1202-VLZ3 12-Channel Mic/Line Mixer Owner`s

1202-VLZ3 12-Channel Mic/Line Mixer Owner`s

CAUTION

Patchbay Description

1

MIC

1

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC

2

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC 3

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC

4

XDR

MIC PRE

L /MONO

1

L

2

R

R

ALL BAL/UNBAL

1

L

TAPE

INPUT

TAPE

OUTPUT

BAL /UNBAL

L

L

2

R R

R

4

3

2

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

LINE IN 1

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

LINE IN 2

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

M

0dBV

IC GAIN

LINE IN 3

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

LINE IN 4

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN LINE IN 5–6

MONO

AUX SEND

MONO MONO

MAIN OUT

MONO

R

L L L L

5

BAL

OR

5

BAL

OR

UNBAL

5

BAL

OR

UNBAL

5

BAL

OR

UNBAL

R R R

LINE IN 7–8 LINE IN 9 –10 LINE IN 11–12

8

At the risk of stating the obvious, this is where you plug everything in: microphones, line-level instruments and effects, headphones, and the ultimate destination for your sound: a tape recorder, PA system, etc.

The 1202-VLZ3’s phantom power is globally controlled by the PHANTOM [22] switch on the rear panel. (This means the phantom power for channels 1-4 is turned on and off together.)

See Appendix B for further details and drawings of the connectors you can use with the 1202-VLZ3. Also see the Channel Strip description on page 13 for details of the signal routing from the XLR and Line inputs.

Not every instrument is made to connect directly to a mixer. Guitars commonly need a Direct Injection (DI) box to connect to the mixer's MIC inputs. These boxes convert unbalanced line-level signals from your guitar, into balanced mic-level outputs, and provide signal and impedance matching. They also let you send your gifted guitar renditions over long cables or audio snakes, with minimum interference and high-frequency signal loss.

Ask your dealer or guitar maker about their recommendations for a good DI box.

PHANTOM POWER

Most modern professional condenser mics are equipped for phantom power, which lets the mixer send low-current DC voltage to the mic’s electronics through the same wires that carry audio. (Semi-pro condenser mics often have batteries to accomplish the same thing.) “Phantom” owes its name to an ability to be “unseen” by dynamic mics (Shure SM57/SM58, for instance), which don’t need external power and aren’t affected by it anyway.

Never plug single-ended (unbalanced) micro phones or instruments into the MIC [1] input jacks if the phantom power is on.

Do not plug instrument outputs into the

MIC input jacks with phantom power on,

unless you know for certain it is safe to do so.

1. MIC INPUTS (Channels 1–4)

We use phantom-powered, balanced microphone inputs just like the big studio mega-consoles, for exactly the same reason: This kind of circuit is excellent at rejecting hum and noise. You can plug in almost any kind of mic that has a standard XLR male mic connector.

Professional ribbon, dynamic, and condenser mics will all sound excellent through these inputs. The

1202-VLZ3’s mic inputs will handle any kind of mic level you can toss at them, without overloading. Be sure to perform the Level-Setting Procedure on page 3.

ASSIGN

TO MAIN MIX

2. LINE INPUTS (Channels 1–4)

These four line-inputs share circuitry (but not phantom power) with the mic preamps, and can be driven by balanced or unbalanced sources at almost any level.

You can use these inputs for virtually any signal you’ll come across, from instrument levels as low as –40 dB to operating levels of –10 dBV to +4 dBu, since there is 40 dB more gain available than on channels 5–12.

To connect balanced lines to these inputs, use a 1⁄4"

Tip-Ring-Sleeve (TRS) plug, the type found on stereo headphones.

To connect unbalanced lines to these inputs, use a

1⁄4" mono (TS) phone plug or standard instrument cable.

The LINE IN inputs 1–4 are a good place to connect older instruments that need more gain. You can correct weak levels by adjusting the corresponding channel’s

GAIN control.

1202-VLZ3

3. LOW CUT (Channels 1–4)

Each LOW CUT switch, often referred to as a High

Pass Filter (all depends on how you look at it), cuts bass frequencies below 75 Hz at a rate of 18 dB per octave.

5. STEREO LINE INPUTS

(Channels 5–6, 7–8, 9–10 and 11–12)

CAUTION

These fully balanced inputs are designed for stereo or mono, balanced or unbalanced signals, from –10 dBV to

+4 dBu. They can be used with just about any professional or semi-pro instrument, effect or tape player.

We recommend that you use low-cut on every microphone application except kick drum, bass guitar, bassy synth patches, or recordings of earthquakes. These aside, there isn’t much down there that you want to hear, and fi ltering it out makes the low stuff you do want much more crisp and tasty. Not only that, but low-cut can help reduce the possibility of feedback in live situations, and it helps to conserve amplifi er power.

In the stereo audio world, an odd-numbered channel usually receives the “left signal.” For example, you would feed the 1202-VLZ3’s line inputs 5-6 a stereo signal by inserting the device’s left output plug into the channel 5 jack, and its right output plug into the channel 6 jack.

Another way to consider low-cut’s function is that it actually adds fl exibility during live performances. With the addition of low-cut, you can safely use low equalization on vocals. Many times, bass shelving EQ can really benefi t voices. Trouble is, adding low EQ also boosts stage rumble, mic handling clunks and breath pops.

Applying low-cut removes all those problems, so you can add low EQ without losing a woofer.

Here’s what the combination of low EQ and low-cut looks like in terms of frequency curves:

When connecting a mono device (just one cord), always use the LEFT (MONO) input (jacks 5, 7, 9 or 11) and plug nothing into the RIGHT input (jacks 6, 8, 10 or

12)— this way the signal will appear on both sides. This trick is called “jack normalling.”

6. IMAGINARY CONTROL

This control is purely a fi gment of our imagination. It will come in handy after long hours of mixing, when you really would like a nice cup of tea, a vacation in Hawaii, or a trip to the outer reaches of the Solar System. This is the control for you. Be thankful, you bought a Mackie.

We love you man!

+15

+10

–5

–10

+5

0

–15

20

Hz

100

Hz

Low Cut

1k

Hz

+15

+10

+5

0

–5

–10

10k

Hz

20k

Hz

–15

20

Hz

100

Hz

1k

Hz

Low Cut with Low EQ

10k

Hz

20k

Hz

EFFECTS: SERIAL OR PARALLEL?

The next two sections toss the terms “serial” and

“parallel” around like hacky sacks. Here’s what we mean by them:

4. GAIN (Channels 1–4)

If you haven’t already, please read the Level-Setting

Procedure on page 3.

GAIN adjusts the input sensitivity of the mic and line inputs connected to channels 1 through 4. This allows signals from the outside world to be adjusted to optimal internal operating levels.

U

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

If the signal originates through the

XLR jack, there will be 0 dB of gain with the knob fully down, ramping to 60 dB of gain fully up.

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN Through the 1⁄4" input, there is 15 dB of attenuation fully down and 45 dB of gain fully up, with a “U” (unity gain) mark at 10:00. This 15 dB of

attenuation can be very handy when you are inserting a very hot signal, or when you want to add a lot of EQ gain, or both. Without this “virtual pad,” this scenario might lead to channel clipping.

“Serial” means that the entire signal is routed through the effects device. Examples: compressor/limiters, graphic equalizers. Line-level sources can be patched through a serial effects device before or after the mixer, or preferably through the insert jacks located on the rear panel (CHANNEL INSERT [17] send/return).

Dry Signal

Insert

Send

Aux

Send

Signal Processor

(e.g., Compressor)

Signal Processor

(e.g., Reverb)

Insert

Return

Aux

Return

Wet Signal

Output

Section

Processed

Signal

“Parallel” means that a portion of the signal in the mixer is tapped off to the device (AUX SEND), processed and returned to the mixer (STEREO RETURN) to be mixed with the original “dry” signal. This way, multiple channels can all make use of the same effects

device. Examples: reverb, digital delay.

Dry Signal(s)

Channel Path

Dry Signal(s)

Mix

Stage

Processed

Signal

Owner’s Manual

9

ASSIGN

TO MAIN MIX

CAUTION

MIC

1

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC

2

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC 3

XDR

MIC PRE

MIC

4

XDR

MIC PRE

L /MONO

7

8 9 10 11

R ALL BAL/UNBAL BAL /UNBAL TAPE

INPUT

TAPE

OUTPUT

1 1 L

L L

L R

2

2

R

R

R

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

BAL

OR

UNBAL

LINE IN 1

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

LINE IN 2

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

LINE IN 3

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

LINE IN 4

U

LOW CUT

75 Hz

18dB/OCT

-1

0dBV

M

IC GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN

0 60

+15dB -45dB

GAIN LINE IN 5–6

MONO

L

BAL

OR

UNBAL

R

AUX SEND

MONO

L

BAL

OR

UNBAL

R

LINE IN 7–8

MONO

L

BAL

OR

UNBAL

R

MAIN OUT

MONO

L

BAL

OR

UNBAL

R

LINE IN 9 –10 LINE IN 11–12

12

10

7. STEREO RETURNS

This is where you connect the outputs of your parallel effects devices (or extra audio sources). These balanced inputs are similar to the stereo LINE IN [2] inputs (without EQ, Aux Sends, Pan, Mute, and Solo).

The circuits will handle stereo or mono, balanced or unbalanced signals, either instrument level, –10 dBV or +4 dBu. They can be used with just about any pro or semipro effects device on the market. The signals coming into these inputs can be adjusted using the STEREO

RETURN [40] knobs before passing onto the main mix bus, see page 19.

One Device: If you have just one parallel effects device (two cords), use STEREO RETURN 1 and leave

STEREO RETURN 2 unplugged. That way, the unused

STEREO RETURN 2 level control can be used to feed

STEREO RETURN 1 to your stage monitors, via the

RETURN TO AUX 1 [41] switch.

Mono Device: If you have an effects device with a mono output (one cord), plug that into STEREO

RETURN 1, L/MONO, and leave STEREO RETURN 1,

RIGHT, unplugged. This way the signal will be sent to both sides, magically appearing in the center as a mono signal. This won’t work with STEREO RETURN 2

— you’ll need a Y-cord.

Use these jacks for convenient tape playback of your mixes. You’ll be able to review a mix and then rewind and try another pass without repatching or disturbing the mixer levels. You can also use these jacks with a portable tape or CD player to feed music to a PA system between sets.

WARNING: Engaging both the TAPE and

ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX buttons in the CON-

TROL ROOM SOURCE [33] matrix can create a feedback path between TAPE INPUT and TAPE OUT-

PUT. Make sure your tape deck is not in record, recordswitches, or make sure the CONTROL ROOM / SUBMIX

[34] level knob is fully counterclockwise (off).

10. TAPE OUTPUT

These unbalanced RCA connections tap the main mix output to make simultaneous recording and PA work more convenient. Connect these to your recorder’s inputs. (See also MAIN MIX [32] on page 16.)

Mono Out: If you want to feed a mono signal to your tape deck or other device, simply use an RCA Y-cord to combine these outputs. Do not attempt this with any other outputs on the 1202-VLZ3.

8. AUX SEND 1&2

The AUX SEND [31] knobs tap a portion of each channel's signal to provide an output here to feed external parallel effects processors or stage monitoring. See the AUX SEND details on page 15.

These 1⁄4" jacks are balanced outputs capable of delivering 22 dBu into a 600 ohm balanced or unbalanced load.

11.

1

4

" MAIN OUTS

These outputs feed the main mix out into the waiting world. You can feed your amplifi ers this way, or through the XLR MAIN OUTS [13].

These balanced outputs are capable of delivering 22 dBu into a 600 ohm balanced or unbalanced load.

To use these outputs to drive balanced inputs, connect 1⁄4" TRS (Tip–Ring–Sleeve) phone plugs like this:

9. TAPE INPUT

These RCA jacks are designed to work with semipro as well as pro recorders. To compensate for typically low levels, signals coming in here will be automatically boosted by 6 dB.

Connect your tape recorder’s outputs here, using standard hi-fi (RCA) cables.

Tip = + (hot)

Ring = –(cold)

Sleeve = Ground

For most music recording and PA applications, unbalanced lines are fi ne. To drive unbalanced inputs, connect 1⁄4" TS (Tip–Sleeve) phone plugs like this:

Tip = + (hot)

Sleeve = Ground

1202-VLZ3

POWER

ON

PHANTOM

ON

13

RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK

DO NOT OPEN

REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.

DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE

WARNING:

TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT

EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.

NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

AVIS:

RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR

UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.

DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE

R

CONTROL

ROOM

BAL/UNBAL

L

SERIAL NUMBER MANUFACTURING DATE

XDR TM EXTENDED DYNAMIC RANGE MIC PREAMPLIFIERS ARE PROPRIETARY TO MACKIE DESIGNS, INC.

R/4

ALT

OUTPUT

BAL/UNBAL

L/3

( PRE-FADER / PRE EQ TIP SEND / RING RETURN )

4

CHANNEL INSERT

3 2 1

MAIN

OUTPUT

LEVEL

14 15 16 17

12. PHONES

This stereo jack will drive any standard headphone to very loud levels. Walkperson-type phones can also be used with an appropriate adapter. To learn how signals are routed to these outputs, see SOURCE MATRIX

[33] on page 16. If you’re wiring your own cable for the

PHONES output, follow standard conventions: loed channels, or the Tape input. The volume is adjustable with the CONTROL ROOM/SUBMIX [34]knob.

These balanced outputs are capable of delivering 22 dBu into a 600 ohm balanced or unbalanced load.

Tip = Left channel

Ring = Right channel

Sleeve = Common ground

WARNING: When we say the headphone amp is loud, we’re not kidding. It can cause permanent ear damage. Even intermediate levels may be painfully loud with some earphones. BE

CAREFUL! Always turn the CTL ROOM/ SUBMIX [34] knob all the way down before connecting headphones.

Keep it down until you’ve put the phones on. Then turn it up slowly. Why? “Engineers who fry their ears fi nd themselves with short careers.”

16. ALT 3–4 OUTPUT

These 1⁄4" outputs are the sum of any channels that have the MUTE/ALT 3-4 [25] switch pressed in (see page 13 for the tender details).

These balanced outputs are capable of delivering 22 dBu into a balanced or unbalanced load.

17. CHANNEL INSERT (Channels 1–4 )

These rear-panel jacks are where you connect serial effects such as compressors, equalizers, de-essers, or fi lters. Since most people don’t have more than a few of these gadgets, we’ve included inserts for just the fi rst four channels. If you want to use this kind of processing on channels 5 through 12, simply patch through the

processor before you plug into the 1202-VLZ3.

13. XLR MAIN OUTS

Use these to send the main mix out into the line-level balanced inputs of your amplifi er or powered speakers.

These low-impedance outputs are fully balanced and capable of driving +4 dBu lines with up to 28 dB of headroom. This output is 6 dB hotter than other outputs.

The channel insert points are after the GAIN [4] and

LOW CUT [3] controls, but before the channel’s EQ

[27] and LEVEL [23] controls. The send (tip) is low-

ASSIGN

TO MAIN MIX impedance (120 ohms), capable of driving any line-level device. The return (ring) is high-impedance (over 2.5 k ohms) and can be driven by almost any device.

(TRS plug)

SEND to processor tip ring sleeve

“tip”

14. XLR MAIN OUTPUT LEVEL SWITCH

Engaging this switch reduces the level of the balanced XLR main outputs by 40 dB, so you can feed the

microphone input of, say, another mixer. (You can safely connect the XLR outputs into an input that provides 48V phantom power.)

This plug connects to one of the mixer’s Channel Insert jacks.

RETURN from processor

“ring”

See Appendix B for details and drawings about Insert cables, and a diagram showing three ways to use the jacks.

15. CONTROL ROOM

These 1⁄4" outputs are provided so you can listen to something other than the main mix. The source is selected using the SOURCE MATRIX [33] switches (see page 16). You can choose to listen to the main mix, the

Alt 3-4 stereo bus (see MUTE/ALT 3-4 on page 13), So-

Besides being used for inserting external devices, these jacks can also be used as channel direct outputs; post-GAIN, post-LOW CUT, and pre EQ. In fact, Mackie mic preamps have become so famous, that people buy these mixers just to have four of these in their arsenal.

Owner’s Manual

11

21 22

POWER

ON

PHANTOM

ON

18

19

20

L MAIN

BALANCED

MAIN

OUTPUT

LEVEL

RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK

DO NOT OPEN

REPLACE WITH THE SAME TYPE FUSE AND RATING.

DISCONNECT SUPPLY CORD BEFORE CHANGING FUSE

WARNING:

TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT

EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. DO NOT REMOVE COVER.

NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

AVIS:

RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE — NE PAS OUVRIR

UTILISE UN FUSIBLE DE RECHANGE DE MÊME TYPE.

DEBRANCHER AVANT DE REMPLACER LE FUSIBLE

SERIAL NUMBER MANUFACTURING DATE

XDR

TM

EXTENDED DYNAMIC RANGE MIC PREAMPLIFIERS ARE PROPRIETARY TO MACKIE DESIGNS, INC.

R

CONTROL

ROOM

BAL/UNBAL

L R/4

ALT

OUTPUT

BAL/UNBAL

L/3 4 3 2 1

18. POWER CONNECTION

Just in case you lose the cord provided with the 1202-

VLZ3, its power jack accepts a standard 3-prong IEC cord like those found on most professional recorders, musical instruments, and computers.

WARNING: Before you plug the AC power cord into the 1202-VLZ3, you must make sure that the VOLTAGE SELECTOR [20] slide switch is set to the same voltage as your local AC mains supply.

WARNING: Disconnecting the plug’s ground pin can be dangerous. Please don’t do it.

21. POWER SWITCH

Press the top of this rocker switch inwards to turn on the mixer. The power LED on the top surface of the mixer will glow with happiness, or at least it will if you have the mixer plugged in to a suitable live AC mains supply.

Press the bottom of this switch to turn off the mixer, whenever you feel that this would be a safe thing to do.

Half-way through Mad Mike's Heavy Metal guitar solo might not be such a good time.

As a general guide, you should turn on your mixer fi rst, before the power amplifi er or powered speakers, and turn it off last. This will reduce the possibilities of any turn-on, or turn-off thumps in your speakers.

19. FUSE

The 1202-VLZ3 is fused for your (and its own) protection. If you suspect a blown fuse, disconnect the cord, pull the fuse drawer out (located just below the cord receptacle) and replace the fuse with a 500 mA (0.5 amps) SLO BLO 5x20mm, available at electronics stores or your dealer. Use a 250 mA fuse if your local voltage is

220-240 VAC.

22. PHANTOM SWITCH

This global rocker switch controls the phantom power supply for condenser microphones plugged into channel

MIC [1] inputs (see page 8).

Press the top of the switch inwards to engage phantom power to the four MIC inputs. Press the bottom of the switch to turn it off.

If two fuses blow in a row, something is very wrong.

Please call our toll-free number 1-800-898-3211 from within the U.S. (or the distributor in your country) and fi nd out what to do.

20. VOLTAGE SELECTOR

WARNING: Before you plug the AC power cord into the 1202-VLZ3, you must make sure that this slide switch is set to the same voltage as your local AC main supply. Only slide the voltage switch with the power cord unplugged.

Use a fl at headed screwdriver to slide the switch if needed. The switch allows you to use the mixer in different countries and voltages, meet interesting people from other cultures, and entertain them with your unique blend of Rockabilly Funkadelia Thrash Metal.

When turned on (or off), the phantom power circuitry takes a few moments for voltage to ramp up (or down).

ASSIGN

This is perfectly normal. Just like me. Oh, and my imaginary friend Lazlo who helps me write all the manuals.

Say hello to the nice folks Lazlo.

12

1202-VLZ3

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