Oracle on LinuxONE

Oracle on LinuxONE

2

Chapter 2.

Setting up Linux guests to install

Oracle Database 12c Release 1

In this chapter, we describe best practices in setting up Linux guests to install Oracle

Database 12cR1. We include information about how to obtain Oracle documentation, code, and My Oracle Support Notes.

We also describe setting up Red Hat Enterprise Linux Servers and configuring Security

Enhanced Linux (SELinux) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Servers.

This chapter includes the following topics:

򐂰

2.1, “Obtaining Oracle documentation, Oracle code, and My Oracle Support notes” on page 6

򐂰

2.2, “Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Enterprise Linux server setup” on page 8

򐂰

2.3, “Red Hat 6 or 7 Enterprise Linux Server Specific Setup” on page 16

򐂰

2.4, “SUSE Linux Enterprise Server specific setup” on page 18

򐂰

2.5, “Installation” on page 20

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2017. All rights reserved.

5

2.1 Obtaining Oracle documentation, Oracle code, and My

Oracle Support notes

This section includes the following topics:

򐂰

“Master Note of Linux OS Requirements for Database Server”

򐂰

“Pre-installation requirements documentation”

򐂰

“Obtaining code for Oracle 12cR1 on IBM LinuxONE” on page 7

2.1.1 Master Note of Linux OS Requirements for Database Server

The Master Note is intended to provide an index and references to the most frequently used

My Oracle Support articles concerning Linux OS Requirements for Oracle Database Software

Installation.

For more information, see My Oracle Support Doc ID 851598.1

, which is available by logging in to your Oracle Support account.

Figure 2-1 shows an example of the latest Linux distributions that were certified on

LinuxONE.

Figure 2-1 Latest Linux distributions that are certified on LinuxONE

The Release Schedule of Current Database Releases is described in Doc ID 742060.1

, which is available by logging in to your Oracle Support account.

Oracle is committed to delivering the next Oracle database version 12.2.0.1 in the second quarter of calendar year 2017 (Q2CY2017) on IBM LinuxONE.

Note: At time of this writing, the SLES12 distribution is not certified for Oracle database.

2.1.2 Pre-installation requirements documentation

For more information about the pre-installation phase, see the Oracle Database (RDBMS) on

UNIX, IBM AIX®, HP-UX, Linux, Mac OS X, Solaris, Tru64 Unix Operating Systems

Installation, and Configuration Requirements Quick Reference (8.0.5 to 12.1) (Doc ID

169706.1), which is available at the Oracle Support website .

For more information about Oracle Database 12cR1, see Doc ID 1587357.1

.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

2.1.3 Obtaining code for Oracle 12cR1 on IBM LinuxONE

For more information about Oracle documentation that is used to obtain the code, see Doc ID

1290644.1

, which is available at this website:

For more information about more recent Oracle Database code for Oracle Database 12cR1,

Install the latest patchset version of 12.1 software (for example, Version 12.1.0.2), which is available under Patch 17694377 or from the Oracle Technical Network website .

Patchsets are full releases and you do not need to install Oracle 12.1.0.1 first.

2.1.4 Oracle database pre-installation tasks in Oracle online Documentation

The Oracle Documentation website describes the tasks that must be completed before the

Oracle Universal Installer is started. Specific information about IBM LinuxONE is included in the Oracle Database Preinstallation Tasks document (particularly bullet points 6 and 9).

2.1.5 Linux Large Pages and Oracle Databases

It is recommended for performance and availability reasons to implement Linux large pages for Oracle databases running on IBM LinuxONE systems. Linux large pages are particularly beneficial for systems where the database's Oracle SGA is greater than 10 GB or if there are many DB connections greater that are greater than 50.

Complete the following steps to implement large pages:

1. Each database that is planned for Linux large pages cannot utilize Automatic Memory

Management (AMM) by setting the MEMORY_MANAGEMENT parameter. It is recommended to utilize Automatic Shared Memory Management (ASMM) by setting the

SGA_TARGET and PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET Oracle parameters.

2. The Oracle use_large_pages

parameter can be set to true, false, or only. If you have a

LinuxONE system with one large database require large pages, and other smaller databases that do not require large pages, you can set the larger SGA database to “only” and the smaller databases to “false”. The default setting for use_large_pages is “true”.

3. At the Linux level, it is recommended to set the /etc/security/limits.conf

to unlimited to allow for changes to the Oracle SGA/Linux large page values dynamically, as shown in the following example:

– soft memlock unlimited

– hard memlock unlimited

4. Set or update the following parameters in the /etc/sysctl.conf

file:

– vm.nr_hugepages = ((sum of all large page SGA's)* 1024) + 16 = N

– vm.hugetlb_shm_group = <Linux group number from /etc/group>

Example:

#cat /etc/group | grep oracle dba:x:54322:oracle,grid

#((SGA = 119GB)*1024) + 16 ' (119 * 1024) + 16 = 121872 vm.nr_hugepages = 121872 vm.hugetlb_shm_group = 54322

5. Restart your Linux Image and restart Oracle for the changes to take effect.

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6. Review your Oracle database’s alert log to verify the database was started with large pages enabled.

2.2 Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Enterprise Linux server setup

This section describes the common steps that are needed to implement an Oracle Single

Instance Database on SUSE Enterprise Server or Red Hat Enterprise Linux on LinuxONE.

For more information about GRID or RAC implementations, see

Experiences with Oracle

Database 12c Release 1 on Linux on System z

, SG24-8159.

2.2.1 Important information

In this section, the following pre-installation verification information is provided to give you a basic understanding before starting an Oracle Database installation on LinuxONE:

򐂰

Graphical user interface (GUI)

A GUI is required to run the Oracle Installers interactively. We use the Linux vncserver on

LinuxONE to start an X server and a VNC viewer client to establish a terminal emulator xterm session.

To use GUIs, such as the Oracle Universal Installer (OUI), configuration assistants, and

Oracle Enterprise Manager, set the display to a system with X Window System server packages.

In our environment, we start a vncserver on LinuxONE, and use a VNC viewer client to establish the connection with the vncserver.

򐂰 Linux minimal installation

A minimal Linux installation lacks many RPMs that are required for database installation.

Therefore, you must use an RPM package for Linux release to install the required packages.

򐂰

ASM

To use Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM), you must first install Oracle Grid

Infrastructure for a stand-alone server before you install and create the database.

To provide persistence of the storage devices across reboots, ASM on LinuxONE requires specific configuration of udev rules. To use Oracle ASM on LinuxONE, you must first install the Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a stand-alone server before you install and create the database.

For Red Hat Refer to: How to Manually Configure Disk Storage devices for use with Oracle

ASM 11.2 and 12.1 on IBM: Linux on System z® under RedHat (Doc ID 1377392.1)

For SLES Refer to: How to Manually Configure Disk Storage devices for use with Oracle

ASM 11.2 and 12.1 on IBM: Linux on System z under SLES (Doc ID 1350008.1)

Although the SUSE

orarun

RPM package can be used to configure the user or groups, ulimits, and kernel parms automatically, our experiences are based on manually configuring these settings based on guidance from the Oracle Database Quick Installation

Guide 12c Release 1 (12.1) for IBM: Linux on System z, E18443. Changes in the recommended Oracle RPMs and kernel parameters can occur between release levels; therefore, review the latest Oracle support Getting Started notes for the latest updates.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

򐂰 Large pages

Use of large (1 M) pages is recommend and requires specific configuration of the system.

2.2.2 Pre-installation checking

The general pre-installation checking tasks that you must perform after ensuring a GUI is established are described in this section.

General requirements and information for Oracle Database on LinuxONE

To obtain general LinuxONE information from a Linux session, run the following commands, ensuring that the system was started with a run level 3 or 5:

򐂰 Check information about the CPU that is defined in LinuxONE: l3oradb2:~ head -2 /proc/cpuinfo

򐂰 Check information about the RAM that is defined in LinuxONE: l3oradb2:~ # grep MemTotal /proc/meminfo

3oradb2:~ # grep SwapTotal /proc/meminfo

򐂰 Check the amount of space that is available in the /tmp directory: l3oradb2:~ # df -h /tmp

򐂰 Check the amount of free disk space on the system: l3oradb2:~ # df -h

򐂰 Check the amount of free RAM and disk swap space on the system: l3oradb2:~ # free

򐂰 Check whether the system architecture can run the software: l3oradb2:~ # uname -m

This command should return: s390x

Server minimum requirements

The following minimum requirements for the server must be met:

򐂰 Disk Space Requirements for Oracle 12cR1 on IBM LinuxONE

Ensure that the system meets the disk space requirements for software files:

– Enterprise Edition database: 5.5 GB.

– Grid Infrastructure: 3.5 GB

򐂰 Recommended memory

A total of 4 GB of virtual memory is recommended for Oracle 12cR1 installations of Oracle

Database, including the Grid Infrastructure requirements.

Note: Although 2 GB is the minimum amount of virtual memory that is required, the

Oracle OPatch utility requires 3072 MB (3 GB) for Oracle patching.

Chapter 2. Setting up Linux guests to install Oracle Database 12c Release 1

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򐂰 Swap

Swap disk space is proportional to the system’s physical memory as listed in Table 2-1.

Table 2-1 Swap size recommendation

RAM Swap space

Between 1 and 8 GB 2 times the size of RAM

Between 8 and 32 GB

More than 32 GB

Equal to the size of RAM

32 GB

More disk space (on a file system or an Oracle ASM disk group) is required for the fast recovery area.

򐂰 Temporary directory

1 GB of space in the /tmp directory on LinuxONE systems.

򐂰 Linux kernel parameters

Verify that you have the required operating system kernel and packages installed.

For more information about kernel requirements, see the online version .

An example of kernel parameters is listed in Table 2-2.

Table 2-2 Kernel parameters

Variable

shmall: Percent of the size of physical memory in pages. If the server supports multiple databases, or uses a large SGA, set this parameter to a value that is equal to the total amount of shared memory in 4 K pages that the system can use at one time. For most systems, this value is the value 2097152. For more information, see My

Oracle Support note 301830.1

shmmax: Half the size of physical memory in bytes. For more information, see My Oracle

Support note 567506.1

semmsl

Example value

2097152

2147483648 semmns semopm semmni shmmni panic_on_oops setting is the value that allows

n

seconds delay before a node eviction/reboot. file-max 512 x number of processes

File

/proc/sys/kernel/shmall

/proc/sys/kernel/shmmax kernel.sem=

250 32000 100

128

/proc/sys/kernel/sem

4096

1

/proc/sys/kernel/sem

/proc/sys/kernel/sem

/proc/sys/kernel/sem

/proc/sys/kernel/shmmni

/proc/sys/kernel/panic_on_oops

/proc/sys/fs/file-max 6815744 for

13312 processes

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Oracle on LinuxONE

Variable

aio-max-nr: This value limits concurrent outstanding requests and should be set to avoid

I/O subsystem failure.

net.ipv4.ip_local_port_range

rmem_default rmem_max wmem_default wmem_max

Example value

3145728

9000 65500

262144

4194304

262144

1048576

File

/proc/sys/fs/aio-max-nr

/proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_local_port_range

/proc/sys/net/core/rmem_default

/proc/sys/net/core/rmem_max

/proc/sys/net/core/wmem_default

/proc/sys/net/core/wmem_max

After kernel parameter values are updated, validate kernel parameters by using the following

sysctl

command: l3oradb2:~ # /sbin/sysctl -p

User login security and limits configuration

The following settings must be verified before an installation is performed:

򐂰

Limits.conf

If necessary, update the resource limits in the /etc/security/limits.conf

configuration file for the installation owner.

Assuming that the “oracle” Linux user performs the installation, add the following settings to /etc/security/limits.conf

: oracle soft nproc 2047 oracle hard nproc 16384 oracle soft nofile 1024 oracle hard nofile 65536 oracle soft stack 10240 oracle hard stack 10240

If you are planning to use large pages, as recommended, add the following settings to

/etc/security/limits.conf

: oracle soft memlock unlimited oracle hard memlock unlimited

If GRID is used, define the following same limits for the GRID Linux user: grid soft nproc 2047

Note: When the limits.conf

file is changed, these changes take effect immediately.

However, if the “oracle” users are logged in, these changes do not take effect until you log out these users and log them back in. You must log these users out and back in before you use these accounts for installation.

򐂰 Oracle user shell limits

Check the current shell limits and raise them if necessary to required values.

Chapter 2. Setting up Linux guests to install Oracle Database 12c Release 1

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In oracle Linux user home, update the profile or bashrc file to define oracle user limits

value, as shown in Example 2-1.

Example 2-1 Oracle user limits

if [ $USER = "oracle" ]; then

if [ $SHELL = "/bin/ksh" ]; then

ulimit -u 16384

ulimit -n 65536

else

ulimit -u 16384 -n 65536

fi fi

򐂰 Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM)

PAM is a system of libraries that manage user authentication tasks for applications. On

Linux, external scheduler jobs require PAM. Oracle strongly recommends that you install the latest Linux-PAM library for your Linux distribution.

Edit the following line in the security services files in /etc/pam.d

, and add the line at the bottom if needed. For example, add the following line in the sshd file: session required pam_limits.so

Warning: Use care when the services files in pam.d

are modified. Test the effect of the modification before closing the current work session by opening a new session.

Shared memory file system

Ensure that the /dev/shm mount area is of type tmpfs and is mounted with the following options:

򐂰 With RW and execute permissions set on it

򐂰 With noexec or nosuid not set on it

Use the following command to check the shared memory file system: l3oradb2:~ # cat /etc/fstab |grep tmpfs

The output for this command looks similar to following example: tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0

If needed, change the mount settings. As the root user, open the

/etc/fstab

file with a text editor and modify the tmpfs

line. If you are planning to use Automatic Memory Management

(AMM), you should set the tmpfs

file system size to the sum of all the MEMORY_TARGET on the system, as shown in the following example: tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs rw,exec,size=30G 0 0

LinuxONE can use large pages of 1 M in size with Oracle. The Oracle MEMORY_TARGET parameter is not eligible for large pages; instead, SGA_TARGET should be used for the

Oracle memory setting when Linux large pages are used.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

Host name

Use the ping command to ensure that the computer host name is resolvable, as shown in

Example 2-2.

Example 2-2 Example of the ping command and its output

l3oradb2:/etc # ping l3oradb0.mop.fr.ibm.com

PING l3oradb0.mop.fr.ibm.com (10.3.58.144) 56(84) bytes of data.

64 bytes from l3oradb0.mop.fr.ibm.com (10.3.58.144): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.290 ms

--- l3oradb0.mop.fr.ibm.com ping statistics ---

2 packets transmitted, 2 received, 0% packet loss, time 999ms rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.090/0.190/0.290/0.100 ms

If needed, add the Fully Qualified Domain Name to the HOSTNAME file, by using the

hostname

command.Example 2-3 demonstrates showing the hostname command and its

results.

Example 2-3 Show the hostname

l3oradb2:~ # hostname l3oradb2.mop.fr.ibm.com

Example 2-4 shows the command and results of displaying the contents of the HOSTNAME

file.

Example 2-4 Show the contents of the HOSTNAME file

l3oradb2:~ # cat /etc/HOSTNAME l3oradb2.mop.fr.ibm.com

To update the hostname, enter the fully qualified hostname by using the

hostname

command,

as shown in Example 2-5.

Example 2-5 Updating the hostname

ll3oradb2:~ # hostname l3oradb2

3oradb2:~ # hostname l3oradb2.mop.fr.ibm.com

3oradb2:~ # hostname l3oradb2.mop.fr.ibm.com

Creating the database installation owner user

The installation process requires at least an Oracle database installation owner (oracle), an

Oracle Inventory group (oinstall), and an Oracle administrative privileges group (dba).

Example 2-6 shows the commands that are used to create the oracle user and groups.

Example 2-6 Creating the oracle user and groups

l3oradb2:~ # /usr/sbin/groupadd oinstall -g 1001 l3oradb2:~ # /usr/sbin/groupadd dba -g 1002 l3oradb2:~ # /usr/sbin/useradd -m -g oinstall -G dba oracle l3oradb2:~ # echo "oracle:newPassw0rd" | /usr/sbin/chpasswd

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Storage options for Oracle database

In this section, we describe the following disk storage configuration options that are available for database files on LinuxONE:

򐂰 Open Storage FCP/SCSI LUNs

򐂰 IBM Extended Count Key Data (ECKD™) DASD with HyperPAV

To configure disk storage for LinuxONE, assign the LUNs (with multiple paths) to Linux to ensure high availability and better performance by spreading the I/O workload across more channel paths/host bus adapters (HBAs).

Configure a UDEV rule that ensures device persistence and set the following file permissions for Oracle:

򐂰 FCP/SCSI: /etc/udev/rules.d/12-dm-permissions.rules

file

򐂰 ECKD/DASD: /etc/udev/rules.d/99-udev-oracle.rules

A restart is required for modifications of UDEV rules to take effect. For Red Hat 6+ / SLES

11+, you can run the command

udevadm trigger

for any udev changes to take effect. This change can be done dynamically.

Then, run the

ls

commands to confirm that the file permissions are set correctly (based on the devices configured in your UDEV rules), as shown in the following example:

# ls -la /dev/dasde1

Running this command results in the following output: brw-rw---- 1 oracle oinstall 94, 5 Sep 25 08:59 /dev/dasde1

򐂰 File systems and Shared Storage

For a stand-alone database on Linux for LinuxONE, database files and recovery files are supported on Linux file systems and Oracle ASM.

When using database with GRID or RAC, ASM provides shared storage and is certified on

LinuxONE.

As described in

Oracle Supported and Recommended File Systems on Linux

(Doc ID

236826.1), the recommended file systems when not utilizing Oracle ASM for database files are:

– For Suse 11 SP3+ systems, use xfs

– For Red Hat 6 systems, use ext4

– For Red Hat 7 systems, use xfs

Required software directories

Identify or create the following directories that are needed by the Oracle software installer.

The examples in this section use

/u01

for the mount point directory:

򐂰 Oracle Base Directory

The following directory is used:

ORACLE_BASE = /mount_point/app/software_owner

In this installation example, we created a 20GB Logical Volume to host Oracle software and data.

Where software_owner is the operating system user name of the software owner that is installing the Oracle software; for example, oracle or grid.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

򐂰 Oracle Inventory Directory

This directory stores an inventory of all software that is installed on the system. It is required and shared by all Oracle software installations on a single system. If Oracle

Inventory paths exist, the Oracle Universal Installer continues to use that Oracle Inventory.

The Oracle Inventory path is in

/var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc

.

Example 2-7 shows the command that is used to check the contents and the existence of the oraInst.loc

file with the results displaying the contents of the file.

Example 2-7 Examining the oraInst.loc

l3oradb0:~ # cat /var/opt/oracle/oraInst.loc inventory_loc=/oraInventory inst_group=oinstall

򐂰 Oracle Home Directory

This directory is where the Oracle software product is installed:

ORACLE_HOME=$ORACLE_BASE/oracle_base/product/12.1.0/dbhome_1

Identifying or creating an Oracle Base Directory

For more information about if Oracle ASM is used, see the Oracle ASM documentation,

How to Manually Configure Disk Storage devices for use with Oracle ASM 11.2 and 12.1 on IBM:

Linux on System z under SLES

(Doc ID 1350008.1).

For more information about Red Hat systems, see,

How to Manually Configure Disk Storage devices for use with Oracle ASM 11.2 on IBM: Linux on System z under RedHat 5

(Doc ID

1351746.1).

If ASM is not used, create a Linux file system by using the following Yast or Linux commands:

򐂰 Create physical volumes, a volume group, and add physical volumes to it and create a

Logical Volume with stripping. Create an ext3 file system.

򐂰 Create the following mount point: l3oradb2:~ # mkdir /u01 l3oradb2:~ # chown -R oracle:oinstall /u01 l3oradb2:~ # chmod -R 775 /u01

򐂰

Mount the logical volume on

ORACLE_BASE=/u01

, as shown in the following example: l 3oradb2:~ # mount -t ext3 /dev/mapper/vg2181-lv2181 /u01

For resiliency after restart, insert the mount statement into /etc/fstab .

Setting the disk I/O scheduler

The following I/O schedulers (also known as

elevators

) are available:

򐂰

Noop: No operation; only last request merging.

򐂰 Deadline: A latency-oriented I/O scheduler. The algorithm preferably serves reads before writes.

򐂰

Complete fair queuing (CFQ): All users of a particular drive can execute approximately the same number of I/O requests over a specific time.

The default scheduler in the current distributions is Deadline. Do not change the default scheduler or default settings without reason. Changing these settings can reduce throughput or increase processor consumption.

Chapter 2. Setting up Linux guests to install Oracle Database 12c Release 1

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For more information about which elevator is the current default, run the command that is shown in Example 2-8. The selected scheduler is listed in brackets.

Example 2-8 Checking the scheduler

l3oradb2:/sys/devices # cat ./css0/0.0.0007/0.0.0100/block/dasdb/queue/scheduler

noop [deadline] cfq

2.3 Red Hat 6 or 7 Enterprise Linux Server Specific Setup

This section describes the other steps that are needed to install Oracle Single Instance

Database on Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Red Hat 6 or 7. These steps are in addition to the

generic Linux setup steps that are described in 2.2, “Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE

Enterprise Linux server setup” on page 8 that apply for Red Hat Linux systems on LinuxONE

only.

2.3.1 Important information

In this section, we describe some information important to note before installation.

Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux)

SELInux is a Linux kernel security module that provides a mechanism for supporting access control security policies for security of Red Hat operating systems.

By default, Red Hat Enterprise Linux server versions 6 and 7 are installed with SELinux in

enforcing

mode (meaning that the SELinux policy is in effect and it enforces access denials and audits them). This configuration is acceptable for the 12c installation process for RedHat

Enterprise Linux server version 6 and 7.

2.3.2 Pre-installation checking

This section describes more pre-installation checking that you must perform after you ensure that a GUI is established.

Operating system requirements for IBM LinuxONE

The following operating system requirements must be met when IBM LinuxONE is used:

򐂰 SSH Requirement: OpenSSH is the required SSH software.

򐂰 RHEL 7 servers must be running Red Hat kernel 3.10.0-229.el7 (s390x) or higher. (Red

Hat 7.2+ is recommended).

򐂰 RHEL 6 Kernel 2.6.32-279.el6 RHEL6 UPDATE3 is the minimum level for Oracle

Database 12c Release 1 Version 12.1.0.2.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

Oracle RPM Checker with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server on LinuxONE

In this section, we describe how to use the Oracle RPM Checker utility to verify that the following required Linux packages are installed on the operating system before starting the

Oracle Database or Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation. The RPM Checker does not install any missing package:

򐂰 Checking missing RPMs

Download the appropriate Oracle RPM Checker utility from one of the following My Oracle

Support websites based on Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Version 12.1.0.2 and the Red

Hat Enterprise Linux Server distribution level (RHEL 6 / 7):

– RedHat 6 12.1.0.2

– RedHat 7 12.1.0.2

After you download the RPM checker on LinuxONE, decompress the RPM and install it as root. To assess the missing RPMs, use one of the following commands (depending on your distribution level): yum install ora-val-rpm-RH7-DB-12.1.0.2-1.s390x.rpm

Running the command automatically pulls in the required RPMs if your yum repository is set up. If you do not have your yum repository set up, you can install the RPM dependency checker by using the following command (use the command corresponding to your distribution level): rpm -ivh ora-val-rpm-RH7-DB-12.1.0.2-1.s390x.rpm

Figure 2-2 shows the result of running the command to install the RPM dependency

checker.

Figure 2-2 Red Hat rpm checker for 12.1.0.2 Red Hat 7 Installation

Chapter 2. Setting up Linux guests to install Oracle Database 12c Release 1

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2.4 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server specific setup

This section describes the steps that are used to set up Oracle Single Instance Database on

SUSE Enterprise Server on LinuxONE.

These steps are in addition to the generic Linux setup steps that are described in 2.2, “Red

Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Enterprise Linux server setup” on page 8 and apply to SUSE

Linux Enterprise systems on LinuxONE only.

2.4.1 Important information

Although the SUSE

orarun

RPM package can be used to configure the user or groups, ulimits, and kernel parms automatically, our experiences are based on manually configuring these settings based on guidance from

Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide 12c

Release 1 (12.1) for IBM: Linux on System z

, E18443. Changes in the recommended Oracle

RPMs and kernel parameters can occur between release levels; therefore, review the latest

Oracle support Getting Started notes for updates.

2.4.2 Pre-installation checking

This section describes other pre-installation checking that you must perform after ensuring that a GUI is established.

Operating system requirements for IBM LinuxONE

The following operating system requirements must be met when IBM LinuxONE is used:

򐂰 SSH Requirement: OpenSSH is the required SSH software.

򐂰 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP2:

3.0.13-0.27-default s390x or later.

Oracle RPM Checker with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on LinuxONE

Use the Oracle RPM Checker utility to verify that the following required Linux packages are installed on the operating system before starting the Oracle Database or Oracle Grid

Infrastructure installation. The RPM checker does

not

install any missing package:

򐂰 Check for missing RPMs

Download the Oracle RPM Checker utility from the link that is provided in the My Oracle

Support note 1574412.1.

After downloading the utility to the Suse Enterprise Linux Server on LinuxONE, decompress the RPM and install it as root. To assess the missing RPMs, use the following command: l3oradb2:~ # rpm -ivh ora-val-rpm-S11-DB-12.1.0.1-1.s390x.rpm

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Oracle on LinuxONE

The output of the command is shown in Figure 2-3.

Figure 2-3 RPM checker output showing missing RPMs

In SLES, you can also use the zypper

installation utility by executing the following command: l3oradb2:~ # zypper install ora-val-rpm-S11-DB-12.1.0.1-1.s390x.rpm

The missing RPMs that are shown by the tool must be installed before the Oracle Installer is used.

With SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, software can be added by using the YAST interface or from the Linux command line (

rpm -i

or

zypper

). Figure 2-4 shows the installation of a

package using zypper.

Figure 2-4 Package installation using zypper

Note: Repositories for zypper can be found in the /etc/zypp/repos.d file system.

򐂰

Automatically install all missing RPMs in a single shell command

To provision LinuxONE Oracle instances and simplify automation, a shell can be used to check and install the missing packages.

Create a shell command file and paste the contents, as shown in Example 2-9 on page 20.

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Example 2-9 Contents of shell command file

rpm -ivh /mnt/oracle/oracle.12c/ora-val-rpm-S11-DB-12.1.0.1-1.s390x.rpm

2>/tmp/tempo; var=$(wc -l /tmp/tempo | awk '{print $1}'); tail -$(($var -1 )) /tmp/tempo | awk '{print "zypper install " $1}'

>/tmp/irpm.sh;sh /tmp/irpm.sh; rm -f /tmp/tempo; cat /tmp/irpm.sh; rm -f /tmp/irpm.sh ; rpm -ivh /mnt/oracle/oracle.12c/ora-val-rpm-S11-DB-12.1.0.1-1.s390x.rpm

This shell first identifies the missing RPMs and writes their name in a temporary file. Then, it starts the RPM installation by using the

zypper

command and removes temporary work files. Finally, it starts the RPM checker utility to ensure that all files were installed.

2.5 Installation

In this section, we describe the use of the OUI as a silent installation and an interactive installation. We then provide the steps to update the oracle user profile. Finally, we describe the steps to create the database.

2.5.1 Oracle Universal Installer

By using OUI, you can install software only, or install and create a database. Other installers are available, such as netca, to create the Oracle listener services, or dbca, to create databases. The Oracle Installers can be run interactively or in silent mode.

Silent installation

Complete the following steps to run a silent installation:

1. The silent mode is useful for automating and provisioning Oracle instances.

2. A response file contains all information that is required for a successful installation.

3. Samples of responses files are on the installation media. The response file can also be created during an interactive installation by clicking Save Response File.

The Silent Installation command is shown in the following example. It was started by the IBM

Wave User Script Manager to provision Oracle Database as a Service: l3oradb2:~ # sudo -u oracle /media/database/runInstaller -silent -responseFile

/tmp/silentInstallFile.rsp

Options, such as

-debug

,

-force

, and

-ignorePrereq

can be added to the command, as needed.

Interactive installation

Complete the following steps to run an interactive installation:

1. Run the Oracle Database Installation program through a VNC viewer by using the oracle user.

2. Mount the Installation DB under /media (for example), and go to the following database directory: cd /media/database/

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Oracle on LinuxONE

3. Start the interactive OUI as shown in the following example:

./runInstaller

4. Complete the required fields in each panel that are raised by the Installer. Table 2-3 lists

the panels you see.

Table 2-3 Installation panels in order of appearance with their options

Panel Comments and options

Configure security updates

Installation Options

Use this panel to enter your My Oracle Support account information if you want to receive the latest product information and security updates by using your My Oracle Support account.

Choose one of the following installation options:

򐂰 Create and configure a database

򐂰

Install database software only

򐂰 Upgrade an existing database

Grid Installation Options.

Product Languages

Select the following type of database installation:

򐂰 Single Instance

򐂰 Oracle RAC

򐂰 Oracle RAC One Node

Select your language

Database Edition

Install Locations

Oracle Inventory

Operating System Groups

Summary

Only the Enterprise Edition is selectable on LinuxONE

Provide your Oracle base and software paths

Location of the Oracle inventory

Specify the access privileges

A summary of the chosen configuration is displayed.

This configuration can be saved in a response file by clicking Save Response File.

5. Click Install.

6. Continue with the installation panels that are listed in Table 2-4.

Table 2-4 Continuation of Installation panels

Panel Comments and options

Product Installation

򐂰

Prepare

򐂰 Copy files

򐂰 Link binaries

򐂰 Setup

򐂰

Setup Oracle Base

򐂰 Execute Root Scripts.

Oracle Database configuration

Finish

The installer asks for running orainstRoot.sh and root.sh postinstallation scripts.

(no customization needed)

Click Finish.

Chapter 2. Setting up Linux guests to install Oracle Database 12c Release 1

21

2.5.2 Updating the Oracle user profile

Following a successful database software installation, set $ORACLE_HOME, and then set the

$PATH to include $ORACLE_HOME/bin at the beginning of the $PATH string, as shown in

Example 2-10.

Example 2-10 Setting variables

export ORACLE_BASE=/u01 export ORACLE_HOME=$ORACLE_BASE/product/12.1.0/dbhome_1 export PATH=$ORACLE_HOME/bin:$PATH

2.5.3 Creating the database

Complete the following steps to create the database:

1. Log in with the Oracle user.

2. Start one of the following installers interactively or in silent mode:

– netca installer to create an Oracle listener service

– dbca installer to create a database

3. Add or uncomment ORACLE_SID in the Oracle user’s profile, which is in the user’s HOME directory using the

export ORACLE_SID=orcl

command.

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Oracle on LinuxONE

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