Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual

C H A P T E R

4

Troubleshooting

This chapter contains information about the troubleshooting the Sun Storage J4500 array and includes locations and behaviors of the array enclosure status and fault

LEDs. The information is organized to describe external LEDs that can be viewed on the outside of the enclosure, and internal LEDs that can be viewed only with the main cover removed.

The following sections are included:

Section 4.1 “External Status LEDs” on page 4-1

Section 4.2 “Internal Disk Drive and Fan LEDs” on page 4-3

Section 4.3 “Diagnostic and Management Tools” on page 4-5

Section 4.4 “Troubleshooting Problems with the Array” on page 4-9

Section 4.5 “Resetting the Enclosure Hardware” on page 4-16

Section 4.6 “Clearing the Enclosure Zoning Password” on page 4-17

4.1

External Status LEDs

TABLE 4-1

lists and describes the external LEDs. The front and back panels are shown in

FIGURE 4-1

.

4-1

FIGURE 4-1

Sun Storage J4500 Array Front and Back Panel LEDs

TABLE 4-1

Front and Back Panel LEDs

Figure

Callout

1 & 9

Name

Enclosure locate button/LED

Color

White

2 & 10 System fault

3 & 11 System power

4

7

8

5

6

12

Top fault

Rear fault

Over temperature

PS fault

PS OK

SAS link

Amber

Green

Amber

Amber

Amber

Amber

Green

Green

Function

Operators can turn this LED on remotely to help locate the server in a crowded server room. Press to turn on or off.

Pressing the Locate LED/Switch for five seconds turns all indicators on for 15 seconds.

Alert/Service action is required.

On – Power is on.

Blinking – Standby power is on but main power is off.

Off – Power is off.

On – Hard disk or fan fault (service is required or should be scheduled).

On – Power supply or system controller fault (service is required).

System over temperature.

Service action required.

On – AC and DC OK.

Slow blink – AC OK.

Each SAS port has a SAS Link Activity LED:

On – 1 to 4 links are ready.

Blinking – Read/Write port activity.

Off – Link is lost.

4-2

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

TABLE 4-1

Front and Back Panel LEDs (Continued)

Figure

Callout

13

14

15

Name Color

SC ready to remove Blue

SC fault Amber

SC OK Green

Function

System Controller (SC) service action allowed.

Service action required.

Operational. No action required.

4.2

Internal Disk Drive and Fan LEDs

The array includes internal LEDs on the disk drives and the fan modules.

Note –

On fan modules, the green and amber (OK and Fault) LEDs might be on simultaneously. This indicates that one of the fans in the module has failed, the other fan is still operational.

FIGURE 4-2

shows the location of the internal LEDs and a close-up view of the disk drive and fan trays, including the symbols that identify the LEDs.

TABLE 4-2

lists the internal LEDs.

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-3

FIGURE 4-2

Disk Drive and Fan Tray LEDs (Fans located at the front of the enclosure)

2

3

4

5

TABLE 4-2

Figure

Callout

1

Internal LEDs

Name Color

Hard disk Ready to Remove

Hard disk Fault

Blue

Amber

Hard disk Status Green

Fan Fault Amber

Fan Status Green

Function

Service action is allowed.

Service action is required.

Unit is OK. Blinking = data transfer.

Fault (Service action required).

Unit is OK. (See Note, above).

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Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

4.3

4.3.1

4.3.2

Diagnostic and Management Tools

For the most part, you will need to use a combination of HBA and array management tools, log files, and enclosure LEDs to help isolate problems. However, available system level software, such as SunVTS™, may contain additional tools for problem identification/resolution.

SunVTS

SunVTS is the Sun Validation Test Suite, which provides a comprehensive diagnostic tool that tests and validates Sun hardware by verifying the connectivity and functionality of most hardware controllers and devices on Sun platforms. SunVTS software can be tailored with modifiable test instances and processor affinity features.

SunVTS 6.2 or later software might be preinstalled on some Sun servers or included as bootable Diagnostics CD. Booting the system with the CD in the server’s internal

DVD drive starts SunVTS software. Diagnostic tests run and write output to log files that the service technician can use to isolate problems.

Common Array Manager (CAM)

The Sun StorageTek Common Array Manager (CAM) software includes the Service

Advisor application, which provides guided wizards with system feedback for hardware replacement of Customer Replaceable Units (CRUs). In addition, Service

Advisor provides troubleshooting procedures for alarms.

Note –

All Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) are also CRUs in the J4500 array.

Before you can access Service Advisor procedures, you must have already installed the Common Array Manager software, as described in the Sun StorageTek Common

Array Manager User Guide for your version of CAM.

Enclosure management (including viewing the event log and upgrading enclosure firmware) and remote command line interface (CLI) functions are performed by the

Sun StorageTek Common Array Manager software.

The CRU replacement procedures available through the Sun StorageTek Common

Array Manager Service Advisor application include (but are not limited to):

Disks

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-5

4-6

Power Supplies

Fans

System Controller

Chassis

▼ To Access Service Advisor Procedures

To launch Service Advisor and access hardware replacement procedures:

1. Log on to the Sun Java Web Console on the management software host.

For example, https://management_host_address:6789

2. In the Storage section of the Sun Java Web Console page, select Sun StorageTek

Common Array Manager.

The navigation pane and the Storage System Summary page appear.

3. Select an array under Storage Systems.

4. At the top right of the Storage System Summary page, click the Service Advisor button.

The Service Advisor application is displayed in a separate window.

5. In the left pane, select the type of hardware replacement procedure you want to perform:

CRU/FRU Removal/Replacement Procedures

Array Utilities

Note –

If you see Service-only procedures listed, these are password protected for access by Sun service personnel only. Contact a Sun service representative for further information and assistance with service only procedures.

6. To view a procedure, in the right pane either select it or expand its category, and select the hardware component that corresponds to the procedure.

▼ To Reserve the Array for Maintenance

Do the following to reserve the array for maintenance. This action will alert other users that a service action is in progress when they login.

1. From the Service Advisor, click the link to reserve the array for maintenance.

2. Enter a description of the service action.

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

4.3.2.1

3. Select the estimated duration of the service action in hours from the pull-down.

4. Select the Reserve button.

5. Use the back arrow to return to the procedure.

▼ To Release the Array After Maintenance

Once the required maintenance has been performed, release the array for normal operation.

From Service Advisor, disable the reserve array function by selecting the

Release button.

Understanding the CAM Event Log

This section provides a listing of possible J4500 array events, descriptions, and where applicable, Service action recommendations.

Refer to the Sun StorageTek Common Array Manager User Guide for your version of

CAM for information on viewing system events and configuring automatic notifications.

The severity of an event in CAM is includes one of the following designations:

Down: Identifies a device or component as not functioning and in need of immediate service.

Critical: Identifies a device or component in which a significant error condition is detected that requires immediate service.

Major: Identifies a device or component in which a major error condition is detected and service may be required.

Minor: Identifies a device or component in which a minor error condition is detected or an event of significance is detected.

Note –

When Auto Service Request (ASR) is enabled, it monitors the array system health and performance and automatically notifies the Sun Technical Support Center when critical events occur. Critical alarms generate an Auto Service Request case.

The notifications enable SunService to respond faster and more accurately to critical on-site issues.

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-7

TABLE 4-3

CAM Events for the Sun Storage J4500 Array

Code Event Name Severity Description

xx.5.13

xx.5.19

xx.5.227

xx.5.586

ValueChangeEvent-.disk

ValueChangeEvent-.fan

ValueChangeEvent-.ps

ValueChangeEvent-.chassis

Major/

Critical

The Disk has changed state from OK to something else. Action: A disk may have been removed, or failed. Check the alarm log for additional events.

Major/

Critical

A fan has changed state from OK to something else. Action: Check fan LEDs to locate the fault and replace the faulty fan to ensure nominal system operating temperature.

Major/

Critical

A power supply has changed state from OK to something else. Action: check the event log and chassis fault LEDs to find the trouble. Replace the faulty power supply.

Major/

Critical

Chassis has had a negative state change. Action:

Look for other events that can help identify the problem, check chassis fault LEDs. Replace any failed components.

xx.5.590

ValueChangeEvent-.overTemperatureF

ailure

Major The system has detected a critical over-temperature. Action: This event should have shut down the array. Look for other events that can help identify the problem. Check the array’s cooling vents and environment. You will need to press the array’s power button to re-apply main power to the array, Check chassis fault LEDs and replace any failed components.

xx.5.591

ValueChangeEvent-.overTemperature

Warning

Major The system has detected a warning temperature.

Action: Look for other events that can help identify the problem. Check the array’s cooling vents and environment. Check chassis fault LEDs and replace any failed components.

xx.11.21

CommunicationEstablishedEvent.ib

xx.12.21

xx.12.31

xx.14.16

CommunicationLostEvent.ib

CommunicationLostEvent.oob

DiscoveryEvent

Minor Indicates that communication has been re-gained to the storage array via the in-band path.

Major/

Critical

Major/

Critical

Indicates that communication has been lost to the array, and that the last path successfully used was the in-band communication path.

Indicates that communication has been lost to the proxy host connected to the storage array.

Minor Indicates that the discovery of an array or proxy host containing one or more arrays has occurred.

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Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

TABLE 4-3

CAM Events for the Sun Storage J4500 Array (Continued)

Code Event Name

xx.41.13

ComponentRemoveEvent.disk

xx.41.19

ComponentRemoveEvent.fan

xx.41.227 ComponentRemoveEvent.ps

xx.75.42

RevisionDeltaEvent.revision

Severity Description

Major/

Critical

A disk has changed state from OK to a removed state. Action: Check the alarm log to determine whether the disk has failed or has been removed for maintenance.

Minor A fan has changed state from OK to a removed state. Action: Check the alarm log to determine whether the fan has failed or has been removed for maintenance.

Minor A power supply has changed state from OK to a removed state. Action: Check the alarm log to determine whether the power supply has failed or has been removed for maintenance.

Minor The firmware revision of the enclosure is not at baseline. Action: upgrade firmware to baseline.

4.4

4.4.1

Troubleshooting Problems with the

Array

The following sections describe how to troubleshoot problems you may experience with the J4500 array.

“Initial Start-up” on page 9

“Check the Event and Performance Logs” on page 10

“Using the Array Management Software to Monitor Enclosure Health” on page 11

“Array Link Problems” on page 11

“Disk Problems” on page 13

“Array Environment Problems” on page 15

“Power Problems” on page 16

Initial Start-up

If you are unable to see the array drives after powering on the array, check the following:

Ensure all cables are properly connected (power and SAS).

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-9

4.4.2

4.4.2.1

Be sure you are using SAS cables supported for use with the array. Using longer, or non-certified cables is not supported. For a list of supported cables, see

Section 3.1 “Options and Replaceable Components” on page 3-1 .

You should carefully follow the configuration rules listed in

Section 2.1

“Configuration and Cabling” on page 2-1 . Not following these rules could result

in an unsupported configuration.

Check the array indicator LEDs to make sure all components are operating normally and the link LEDs are green.

The proper startup sequence for the enclosure is to power-on the enclosure first, wait one minute, then power-up the server.

Check the Event and Performance Logs

The operating system event log is a good first place to start in identifying problems or potential issues with the enclosure or its disks. If you experience disk problems, such as disk errors or invalid read/writes, the system event log can help identify the problem disk.

Note –

By default, errors for the enclosure (temperature, voltage, device status), may not be logged in the system event log, but only in the array management software event log. If you want errors to be forwarded to the system event log, refer to the

HBA documentation to see if it supports this feature.

You may have problems with the array listed in multiple log files (system and HBA).

If this is the case, concentrate on recent errors that best relate to the problem. Try to pinpoint the time when problems began to appear. Search through the log files as soon as possible for when the problems first appeared—log files can quickly fill up with errors and some information may be lost.

Identifying Disks in the Array Enclosure

Disks in the array enclosure are typically identified by the operating system in sequential order in a list of 51 devices; the first 4 addresses (0-3) represent the array's four SAS expanders, the other 48 addresses (4-51) represent the 48 hard disks. Drives are mapped in numerical order as shown on the drive map label on the top of the array enclosure. Device names and address information depends on other mass storage devices attached to the server and where the array’s HBA is located in the

PCI bus boot order.

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Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

4.4.3

4.4.4

Using the Array Management Software to Monitor

Enclosure Health

Your J4500 array supports a powerful set of SMP (Serial Management Protocol) and

SES-2 (SCSI Enclosure Services) enclosure management features. Some or all of these features are available through supported management software (for example, the Sun

Common Array Manager, or the Sun StorageTek RAID Manager software) to provide a system administrator at the array-connected server or network-connected management console the following capabilities:

Monitor the enclosure status (on/off line status, component health)

Monitor the enclosure environment (voltage and temperature)

Remotely identify and locate enclosure components

Obtain FRU identification and status (expanders, hard disks, fans, power supplies)

Remove and install FRU components

Remotely reset the enclosure hardware

Remotely upgrade the enclosure’s firmware (expanders and hard disk—must use

CAM)

View the enclosure event log to aid in troubleshooting

Refer to the Sun Storage J4500 Array System Overview (820-3163) for more information on array management software.

Array Link Problems

You may encounter a problem where the server is unable to communicate with the array. Complete the following troubleshooting tasks to reestablish communications with the array.

Check the SAS link LEDs at the rear of the enclosure (see

Section 4.1 “External

Status LEDs” on page 4-1 ) to ensure the ports are properly communicating with

the HBA. Each SAS port has a SAS Link Activity LED. The following LED states will be viewable:

On – 1 to 4 links are ready.

Blink – Read/Write port activity.

Off – Link is lost.

If the link LED is off, check the SAS cables for proper connection. Ensure that the cables are supported for the enclosure (refer to

Section 3.1 “Options and

Replaceable Components” on page 3-1

).

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-11

4.4.4.1

If you can not reestablish communication with the server, you can try resetting the enclosure hardware. The enclosure hardware may be reset with the power on. See

Section 4.5 “Resetting the Enclosure Hardware” on page 4-16 . You may also

remotely reset the enclosure through the Sun Common Array Manager.

There may be a problem with SAS fabric you are using. Try using the redundant fabric. If you have daisy chained J4500 arrays, be sure to move all cable connections to the redundant fabric—only one SAS fabric (SAS A or SAS B) may be used per HBA port connection. Cross fabric connections on an array enclosure

(SAS A to SAS B) are not supported.

There may be a problem with the SAS cable. The cable might be damaged and either prevents communication, or it may allow only degraded communication

(which can manifest itself in poor array performance). The array comes with two cables, try attaching a new SAS cable.

Review the Sun and server operating system vendor knowledge base to see if the problem is a known issue with a solution, also see the Sun support site http://www.sun.com/support

. The J4500 array SAS expanders have firmware that may be upgraded as fixes and new features become available from Sun. For more information on upgrading enclosure firmware, see

Section 3.7 “Upgrading

Enclosure Firmware” on page 3-33 .

Switching SAS Cables or Making New Connections

In a single path environment:

If your J4500 array is connected to the StorageTek SAS

RAID External HBA, and you switch a cable from one port of the HBA to the other port on the HBA, you should wait long enough after the initial cable pull for all the physical hard drives shown in the GUI or through the CLI to be removed from the display. This prevents the problem of the controller attempting to remove drives at the same time it is reading the same drives on another port. If no display is available, you should wait at least 2 minutes between pull and reconnect.

In a multipath environment:

Since the J4500 array uses SATA drives, the potential for SATA affiliation conflicts exists. Conflict can occur when more than one initiator tries to access the drive via the same path (for example, two hosts attached to SAS A on a J4500 array), or if you move an established connection from one domain port to another (for example, from port 0 to port 1). Possible symptoms of SATA affiliation conflicts are: operating system hangs, zoning operations take longer than 10 minutes to complete, and/or disk utilities like “format” will not return device lists in a timely fashion. For more about SATA affiliations, see the Sun Storage J4500 Array System

Overview (820-3163).

4-12

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

4.4.5

Disk Problems

Issues with array disks might be identified by viewing the system event log, being alerted by your array management software, or by viewing the J4500 array’s LEDs. In the event of a disk failure, the disk may be replaced with the array online.

▼ To Replace a Disk

If the disk must be replaced, complete the following tasks:

1. Slide the J4500 array out of the rack far enough to remove the disk top cover panel. See

“To Remove the Hard Disk Drive Access Cover” on page 3-9

.

2. To replace a disk, use the operating system, or enclosure management software command to unmount the disk and prepare it for removal. This is required to isolate the disk and stop all read/write activity.

3. Identify the physical disk to be removed by looking for the blue ready-to-remove LED, or the amber failed LED, on the disk. Then, remove the disk. For step-by-step procedures for removing disks from the enclosure, see

“To Replace a Hard Disk Drive” on page 3-18

.

4. Replace the disk, then use the operating system or enclosure management software commands to remount the disk. If the disk is part of a RAID volume, it will automatically rebuild with the required data after replacement.

4.4.5.1

4.4.5.2

Guidelines for Removal and Replacement of RAID Storage

When removing and replacing RAID disks in the J4500 array, use the following guidelines:

Perform RAID disk removal and replacement procedures with the system powered on. That way, the HBA can update its RAID configuration information.

When removing and replacing disks, allow enough time between each operation for the HBA to update the RAID configuration information. When hot-plugging non-failed drives for test purposes, you should wait a full minute after removal before reinserting the drive.

Persistent Affiliation When Changing HBAs

When connecting your array to an HBA, it is possible that the SAS “affiliation” feature may cause problems if the array was previously connected to another HBA.

An affiliation is used by the SAS protocol to prevent multiple SAS initiators (HBAs)

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-13

4.4.5.3

from interfering with each other when communicating with SATA drives. If you encounter such a problem, affiliations may be removed by power cycling the array enclosure prior to connecting it to a different HBA.

If You Do Not See All of the 48 Disks

If you see only some of the available disks (for example, if you see only 20 or 28 of the total 48 disks), try the following:

Look through the vents at the back of the System Controller module to see if the 4 green expander heartbeat LEDs are blinking. If not, try power cycling the array.

If the problem occurs repeatedly, there might be a problem with the System

Controller module. Check in the Sun Common Array Manager (CAM) to see if the array is at firmware baseline, if not, you should upgrade the array firmware.

If updating the array firmware does not solve the problem, the System Controller module may need to be replaced. For step-by-step procedures for replacing the

System Controller module, , refer to

“To Replace the System Controller Module” on page 3-28

.

If you have moved SAS cables from one port to another, you may have SATA affiliation conflicts. Conflict can occur when more than one initiator tries to access the drive via the same path (for example, two hosts attached to SAS A on a J4500 array), or if you move an established connection from one domain port to another

(for example, from port 0 to port 1). Possible symptoms of SATA affiliation conflicts are: operating system hangs, zoning operations take longer than 10 minutes to complete, and/or disk utilities like “format” will not return device lists in a timely fashion. Refer to the chapters on zoning and multipathing in the Sun

Storage J4500 Array System Overview (820-3163) for proper initiator-to-disk access configuration. Also refer to the Sun StorageTek Common Array Manager Release Notes for the version of CAM being used.

4.4.5.4

4-14

Multipath Problems With Unsupported Drives

Only SATA hard disk drives supported for use with the J4500 array may be used for multipathing. If you install an unsupported drive, you might get the following error in the System Event Log and you will be unable to configure the drive for multipath:

Target:2, lun:0 doesn’t have a valid GUID, multi pathing for this drive is not enabled

This error means that the drive does not have a SAS WWN (World Wide Name). All drives supported for use with the J4500 array have a unique WWN. The WWN does not change even if the drive firmware is upgraded.

At the release of this document, the following Sun hard disk drives are supported for use in the J4500 array (check the label on the drive to verify it is a supported):

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

HUA7250SBSUN500G A90A Hitachi 500 GB SATA 390-0384-02

HUA7275SASUN750G A90A Hitachi 750 GB SATA 390-0379-02

HUA7210SASUN1.0T A90A Hitachi 1.0 TB SATA 390-0381-012

ST35002NSSUN500G SU0B Seagate 500GB SATA 390-0412-02

ST37502NSSUN750G SU0B Seagate 750GB SATA 390-0413-02

ST31000NSSUN1.0T SU0B Seagate 1.0 TB SATA 390-0414-02

Note –

The J4500 array is shipped from the factory with drives of the same capacity.

Mixing drives of different capacities in the array is unsupported. Refer to the Sun

Storage J4500 Array Product Notes (820-3162) for updated information.

4.4.6

Array Environment Problems

The array enclosure needs to operate within a specific temperature range (below 35

˚C or 95 ˚F). If the internal temperature is above that, the fans automatically increase in speed when a thermal threshold is reached. This could be a reaction to higher external ambient temperatures in the local environment. If the fan noise level and tone seem high, check to ensure there is no airflow restriction raising the enclosure’s internal temperature.

If an excessive temperature threshold is reached that could damage components in the enclosure, the J4500 array Over Temperature LED will light. If this happens do the following:

Use your array management software to check for a faulty fan. An enclosure fan is a hot-swappable and may be replaced with the power on. The fans include status

LEDs to identify a faulty fan. For step-by-step procedures for replacing enclosure fans, refer to

“To Replace a Fan Module” on page 3-12 .

Check that there is clear, uninterrupted airflow at the front and rear of the storage system.

Check for enclosure intake restrictions due to dust buildup and clear them.

Check for excessive recirculation of heated air from the rear of the array enclosure to the front.

Reduce the ambient temperature in the room where the array enclosure is racked.

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4-15

4.4.7

Power Problems

The J4500 array includes redundant, hot-swappable power supplies. If a power supply fails, you may be alerted by the array management software or the enclosure power supply status LEDs (an alert LED will light amber both at the front and rear of the enclosure when service is required). For step-by-step procedures for replacing an array power supply, see

“To Replace a Power Supply” on page 3-26 .

4.5

Resetting the Enclosure Hardware

In the event the array becomes non-responsive to host commands or you cannot see its disks, you may need to reset the array enclosure hardware. You can reset the array with the power on. The array takes about 1 minute to reset before relinking to the host.

Note –

The enclosure may be reset remotely using the Common Array Manager

(CAM) software.

▼ To Reset the Enclosure Hardware Using the

Reset Button

Resetting the array is done by pressing a recessed button at the rear of the enclosure

(see

FIGURE 4-3

). The array may also be reset remotely using the Sun Common Array

Manager.

Note –

This procedure should only be performed after you’ve checked of other problems at the server and have shut down all server processes that are actively accessing the J4500 array.

1. At the back of the J4500 array, locate the enclosure Reset button (see

FIGURE 4-3

).

2. Using a paper clip or stylus, press and release the recessed button on the back panel.

The reset process takes about 1 minute. After that, the server should see the array disks.

4-16

Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

FIGURE 4-3

Enclosure Reset Button Location

Figure Legend

1

Enclosure Reset button

4.6

Clearing the Enclosure Zoning Password

When creating storage zones on your J4500 array, use the Common Array Manager

(CAM). CAM allows you to set a zoning password for each of the array’s SAS domains (each domain equates to one of the array’s SAS fabrics: A or B). The zoning passwords are stored in the array expanders and in CAM, and are used to prevent unauthorized changes to storage zones. If the array’s zoning password is ever forgotten, or becomes corrupt, it can be cleared using the enclosure zoning password clear button on the back of the J4500 array.

Note –

Using the enclosure zoning password clear button clears the zoning password for both of the J4500 array’s SAS domains. It does not clear zoning configurations.

After clearing the zoning password on the array enclosure, you will also need to clear the zoning password for each of the array’s SAS domains stored in CAM. This can be done from the CAM management host. Once the password is cleared in both places, you can use CAM to assign a new password to each of the array’s SAS domains.

Chapter 4 Troubleshooting

4-17

Note –

Clearing the password in both places is important to ensure the passwords stored in the array and in CAM match. Some CAM array maintence operations use the enclosure zone password during execution to ensure the action is authorized.

▼ To Clear the Enclosure Zoning Password

Clearing the enclosure zoning password is done by pressing a recessed button at the rear of the array. This operation may be performed with the enclosure running.

1. At the back of the J4500 array, locate the Enclosure Zoning Password Clear button (see

FIGURE 4-4

).

2. Using a paper clip, press and hold the recessed button on the back panel for five seconds and then release.

The enclosure zoning password for both SAS fabrics (A and B) is cleared.

FIGURE 4-4

Enclosure Zoning Password Clear Button

Figure Legend

1

Enclosure Zoning Password Clear button

3. From the CAM management host, select Clear password from the

Administration page and saving the setting for both of the array’s SAS domains.

Once that is done, you can assign new zoning passwords using CAM.

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Sun Storage J4500 Array Service Manual • March 2013

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