Guidelines for healthy foods and drinks supplied in school canteens

Guidelines for healthy foods and drinks supplied in school canteens

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

The

Australian Guide to Health Eating

is the national

Australian food selection guide. The guide is consistent with the

2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines

and visually represents the recommended proportion for consumption from each of the five food groups each day. Following a dietary pattern in these recommended proportions will provide enough of the nutrients essential for good health.

Vegetables – different types and colours, and legume/ beans

The

Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

What are the five food groups?

Five Food Groups Major foods in this group

• Dark green and cruciferous vegetables: bok choy, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts

• Orange vegetables: sweet potato, pumpkin, carrots

• Salad vegetables: lettuce, tomato, cucumber, capsicum

• Starchy vegetables: potatoes, sweet potato, taro, corn

• Legumes: dried peas, beans, lentils, chick peas

Fruit

• Pome fruits: apples and pears

• Citrus fruit: oranges, mandarins and grapefruit

• Stone fruit: apricots and peaches

• Tropical fruit: bananas, mangoes, pawpaw, and pineapple

• Berries

• Other fruits: grapes and passionfruit

Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain and/or high in fibre

• Wheat, oats, rice, rye, barley, millet, quinoa, and corn

Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans

Milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or their alternatives, mostly reduced fat

• Lean meats: Beef, lamb, pork, veal, kangaroo

• Lean poultry: Chicken, duck, emu, goose, turkey

• Fish and seafood: Fish, clams, crab, lobster, mussels, oysters, prawns, scallops

• Egg: chicken, duck

• Nuts and seeds: almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazel nuts, macadamia nuts, pine nuts, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, walnuts

• Beans/legumes: all beans, chickpeas, lentils, split peas, tofu

• Milks: long life, fat reduce or full cream milks – preferably unflavoured types, buttermilk, evaporated milk, powdered milk

• Soy or other beverages (fortified with at least 100mg calcium/100ml)

• Yoghurt: all yoghurts including reduced fat or full cream – without added sugar; soy yoghurt (calcium fortified)

• Cheese: cheddar, edam, gouda, ricotta, soy cheeses (calcium fortified)

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

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Discretionary foods and drinks

Some foods and drinks do not appear in the table above. The

2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines

refers to them as ‘Discretionary’. Discretionary choices are called that because they are not an essential or necessary part of healthy dietary patterns. Discretionary foods are high in kilojoules, saturated fat, added sugars, added salt, or alcohol. If chosen, they should be eaten only sometimes and in small amounts.

For younger children (up to about 8 years of age), discretionary choices are best avoided or limited to no more than ½ serve a day unless the child is taller or more active, in which case they could have

0-2 serves a day. Older children and adolescents who are more active and not above their healthy weight range could have up to 2 ½ serves a day, and older adolescents up to 3 serves a day.

A sample Discretionary serve could be: 2 scoops (75g) ice-cream, 1 (40g) doughnut, 1 can soft drink,

½ small bar (25g) chocolate, 12 (60g) fried hot chips, ¼ meat pie or pastie (full pie = 4 serves).

How many serves do children need?

How many serves of each of the five food groups a child needs each day will depend on their size, physical activity levels, stage of growth and whether they are male or female. The following table gives a guide for most healthy children to achieve their recommended minimum daily nutrient intake.

Additional serves of the five food groups or unsaturated spreads and oils or discretionary choices are needed only by children and adolescent who are taller, more active or in the higher end of a particular age band, to meet additional energy requirements.

Food Groups

Boys

Vegetables

Fruit

Grain (cereal)

Lean meats and alternatives

4 – 8 years

4 ½

1 ½

4

1 ½

Number Of Serves

9 – 11 years 12 – 13 years 14 – 18 years

5 5 ½ 5 ½

2

5

2 ½

2

6

2 ½

2

7

2 ½

Dairy and alternatives

Girls

Vegetables

2

4 – 8 years

4 ½

2 ½

9 – 11 years

5

3 ½ 3 ½

12 – 13 years 14 – 18 years

5 5

Fruit

Grain (cereal)

Lean meats and alternatives

Dairy and alternatives

1 ½

4

1 ½

1 ½

2

4

2 ½

3

2

5

2 ½

3 ½

2

7

2 ½

3 ½

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

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How much is a serve?

Food Groups

Vegetables – different types and colours, and legume/ beans

Serve Size

• ½ cup cooked green or orange vegetables (eg broccoli, spinach, carrots or pumpkin)

• ½ cup cooked dried or canned , peas or lentils

• 1 cup green leafy or raw salad vegetables, ½ cup sweet corn,

½ medium potato or other starchy vegetables (sweet potato, taro or cassava), 1 medium tomato

Fruit

Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain and/or high in fibre

Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans

• 1 medium apple, banana, orange or pear

• 2 small apricots, kiwi fruits or plums

• 1 cup diced or canned fruit (no added sugar)

• 1 slice bread, ½ medium roll or flat bread,

• ½ cup cooked rice, pasta, noodles, barley, buckwheat, semolina, polenta, bulgur or quinoa

• ½ cup cooked porridge, 2/3 cup wheat cereal flakes,

¼ cup muesli

• 3 crispbreads, 1 crumpet, 1 small English muffin or scone

• 65g cooked lean red meats such as beef, lamb, veal, pork, goat or kangaroo (about 90-100g raw)

• 80g cooked lean poultry such as chicken or turkey (100g raw)

• 100g cooked fish fillet (about 115g raw) or one small can of fish

• 2 large eggs (120g), 1 cup (150g) cooked or canned legumes/beans such as lentils, chick peas or split peas

• 30g nuts*, seeds, peanut* or almond butter *or tahini or other nut or seed paste

Milk, yoghurt, cheese and/ or their alternatives, mostly reduced fat

• 1 cup (250ml) milk, ½ cup (120ml) evaporated unsweetened milk, 2 slices

(40g) hard cheese, such as cheddar

• ½ cup (120g) ricotta cheese

• ¾ cup (200g) yoghurt

• 1 cup (250ml) soy, rice or other cereal drink with at least

100mg of added calcium per 100ml

*Check your school policy regarding the use of nuts and products containing nuts

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