove the disc. Make sure the tray is clean. Any dirt or foreign object can interfere with the laser beam.

Make sure the disc is seated properly on the spindle. The disc should click into place when pressed gently on the device spindle.

Examine the disc to see if it is dirty. If necessary, wipe it with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral cleaner.

Replace the disc in the tray. Make sure that the disc is lying flat, label side uppermost. Close the tray carefully, making sure it has shut completely.

You press the eject button, but the drive tray does not slide out.

Make sure the computer is connected to a power source and turned on. The drive eject mechanism requires power to operate.

If you need to remove a disc and cannot turn on the computer

(for example, if the battery is completely discharged), use a narrow object, such as a straightened paper clip, to press the manual eject button. This button is in the small hole next to the disc eject button on the face of the drive tray.

Some discs run correctly but others do not.

If the problem is with an application CD-ROM, refer to the software’s documentation and check that the hardware configuration meets the program’s needs.

The color of the materials used to make the disc can affect its reliability. Silver-colored CD-ROMs are the most reliable, followed by gold-colored CD-ROM. Green-colored CD-

ROMs are the least reliable.

HINT: The DVD-ROM drive is initially set for Region 1 (North

America) DVDs.

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The disc will not come out of the drive when you click the eject button on the screen.

Press the button on the drive itself.

Sound system problems

You do not hear any sound from the computer.

Adjust the volume control. There is a volume control dial on the computer, a volume control feature in the Windows

Control Panel (“Sounds”), or it might be muted. There may also be a volume control on your speakers or headphones or in your audio application.

If you are using an external microphone or speakers, check that they are securely connected to your computer.

The computer emits a loud, high-pitched noise.

This is feedback between the microphone and the speakers. It occurs in any sound system when input from a microphone is fed to the speakers and the speaker volume is too loud. Adjust the volume control.

If you have changed the settings for the Record Monitor feature in the Recording Control Utility (default Off) or the

Mute feature in the Mixer Utility (default Enabled), these may cause feedback. Revert to the default settings.

Optional devices

Optional devices can include a printer, PC Cards, an external monitor, or any other device you connect to your computer to expand its capabilities.

For an external monitor, see

“Display problems” on page 195

.

PC Card problems

Most PC Card problems occur during installation and setup of new cards. If you’re having trouble getting one or more of

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these devices to work together, several sections in this chapter may apply.

Resource conflicts can cause problems when using PC Cards.

Refer to

“Resolving a hardware conflict” on page 188 .

Card information structure (CIS)

When you insert a PC Card into a slot, the computer attempts to determine the type of card and the resources it requires by reading its CIS. Sometimes the CIS contains enough information for you to use the card immediately. Other cards must be configured before you can use them.

Some card manufacturers use special software called enablers to support their cards. Enablers result in nonstandard configurations that can cause problems when installing another PC Card.

If Windows does not have built-in drivers for your PC Card and the card did not come with a Windows driver, it may not work under Windows. Contact the manufacturer of the PC

Card for information about operating the card under your version of Windows.

PC Card checklist

Make sure the card is compatible with your operating system.

Make sure the card is inserted properly into the slot.

Refer to

“Inserting and removing PC Cards” on page 82

for how to insert PC Cards, and to the documentation that came with the PC Card.

Make sure all cables are securely connected.

Make sure the computer has only one version of Card and

Socket Services loaded.

Occasionally a defective PC Card slips through quality control. If another PCMCIA-equipped computer is

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203 available, try the card in that machine. If the card malfunctions again, it may be defective.

Resolving PC Card problems

Here are some common problems and their solutions:

The slots appear to be dead. PC Cards that used to work no longer work.

To view the PC Card status:

1

Click the

My Computer

icon with the secondary button, then click

Properties

.

Windows displays the System Properties dialog box.

2

Click the

Hardware

tab.

3

Click the

Device Manager

button.

4

Double-click

PC Card (PCMCIA)

.

5

Double-click the device listed as your PC Card.

Windows displays your PC Card’s Properties dialog box. This dialog box contains information about your PC Card configuration and status.

The computer stops working (hangs) when you insert a

PC Card.

The problem may be caused by an I/O (input/output) conflict between the PCMCIA socket and another device in the system. Make sure each device has its own I/O base address.

Since all PC Cards share the same socket, each card is not required to have its own address.

Hot swapping (removing one PC Card and inserting another without turning the computer off) fails.

Follow this procedure before you remove a PC Card:

1

Click the

PC Card

icon on the taskbar.

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2

Click

Stop

xxxx

, where

xxxx

is the identifier for your PC

Card.

Windows XP displays a message saying you may safely remove the card.

3

Remove the card from the slot.

There is still a yellow exclamation point

( )

over the

PCMCIA controller icon in Device Manager (Windows

XP).

You’ve installed the PC Card as described in

“Using PC

Cards” on page 109 , but the system still reports the controller

with a yellow exclamation point ( ).

The PCMCIA.INI file may not be installed on your computer.

Install it, referring to the Recovery media for the installation procedure.

A PC Card error occurs.

Reinsert the card to make sure it is properly connected.

If the card is attached to an external device, check that the connection is secure.

Refer to the card’s documentation, which should contain a troubleshooting section.

Printer problems

This section lists some of the most common printer problems.

The printer does not print.

Check that the printer is connected to a working electrical outlet and is turned on.

Check that the printer has plenty of paper. Some printers will not start printing when there are just two or three sheets of paper left in the tray.

Make sure the printer cable is firmly attached to both the computer and the printer.

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