Manual 13824619

Manual 13824619

Section 1 Seats and Restraint Systems

Here you’ll find information about the seats in your vehicle and how to use your safety belts properly. You can also learn about some things you should not do with air bags and safety belts.

1

-

2

1

-

8

Seats and Seat Controls

Safety Belts: They’re for Everyone

1

-

13 Here Are Questions Many People Ask About

Safety Belts

--

and the Answers

1

-

14 How to Wear Safety Belts Properly

1

-

14 Driver Position

1

-

22 Safety Belt Use During Pregnancy

1

-

23 Right Front Passenger Position

1

-

23 Air Bag Systems

1

-

33 Safety Belt Pretensioners

1

-

33 Center Front Passenger Position

1

-

34 Rear Seat Passengers

1

-

39 Rear Safety Belt Comfort Guides for Children

1

and Small Adults

-

41 Children

1

-

44 Child Restraints

1

-

55 Larger Children

1

-

58 Safety Belt Extender

1

-

58 Checking Your Restraint Systems

1

-

58 Replacing Restraint System Parts After a Crash

1-

1-1

Seats and Seat Controls

This section tells you about the power seats

--

how to adjust them, and also about the reclining front seatbacks, memory seats, lumbar adjustments and heated seats.

Power Seats

The power seat controls, located on the sides of the front seats, move and adjust the angle of the front seats.

D Moving the seat cushion control (A) forward or rearward moves the entire seat.

D Moving the seat cushion control (A) up or down adjusts the seat height.

D Lifting up or pressing down on the front part of the seat control (A) adjusts the front angle of the seat cushion.

D Lifting up or pressing down on the rear part of the seat control (A) adjusts the rear angle of the seat cushion.

D Lifting up or pressing down on the rear part of the recline control (B) will also adjust the position of the safety belt height adjuster.

1-2

Four-Way Power Lumbar Control

(If Equipped)

If your vehicle has this feature, the driver’s and passenger’s seatback lumbar support can be adjusted four ways by moving the single switch located on the side of the seat.

To increase the lumbar support, push the switch forward.

To decrease the support, push the switch backward. To adjust the location of the lumbar support, push the switch upward or downward.

Keep in mind that as your seating position changes, as it may during long trips, so should the position of your lumbar support. Adjust the seat as needed.

If you have the optional personalization package, the power lumbar control can be programmed for memory recall. For more information, see “Memory and

Personalization Features” in the Index.

Massaging Lumbar (If Equipped)

Push the top of the lumbar control where it is marked

AUTO briefly to activate the massage feature.

The massage cycle will run continuously for up to

10 minutes and can be interrupted by pushing the lumbar control down briefly. The lumbar support can be adjusted during the massage cycle by moving the switch forward to increase support and rearward to decrease support. The massage cycle will continue to run even if the ignition is turned to OFF, unless interrupted.

Four-Way Rear Power Lumbar

(If Equipped)

Four

way lumbar, without the massage feature, is also available for the outboard rear seating positions. To activate the rear lumbar feature, push forward on the switch located on the rear door trim to increase support or rearward to decrease support. The lumbar switch can also be moved up and down to adjust the location of the support.

1-3

Adaptive Seat Control (Option)

The adaptive seat control is located on the outboard side of each front seat. With the ignition in ON, first use the power seat control to get the proper position.

Then press the top of the control where it is marked

AUTO. The system will inflate the cushion and take a reading, then automatically deflate the cushion to a suggested level of comfort, by distributing the pressure evenly.

You may still wish to further adjust the overall firmness or softness of the seat cushion. To get to your desired level of comfort, hold the control up to increase the firmness, or down for less firmness. When you let go of the control, the seat will then automatically readjust to your desired level of comfort.

You will also need to adjust the lumbar support. To increase the lumbar support, push forward on the control and to decrease support, push rearward on the control.

(The lumbar will then automatically adjust to your body’s positioning for the duration of the trip in two

minute cycles.)

If you exit the vehicle after the system has been activated and the seat is left unoccupied for more than two minutes, the system will deflate. You will then need to readjust the lumbar support upon returning to your vehicle.

To turn off the adaptive seat feature while still in your vehicle, press the control down briefly. The seat will also deflate when the ignition is turned to OFF.

1-4

Memory Seat, Mirrors and Steering

Wheel (Option)

The controls for these features are located on the driver’s door panel, and are used to program and recall previous settings.

Adjust the driver’s seat (including the lumbar adjustments), both the outside mirrors and steering wheel to a comfortable position and then press the SET button. Within five seconds, press button 1.

A second mirror, seating and steering wheel position can be programmed by repeating the above steps and pressing button 2. Each time a memory button is pressed, a single beep will sound. Each time button 1 or

2 is pressed, the memory positions will be recalled. Two personalized exit positions can be set by first recalling the driving position (1 or 2), positioning the wheel and seat in the desired exit positions and then pressing the

SET button and, within five seconds, pressing the EXIT button. the exit position for either previously set driver can be recalled by pressing the EXIT button.

If you use the remote keyless entry transmitter to enter your vehicle, automatic seat and mirror movement will occur. The numbers on the back of the transmitters,

1 and 2, correspond directly to the numbers on the buttons on the door panel and each seat and mirror can be programmed to suit driver 1 or 2.

When the key is placed in the ignition in the OFF position or when the unlock button is pressed on the transmitter, the seats and mirrors will automatically adjust to the programmed position.

Programming for automatic mirror and/or seat movement is done through the Driver Information

Center (DIC). You can choose to either select or not select automatic seat and/or mirror movement using the transmitter or by placing your key in the ignition. For programming information, see “Memory and

Personalization Features” in the Index.

1-5

Heated Seats (Option)

heat in approximately two minutes. To heat just the seatback, push the BACK ONLY button once, after first activating the heated seat feature. To turn off the heat in the seatback, push the button again. The feature will shut off when the ignition is turned to OFF.

Reclining Front Seatbacks

Your vehicle may be equipped with heated front and rear seats. The control buttons are located on the armrests.

The HEAT/OFF button controls the temperature settings

HI, MED and LO. The other button is to choose BACK

ONLY heating. The LO setting warms the seatback and cushion until the seat approximates body temperature.

The MED and HI settings heat the seatback and seat cushion to a slightly higher temperature, and the BACK

ONLY heats only the seatback. The temperature can be adjusted by pushing the button from HI to LO or, until the desired setting is reached. You will be able to feel

1-6

Press the recliner control (B), located on the side of the seat, forward or rearward to adjust the seatback.

Push the recliner control (B) up or down to adjust the safety belt tower.

But don’t have a seatback reclined if your vehicle is moving.

CAUTION:

Sitting in a reclined position when your vehicle is in motion can be dangerous. Even if you buckle up, your safety belts can’t do their job when you’re reclined like this.

The shoulder belt can’t do its job. In a crash you could go into it, receiving neck or other injuries.

The lap belt can’t do its job either. In a crash the belt could go up over your abdomen. The belt forces would be there, not at your pelvic bones.

This could cause serious internal injuries.

For proper protection when the vehicle is in motion, have the seatback upright. Then sit well back in the seat and wear your safety belt properly.

1-7

Head Restraints

Slide the head restraint up or down so that the top of the restraint is closest to the top of your ears. This position reduces the chance of a neck injury in a crash.

On some models, the head restraints tilt forward and rear also.

Some rear seats have adjustable head restraints. Slide an adjustable head restraint up or down so that the top of the restraint is closest to the top of your ears. This position reduces the chance of a neck injury in a crash.

Safety Belts: They’re for Everyone

This part of the manual tells you how to use safety belts properly. It also tells you some things you should not do with safety belts.

And it explains the air bag system.

CAUTION:

Don’t let anyone ride where he or she can’t wear a safety belt properly. If you are in a crash and you’re not wearing a safety belt, your injuries can be much worse. You can hit things inside the vehicle or be ejected from it. You can be seriously injured or killed. In the same crash, you might not be if you are buckled up. Always fasten your safety belt, and check that your passengers’ belts are fastened properly too.

1-8

CAUTION:

It is extremely dangerous to ride in a cargo area, inside or outside of a vehicle. In a collision, people riding in these areas are more likely to be seriously injured or killed. Do not allow people to ride in any area of your vehicle that is not equipped with seats and safety belts. Be sure everyone in your vehicle is in a seat and using a safety belt properly.

Your vehicle has a light that comes on as a reminder to buckle up. (See “Safety Belt

Reminder Light” in the Index.)

In most states and Canadian provinces, the law says to wear safety belts. Here’s why: They work.

You never know if you’ll be in a crash. If you do have a crash, you don’t know if it will be a bad one.

A few crashes are mild, and some crashes can be so serious that even buckled up a person wouldn’t survive.

But most crashes are in between. In many of them, people who buckle up can survive and sometimes walk away. Without belts they could have been badly hurt or killed.

After more than 30 years of safety belts in vehicles, the facts are clear. In most crashes buckling up does matter ... a lot!

1-9

Why Safety Belts Work

When you ride in or on anything, you go as fast as it goes.

Take the simplest vehicle. Suppose it’s just a seat on wheels.

1-10

Put someone on it.

Get it up to speed. Then stop the vehicle. The rider doesn’t stop.

The person keeps going until stopped by something.

In a real vehicle, it could be the windshield ...

1-11

or the instrument panel ...

1-12

or the safety belts!

With safety belts, you slow down as the vehicle does.

You get more time to stop. You stop over more distance, and your strongest bones take the forces. That’s why safety belts make such good sense.

Here Are Questions Many People Ask

About Safety Belts

--

and the Answers

Q:

Won’t I be trapped in the vehicle after an accident if I’m wearing a safety belt?

A:

You could be

--

whether you’re wearing a safety belt or not. But you can unbuckle a safety belt, even if you’re upside down. And your chance of being conscious during and after an accident, so you can unbuckle and get out, is much greater if you are belted.

Q:

If my vehicle has air bags, why should I have to wear safety belts?

A:

Air bags are in many vehicles today and will be in most of them in the future. But they are supplemental systems only; so they work with safety belts

--

not instead of them. Every air bag system ever offered for sale has required the use of safety belts. Even if you’re in a vehicle that has air bags, you still have to buckle up to get the most protection. That’s true not only in frontal collisions, but especially in side and other collisions.

Q:

If I’m a good driver, and I never drive far from home, why should I wear safety belts?

A:

You may be an excellent driver, but if you’re in an accident

--

even one that isn’t your fault

--

you and your passengers can be hurt. Being a good driver doesn’t protect you from things beyond your control, such as bad drivers.

Most accidents occur within 25 miles (40 km) of home. And the greatest number of serious injuries and deaths occur at speeds of less than

40 mph (65 km/h).

Safety belts are for everyone.

1-13

How to Wear Safety Belts Properly

Adults

This part is only for people of adult size.

Be aware that there are special things to know about safety belts and children. And there are different rules for smaller children and babies. If a child will be riding in your vehicle, see the part of this manual called

“Children.” Follow those rules for everyone’s protection.

First, you’ll want to know which restraint systems your vehicle has.

We’ll start with the driver position.

Driver Position

This part describes the driver’s restraint system.

Lap-Shoulder Belt

The driver has a lap

shoulder belt. Here’s how to wear it properly.

1. Close and lock the door.

2. Adjust the seat (to see how, see “Seats” in the Index) so you can sit up straight.

3. Pick up the latch plate and pull the belt across you.

Don’t let it get twisted.

The lap

shoulder belt may lock if you pull the belt across you very quickly. If this happens, let the belt go back slightly to unlock it. Then pull the belt across you more slowly.

1-14

4. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks.

Be sure to use the correct buckle when buckling your lap

shoulder belt. If you find that the latch plate will not go fully into the buckle, see if you are using the buckle for the center passenger position.

Pull up on the latch plate to make sure it is secure.

If the belt isn’t long enough, see “Safety Belt

Extender” at the end of this section.

Make sure the release button on the buckle is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.

The lap part of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the thighs. In a crash, this applies force to the strong pelvic bones. And you’d be less likely to slide under the lap belt. If you slid under it, the belt would apply force at your abdomen. This could cause serious or even fatal injuries. The shoulder belt should go over the shoulder and across the chest. These parts of the body are best able to take belt restraining forces.

The safety belt locks if there’s a sudden stop or crash, or if you pull the belt very quickly out of the retractor.

1-15

Shoulder Belt Height Adjuster

Before you begin to drive, move the shoulder belt adjuster to the height that is right for you.

To move it down, press down on the power seat recline control and move the height adjuster to the desired position. You can move the adjuster up just by pushing up on the power seat recline control. After you move the adjuster to where you want it, try to move it down without pushing the power seat recline control to make sure it has locked into position.

Adjust the height so that the shoulder portion of the belt is centered on your shoulder. The belt should be away from your face and neck, but not falling off your shoulder.

Shoulder Belt Tightness Adjustment

Your vehicle may have a shoulder belt tightness adjustment feature. You can tell if your vehicle has this feature by following the steps below. If you can add a small amount of slack, your vehicle has this feature. If the shoulder belt seems too tight, adjust it before you begin to drive.

1. Sit well back in the seat.

2. Pull the shoulder belt all the way out of the retractor.

3. Let the belt go back all the way.

1-16

4. Now you can add a small amount of slack. Lean forward slightly, then sit back. If you’ve added more than 1 inch (25 mm) of slack, pull the shoulder belt out as you did before and start again.

If you move around in the vehicle enough, or if you pull out the shoulder belt, the belt will become tight again. If this happens, you can reset it.

CAUTION:

For many people, it takes two hands to adjust the shoulder belt for tightness because a lot of webbing must be pulled out. If you ever tried to do this while driving, you could lose control of the vehicle. Adjust your shoulder belt for tightness only when your vehicle isn’t moving.

1-17

Q:

What’s wrong with this?

CAUTION:

You can be seriously hurt if your shoulder belt is too loose. In a crash, you would move forward too much, which could increase injury. The shoulder belt should fit against your body. Don’t allow more than 1 inch (25 mm) of slack.

A:

The shoulder belt is too loose. It won’t give nearly as much protection this way.

1-18

Q:

What’s wrong with this?

CAUTION:

You can be seriously injured if your belt is buckled in the wrong place like this. In a crash, the belt would go up over your abdomen. The belt forces would be there, not at the pelvic bones. This could cause serious internal injuries.

Always buckle your belt into the buckle nearest you.

A:

The belt is buckled in the wrong place.

1-19

Q:

What’s wrong with this?

A:

The shoulder belt is worn under the arm. It should be worn over the shoulder at all times.

1-20

CAUTION:

You can be seriously injured if you wear the shoulder belt under your arm. In a crash, your body would move too far forward, which would increase the chance of head and neck injury.

Also, the belt would apply too much force to the ribs, which aren’t as strong as shoulder bones.

You could also severely injure internal organs like your liver or spleen.

Q:

What’s wrong with this?

CAUTION:

You can be seriously injured by a twisted belt. In a crash, you wouldn’t have the full width of the belt to spread impact forces. If a belt is twisted, make it straight so it can work properly, or ask your dealer to fix it.

A:

The belt is twisted across the body.

1-21

Safety Belt Use During Pregnancy

Safety belts work for everyone, including pregnant women. Like all occupants, they are more likely to be seriously injured if they don’t wear safety belts.

To unlatch the belt, just push the button on the buckle.

The belt should go back out of the way.

Before you close the door, be sure the belt is out of the way. If you slam the door on it, you can damage both the belt and your vehicle.

A pregnant woman should wear a lap

shoulder belt, and the lap portion should be worn as low as possible, below the rounding, throughout the pregnancy.

1-22

The best way to protect the fetus is to protect the mother. When a safety belt is worn properly, it’s more likely that the fetus won’t be hurt in a crash. For pregnant women, as for anyone, the key to making safety belts effective is wearing them properly.

Right Front Passenger Position

To learn how to wear the right front passenger’s safety belt properly, see “Driver Position” earlier in this section.

The right front passenger’s safety belt works the same way as the driver’s safety belt

--

except for one thing. If you ever pull the lap portion of the belt out all the way, you will engage the child restraint locking feature. If this happens, just let the belt go back all the way and start again.

Air Bag Systems

This part explains the frontal and side impact air bag systems.

Your vehicle has air bags

--

a frontal air bag for the driver and another frontal air bag for the right front passenger. Your vehicle also has a side impact air bag for the driver and another side impact air bag for the right front passenger. Your vehicle may also have a side impact air bag for each of the two rear seat outboard passenger positions.

If your vehicle has side impact air bags for each of the two rear seat outboard passenger positions, it will say

AIR BAG on each side of the rear seatback closest to the door.

Frontal air bags are designed to help reduce the risk of injury from the force of an inflating frontal air bag. But these air bags must inflate very quickly to do their job and comply with federal regulations.

1-23

Here are the most important things to know about the air bag systems:

CAUTION:

You can be severely injured or killed in a crash if you aren’t wearing your safety belt

--

even if you have air bags. Wearing your safety belt during a crash helps reduce your chance of hitting things inside the vehicle or being ejected from it. Air bags are “supplemental restraints” to the safety belts. All air bags are designed to work with safety belts but don’t replace them.

CAUTION: (Continued)

CAUTION: (Continued)

Frontal air bags for the driver and right front passenger are designed to work only in moderate to severe crashes where the front of your vehicle hits something. They aren’t designed to inflate at all in rollover, rear, side or low

speed frontal crashes. And, for unrestrained occupants, frontal air bags may provide less protection in frontal crashes than more forceful air bags have provided in the past. Side impact air bags are designed to inflate only in moderate to severe crashes where something hits the side of your vehicle. They aren’t designed to inflate in frontal, in rollover or in rear crashes. Everyone in your vehicle should wear a safety belt properly

--

whether or not there’s an air bag for that person.

1-24

CAUTION:

Both frontal and side impact air bags inflate with great force, faster than the blink of an eye. If you’re too close to an inflating air bag, as you would be if you were leaning forward, it could seriously injure you. Safety belts help keep you in position for air bag inflation before and during a crash. Always wear your safety belt, even with frontal air bags. The driver should sit as far back as possible while still maintaining control of the vehicle. Occupants should not lean on or sleep against the door.

CAUTION:

Anyone who is up against, or very close to, any air bag when it inflates can be seriously injured or killed. Air bags plus lap

shoulder belts offer the best protection for adults, but not for young children and infants. Neither the vehicle’s safety belt system nor its air bag system is designed for them. Young children and infants need the protection that a child restraint system can provide. Always secure children properly in your vehicle. To read how, see the part of this manual called “Children.”

1-25

How the Air Bag Systems Work

Where are the air bags?

United States Canada

There is an air bag readiness light on the instrument panel, which shows the words AIR BAG or an air bag symbol.

The system checks the air bag electrical system for malfunctions. The light tells you if there is an electrical problem. See “Air Bag Readiness Light” in the Index for more information.

The driver’s frontal air bag is in the middle of the steering wheel.

1-26

The right front passenger’s frontal air bag is in the instrument panel on the passenger’s side.

The driver’s side impact air bag is in the side of the driver’s seatback closest to the door.

1-27

The right front passenger’s side impact air bag is in the side of the passenger’s seatback closest to the door.

The side impact air bags for the rear seat outboard passenger positions are in the sides of the rear seatback closest to the doors.

1-28

CAUTION:

If something is between an occupant and an air bag, the bag might not inflate properly or it might force the object into that person. The path of an inflating air bag must be kept clear. Don’t put anything between an occupant and an air bag, and don’t attach or put anything on the steering wheel hub or on or near any other air bag covering and don’t let seat covers block the inflation path of a side impact air bag.

When should an air bag inflate?

The driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags are designed to inflate in moderate to severe frontal or near

frontal crashes. The frontal air bags are designed to inflate only if the impact speed is above the system’s designed “threshold level.” If your vehicle goes straight into a wall that doesn’t move or deform, the threshold level is about 9 to 15 mph (14 to 24 km/h). The threshold level can vary, however, with specific vehicle design, so that it can be somewhat above or below this range. If your vehicle strikes something that will move or deform, such as a parked car, the threshold level will be higher. The driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags are not designed to inflate in rollovers, side impacts, or rear impacts, because inflation would not help the occupant.

The side impact air bags are designed to inflate in moderate to severe side crashes. A side impact air bag will inflate if the crash severity is above the system’s designed “threshold level.” The threshold level can vary with specific vehicle design. Side impact air bags are not designed to inflate in frontal or near

frontal impacts, rollovers or rear impacts, because inflation would not help the occupant. A side impact air bag will only deploy on the side of the vehicle that is struck.

In any particular crash, no one can say whether an air bag should have inflated simply because of the damage to a vehicle or because of what the repair costs were. For frontal air bags, inflation is determined by the angle of the impact and how quickly the vehicle slows down in frontal and near

frontal impacts. For side impact air bags, inflation is determined by the location and severity of the impact.

1-29

What makes an air bag inflate?

In an impact of sufficient severity, the air bag sensing system detects that the vehicle is in a crash. For both frontal and side impact air bags, the sensing system triggers a release of gas from the inflator, which inflates the air bag. The inflator, air bag and related hardware are all part of the air bag modules inside the steering wheel, instrument panel and the side of the front seatbacks and behind the rear seatbacks closest to the door.

How does an air bag restrain?

In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions, even belted occupants can contact the steering wheel or the instrument panel. In moderate to severe side collisions, even belted occupants can contact the inside of the vehicle. The air bag supplements the protection provided by safety belts. Air bags distribute the force of the impact more evenly over the occupant’s upper body, stopping the occupant more gradually. But the frontal air bags would not help you in many types of collisions, including rollovers, rear impacts, and side impacts, primarily because an occupant’s motion is not toward the air bag. Side impact air bags would not help you in many types of collisions, including frontal or near frontal collisions, rollovers, and rear impacts, primarily because an occupant’s motion is not toward those air bags. Air bags should never be regarded as anything more than a supplement to safety belts, and then only in moderate to severe frontal or near

frontal collisions for the driver’s and right front passenger’s frontal air bags, and only in moderate to severe side collisions for the side impact air bags.

What will you see after an air bag inflates?

After an air bag inflates, it quickly deflates, so quickly that some people may not even realize the air bag inflated. Some components of the air bag module

--

the steering wheel hub for the driver’s air bag, the instrument panel for the right front passenger’s bag, the side of the seatback closest to the door for the side impact air bags

--

will be hot for a short time. The parts of the bag that come into contact with you may be warm, but not too hot to touch. There will be some smoke and dust coming from the vents in the deflated air bags. Air bag inflation doesn’t prevent the driver from seeing or being able to steer the vehicle, nor does it stop people from leaving the vehicle.

1-30

CAUTION:

When an air bag inflates, there is dust in the air.

This dust could cause breathing problems for people with a history of asthma or other breathing trouble. To avoid this, everyone in the vehicle should get out as soon as it is safe to do so.

If you have breathing problems but can’t get out of the vehicle after an air bag inflates, then get fresh air by opening a window or a door.

Your vehicle has a feature that will automatically unlock the doors and turn the interior lamps on when the air bags inflate (if battery power is available). You can lock the doors again and turn the interior lamps off by using the door lock and interior lamp controls.

In many crashes severe enough to inflate an air bag, windshields are broken by vehicle deformation.

Additional windshield breakage may also occur from the right front passenger air bag.

D Air bags are designed to inflate only once. After an air bag inflates, you’ll need some new parts for your air bag system. If you don’t get them, the air bag system won’t be there to help protect you in another crash. A new system will include air bag modules and possibly other parts. The service manual for your vehicle covers the need to replace other parts.

D Your vehicle is equipped with a crash sensing and diagnostic module, which records information about the frontal air bag system. The module records information about the readiness of the system, when the system commands air bag inflation and driver’s safety belt usage at deployment or in a near

deployment crash. Some modules also record speed, engine rpm, brake and throttle data.

D Let only qualified technicians work on your air bag systems. Improper service can mean that an air bag system won’t work properly. See your dealer for service.

1-31

NOTICE:

If you damage the covering for the driver’s or the right front passenger’s air bag, or the air bag covering on the driver’s, right front passenger’s or rear seatback, the bag may not work properly.

You may have to replace the air bag module in the steering wheel, both the air bag module and the instrument panel for the right front passenger’s air bag, or both the air bag module and seatback for the side impact air bag. Do not open or break the air bag coverings.

Servicing Your Air Bag-Equipped Vehicle

Air bags affect how your vehicle should be serviced.

There are parts of the air bag systems in several places around your vehicle. Your dealer and the service manual have information about servicing your vehicle and the air bag systems. To purchase a service manual, see

“Service and Owner Publications” in the Index.

CAUTION:

For up to 10 seconds after the ignition key is turned off and the battery is disconnected, an air bag can still inflate during improper service. You can be injured if you are close to an air bag when it inflates. Avoid yellow connectors. They are probably part of the air bag systems. Be sure to follow proper service procedures, and make sure the person performing work for you is qualified to do so.

The air bag systems do not need regular maintenance.

1-32

Safety Belt Pretensioners

Your vehicle has safety belt pretensioners. You’ll find them on the buckle end of the safety belts for the driver and right front passenger. They help the safety belts reduce a person’s forward movement in a moderate to severe crash in which the front of the vehicle hits something.

Pretensioners work only once. If they activate in a crash, you’ll need to get new ones, and probably other new parts for your safety belt system. See “Replacing

Restraint System Parts After a Crash” in the Index.

Center Front Passenger Position

Lap Belt

If your vehicle has a front bench seat, someone can sit in the center position.

When you sit in the center front seating position, you have a lap safety belt, which has no retractor. To make the belt longer, tilt the latch plate and pull it along the belt.

1-33

Rear Seat Passengers

It’s very important for rear seat passengers to buckle up!

Accident statistics show that unbelted people in the rear seat are hurt more often in crashes than those who are wearing safety belts.

Rear passengers who aren’t safety belted can be thrown out of the vehicle in a crash. And they can strike others in the vehicle who are wearing safety belts.

Rear Seat Passenger Positions

To make the belt shorter, pull its free end as shown until the belt is snug.

Buckle, position and release it the same way as the lap part of a lap

shoulder belt. If the belt isn’t long enough, see “Safety Belt Extender” at the end of this section.

Make sure the release button on the buckle is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.

Lap

-

Shoulder Belt

All three rear seating positions have lap

shoulder belts.

Here’s how to wear one properly.

1-34

1. Pick up the latch plate and pull the belt across you.

Don’t let it get twisted.

The shoulder belt may lock if you pull the belt across you very quickly. If this happens, let the belt go back slightly to unlock it. Then pull the belt across you more slowly.

2. Push the latch plate into the buckle until it clicks.

If the belt stops before it reaches the buckle, tilt the latch plate and keep pulling until you can buckle it.

Pull up on the latch plate to make sure it is secure.

If the belt is not long enough, see “Safety Belt

Extender” at the end of this section. Make sure the release button on the buckle is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.

1-35

3. To make the lap part tight, pull down on the buckle end of the belt as you pull up on the shoulder part.

The lap part of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the thighs. In a crash, this applies force to the strong pelvic bones. And you’d be less likely to slide under the lap belt. If you slid under it, the belt would apply force at your abdomen. This could cause serious or even fatal injuries. The shoulder belt should go over the shoulder and across the chest.

These parts of the body are best able to take belt restraining forces.

1-36

The safety belt locks if there’s a sudden stop or a crash, or if you pull the belt very quickly out of the retractor.

The rear outboard seating positions may have a shoulder belt tightness adjustment feature. You can tell if your vehicle has this feature by following the steps below. If you can add a small amount of slack, your vehicle has this feature.

If the shoulder belt seems too tight:

1. Sit well back in the seat.

2. Pull the shoulder belt all the way out of the retractor.

3. Let belt go back all the way.

4. Now you can add a small amount of slack. Lean forward slightly, then sit back. If you’ve added more than 1 inch (25 mm) of slack, pull the shoulder belt out as you did before and start again.

If you move around in the vehicle enough or if you pull out the shoulder belt, the belt will become tight again. If this happens, you can reset it.

1-37

CAUTION:

You can be seriously hurt if your shoulder belt is too loose. In a crash, you would move forward too much, which could increase injury. The shoulder belt should fit against your body.

To unlatch the belt, just push the button on the buckle.

1-38

Rear Safety Belt Comfort Guides for

Children and Small Adults

Rear shoulder belt comfort guides will provide added safety belt comfort for children who have outgrown child restraints and for small adults. When installed on a shoulder belt, the comfort guide pulls the belt away from the neck and head.

There is one guide for each outside passenger position in the rear seat. To provide added safety belt comfort for children who have outgrown child restraints and for smaller adults, the comfort guides may be installed on the shoulder belts. Here’s how to install a comfort guide and use the safety belt:

1. Remove the guide from its storage pocket on the top of the seatback.

1-39

2. Slide the guide under and past the belt. The elastic cord must be under the belt. Then, place the guide over the belt, and insert the two edges of the belt into the slots of the guide.

3. Be sure that the belt is not twisted and it lies flat.

The elastic cord must be under the belt and the guide on top.

1-40

4. Buckle, position and release the safety belt as described in “Rear Seat Passenger Positions” earlier in this section. Make sure that the shoulder belt crosses the shoulder.

To remove and store the comfort guides, squeeze the belt edges together so that you can take them out from the guides. Slide the guide into its storage pocket on the top of the seatback.

Children

Everyone in a vehicle needs protection! That includes infants and all children smaller than adult size. Neither the distance traveled nor the age and size of the traveler changes the need, for everyone, to use safety restraints.

In fact, the law in every state in the United States and in every Canadian province says children up to some age must be restrained while in a vehicle.

Smaller Children and Babies

CAUTION:

Children who are up against, or very close to, any air bag when it inflates can be seriously injured or killed. Air bags plus lap

shoulder belts offer the best protection for adults, but not for young children and infants. Neither the vehicle’s safety belt system nor its air bag system is designed for them. Young children and infants need the protection that a child restraint system can provide. Always secure children properly in your vehicle.

1-41

CAUTION:

Smaller children and babies should always be restrained in a child or infant restraint. The instructions for the restraint will say whether it is the right type and size for your child. A very young child’s hip bones are so small that a regular belt might not stay low on the hips, as it should. Instead, the belt will likely be over the child’s abdomen. In a crash, the belt would apply force right on the child’s abdomen, which could cause serious or fatal injuries. So, be sure that any child small enough for one is always properly restrained in a child or infant restraint.

Infants need complete support, including support for the head and neck. This is necessary because an infant’s neck is weak and its head weighs so much compared with the rest of its body. In a frontal crash, an infant in a rear

facing restraint settles into the restraint, so the crash forces can be distributed across the strongest part of the infant’s body, the back and shoulders. A baby should be secured in an appropriate infant restraint. This is so important that many hospitals today won’t release a newborn infant to its parents unless there is an infant restraint available for the baby’s first trip in a motor vehicle.

1-42

CAUTION:

Never hold a baby in your arms while riding in a vehicle. A baby doesn’t weigh much

--

until a crash. During a crash a baby will become so heavy you can’t hold it. For example, in a crash

CAUTION: (Continued)

CAUTION: (Continued) at only 25 mph (40 km/h), a 12

lb. (5.5 kg) baby will suddenly become a 240

lb. (110 kg) force on your arms. The baby would be almost impossible to hold.

Secure the baby in an infant restraint.

1-43

Child Restraints

Every time infants and young children ride in vehicles, they should have protection provided by appropriate restraints.

Q:

What are the different types of add

on child restraints?

A:

Add

on child restraints are available in four basic types. When selecting a child restraint, take into consideration not only the child’s weight and size, but also whether or not the restraint will be compatible with the motor vehicle in which it will be used.

An infant car bed (A) is a special bed made for use in a motor vehicle. It’s an infant restraint system designed to restrain or position a child on a continuous flat surface. With an infant car bed, make sure that the infant’s head rests toward the center of the vehicle.

1-44

A rear

facing infant restraint (B) positions an infant to face the rear of the vehicle. Rear

facing infant restraints are designed for infants of up to about

20 lbs. (9 kg) and about one year of age. This type of restraint faces the rear so that the infant’s head, neck and body can have the support they need in a frontal crash. Some infant seats come in two parts

--

the base stays secured in the vehicle and the seat part is removable.

1-45

1-46

A forward

facing child restraint (C

-

E) positions a child upright to face forward in the vehicle. These forward

facing restraints are designed to help protect children who are from 20 to 40 lbs.

(9 to 18 kg) and about 26 to 40 inches

(66 to 102 cm) in height, or up to around four years of age. One type, a convertible restraint, is designed to be used either as a rear

facing infant seat or a forward

facing child seat.

A booster seat (F) is designed for children who are about 40 to 60 lbs., or even up to 80 lbs.

(18 to 27 kg, or even up to 36 kg), and about four to eight years of age. A booster seat is designed to improve the fit of the vehicle’s safety belt system.

Booster seats with shields use lap

only belts; however, booster seats without shields use lap

shoulder belts. Booster seats can also help a child to see out the window.

When choosing a child restraint, be sure the child restraint is designed to be used in a vehicle. If it is, it will have a label saying that it meets federal motor vehicle safety standards.

Then follow the instructions for the restraint. You may find these instructions on the restraint itself or in a booklet, or both. These restraints use the belt system in your vehicle, but the child also has to be secured within the restraint to help reduce the chance of personal injury.

The instructions that come with the infant or child restraint will show you how to do that. Both the owner’s manual and the child restraint instructions are important, so if either one of these is not available, obtain a replacement copy from the manufacturer.

1-47

Where to Put the Restraint

Accident statistics show that children are safer if they are restrained in the rear rather than the front seat. We at

General Motors therefore recommend that you put your child restraint in the rear seat. Never put a rear

facing child restraint in the front passenger seat. Here’s why:

CAUTION:

A child in a rear

facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the right front passenger’s air bag inflates. This is because the back of the rear

facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating air bag. Always secure a rear

facing child restraint in a rear seat.

You may secure a forward

facing child restraint in the right front seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.

CAUTION:

A child in a child restraint in the center front seat can be badly injured or killed by the right front passenger air bag if it inflates. Never secure a child restraint in the center front seat. It’s always better to secure a child restraint in the rear seat.

You may secure a forward

facing child restraint in the right front passenger seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in a rear seat.

Wherever you install it, be sure to secure the child restraint properly.

Keep in mind that an unsecured child restraint can move around in a collision or sudden stop and injure people in the vehicle. Be sure to properly secure any child restraint in your vehicle

--

even when no child is in it.

1-48

Top Strap

In order to get to a bracket, you’ll have to open the trim cover.

In Canada, the law requires that forward

facing child restraints have a top strap, and that the strap be anchored. In the United States, some child restraints also have a top strap. If your child restraint has a top strap, it should be anchored.

Your vehicle has top strap anchors already installed for the rear seating positions. You’ll find them behind the rear seat on the filler panel.

Anchor the top strap to this bracket. Once you have the top strap anchored, you’ll be ready to secure the child restraint itself.

1-49

Securing a Child Restraint in a

Rear Seat Position

CAUTION:

A child in a child restraint in the center front seat can be badly injured or killed by the right front passenger air bag if it inflates. Never secure a child restraint in the center front seat. It’s always better to secure a child restraint in the rear seat.

You may secure a forward

facing child restraint in the right front passenger seat, but before you do, always move the front passenger seat as far back as it will go. It’s better to secure the child restraint in the rear seat.

1-50

You’ll be using the lap

shoulder belt. See the earlier part about the top strap if the child restraint has one. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint. Secure the child in the child restraint when and as the instructions say.

1. Put the restraint on the seat.

2. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder portions of the vehicle’s safety belt through or around the restraint. The child restraint instructions will show you how.

Tilt the latch plate to adjust the belt if needed.

If the shoulder belt goes in front of the child’s face or neck, put it behind the child restraint.

3. Buckle the belt. Make sure the release button is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.

1-51

To remove the child restraint, just unbuckle the vehicle’s safety belt and let it go back all the way. The safety belt will move freely again and be ready to work for an adult or larger child passenger.

Securing a Child Restraint in the Right

Front Seat Position

4. To tighten the belt, pull up on the shoulder belt while you push down on the child restraint. If you’re using a forward

facing child restraint, you may find it helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.

5. Push and pull the child restraint in different directions to be sure it is secure.

Your vehicle has a right front passenger air bag. Never put a rear

facing child restraint in this seat. Here’s why:

1-52

CAUTION:

A child in a rear

facing child restraint can be seriously injured or killed if the right front passenger’s air bag inflates. This is because the back of the rear

facing child restraint would be very close to the inflating air bag. Always secure a rear

facing child restraint in the rear seat.

3. Pick up the latch plate, and run the lap and shoulder portions of the vehicle’s safety belt through or around the restraint. The child restraint instructions will show you how.

If the shoulder belt goes in front of the child’s face or neck, put it behind the child restraint.

Although a rear seat is a safer place, you can secure a forward

facing child restraint in the right front seat.

You’ll be using the lap

shoulder belt. See the earlier part about the top strap if the child restraint has one. Be sure to follow the instructions that came with the child restraint. Secure the child in the child restraint when and as the instructions say.

1. Because your vehicle has a right front passenger air bag, always move the seat as far back as it will go before securing a forward

facing child restraint. (See

“Seats” in the Index.)

2. Put the restraint on the seat.

4. Buckle the belt. Make sure the release button is positioned so you would be able to unbuckle the safety belt quickly if you ever had to.

1-53

5. Pull the rest of the lap belt all the way out of the retractor to set the lock.

6. To tighten the belt, feed the lap belt back into the retractor while you push down on the child restraint.

You may find it helpful to use your knee to push down on the child restraint as you tighten the belt.

7. Push and pull the child restraint in different directions to be sure it is secure.

To remove the child restraint, just unbuckle the vehicle’s safety belt and let it go back all the way. The safety belt will move freely again and be ready to work for an adult or larger child passenger.

1-54

Larger Children

Children who have outgrown child restraints should wear the vehicle’s safety belts.

If you have the choice, a child should sit next to a window so the child can wear a lap

shoulder belt and get the additional restraint a shoulder belt can provide.

Accident statistics show that children are safer if they are restrained in the rear seat. But they need to use the safety belts properly.

D Children who aren’t buckled up can be thrown out in a crash.

D Children who aren’t buckled up can strike other people who are.

1-55

1-56

CAUTION:

Never do this.

Here two children are wearing the same belt. The belt can’t properly spread the impact forces. In a crash, the two children can be crushed together and seriously injured. A belt must be used by only one person at a time.

Q:

What if a child is wearing a lap

shoulder belt, but the child is so small that the shoulder belt is very close to the child’s face or neck?

A:

If the child is sitting in a seat next to a window, move the child toward the center of the vehicle. If the child is sitting in the center rear seat passenger position, move the child toward the safety belt buckle. In either case, be sure that the shoulder belt still is on the child’s shoulder, so that in a crash the child’s upper body would have the restraint that belts provide. If the child is sitting in a rear seat outside position, see “Rear Safety Belt Comfort

Guides” in the Index.

CAUTION:

Never do this.

Here a child is sitting in a seat that has a lap

shoulder belt, but the shoulder part is behind the child. If the child wears the belt in this way, in a crash the child might slide under the belt. The belt’s force would then be applied right on the child’s abdomen. That could cause serious or fatal injuries.

The lap portion of the belt should be worn low and snug on the hips, just touching the child’s thighs. This applies belt force to the child’s pelvic bones in a crash.

1-57

Safety Belt Extender

If the vehicle’s safety belt will fasten around you, you should use it.

But if a safety belt isn’t long enough to fasten, your dealer will order you an extender. It’s free. When you go in to order it, take the heaviest coat you will wear, so the extender will be long enough for you. The extender will be just for you, and just for the seat in your vehicle that you choose. Don’t let someone else use it, and use it only for the seat it is made to fit. To wear it, just attach it to the regular safety belt.

Checking Your Restraint Systems

Now and then, make sure the safety belt reminder light and all your belts, buckles, latch plates, retractors and anchorages are working properly. Look for any other loose or damaged safety belt system parts. If you see anything that might keep a safety belt system from doing its job, have it repaired.

Torn or frayed safety belts may not protect you in a crash. They can rip apart under impact forces. If a belt is torn or frayed, get a new one right away.

Also look for any opened or broken air bag covers, and have them repaired or replaced. (The air bag system does not need regular maintenance.)

1-58

Replacing Restraint System Parts

After a Crash

If you’ve had a crash, do you need new belts?

After a very minor collision, nothing may be necessary.

But if the belts were stretched, as they would be if worn during a more severe crash, then you need new belts.

If belts are cut or damaged, replace them. Collision damage also may mean you will need to have safety belt or seat parts repaired or replaced. New parts and repairs may be necessary even if the belt wasn’t being used at the time of the collision.

If an air bag inflates, you’ll need to replace air bag system parts. See the part on the air bag system earlier in this section.

If the frontal air bags inflate, you’ll also need to replace the driver’s and right front passenger’s safety belt buckle assembly. Be sure to do so. Then the new buckle assembly will be there to help protect you in a collision.

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents