Sample Chapters from Microsoft Exchange

Sample Chapters from Microsoft Exchange

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Organization Management Members of this group have full access to all

Exchange properties and objects in the Exchange organization .

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Public Folder Management Members of this group can manage public folders and perform most public folder management operations .

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Recipient Management Members of this group have permissions to modify Exchange user attributes in Active Directory and perform most mailbox operations .

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Records Management Members of this group can manage compliance features, including retention policies, message classifications, and transport rules .

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Server Management Members of this group can manage all Exchange servers in the organization but do not have permission to perform global operations .

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UM Management Members of this group can manage all aspects of unified messaging, including unified messaging server configuration and unified messaging recipient configuration .

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view-Only Organization Management Members of this group have read-only access to the entire Exchange organization tree in the Active

Directory configuration container and read-only access to all the Windows domain containers that have Exchange recipients .

Exchange Server and Active Directory

Like Exchange Server 2007, Exchange Server 2010 is tightly integrated with Active

Directory . Not only does Exchange Server 2010 store information in Active Directory, but it also uses the Active Directory routing topology to determine how to route messages within the organization . Routing to and from the organization is handled using transport servers .

Understanding how Exchange Stores Information

Exchange stores four types of data in Active Directory: schema data (stored in the

Schema partition), configuration data (stored in the Configuration partition), domain data (stored in the Domain partition), and application data (stored in applicationspecific partitions) . In Active Directory, schema rules determine what types of objects are available and what attributes those objects have . When you install the first

Exchange server in the forest, the Active Directory preparation process adds many

Exchange-specific object classes and attributes to the schema partition in Active

Directory . This allows Exchange-specific objects, such as agents and connectors, to be created . It also allows you to extend existing objects, such as users and groups, with new attributes, such as attributes that allow user objects to be used for sending

Exchange Server 2010 Administration Overview

ChAPTEr 1 17

and receiving e-mail . Every domain controller and global catalog server in the

organization has a complete copy of the Schema partition .

During the installation of the first Exchange server in the forest, Exchange configuration information is generated and stored in Active Directory . Exchange configuration information, like other configuration information, is also stored in the Configuration partition . For Active Directory, the configuration information describes the structure of the directory, and the Configuration container includes all of the domains, trees, and forests, as well as the locations of domain controllers and global catalogs . For Exchange, the configuration information is used to describe the structure of the Exchange organization . The Configuration container includes lists of templates, policies, and other global organization-level details . Every domain controller and global catalog server in the organization has a complete copy of the

Configuration partition .

In Active Directory, the Domain partition stores domain-specific objects, such as users and groups, and the stored values of attributes associated with those objects .

As you create, modify, or delete objects, Exchange stores the details about those objects in the Domain partition . During the installation of the first Exchange server in the forest, Exchange objects are created in the current domain . Whenever you create new recipients or modify Exchange details, the related changes are reflected in the Domain partition as well . Every domain controller has a complete copy of the

Domain partition for the domain for which it is authoritative . Every global catalog server in the forest maintains information about a subset of every Domain partition in the forest .

Understanding how Exchange routes Messages

Within the organization, Hub Transport servers use the information about sites stored in Active Directory to determine how to route messages, and they can also route messages across site links . The Hub Transport server does this by querying

Active Directory about its site membership and the site membership of other servers, and then it uses the information it discovers to route messages appropriately .

Because of this, when you are deploying an Exchange Server 2010 organization, no additional configuration is required to establish routing in the Active Directory forest .

For mail delivery within the organization, additional routing configuration is necessary only in these specific scenarios: n

If you deploy Exchange Server 2010 in an existing Exchange Server 2003

organization, you must configure a two-way routing group connector from the Exchange routing group to each Exchange Server 2003 routing group that communicates with Exchange Server 2010 . You must also suppress link state updates for the same .

18 ChAPTEr 1

Exchange Server 2010 Administration Overview

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