Simplicity | 1693407 | Specifications | Simplicity 1693407 Specifications

Maintenance Manual Edition 10/2012
MAXUMTM edition II
Process Gas Chromatograph
(Modular Oven Configuration)
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GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY
Maxum edition II
Process Gas Chromatograph
(Modular Oven Configuration)
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© 2012 by Siemens
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be construed as a commitment, representation, warranty, or guarantee of any method, product, or device
by Siemens.
Reproduction or translation of any part of this publication beyond that permitted by Sections 107 and 109
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ii •
A5E31405710001
A5E31405710001
Safety Practices and Precautions
Safety First
This product has been designed and tested in accordance with IEC
Publication 1010-1, Safety Requirements for Electronic Measuring
Apparatus, and has been supplied in a safe condition. This manual
contains information and warnings which have to be followed by the user
to ensure safe operation and to retain the product in a safe condition.
Terms in This Manual
WARNING statements identify conditions or practices that could result in
personal injury or loss of life.
CAUTION statements identify conditions or practices that could result in
damage to the equipment or other property.
Terms as Marked on
Equipment
DANGER indicates a personal injury hazard immediately accessible as
one reads the markings.
CAUTION indicates a personal injury hazard not immediately accessible
as one reads the markings, or a hazard to property, including the
equipment itself.
Symbols in This
Manual
This symbol indicates where applicable cautionary or other
information is to be found.
This HOT symbol warns the user of a hot surface and
potential injury if touched.
Symbols Marked on
Equipment
DANGER - High voltage
Protective ground (earth) terminal
ATTENTION - Refer to Manual
This HOT symbol warns the user of a hot surface and
potential injury if touched.
Safety Practices and Precautions, Continued
Grounding the
Product
A grounding conductor should be connected to the grounding terminal
before any other connections are made.
Correct Operating
Voltage
Before switching on the power, check that the operating voltage listed on
the equipment agrees with the available line voltage.
Danger Arising From
Loss of Ground
Any interruption of the grounding conductor inside or outside the
equipment or loose connection of the grounding conductor can result in a
dangerous unit. Intentional interruption of the grounding conductor is not
permitted.
Safe Equipment
If it is determined that the equipment cannot be operated safely, it should
be taken out of operation and secured against unintentional usage.
Use the Proper Fuse
Safety Guidelines
To avoid fire hazard, use only a fuse of the correct type,
voltage rating and current rating as specified in the parts list for
your product. Use of repaired fuses or short circuiting of the
fuse switch is not permitted.
DO NOT open the equipment to perform any adjustments,
measurements, maintenance, parts replacement or repairs until all
power supplies have been disconnected.
Only a properly trained technician should work on any equipment with
power still applied.
When opening covers or removing parts, exercise extreme care "live
parts or connections can be exposed".
Capacitors in the equipment can still be charged even after the unit has
been disconnected from all power supplies.
CAUTION
Caution should be taken when touching the outside surfaces of the
analyzer when installed in ambient conditions above 40°C.
Chapter 1
Knowing Your System
Introduction
Overview
The Maxum edition II © system, hereafter referred to as Maxum II,
represents a significant advance in process chromatography. This was
accomplished by combining the best of the Siemens Advance Maxum
and PGC 302 gas chromatographs into a single platform analyzer.
Multiple configurations of the Maxum II exist, and each of these
configurations may be further customized to meet customer needs. This
manual is applicable to the Modular Oven configuration of the Maxum II.
The Maxum II Modular Oven has simplified electronics and is fully
modular for ease of maintenance.
A Maxum II Modular Oven is equipped with Thermal Conductivity
detectors. The Maxum II Modular Oven is designed so it can be
equipped with two independently heated isothermal ovens for parallel
chromatography applications. Each modular oven can accommodate up
to 8 detector channels.
The Maxum II CIM touch screen display panel provides maintenance
personnel with access to all maintenance functions and data. In addition,
the CIM will display both real time and archived chromatograms. A PC
based network workstation incorporates EZChrom© industry specific
software. This laboratory quality application builder includes custom
features designed particularly for the Maxum II.
In this chapter
This chapter covers the following topics:
Topic
A5E31405710001
Page
Introduction
1-1
Maxum II Specifications
1-3
About the Maxum II Modular Oven
1-12
Maxum II Operation Overview
1-19
Functional Tasks
1-23
Analyzer Internal Communications
1-26
Maxum II Hardware Identification
1-27
Advance Communication System
1-28
1-1
Introduction, Continued
Important Information
Included with each analyzer is a custom documentation-drawing
package. This package provides drawings and information pertinent only
to a specific analyzer. Contents of this package are application
dependent and will vary for each analyzer. Typical drawings included
are:
System Block and Utility Requirements
System Outline and Dimensional Drawings
Sampling System - Plumbing and Spare Parts List
Sampling System Dimensional Diagram
Sampling Probe
Electronic Enclosure Section - Internal Layout
Applicable Wiring Diagrams
Oven Plumbing Diagram - Sensor Near Electronics
Recommended Spare Parts - Analyzer
Manufacturing Test Charts
Stream Composition Data
Data Base
1-2
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Specifications
Configuration
Oven
Single isothermal airbath oven or split airbath oven with 2
independent isothermal zones or split airbath oven with one side
isothermal and one side programmed temperature.
or
Single or dual independent airless ovens. Dual version has two
distinct oven compartments for complete operating independence.
or
Modular Oven configuration consisting of any combination of up to
two large or small analytical oven units.
Note: Any isothermal dual-configuration of airbath or airless oven is
rated for up to a maximum temperature differential of 100°C. The
modular oven configuration does not have a temperature differential
limitation across its operating range.
Detector Modules
Thermal Conductivity, Flame Ionization, Flame Photometric, and
Pulse Discharge Detector (in Helium Ionization, Photoionization, or
Electron Capture Mode).
Note: Modular Oven only supports Thermal Conductivity.
Number of Detector Modules
Airbath/Airless Oven:
1, 2, or 3 in any combination of detector module types for air bath
oven (except restricted to a single pulse discharge detector).
1 or 2 in any combination of detector module types for airless oven
(except restricted to a single pulse discharge detector).
Detector combinations can total up to 18 channels.
Modular Oven:
1 4-cell TCD for small modular oven, 1 or 2 4-cell TCDs for large
modular oven.
Sample/Column Valves
Pneumatic-driven diaphragm, diaphragm-plunger, heated liquid
injection, rotating, or linear transport.
Note: Modular Oven configuration only supports Model 50 pneumaticdriven diaphragm valve.
Valveless Option
"Live" Switching (not available for modular oven configuration)
Columns
Packed, micro-packed, or capillary (application dependent)
Gas Supply Regulation
Airbath/Airless Oven:
Up to 8 electronic pressure controls and
Up to 8 mechanical pressure controls
Modular Oven:
Up to 6 electronic pressure controls and
Up to 4 mechanical pressure controls
A5E31405710001
1-3
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Performance
Minimum Range (general)*
Thermal Conductivity: 0-500 ppm
Flame Ionization: 0-1 ppm
FPD: 0-1 ppm
(application dependent: some lower ranges may be available)
Repeatability (general)*
± 0.5% of full scale for full scale ranges from 2-100%;
± 1% of full scale for full scale ranges from 0.05-2%;
± 2% of full scale for full scale ranges from 50-500 ppm;
± 3% of full scale for full scale ranges from 5-50 ppm;
± 5% of full scale for full scale ranges from 0.5-5 ppm;
(All values expressed at 2 times standard deviation and are
application dependent.)
Cycle Time
30 seconds to 3 hours (application dependent)
Sensitivity*
Varies by component and with application. Specific Minimum
Detectable Level of measured components can be estimated for
some applications. Consult factory.
Linearity*
± 2% of full scale
Oven Temperature Range
(Dependent on T – Rating)
40 to 440°F (5 to 225°C) for airbath oven (dependent on T-rating)
40 to 625°F (5 to 330 ºC) for programmed temperature column
compartment
122 to 535°F (50 to 260°C) for airless oven (dependent on T-rating)
Ambient to 176°F (80°C) for modular oven
Note: 10°C differential above ambient is required for control in all
cases.
Temperature Control
± 0.05°F (± 0.02°C)
Ambient Temperature Effect on
Column Flow
Negligible with electronic pressure control
Varying effect with mechanical pressure control
Vibration Effect
Airbath/Airless Oven – Not specified
Modular Oven – TBD
*Confirm with application
1-4
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Communication Options
Serial Output
RS232, RS485
Airbath/Airless Oven:
Port 1 – RS232/RS485 (Modbus)
Port 2 – RS232/RS485 (Serial Printer)
Port 3 – RS232/RS485 (Modbus)
Port 4 – RS232/RS485 (Modbus)
Modular Oven:
Port 1 – RS232/RS485 (Modbus)
Port 2 – RS485 (Modbus)
In addition to serial connections, network Modbus and network printers
supported on all configurations.
Ethernet
Standard:
10/100BaseT Ethernet connections with RJ45 connectors auto-sense and
auto-negotiate.
Airbath/Airless Ovens – 4 RJ45
Modular Oven – 2 RJ45
Optional (with ESBF board):
Fiber Optic 100Base FX multimode with ST® connector
Airbath/Airless Ovens – 3 RJ45 plus 1 fiber
Modular Oven – Not currently available
Redundant Ethernet
Siemens Scalance high speed TCP/IP communication network optional
Data Hiway
Proprietary serial communication network (redundant pair cable) optional
A5E31405710001
1-5
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Input/Output Options
Standard I/O
Airbath/Airless Oven Configuration:
2 analog outputs; 4 digital outputs (1 indicates system error, 3 are
user configurable); 4 digital inputs
Modular Oven Configuration:
2 digital outputs (1 indicates system error, 1 is user configurable)
Board Slots for Optional I/O
Airbath/Airless Oven Configuration: Up to 2
Modular Oven Configuration: Up to 2
2
I C I/O Boards
I2C AIO:8 analog inputs, 8 analog outputs, 2 digital inputs
I2C DIO: 6 digital inputs, 8 digital outputs
I2C ADIO:4 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs, 4 digital inputs, and 4
digital outputs
Note: The Maxum II Airbath/Airless configuration is also compatible
with original version CAN bus I/O from Siemens. CAN I/O boards
have lower I/O channel count and capacity; consult factory for detail
as needed.
Digital Inputs
Optically coupled with a common for all inputs. Self powered floating
contact input, or configurable for sinking or sourcing current. Sourcing
current mode: 24V internal isolated supply, with positive terminal of
supply at common. Sinking current mode: 5V internal isolated supply,
with negative terminal of supply at common.
Digital Outputs
Floating double-throw contacts, maximum contact load rating 1 A at
30 V (AC or DC). External diode shunt suppression should be used
for inductive DC loads, preferably at the load
Analog Inputs
Each input configurable for current or voltage; -20 to +20 mA into 50
ohms or -10 to +10 V with 100K. ohm input resistance, fully
differential. Each differential channel operates within the range of 100 to +100V common mode to chassis ground.
Analog Outputs
0/4 to 20 mA into 750 ohms maximum, common negative pole,
galvanically separated from ground, freely connectable to ground
Termination
Terminal strip for braided or solid cable with maximum section of 18
AWG or 0.82 mm2
1-6
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Gas Sample Requirements
Sample Flow
50-200 cc/min (application dependent)
Sample Filtration
0.1 micron
Minimum Sample Pressure
5 psig (35 kPa), lower pressure optional
Maximum Sample Pressure
75 psig (517 kPa), standard; higher pressure optional for
airbath/airless oven
Maximum Sample Temperature
250°F (121°C) standard for airbath/airless oven; higher temperature
optional
176°F (80°C) for modular oven
(Application dependent: not higher than oven temperature)
Material in Contact with Sample
Stainless steel, Teflon©, and polyamide; other material optional
Liquid Sample Requirements
Sample Flow
5-20 cc/min (application dependent)
Sample Filtration
0.3-5 micron (sample valve dependent)
Minimum Sample Pressure
5 psig (35 kPa), lower pressure optional
Maximum Sample Pressure
300 psig (2070 kPa) standard; higher pressure optional
Maximum Sample Temperature
250°F (121°C) standard; higher temperature optional
Material in Contact with Sample
Stainless steel and Teflon©, other material optional
A5E31405710001
1-7
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Installation
Configuration
Single unit with multiple enclosures
Dimensions
Height39 3/4" (1010 mm) [ Modular Oven - 24 11/16 (627 mm) ]
Width:26 1/16" (662 mm)
Depth: 16 3/16" (411 mm)
CAUTION
When mounting the analyzer on a wall, care should be taken to ensure that the
wall (vertical mounting surface) can withstand four times the minimum weight
of the analyzer when mounted with the appropriate hardware. In some cases,
it is recommended that brackets, such as Unistrut or angle iron be added to the
mounting surface to help distribute the weight.
Mounting
Wall mount: center to center 44" (1120 mm)
Left side clearance:18" (460 mm)
Front side clearance:25 3/4" (654 mm)
Right side clearance: 18" (460 mm)
Weight
Airbath/Airless Oven Configuration:
170 lb (77 kg) – typical, dependent on application
Modular Oven Configuration:
150 lb (68 kg) – Maximum, may be less depending on application
Electronics Enclosure
Rating
Airbath/Airless: NEMA 3, IP44 Category 2
Modular: NEMA 3, IP54 Category 1
EMI/RFI Rating
CE Compliance; certified to 89/336/EC and 2004/108/EC (EMC directive)
CE Compliance; certified to 73/23/EC and 2006/95/EC (Low Voltage
directive)
Tested per EN 61010-1 / IEC 61010-1
Hazardous Class
Airbath/Airless Oven
Standard Configurations:
Certified by CSA C/US for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups B,C,D with air
or nitrogen purge
Certified by CSA C/US for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups B,C,D
Certified according to ATEX with air or nitrogen purge and purge control
for Zone 1 or Zone 2 (Ex pyedmib IIB + H2)
Suitable for use in general purpose and non-hazardous areas.
Important:
General Purpose, Division 2 and Zone 2 applications require
environmental purge of Electronic Enclosure (EC) to maintain operation
integrity and performance
PDHID is not rated for hazardous areas
1-8
A5E31405710001
Installation (continued)
Hazardous Class
Airbath/Airless Oven
Standard Configurations:
Certified by CSA C/US for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B,C,D with
air or nitrogen purge
Certified by CSA C/US for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B,C,D
Certified according to ATEX with air or nitrogen purge and purge control
for Zone 1 or Zone 2 (II 2 G c Ex py nA nC ib IIB+H2 T4 Gb)
Suitable for use in general purpose and non-hazardous areas.
Altitude
Up to 2000m (6561 ft) for analyzers using 230 VAC Supply
Up to 3000m (9842 ft) for analyzers using 115 VAC Supply
Ambient Temperature and
Humidity (for Normal
Operation, Storage, and
Transport)
0 to 122 °F (-18 to 50°C) (application dependent**)
Minimums - 0°F (-18°C) and 0% humidity
Maximums Up to 104°F (40°C) at 50% relative humidity
Up to 86°F (30°C) at 80% relative humidity
Operational Maximums – The Maxum II may be operated at ambient
conditions of up to 122°F (50°C) (application dependent**) and 95%
relative humidity provided the electronic doors are not opened and the
electronics compartment is purged with clean, dry instrument air. The
instrument air must be dry enough to prevent humidity condensation inside
the electronics enclosure.
Note: If the Maxum II is exposed to high condensing humidity with the
electronics open or without dry purge air applied, then it must be allowed
to re-stabilize at the above stated conditions for at least 8 hours before
electrical power is applied.
** Depending on application characteristics such as number of detectors,
oven temperature, and electronic loading, the acceptable ambient
temperature range may be reduced. Consult factory for application-specific
detail.
AC Power
Wiring should be rated for 80°C (176°F) or higher.
Mains buffering (maximum power interruption): >20 ms
Airbath/Airless Oven:
100-130 VAC or 187-264 VAC (configurable); 47-63 Hz, single phase
Typical applications: single circuit, max. 1800 VA
Complex applications may require 2 circuits at max. 1800VA per circuit.
Modular Oven:
85-264 VAC; 47-63 Hz, single phase
Single circuit for all applications, maximum 655 VA (maximum rating for
the power supply, nominal power is less than 280 VA)
A5E31405710001
1-9
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Installation (continued)
DC Power
(optional)
Modular Oven Configuration Only:
24VDC +/-10%, 10A minimum, with 32V over voltage protection limit (from
power source).
Power must be regulated, with 100mV max, pk-pk, noise/ripple measured
with 20MHZ bandwidth.
The power must be limited to 20A by short circuit protection, fusing or
circuit breaker.
External 24V must be accepting of the negative terminal being grounded to
earth potential.
Instrument Air
50 psig (345kPa) minimum for units using Model 11 or Valco valves
120 psig (828 kPa) minimum for units using Model 50 valves
25 psig (173 kPa) minimum for air bath oven; 3 scfm (85
liters/minute)/oven
No instrument air for airless oven or modular oven heating (electronics
compartment purge still required with airless oven).
100 psig (690 kPa) minimum for units using Vortex tubes;
at dewpoint -40°F (-40°C) 15 scfm (85 liters/minute)
Configuration
Single unit with multiple compartments. Indoor mounting with protection
from weather and corrosive or dirty atmosphere is strongly recommended
to enhance life and improve maintainability.
Carrier Gas
Cylinder nitrogen, helium, or argon at 99.998% purity, or hydrogen at
99.999% purity depending on application
Typical consumption – 180 scf/month/detector module (5100
liters/month/detector module)
Flame Fuel
Hydrogen at 99.999% purity with no more than 0.5 ppm total hydrocarbons
Typical consumption – 70 scf/month/detector module
(2000 liters/month/detector module)
(Not applicable to Modular Oven)
Flame Air
Zero grade air (< 1ppm THC, O2 content 20-21%). Supplied from
instrument air with catalytic purifier (optional). Typical consumption – 900
scf/month (26,000 liters/month)
(Not applicable to Modular Oven)
Corrosion Protection
Dry air purge to protect electronics (Airbath/Airless oven configurations
only)
Stainless steel oven protection
Painted steel exterior (epoxy powder coat)
1-10
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Specifications, Continued
Calibration
Type
Manual or automatic
Zero
Automatic baseline correction
Span
Standard sample cylinder
Notes: Dimensions are shown as millimeters
Recommended Clearance
Left Side - 460 (18”)
Right Side – 460 (18”)
Front Side – 654 (25 ¾”)
Center to Center – 1120 (44”)
A5E31405710001
1-11
About The Maxum II Modular oven
Description
The Maxum II GC is completely enclosed in an air-purgable, metal
cabinet with hinged doors. Mounted above the isothermal oven is the
electronics enclosure and regulator panel. The analyzer may be
mounted on a wall, in a rack or on a floor stand.
Figure 1-1: Maxum II Modular Oven Process Gas Chromatograph
Electronics
Enclosure
The Electronics Enclosure houses all the electronics and pneumatic
modules required for performing all temperature, valve control and
analysis functions. The Electronics Enclosure modules are
interconnected using simple cable connections made to each module. All
modules can be easily removed and replaced. The Maxum II software
recognizes each Maxum II’s application, hardware components and
network configurations.
Figure 1-2: Maxum II Modular Oven Electronics Enclosure
1-12
A5E31405710001
About The Maxum II, Continued
Regulator Panel
The regulator tower contains space for six gauges and regulators. The
base Maxum II Modular Oven includes an electronics enclosure fast
purge gauge and regulators to support the configuration. See the custom
documentation drawing package that was shipped with the analyzer to
see which gauges and regulators are mounted on the analyzer.
Isothermal Oven
The Maxum ll has a wide variety of oven configurations. These include
the modular oven, air bath ovens (both single and split), and airless
ovens. Airbath and airless configurations are described in the
Maintenance Manual for those configurations (2000596-001). The
isothermal modular oven is described below.
Oven Configurations
Two different isothermal modular ovens are available, large and small.
The Maxum II Modular Oven compartment may contain up to two
individual isothermal modular ovens in any configuration (two large, two
small, or a large and small). The large oven may be equipped with
either a double application module or up to 2 single application
modules. The small oven may be equipped with a single application
module.
Application modules are self-contained analytical configurations, which
are available in either single or double sizes. Each size may be
equipped with a varying configuration of Model 50 valves, thermistor
beads, and columns plumbed in various ways. Refer to the site specific
application drawings to determine the configuration and plumbing
relevant for a specific analyzer. The application modules are designed
to be easily removed and inserted in the modular oven for ease of
maintenance. This is achieved through the use of a manifold in the
modular oven that provides all electrical and plumbing connections.
A5E31405710001
1-13
About The Maxum II, Continued
Switching and
Sample Valves
The application modules for the Maxum II Modular Oven use the
Siemens Model 50 valve. The Model 50 is a 10-port diaphragm type
valve that is suitable for vapor samples. The Model 50 is operated solely
by air pressure against the diaphragm, with no moving parts. This unique
design allows for easy maintenance, a long operation life, and a very
compact size.
Detectors
The Maxum II Modular Oven is equipped with thermal conductivity
detector beads built into the application modules. These thermistor
beads connect to an electronic Detector Personality Module (DPM) in the
Electronics Enclosure (EC).
The TCD is a concentration response detector for moderate sensitivity of
most components. A double application module can be equipped with up
to 8 thermistor channels (6 for measurement and 2 for reference). A
single application module can be equipped with up to 4 thermistor
channels (3 for measurement and 1 for reference).
Simplicity of the application module and detector design allows the TCD
detector to be easily serviced. Maintenance is limited to replacement of
thermistor beads, which is easily accomplished by removing the
application module from the modular oven and inserting a new pair of
beads.
CIM Touch screen
Display Panel
1-14
The Control Interface Module (CIM) consists of a touch screen display
and a controlling circuit board. The CIM displays all maintenance
functions and data in a menu driven graphical display. In addition, it
eliminates the need for strip-chart recorder because it can also display
both real-time and stored chromatograms. The real-time chromatograms
include zoom and pan features. The stored chromatograms include
voltages and cycle times for future comparison. All of the operational and
daily routine maintenance tasks of the GC can be performed using the
CIM interactive display screens and menus. System security is assured
with multiple levels of password protection for all analyzer-operating
functions. The touch screen function of the CIM is pressure activated. A
software emulator for the touch screen display (also called a Human
Machine Interface, or HMI, emulator) is available from the Maxum
System Manager Workstation software. This emulator allows a user to
perform CIM tasks without being located at the unit. Information on the
use of the CIM touch screen display is detailed in section 3 of this
manual and in the CIM User’s manual.
A5E31405710001
About The Maxum II, Continued
Work Station
The Maxum II uses a PC based network workstation for programming
and data processing. Analyzers can be programmed and monitored from
a single location, and, like the CIM Display, the workstation includes
graphical displays for operation, maintenance, and diagnostics. It also
supports PC printers to print chromatograms and alarm logs in order to
meet record keeping requirements.
The Maxum II workstation software is designed for PCs with Microsoft
Windows XP (SP1 or SP2) or Windows 2000. PC workstations can be
connected through existing LANs for wide access to monitoring or
maintenance tasks. The graphical interface recognizes and displays all
network hardware. The system monitors the alarm status of all analyzers
connected to the network to centralize system maintenance. More
information can be found in the Release Notes file supplied with the
Maxum System Manager Software (under the Maxum System Manager
directory).
System security is assured with multiple levels of password protection for
all analyzer-operating functions.
Chromatography Software EZChrom industry specific software is incorporated in the workstation
program. This is a laboratory quality application builder developed by
Scientific Software, Inc. and includes custom features for the Maxum II.
Using EZChrom, it is possible to set up methods and component peak
identification. More information can be found in the Release Notes file
supplied with the EZChrom software (under the Maxum EZChrom
directory) and in the help files provided with that software.
EZChrom allows a user to choose the best peak gating and basing
methods automatically. It is also possible to:
•
•
•
A5E31405710001
Re-process captured chromatograms with different methods
Measure unknown component peaks automatically
Record multiple detector measurements simultaneously.
1-15
About The Maxum II, Continued
Terms
The following are new terms that are used in this manual.
Application refers to the supporting hardware and software required to
perform the analysis. Supporting hardware consists of hardware
channels: detector channel (AI), Solenoid Valve Control Module channel
(AO), Electronic Pressure Control channel (DI), Temperature Controller
(DO). Streams are defined to applications. If there are 3 or 4
simultaneous streams, they are defined as a single group called a
Method. Applications can run only one Method at a time. Two
applications can run if there are two cycle clocks in the Maxum II.
Method is the part of the application that contains the parameters for
controlling the hardware. Methods control the hardware associated with
an Application. The method tells the hardware what to do, and includes
all cycle clock timed events. Methods are defined to streams. That is,
several stream sequences can make up one Method. Methods also
control the integration and calculations of the chromatogram. There is
one cycle clock per method.
Parallel
Chromatography
With the Maxum II hardware and software, it is possible to take a
complex single-train chromatograph analysis and break it into multiple
simple trains. Each simple train is then run simultaneously – in parallel.
Not only does this procedure simplify the overall analysis, but also it is
performed faster and more reliably.
Standard Configurations
Since the chromatography is broken into parallel operating modules, it is
possible to use standard configurations for common applications. For
example, 95% of the vapor thermal conductivity detector applications in a
typical olefins plant can be done with various combinations of fewer than
12 standard mini-applications. Many of these measurements can be
performed in less than two minutes. Standard application modules and
methods can be taken off-the-shelf and installed in the modular oven
analyzer. These application modules can be configured alone or in any
combination of parallel groups, depending on the measurement
requirements. By using parallel chromatography and application
modules, it is possible to significantly reduce application development.
1-16
A5E31405710001
About The Maxum II, Continued
Duplicate Modules
Parallel Chromatography can reduce the cycle time for complex
applications and also increase chromatograph analysis frequency by
running duplicate modules in parallel at staggered times. Since times are
staggered the system will provide more frequent measurement updates.
If similar measurements are performed on different streams, parallel
modules can be used for each stream instead of switching the stream to
a single module. This will reduce overall cycle time on multiple stream
applications.
Redundant Measurements
Use of parallel chromatography can reduce calibration requirements by
running two identical modules in parallel on the same stream to obtain
redundant measurements. As long as the results remain the same within
a predefined error limit, the analysis is known to be accurate. Deviations
outside the error limit can trigger notification or activate analyzer
calibration. Overall, the Maxum II calibration requirements are
significantly lower because of the parallel measurement configurations
and standard modular applications.
Example
Detector Vents
S
S
S
R
2
1
3
10
4
9
SSO
Column 1
Carrier In
from EPC
5
8
6
Column 2
7
Sample Sample
Out
In
Fixed Restrictor
Figure 1-3: Applications Module Example
A5E31405710001
1-17
About The Maxum II, Continued
Intended Use
The Maxum edition II gas chromatograph is primarily used in all
branches of the fine chemicals, refining and hydrocarbon processing
industries. It performs chemical composition analysis of gases and
liquids that are present in all phases of production. The Maxum II is built
for installation in harsh environments either directly or nearby in at-line
process measurement laboratories. Its application flexibility allows it to
analyze samples of feedstock, partially processed streams, final
products and process byproducts including wastes and environmental
hazards.
This product is intended to be used only in conjunction with other
devices and components which have been recommended and approved
by Siemens. Appropriate safety standards were used in the
development, manufacture, testing, and documentation of the Maxum II.
Under normal operation, this product is safe for use providing that all
safety and handling guidelines are observed with respect to
configuration, assembly, approved use, and maintenance. This device
has been designed such that safe isolation is guaranteed between high
and low voltage circuits. Low voltages which are connected must also
be generated using safe isolation.
If any part of the Maxum II is opened, certain parts of the device are
accessible which may carry dangerous voltages. Therefore, only
suitably qualified personnel may work on this device as indicated below
in the section titled “Qualified Personnel”.
Qualified Personnel
Only suitably qualified personnel may operate or perform maintenance
on the Maxum II. For the purposes of safety, qualified personnel are
defined as follows:
1. Those who have been appropriately trained for the tasks which
they are performing (for example, commissioning, maintenance,
or operation).
2. Those who have been appropriately trained in the operation of
automation technology equipment and are sufficiently
acquainted with Maxum II documentation.
3. Those who are familiar with the safety concepts of automation
technology and are sufficiently acquainted with Maxum II
documentation.
4. Those who are authorized to energize, ground and tag circuits
and devices in accordance with established safety practices may
perform the tasks for which they are trained.
WARNING
1-18
Operation or Maintenance of the Maxum II by unqualified personnel
or failure to observe the warnings in this manual or on the device
may lead to severe personal injury and/or extensive property
damage.
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Operation Overview
Description
This section provides an overview of the operation of the Maxum II
analyzer. Figure 1-4 is an operational block diagram showing how a
sample is processed within the analyzer. For simplicity the block diagram
only depicts a single modular oven. The accompanying narrative traces
the sample through the Maxum II and how the various modules interact
during the analysis.
Figure 1-4: Operational Block Diagram
More Information
A5E31405710001
See Chapter 2, Maxum II Modules for additional detailed information
regarding the hardware in the Maxum II.
1-19
Maxum II Operation Overview, Continued
Analyzer Operation
Refer to Figure 1-4 for the following narrative.
Power On
The Power Entry Control Module-Direct Current (PECM-DC), in
response to commands on the internal bus, accepts system primary
power and provides switching and control of AC power for oven heaters
and other AC powered devices.
Sample Conditioning
Before being piped to the analyzer, the sample from the process is sent
to a sample conditioning system. The sample conditioning system
ensures that the process sample is compatible with the requirements of
the analyzer. That is, it assures that the phase, pressure, temperature
and flow rate to the analyzer are suitable, that the sample is filtered, that
condensates are removed and other treatments are carried out. The
resultant conditioned sample is piped via stainless steel tubing to the
sample valve(s) located at the bottom of the Maxum II Modular Oven.
One sample stream is allowed per oven.
Sample Shutoff and
Sample Valves
The Sample Shutoff Valve (SSO), mounted in the modular oven, is used
to turn off the sample flow at the appropriate time in the cycle. The
Model 50 valve is used as a sample valve. The Model 50 is a 10-port
valve that is designed for vapor sample only. All valves are controlled by
a Solenoid Valve Control Module located in the electronic enclosure
section of the Maxum II.
Solenoid Valve Control
Module
The Solenoid Valve Control Module (SVCM), which is not shown in
figure 1-4, provides pneumatic on/off control for both sampling and oven
systems functions. Each SVCM consists of a group of solenoids with
2
control electronics that receives commands from the internal I C bus.
Solenoid commands are received from the Embedded Sensor Near
Electronics (EMSNE) control. Solenoid relay status is read back to the
control software to indicate whether a selected solenoid is to be
deactivated or activated. Timing is controlled by the processor timing.
There is no time base on the SVCM.
Commands from the I2C bus control the deactivation or activation of
solenoid valves. If fault or warning conditions have occurred, pressure
control and SVCM status information is returned to the database.
Columns
1-20
The sample is injected by the sample valve(s) into the chromatograph
columns where the sample is separated into individual components.
Many different types of columns may be used and are dependent on the
requirements of the application.
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Operation Overview, Continued
Column Valves
In most applications, there are multiple columns in use that are typically
switched by column valves located in between them. These column
valves are not shown in the illustration, but like the sample valves and
SSOs described above they are also controlled by the SVCM and
EMSNE software located in the electronics control section. The Siemens
Model 50 valve is used for any required column valves.
Electronic Pressure
Control
The carrier gas pressure that is used to push the sample through the
columns is controlled by an Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module(s)
(or optionally by mechanical regulators). All EPCs are mounted on a
manifold located on the EC right-side wall. The pneumatics for the EPC
is digitally controlled by the EMSNE software on the CIM (Control
Interface Module). Up to three EPCs can be mounted in an EC. Each
EPC contains two channels, and each channel can use a different gas at
a different pressure. Each EPC communicates the actual pressure back
to the EMSNE software.
Oven Heaters
For the columns and detectors to work correctly, they must usually be
operated at elevated temperatures. The Maxum II uses electrical heaters
to elevate the temperature. These heaters (not shown in block diagram)
are connected to relays in the Electronic Enclosure and, like the valves
and the EPCs, are controlled by the EMSNE software.
Detector
The sample eluted from the columns is transported to the associated
detector that senses the presence of the sample and converts it to an
electrical signal. The Maxum II Modular Oven is equipped with thermal
conductivity detectors. These detectors sense changes in heat flow
across detector beads relative to a reference as sample flows across the
beads. Depending upon the application, the Maxum II Modular Oven
may be equipped with up to 16 TCD channels (8 per oven, 2 of which
are reference).
The resulting electrical signal from the detector is then transmitted from
the beads (which are part of the Application Module) to the Detector
Personality Module located in the EC.
Detector Personality
Module
A5E31405710001
The Detector Personality Module (DPM) resides in the EC and amplifies
and then converts the analog signal from the detector beads into a digital
signal. The DPM in the Maxum II Modular Oven is the Intrinsically Safe
Thermal Conductivity Detector DPM (ISTCD-DPM). The intrinsically safe
designation indicates that the device has been designed such that it
cannot ignite flammable vapors or gases. This allows the DPM to control
the TCD beads in the oven without the need for explosion-proof or flameproof protection. Each ISTCD-DPM is capable of controlling up to 8
detector channels.
1-21
Maxum II Operation Overview, Continued
Embedded Sensor Near
Electronics
The Embedded Sensor Near Electronics (EMSNE) software takes the
place of a physical SNE Controller board (SNECON) that is used many
configurations of Maxum analyzer. In the modular oven configuration,
this function is performed by the processor on the Communication and
Control (CAC3) board, which resides on the CIM board. The digital
signal output from the DPM is sent to the CIM board via the I2C bus and
processed by the EMSNE software. The EMSNE software manages and
controls all chromatography functions to perform the compositional
analysis of the input stream.
Control Interface Module
The Control Interface Module (CIM) is an assembly located on the door
of the Maxum II. The assembly consists of a CIM-Base module, a CAC3
processor module that is mounted on the CIM-Base, and a touch screen
display user interface. The CIM controls all external and internal
communication for the analyzer.
In the Modular Oven configuration, the CIM performs both SNE software
functions (called Embedded SNE, or EMSNE) as well as primary
processor functions. This includes combining all data results from the
EMSNE software and performing additional high level data processing
and calculations. The CIM also connects to other devices, such as other
analyzers, printer, or Modbus. .
The CIM is the analyzer control system in addition to containing the
application database. The application database also contains analytical
hardware database definitions that are used to perform the following
functions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
I C Bus
Obtain desired sampling measurements
I/O and EMSNE schedule of timing events
Sequence of sampling streams
Calculations of calculated values
Formatting of results and location, and outputting results
How to report or correct error conditions
The CIM communicates with the electronics enclosure (EC) installed
modules via the I2C bus (Inter-Integrated Circuit bus). The I2C is a serial
communication bus that is sourced in the CIM. The CIM is equipped with
two I2C buses. Bus A is used for communication with EC installed
modules and Bus B is available for other uses (such as interface to a
Siemens Smart Sampling System).
The PECM-DC is used to distribute the internal I2C bus and is equipped
with multiple bus connectors for this purpose.
1-22
A5E31405710001
Functional Tasks
Overview
This section provides an operational overview of the Real-Time
functional tasks of the Maxum II.
•
•
Startup Tasks
Startup Tasks
Applying Power
Valid Database
Oven Temperature
Cycle Control Flag
Timed Event Scheduling
Time-Of-Day Clock
Schedule of Events
•
•
•
Frequency Events
Analysis Cycle Clock
Accessing CIM
Analysis Cycle Clock
Cycle Clock
Valve Events
Manual Operations
User Interface
On start-up, when primary AC power is applied to the analyzer, the
analyzer first processes whatever electronic self-tests and diagnostics
are required (for example, PROM, RAM, A/D, communication ports, etc.).
The processing occurs within 5 seconds.
System related initial messages are generated and output to the network
ports. Appropriate initial messages are then displayed on the CIM
display panel and completed within 20 to 25 seconds. If the analyzer
cycle clock is in RUN or CAL mode, an appropriate alarm may be
generated during this internal test and the following startup period.
Self Test
After the self-test, the following conditions occur:
•
•
•
•
Installed hardware is initialized
Interrupts enabled
Oven temperatures and carrier pressure default set points are output
Analog input system(s), associated with detector inputs, are
initialized and begin scanning.
The CIM checks to be certain a valid database is resident. If it is, the
appropriate temperature and carrier set points are output. If not, default
set points are left in place.
Oven Temperature
A5E31405710001
The oven temperature is monitored to check for being at set point and
stable before automatically proceeding. Depending on how long primary
AC power has been off, this may take from 2 seconds to 45 minutes.
1-23
Functional Tasks, Continued
Cycle Control Flag
A check is made to see if the analyzer is to run a diagnostic type cycle.
This is for the purpose of validating the analytical hardware, such as
solenoid valves, detectors, carrier regulators, etc. This is optional based
on a custom application being initiated per the power fail alarm.
Cycle control flags are checked to see if any analyzer cycle clocks are to
be in RUN mode. If they are not, the analyzer remains in the HOLD
mode until operator intervention. If the cycle clock is in RUN mode,
based on having been in that mode prior to powering down, then that
mode should be started in progress without waiting for intervention.
Event Scheduling
The TOD (Time of Day) clock schedules events on a second, minute,
hourly, daily or weekly basis. The clock is maintained on the CAC3 board
and schedules events from the residing SYSCON database.
The TOD clock has one-second resolution that is maintained and
generated by a hardware device that maintains accurate time
independent of analyzer power. This allows a power recovery event to
determine duration of power down state.
Certain events are scheduled on a frequency basis, which are
independent of the TOD or analysis cycle clocks. The frequency clock
has a resolution of 1 second, which is used to schedule repetitive events,
such as reading DI and AI signals for alarm purposes. Scheduling of
events typically occur at a frequency of every 5 or 10 seconds. They
occur regardless of whether the analyzer is in Run or Hold.
Description
A schedule event can be for instrument calibration and special
calibrations. Special calibrations include daily or shift averages, report
logging to a printer or Host computer. When these tasks are scheduled
by TOD clock, they are put on queue. This allows them to be performed
at the next appropriate time. Typically, this is after completion of current
analysis cycle.
If a calibration is scheduled, it will be put in queue. The calibration is then
initiated after completion of current cycle and appropriate time has been
allotted for calibration blend to flow through the sampling valve. If shift
average reports are to be calculated and printed, the report should
include all cycles, which started, or sampled, during the specified shift.
To have data available for calculation, a wait period may occur for
completion of the current sample analysis.
1-24
A5E31405710001
Functional Tasks, Continued
Cycle Clock
The Analysis Cycle Clock is another clock that provides the time base for
all events associated with the actual chromatograph analysis cycle. The
cycle clock is maintained by the EMSNE software and can be configured
to provide timed event resolutions of 0.1 second, 0.01 second, 0.01
minute, or 0.001 minute. This is the Embedded SNE Event Table Scan
Rate, which is independent of detector scan rates. A unique cycle clock
exists for each method configured in the analyzer database. All cycle
clocks must be of the same second or minute time units.
The cycle clock is mirrored by a cycle clock in the CIM control software.
This mirror is used in displaying results status to a user. For example,
the status timer at the top of the CIM display indicates whether the
current application is in Run status as well as the value of the cycle
clock. It is important to note that depending on processor load, this clock
may appear to be slightly out of sync with the EMSNE cycle clock. It may
appear to pause at times and run fast at other times. This does not affect
the actual cycle clock of the EMSNE software or the ongoing analysis.
The EMSNE cycle clock is used to schedule the following events.
•
•
•
•
Analysis valve timing
Detector balances
Temperature set points start
and stop for PTGC
Cycle Reset
•
•
Pressure set point timing for
pressure programming
Analysis result calculations
and reporting
Important
Scheduled solenoid valve events cause Solenoid Valve Control Module
(SVCM) hardware to be activated within 5 milliseconds of stated cycle
time. Any scheduled pressure set point adjustments are transferred to
the actual Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) hardware within 5
milliseconds.
Manual Operations
Manually controlled functions can be initiated through the CIM touch
screen display panel. A manual controlled event can occur
asynchronously with any event and control some of the analyzer
operations. Controlled items include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A5E31405710001
Activation of solenoid valves
Balancing detectors
Changing a pressure or temperature set point
Initiating a calculation
Report logging event
Change the cycle time of an event
Initiate a calibration
1-25
Analyzer Internal Communications
Description
The primary internal communication link within the Maxum II Modular
Oven analyzer is the I2C bus. This bus is used to provide the
communication paths from the CIM to the internal devices including
DPMs, EPCs, PECM-DC and I/O boards. Note that the SVCM
communications are via the PECM-DC.
I2C Internal Bus
Physical Connections
The Advance Communication System (ACS) Ethernet is accessed via
the 10BaseT port on the CAC3 board. Internal boards are accessed via
I2C bus cables. I2C Bus A from the CIM-Base board connects to an I2C
connector on the PECM-DC board. The PECM-DC acts as a bus
distribution board with other I2C connectors on the PECM-DC being used
to connect to other devices. There are a total of 6 I2C connectors on the
PECM-DC board (1 for connection to the CIM and 5 for distribution to
other devices). Three of the connectors on the left of the PECM-DC and
three are on the right.
Note that a single daisy chain cable is used to connect from the PECMDC to the I/O boards, and another is used to connect from the PECM-DC
to the EPCs.
Figure 1-6: I2C Internal
1-26
A5E31405710001
Maxum II Hardware Identification
Overview
The Maxum II modules located in the electronic enclosure section have
their own physical address and communicate via the I2C Internal Bus.
Address information is contained in the SYSCON database and identifies
modules by their location.
Identification Number
ALL modules within the Maxum II electronic enclosure have a unique
hardware identification number. The first section of the hardware ID is
the SNE ID. In the Maxum II Modular Oven configuration, the ID for
EMSNE software is always zero.
11:1-1.1-1.1.129
Channel Number
Channel Type
PIC Index
Module Number (Location I/D)
Sub Module Type & Description)
Module Type
SNE ID (I2C ID)
Address information is located in the analyzer local I/O Table. The I/O
points are identified by module type, mounting location within the
electronic enclosure and channel number. This allows module
addressing from either the SYSCON database, SNE Tables or from
Advance Database.
A5E31405710001
1-27
Advance Communication System
Network Connectivity
The Advance Communication System (ACS) uses industry standard
protocols and provides high-speed communication among all devices.
The ACS can function alone or may be connected to a Distributed
Control System (DCS) or plant-wide Local Area Network (LAN). As with
other Siemens systems, the network has complete backward
compatibility with existing Advance Data Hiway systems.
The network supports the following Advance products (note that some
products may be legacy products no longer offered):
•
Flexible high speed peer-to-peer communication
•
Open TCP/IP connectivity to industry standard networks for large,
open systems.
•
Single Ethernet (100 MB fiber or 10BaseT) or redundant DataNET
implement in any combination.
•
Interconnection to Advance Data Hiway and Advance Optichrom
Chromatographs for backward compatibility.
•
Maintenance Panel availability
•
Remote Maintenance Panel access (optional) to any GC attached to
the ACS
•
Slots for optional analog and digital I/O boards which can be used by
any GC attached to the ACS
•
Multiple units can be attached anywhere in one ACS
CAN Extension (CEU)
•
Additional I/O board slots allows for expansion of I/O capability
Hub
•
Redundant version of ACS
DataNET
•
Twisted pair wire or fiber optics
•
True message confirmation
•
Hazardous area hardware ratings
Advance Network
Gateway (ANG)
•
Interface high speed Ethernet or DataNET to existing
Advance Data Hiway for backwards compatibility
Work Station
•
User interface for maintenance
•
Programming interface for engineering changes
•
Real time network status monitoring
Maxum II and Optichrom
GCs
Network Access Unit
1-28
A5E31405710001
Chapter 2
Maxum II Modules
Overview
Description
This chapter provides a functional description for each replaceable
module installed within the Maxum II Gas Chromatograph Modular Oven
configuration.
Learning Hint
Please read the System Overview section of this manual for a basic
understanding of the overall operation of the Maxum II.
Chapter Highlights
In this Chapter the following information is provided:
Topic
Overview
2-1
Control Interface Module (CIM)
2-2
2
A5E31405710001
Page
I C Input Output Boards
2-11
ISTCD Detector Personality Module (DPM)
2-20
Power Entry and Control Module–Direct Current
(PECM-DC)
2-22
Solenoid Valves
2-26
Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module
2-29
24V Power Supply
2-33
2-1
Control Interface Module (CIM)
Description
The Control Interface Module (CIM) is a multipurpose assembly capable
of functioning as the control processor, motherboard, peripheral
interface, and user interface for the Maxum II analyzer. It may be used in
both the Modular Oven and Airbath/Airless Oven configurations of the
Maxum analyzer. This section is related to the use of the CIM in the
Maxum II Modular Oven configuration.
In the Maxum II Modular Oven, the CIM functions as the primary
processor, receiving data and performing analytical calculations, storing
the analyzer application database, communicating and controlling other
installed electronic hardware, as well as controlling external
communications (including network, serial, and I2C communications to
external devices). The CIM also includes a user interface for onsite
access to the analyzer.
Figure 2-1: CIM Assembly in the Maxum Analyzer
Mechanical
The CIM assembly consists of a base hardware module (CIMBase), a
processor module (CAC3) mounted on the CIM-Base, a color display
panel, and a touch screen interface mounted over the color display
panel. The combination of CIMBase with CAC3 installed is called the
CIMBoard. The entire assembly of CIMBoard, display, and touch screen
are called the CIM assembly, or simply CIM. The functions performed by
the CIM depend on the analyzer configuration. In the Maxum II Modular
Oven configuration, the CIM functions as primary processor for the
analyzer and also provides interface, software, and control for the
enhanced color touch screen display unit mounted on the analyzer
The CIM may also be installed in a Maxum Airbath/Airless oven
configuration. This function is described in the Maintenance Manual for
the Airbath Airless Configuration Maxum II (part number 2000596-001).
The functional versatility of the CIM allows one set of hardware for
multiple functions, allowing for simplified maintenance and reduced
spare parts requirements.
The CIM is housed on the door of the Maxum or Maxum II. The circuit
boards are mounted on the inside of the door while the display is
mounted in the door, facing out for exterior user access. External
connections are via connectors on the CIM-Board.
2-2
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIM Operation
Below is a summary of the basic functions performed by the CIM
assembly
•
Memory storage for the application database, analytical results,
programs, etc.
•
Running Embedded Sensor Near Electronics (EMSNE) software
to control the sample analysis, acquire and process data from
detectors and control and monitor the analytical operating
environment.
•
Performing data processing and calculations.
•
Storing and executing MaxBasic programs.
•
Providing a local user interface via the CIM Display.
•
Communication via I2C bus to control internal hardware (PECMDC, EPC, DPM, I /O boards) and sending/receiving data.
•
Optional control of Siemens Smart Sampling System
components via second I2C bus.
•
Interface to external Ethernet and other network
communications.
•
Interface via Serial ports (printer and Modbus).
Color Display and
Touch Screen
The CIM display is a 10.4” color display with backlight manufactured by
Mitsubishi. It is controlled by software on the CIMBoard. Overlaid on top
of the display is the touch screen interface, also interfaced to the
CIMBoard. The touch screen is an 8-wire resistive custom touch screen
panel manufactured by Dawar. The touch screen is pressure sensitive,
meaning that it can be operated while wearing gloves or using an
appropriate stylus. Use of the display is described in Chapter 3 of this
manual.
CAC3
The Communication and Control board (CAC) is a standardized, singleboard central processing unit for intended for use in Siemens products.
For the Maxum family of products the third generation of the CAC board
(CAC3) is used, see figure 2-2. In the Maxum II Modular Oven
configuration, the CAC3 is mounted on the CIMBase board.
The CAC3 contains the processor and memory functions for the CIM as
well as control of external Ethernet communications. The RJ-45 Ethernet
connection connects directly to the customer LAN. With the exception of
external Ethernet, the CIMBase contains all other interfaces provided by
the CIM assembly.
A5E31405710001
2-3
Control Interface Module, Continued
CAC3 (continued)
The CAC3 utilizes a 32-Bit, 240 MHz microprocessor. The on-board
memory for the CAC3 consists of 128 MB SDRAM, 64 MB NOR Flash,
and 256 MB NAND Flash. The CAC3 also includes an on-board 10/100
Ethernet controller, used for connection to external Ethernet.
The communication backbone between the CAC and the CIMBase is the
General Purpose Bus (GP Bus). The GP Bus is a 32 bit, 120 MHz
parallel address/data bus with dedicated chip selects and interrupts. In
addition to the GP Bus, the CAC communicates via two serial buses.
One serial bus is dedicated to the serial debug port. The second serial
bus provides the serial communications ports.
Figure 2-2: CAC3 Board
2-4
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
LED indicators for the CAC3 are as shown in figure 2-3 and table 2-1
CAC3 LEDs
Figure 2-3: LEDs on the CAC3 Board
LED
LED1
LED2
Description
Debug LED1
Debug LED2
LED3
LED4
Power Good
Maintenance
LED5
LED7
Fault
Ethernet
Speed
Green LED on RJ-45
Link Status
Yellow LED on RJ-45
Link
Acknowledge
Color / Meaning
Green – On during normal operation.
Green – On during normal operation.
Off during bootload
Green – Power to CAC3 is functional
Yellow – Off during normal operation.
On during bootload.
On – Maintenance fault or bootload
Red – CAC3 Board fault
Green –
On – Speed is 100 Mbits/sec
(or auto-negotiating)
Off – Speed is 10 Mbits/sec
(or disconnected)
Green – LED is green when link is in
full duplex mode.
Yellow – LED is on when link is active.
Will flash off for transmit or receive
activity.
Table 2-1: CAC3 LEDs
A5E31405710001
2-5
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIMBase Board
Connections
Other than the external Ethernet connection on the CAC3, CIMBase
board provides all of the connections for the CIM assembly, External
connectors are shown below.
Figure 2-4: CIM Connections
2-6
•
Debug Connector – This serial RS-232 port is used to interface
to the debug function on the CAC3. The debug port has no
support for hardware handshake.
•
CIM Display Control – This connection is for the software control
of the color CIM display panel.
•
Alarm/Power LEDs – Interface to the Purge, Fault, Warning, and
Power indicator LEDs that are built into the display panel.
•
Touch Screen Interface – Control connection for the touch
screen panel.
•
Walk-up Ethernet – This is a spare 10BaseT RJ-45 Ethernet
connection that can be used for direct connection to PC. It is
auto-negotiating to either 10 Mb or 100 Mb.
•
Network Ethernet Connection – This connector on the CAC3
board connects directly to the customer LAN.
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIMBase Board
Connections
(continued)
•
Reset Switch – This pushbutton switch initiates a hard reset of
the CIM (same as initial power up).
•
CIM Display Backlight – Power/Control connector for the
backlight of the color display.
•
I2C Bus – The I2C connectors are shown on the left side of figure
2-4. Two I2C buses are equipped on the CIM. These are labeled
I2C Bus A and I2C Bus B.
o I2C Bus A includes the two connectors on the top as
shown in figure 2-4.
o I2C Bus B includes the three I2C connectors on the
bottom figure 2-4. I2C Bus B is intended for use to
support extra hardware such as Siemens Smart
Sampling System Initiative (SSSI) components.
Digital Outputs - The CIM has two on-board Digital Outputs
(DOs) configured. The pin layout of this connector is printed on
the CIMBase board as shown below.
•
Figure 2-5: CIM CO Connector Pin Layout
•
CAUTION
A5E31405710001
Serial Ports 1 and 2 – The SYSCON2 is equipped with two serial
ports, each ground isolated. Serial Port 1 is configurable via the
Maxum software for RS-232 or RS-485. Serial Port 2 is hardcoded for RS-485. Both ports support RTS/CTS hardware
handshake. Maximum supported data rate on the serial ports is
115200 bits/second.
Mixing RS-485 and RS-232 cabling/devices could possibly damage a
serial device. Because of this, always verify the port settings in software
prior to plugging any cable into CIM serial port 1, and do not connect an
RS-232 cable/device to CIM serial port 2.
2-7
Control Interface Module, Continued
Note: RS-485 serial ports are designed to comply with the Profibus
standard. The pin layout is below.
DB-9 Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
RS-232
RX
TX
GND
RTS
CTS
-
RS-485 Modbus
5 V Pwr
Line B (RxD+/TxD+)
Common
Line A (RxD–/TxD–)
-
Table 2-2: Serial Port Pin Layouts for CIM
•
CAUTION
2-8
Intrinsic Safety Grounds – The touch screen display is designed
as an intrinsically safe device. This means that it is designed
such that it cannot be a source of ignition for flammable vapors
or gases, even when a fault exists. This protection requires two
ground connections to the chassis. These ground connections
must also terminate to two different terminals. The Maxum II
Modular Oven is shipped with these grounds connected
correctly. Refer to the Maxum II Explosion Protection Safety
Standards Manual (A5E02220442001) for more information on
the safe use of intrinsically safe circuitry in the Maxum II.
The intrinsically safe (IS) design for IS devices in the Maxum II (e.g. CIM
Display and ISTCD) requite two (2) connections to ground.
Disconnecting of either ground violates this protection. Refer to the
Maxum II Explosion Protection Safety Standards Manual
(A5E02220442001) for more information on the safe use of intrinsically
safe circuitry in the Maxum II.
•
Purge –The purge detect signal is received from the PECM-DC
and distributed to the CIM Display (purge fault LED) without
software intervention (purge fault causes LED to light whether
software is running or not. In addition, the signal is also handled
by the software as a digital input to generate a purge alarm.
•
24V Power Connection – This connection is the power for the
entire CIM assembly supplied from the PECM-DC (orange
connectors on the upper left corner of the PECM-DC). Although
two connectors exist, only one is currently required.
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIMBase LEDs and
Options
The CIMBase is equipped with several LEDs that relate useful
information regarding the operating status of different interfaces. These
LEDs are shown in figure 2-6 and described in table 2-3. The CIMBase
is also equipped with certain option switches, described below, that must
be set appropriately for proper operation. Before installation, verify that
all switches are set correctly. When replacing a CIMBase verify that the
switch settings on the new board match the switch settings on the board
being removed.
•
I2C Bus Pull-Up Dip Switches – These switches are set to OFF
for a particular CIM I2C Bus when that bus is connected directly
to the internal I2C distribution on the PECM-DC. They are set to
ON otherwise. There is one set of two switches for I2C Bus A
and another set for I2C Bus B (as marked on the board). Both
switches for a particular bus must be set the same.
•
CPLD Spare – These switches are not used in normal operation,
and are set to OFF.
Figure 2-6: CIM LEDs and Switch Layout
A5E31405710001
2-9
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIMBase LEDs
Table
Name
Color
Description
Power
Green
Is connected directly to 3.3V supply.
Should be on at all times.
Power Fault
Red
Power is faulty or hardware reset
switch is being pressed.
CAC Connection
Fault
Red
Connection from the CIMBase to the
CAC3 is faulty or incomplete. After
power up, this LED should turn off
once CAC3 to CIMBase connection is
completely initialized.
Green
On – Speed is 100 Mbits/sec
(or auto-negotiating)
Power LEDs
Connection Speed
LED1 Speed/Conn
Off – Speed is 10 Mbits/sec
(or disconnected)
I2C Bus A and Bus B LEDs
LED2 Norm/Comm
Green
Dim Green – I2C Bus is normal.
Bright Green - Bus is communicating
LED3 Warn
Yellow
Warning on the I2C Bus
LED4 Fault
Red
I2C Bus Fault
LED8 Ready/Comm
Green
Dim green – CAN Bridge Normal
Bright – CAN Bridge Communicating
LED9 Warn
Red
Warning on I2C CAN Bridge
LED10 Fault
Yellow
Fault on I2C CAN Bridge
CAN Bridge
Table 2-3: LEDs for CIM
2-10
A5E31405710001
I2C Input/Output Boards
Description
The Maxum II Modular Oven supports three different types of I/O circuit
boards that communicate via the I2C bus. The available I2C I/O boards
are as follows:
•
AIO - Eight Analog Input channels; Eight Analog Output
channels; Two Digital Input channels
•
DIO - Eight Digital Output channels; Six Digital Input channels
•
ADIO - Four Analog Inputs; Four Digital Inputs; Four Analog
Outputs; Four Digital Outputs
The I2C I/O boards are designed to plug into Maxum II Modular Oven I/O
Cage installed on the inside ceiling of the electronics enclosure as
shown below
Figure 2-7: I2C I/O Board Cage
I/O Boards General
Characteristics
The following characteristics are the same for all configurations of the I2C
I/O boards.
Status LEDs
Three status LEDs have been included on each I2C I/O board. These
LEDs are visible on the top front of the board. The LEDs follow the
Maxum standard as follows:
A5E31405710001
•
LED1 (Fault) - When lit, the bottom (red) LED indicates that the
board has a fault.
•
LED2 (Warn) - When lit, the middle (yellow) LED indicates that
there is a warning status for the board.
•
LED3 (Norm) - The bottom (green) LED indicates that the board
is powered when lit. When this is the only LED illuminated, then
the board is operating normally.
2-11
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
DI Mode Switch
Switch SW1 located at the top of the board near the front (connector
end) controls the mode setting for the on-board digital inputs. The switch
sets the mode for all digital input circuits on the board (mixing of modes
on a board is not allowed). The available options are Default/Sink and
Legacy. The Legacy option is designed to adjust for a non-standard
configuration that may be in use on some systems. The Mode switch
should be set to Mode 2 unless instructed differently by Siemens.
I2C Bus Connections
There are two standard I2C bus connections on the top of the board.
Either of these connections may be used as either a bus input or bus
extension connection. In this manner the I2C bus can daisy-chain from
one board to another or to other I2C devices.
Address Switches
The I2C I/O boards use an 8-bit board identification number as an
address on the I2C bus. The address is a hex number from 00 to FF,
corresponding to a decimal number from 0 to 255. Address numbers
from 1 to 254 are used (numbers 0 and 255 are reserved).
DIP switches are used to set the address for the physical board. When a
board is being replaced it is necessary to set the switches on the new
board to match the old board.
Figure 2-8: I2C I/O Address Switches
The DIP switches used to set the address are on the top back part of the
board and are labeled BOARD ID as shown in the figure above.
Together, the DIP switches correspond to an 8 bit binary number that is
set to match the board address. Each switch is labeled for the binary
digit it represents, and setting a switch is equivalent to setting that bit to
1. For example, in figure 2-8 above, the switches for 1, 2 and 4 are set
high. Thus, the board ID would be 1+2+4 = 7.
2-12
A5E31405710001
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Analog Input/Output
Board
The I2C AIO board makes available 8 Analog Outputs (AOs), 8 Analog
Inputs (AIs), and 2 Digital Inputs (DIs).
Figure 2-9: I2C Analog Input/Output Board
Analog Outputs
There are eight AO circuits available on the AIO board. The AO is able to
output currents from 0 to 25mA, although a 4 to 20mA range can be
selected in software. The range above 20mA is used to meet Namur
compliant out-of-range fault readings.
Two pins are used for each AO. One pin is a common ground. The other
pin is the AO current output pin. Each AO current output pin has
protection against high overvoltage using diode circuitry. In addition,
there is 400V isolation between the AO on the connector and the rest of
the I/O board.
AOs can be modified for voltage output by adding a resistor across the
AO terminal. Value of the resistor is dependant on the desired voltage
range, subject to Ohm's law (V=IR). Accuracy of the output is dependant
on the tolerance of the resistor. The maximum supported voltage output
is 23V, corresponding to approximately a maximum 920 ohm resistor.
A5E31405710001
2-13
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Analog Inputs
There are eight AI circuits available on the AIO board. Analog inputs may
be either voltage or current based. The I2C I/O boards use two pins for AI
circuits. Setting for either voltage or current is accomplished using
jumper settings on the board, one jumper per circuit so that AIs on the
same board can be set differently. Shorting the jumper across the left
two pins engages a 50 ohm resistor across the inputs. This allows a 0 to
20mA input current to be measured.
Diagrams on the board indicate which jumpers correspond to which AIs.
Jumpers count from bottom to top and left to right (bottom left is AI1; top
left is AI4; bottom right is AI5; top right is AI8). Diagrams on the board
also indicate correct jumper settings for either current or voltage (install
jumper on right two pins for voltage, and left two pins for current).
Digital Inputs
There are two DI circuits available on the AIO board. DI circuits consist
of a +5V Signal lead and a Common lead. There is a 500V isolation
between the DI on the connector and the rest of the AIO board.
There is a DI mode switch on the AIO board. This switch is described in
the General Board Characteristics section for the I/O boards earlier in
this chapter.
2-14
A5E31405710001
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Analog I/O Board
(AIO) Connections
Circuits on the AIO board are wired as shown in the following table. The
table is the view as seen when looking at the connector while the board
is installed.
AIO I2C Wire Side View
Lead
Pin
Pin
Lead
AI8 -10V
2
∎
∎
1
AI8 +10V
AI7 -10V
4
∎
∎
3
AI7 +10V
AI6 -10V
6
∎
∎
5
AI6 +10V
AI5 -10V
8
∎
∎
7
AI5 +10V
AI4 -10V
10
∎
∎
9
AI4 +10V
AI3 -10V
12
∎
∎
11
AI3 +10V
AI2 -10V
14
∎
∎
13
AI2 +10V
AI1 -10V
16
∎
∎
15
AI1 +10V
AO_GND
18
∎
∎
17
AO8 Current
AO_GND
20
∎
∎
19
AO7 Current
AO_GND
22
∎
∎
21
AO6 Current
AO_GND
24
∎
∎
23
AO5 Current
AO_GND
26
∎
∎
25
AO4 Current
AO_GND
28
∎
∎
27
AO3 Current
AO_GND
30
∎
∎
29
AO2 Current
AO_GND
32
∎
∎
31
AO1 Current
DI Common
34
∎
∎
33
DI2 Signal
DI Common
36
∎
∎
35
DI1 Signal
Analog Inputs: -20 to +20 mA into 50 ohms or -10 to +10V, R10=1 M-ohm,
mutually isolated 10 V
Analog Outputs: 0/4-20 mA. Common negative pole galvanically separated
from ground, freely connectable to ground, max. gain vs. local protective
ground potential 50B, max. working resistance 750 ohms.
Digital Inputs: Optocoupler with internal 12-24 VDC power supply,
switchable with floating contacts; alternative: switchable with external
voltage 12-24 VDC, common negative pole.
Design: Terminal strips for braided or solid conductors with a maximum
diameter of 1.5 mm or 16 AWG.
Table 2-4: I2C AIO Board Connection Diagram
A5E31405710001
2-15
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Digital Input/Output
Board
The I2C DIO board makes available 8 Digital Outputs (DOs) and 6 Digital
Inputs (DIs).
Figure 2-10: I2C Digital Input/Output Board
Digital Outputs
There are eight DO circuits available on the DIO board. The DO consists
of three pins connected to a relay; Normally Open (NO), Normally
Closed (NC), and Common (C). When the relay is not activated (DO has
value of zero) then NO is open and NC is connected to C. When the
relay is activated (DO has a value of one) then NO connects to C, and
NC is open.
There is 500V isolation between the three pins of the DO on the
connector and the rest of the I/O board.
Digital Inputs
There are six DI circuits available on the DIO board. DI circuits consist of
a +5V Signal lead and a Common lead. There is a 500V isolation
between the DI on the connector and the rest of the DIO board.
There is a DI mode switch on the DIO board. This switch is described in
the General Board Characteristics section for the I/O boards earlier in
this chapter.
2-16
A5E31405710001
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Digital I/O Board
(DIO) Connections
Circuits on the DIO board are wired as shown in the following table. The
table is the view as seen when looking at the connector while the board
is installed.
DIO I2C Wire Side View
Lead
Pin
Pin
Lead
DI Common
2
∎
∎
1
DI6 Signal
DI Common
4
∎
∎
3
DI5 Signal
DI Common
6
∎
∎
5
DI4 Signal
DI Common
8
∎
∎
7
DI3 Signal
DI Common
10
∎
∎
9
DI2 Signal
DI Common
12
∎
∎
11
DI1 Signal
DO8 C
14
∎
∎
13
DO8 NC
DO7 NC
16
∎
∎
15
DO8 NO
DO7 NO
18
∎
∎
17
DO7 C
DO6 C
20
∎
∎
19
DO6 NC
DO5 NC
22
∎
∎
21
DO6 NO
DO5 NO
24
∎
∎
23
DO5 C
DO4 C
26
∎
∎
25
DO4 NC
DO3 NC
28
∎
∎
27
DO4 NO
DO3 NO
30
∎
∎
29
DO3 C
DO2 C
32
∎
∎
31
DO2 NC
DO1 NC
34
∎
∎
33
DO2 NO
DO1 NO
36
∎
∎
35
DO1 C
Digital Inputs: Optocoupler with internal 12-24 VDC power supply,
switchable with floating contacts; alternative: switchable with external
voltage 12-24 VDC, common negative pole.
Digital Outputs: Digital Outputs: Floating double-throw contacts, max.
contact load rating 30 V/1A
The DOs are rated for 1A resistive load. Inductive loads are different. A DO
should not drive an inductive load greater than 0.5A. The typical block and
bleed application, which uses two parallel solenoids at 0.4A each, should
use separate DOs to drive each solenoid. Each DO connected to a solenoid
should have a diode to suppress the solenoid load.
Design: Terminal strips for braided or solid conductors with a maximum
diameter of 1.5 mm or 16 AWG.
Table 2-5: I2C DIO Board Connection Diagram
A5E31405710001
2-17
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Analog and Digital
Input/Output Board
The I2C ADIO board makes available 4 Digital Outputs (DOs), 4 Digital
Inputs (DIs), 4 Analog Outputs (AOs), and 4 Analog Inputs (AIs).
Figure 2-11: I2C Analog and Digital Input/Output Board
Digital Outputs
There are four DO circuits available on the ADIO board. DOs are
described in the previous section for the DIO board.
Digital Inputs
There are four DI circuits available on the ADIO board. DIs are described
in the previous section for the DIO board.
There is a DI mode switch on the ADIO board. This switch is described
in the General Board Characteristics section for the I/O boards earlier in
this chapter.
Analog Outputs
There are four AO circuits available on the ADIO board. AOs are
described in the previous section for the AIO board.
Analog Inputs
There are four AI circuits available on the ADIO board. AIs are described
in the previous section for the AIO board.
2-18
A5E31405710001
I2C Input/Output Boards, Continued
Analog and Digital I/O
Board (ADIO)
Connections
Circuits on the ADIO board are wired as shown in the following table.
The table is the view as seen when looking at the connector while the
board is installed.
ADIO I2C Wire Side View
Lead
Pin
Pin
Lead
AI4 -10V
2
∎
∎
1
AI4 +10V
AI3 -10V
4
∎
∎
3
AI3 +10V
AI2 -10V
6
∎
∎
5
AI2 +10V
AI1 -10V
8
∎
∎
7
AI1 +10V
DI Common
10
∎
∎
9
DI4 Signal
DI Common
12
∎
∎
11
DI3 Signal
DI Common
14
∎
∎
13
DI2 Signal
DI Common
16
∎
∎
15
DI1 Signal
AO_GND
18
∎
∎
17
AO4 Current
AO_GND
20
∎
∎
19
AO3 Current
AO_GND
22
∎
∎
21
AO2 Current
AO_GND
24
∎
∎
23
AO1 Current
DO4 C
26
∎
∎
25
DO4 NC
DO3 NC
28
∎
∎
27
DO4 NO
DO3 NO
30
∎
∎
29
DO3 C
DO2 C
32
∎
∎
31
DO2 NC
DO1 NC
34
∎
∎
33
DO2 NO
DO1 NO
36
∎
∎
35
DO1 C
Analog Inputs: -20 to +20 mA into 50 ohms or -10 to +10V, R10=1 M-ohm,
mutually isolated 10 V
Analog Outputs: 0/4-20 mA. Common negative pole, galvanically separated
from ground, freely connectable to ground, max. gain vs. local protective
ground potential 50B, max. working resistance 750 ohms.
Digital Inputs: Optocoupler with internal 12-24 VDC power supply,
switchable with floating contacts; alternative: switchable with external
voltage 12-24 VDC, common negative pole.
Digital Outputs: Digital Outputs: Floating double-throw contacts, max.
contact load rating 30 V/1A
Design: Terminal strips for braided or solid conductors with a maximum
diameter of 1.5 mm or 16 AWG.
Table 2-6: I2C ADIO Board Connection Diagram
A5E31405710001
2-19
Intrinsically Safe TCD Detector Personality Module (ISTCD DPM)
Description
Output signals from Thermal Conductivity Detector (TCD) in the Modular
Oven are input to the associated Detector Personality Module (DPM).
The DPM is mounted inside the Electronics Enclosure (EC) on the floor
of the compartment. The DPM digitizes the incoming analog data and
then passes it to the CIM via an I2C port. The resulting data is then
processed by the Embedded SNE software in the CIM. Resulting data
can then be viewed on the CIM Display or the workstation. Refer to
Figure 2-12.
The ISTCD DPM is an enclosed unit that is not field repairable. Opening
the black case may violate the safety protection of the device. Service is
limited to replacement of the entire DPM.
Figure 2-12: ISTCD DPM
Intrinsic Safety
CAUTION
2-20
The TCD DPM in the Maxum II, as well as the actual detector controlled
by the TCD, is protected by intrinsic safety. Intrinsic safety is a method of
protection where a circuit is designed such that it will not create a spark
or other condition capable of causing ignition of flammable vapors or
gases, even under fault conditions. Various circuits in the Maxum
analyzer utilize this form of protection, including the IS-TCD.
To preserve the intrinsically safe design protection of the ISTCD, certain
measures are required. Failure to adhere to all requirements for use of
the ISTCD in the Maxum II could violate the safety protections of the
analyzer. Refer to the Maxum II Explosion Protection Safety Standards
Manual (A5E02220442001) for more information on the safe use of
intrinsically safe circuitry in the Maxum II.
A5E31405710001
ISTCD Detector Personality Module (ISTCD DPM), Continued
Connections
The connections to the ISTCD DPM are shown in figure 2-13 below. The
connections are described below.
Figure 2-13: ISTCD DPM Connections and Board ID
Orange connectors to detectors: Each ISTCD DPM consist two
connections. Each connection is capable of interfacing to two pairs of
TCD elements (four total channels, 1 for reference and 3 for signal).
Wiring of the connectors to the ovens depends on the configuration.
•
A large analytical oven can contain two independent sets of
beads (eight channels), and will utilize both connectors from an
ISTCD DPM. One will control the right side of the oven and the
other will control the left side.
•
A small analytical oven contains only one set of beads (four
channels), and only requires one connector. With two small
ovens installed one connector will go to the right oven and one
will go to the left oven.
Intrinsic Safety Grounds: The intrinsically safe design of the ISTCD DPM
requires two ground connections to the chassis. These ground
connections must also terminate to two different terminals. The Maxum II
Modular Oven is shipped with these grounds connected correctly. Refer
to the Maxum II Explosion Protection Safety Standards Manual
(A5E02220442001) for more information on the safe use of intrinsically
safe circuitry in the Maxum II.
I2C Bus Connection: The white connector on the reverse side of the DPM
is used for connection to the I2C Bus on the PECM-DC.
A5E31405710001
2-21
ISTCD Detector Personality Module (ISTCD DPM), Continued
Board ID Switch
The Board ID switch shown in figure 2-13 indicates the board number for
the I2C bus. A diagram of how to set the switch is shown on the board.
Each equipped DPM must have a unique board ID
Reference Select
Switches
A Detector Personality Module is designed to process the signals for two
sets of four thermistor beads. The usual configuration of a TCD in the
Maxum analyzer is to have sets of four thermistor beads, one of which
acts as a reference for the other three. However, in certain situations it
may be desirable to have more than three beads use a single reference.
In other situations only one bead may be needed for a reference.
Occasionally, this could lead to needing additional detector and DPM
hardware.
The ISTCD is designed to allow the user to partially configure which
reference to use for a particular thermistor bead. This allows for greater
flexibility and reduced hardware costs in some situations.
Either or both of two different beads from the Left/Upper TCD may be
configured to use the reference for the Right/Lower TCD (see figure 2-13
for connector locations). By setting the Reference Select switches, the
Left/Upper beads 1 and 3 may be configured to either Left/Upper or
Right/Lower reference. Note that Left/Upper bead 2 is hard wired to the
Left/Upper reference (bead 2 is selected because it is mounted closest
to the Reference bead in an analytical module).
The diagram on the ISTCD board shows how the switches are set.
Rotating a switch to the right connects that bead to the Left/Upper
reference (the traditional configuration). Rotating the switch to the left
connects the bead to the other reference, Right/Lower.
Note: Rotation of the switch is identified by the small point on the switch,
not the line used to insert a screwdriver to turn the switch. See below.
Rotated Left (Right/Lower Ref)
Rotated Right (Left/Upper Ref)
Figure 2-14: ISTCD DPM Connections and Board ID
2-22
A5E31405710001
Power Entry and Control Module–Direct Current (PECM-DC)
The Power Entry and Control Module – Direct Current (PECM-DC) board
contains the electronics that distributes 24V DC power to the various
other components in the Maxum II Modular Oven configuration. Input
24V power is received from either the internal 24V Power supply or
optionally from an external source. The PECM-DC is mounted on the
back inside wall of the EC cabinet.
Overview
In addition to power distribution, the PECM performs the following
functions:
•
Provides temperature control circuits for the oven heating
system, including temperature sense and over temperature
detection.
•
Provides control circuitry for solenoid valves.
•
Serves as a wiring distribution board for the I2C bus and for the
Solenoid Valves.
•
Provides purge pressure detection circuitry (when the enclosure
is purged), or purge disable circuitry (when purge is not
configured).
Figure 2-15: Power Entry and Control Module – Direct Current (PECM-DC)
A5E31405710001
2-23
Power Entry and Control Module–Direct Current (PECM-DC), Continued
DC Power Input
(Optional)
The Maxum II Modular Oven is typically installed with an internal 24V
power supply that supports a wide range of AC power input options.
In addition to AC input, the PECM-DC allows for power via external 24V
DC supply. In this configuration the internal DC power supply is not
installed. The requirements for this configuration are detailed in the
specification table at the beginning of Chapter 1 of this manual.
Connections
The connections to the PECM-DC are shown in figure 2-16 below.
Figure 2-16: PECM-DC Connections
Purge
One function of the PECM-DC is to monitor the state of the purge
condition for the analyzer, if purge is required. The atmospheric
reference is connected to the outside via a tube. If the switch detects that
the pressure difference between internal and external drops below the
required threshold (pressure difference of at least 05 inches water), then
the switch is enabled. This sends a signal via the purge signal cable to
the CIM, which illuminates the purge fault LED and creates a purge
alarm.
When a purged enclosure is not required per the safety codes, connector
IP1 on the PECM-DC can be used to disable the purge alarm. Refer to
Figure 2-16 for connector locations.
2-24
A5E31405710001
Power Entry and Control Module–Direct Current (PECM-DC), Continued
Heater Control for
Modular Ovens
The PECM design provides control for the oven heaters. All oven
heaters for a modular oven (left for right) are powered by a single
harness. RTDs for temperature sense and over temperature sense for a
modular oven (left or right) are connected by a single harness as well.
Connector locations are shown in figure 2-16.
I2C Bus
The PECM-DC has six I2C bus connectors for internal bus distribution.
All six connectors (three on the right and three on the left are wired in
parallel for the same bus. The I2C bus originates from the CIM and is
connected to the PECM-DC (typically on the far left I2C connector of the
PECM-DC). All other connections for internal I2C bus control are
connected to the other connectors as needed. Refer to figure 2-16.
Solenoid Valve Control
The Solenoid Valves in the Maxum II Modular Oven are controlled via
the PECM-DC. Dedicated cable harnesses connect to the left, right, and
upper solenoids and are used to switch the solenoids upon command
from the CIM. Refer to figure 2-16 for connector locations and the
Solenoid Valve section of this chapter for more information on the
Solenoid Valve hardware.
Air Circulation Fan
The EC for the Maxum II Modular Oven Configuration typically does not
require an air circulation fan. A fan power connection on the PECM-DC
is equipped for possible future use.
A5E31405710001
2-25
Solenoid Valves
Description
The Solenoid Valves provide pneumatic interface to control flow to the
oven sampling and column valves as well as optional control for external
devices. Solenoid Valves are suitable for air, nitrogen and helium on the
pressure side and vacuum on the vent side. The electronic enclosure for
the Maxum II Modular Oven configuration has space for three modules,
one for the left oven, one for the right oven and one for external devices.
Three Types
There are three configurations of solenoid valves for the Maxum II
Modular Oven. There is a version equipped with 2 solenoid valves (2
Station), a version equipped with 4 solenoid valves (4 Station), and a
version equipped with 8 solenoid valves (8 Station). Each is used for a
different function.
•
2 Station: Used for valve control of small analytical oven. This
device is installed on the floor of the electronics enclosure on
either the left or right side, depending on configuration.
•
4 Station: Used for valve control of the large analytical oven.
This device is installed on the floor of the electronics enclosure
on either the left or right side, depending on configuration.
•
8 Station: Used for valve control of external devices, such as
sampling systems. This device is installed on the back right side
wall of the electronics enclosure.
The solenoid valves are actuated via circuitry on the PECM-DC. The
PECM-DC circuitry receives commands from the Embedded Sensor
Near Electronics software on the CIM board (via the internal bus). Pulse
timing is controlled from the electronics.
8 Station
4 Station
2 Station
Figure 2-17: Solenoid Valves in the Modular Oven
2-26
A5E31405710001
Solenoid Valves, Continued
Mechanical
The SMC brand solenoid valves used in the Modular Oven are 4-port
valves that can optionally be used in 3-port operation. Each type of
configuration utilizes both 4-port and 3-port operation via the
pre-configured manifold block.
•
2 Station: Viewed from front as installed, the left solenoid valve
is configured as 4-port and the right solenoid valve is configured
as 3-port.
•
4 Station: Viewed from front as installed, the left three solenoid
valves are configured as 4-port and the far right solenoid valve
is configured as 3-port.
•
8 Station: Viewed from front as installed, the top four solenoid
valves are configured as 4-port and the bottom four solenoid
valves are configured as 3-port.
Manifold in/out tubing connections incorporate one touch push type
tubing connectors.
Installed on Floor of EC – For Oven
Installed on Back of EC – for External
Figure 2-18: Solenoid Manifold Installed
A5E31405710001
2-27
Solenoid Valves, Continued
Operation Test
Specifications
Step
Procedure
1.
Using a fine pointed object, depress orange button on the
solenoid.
2.
When depressed, pressure is applied to the piston that moves
to either the open or closed position. Resulting pressure is then
applied to the column or sample valve.
3.
If piston does not operate when the button is depressed, check
for correct gas pressure.
4.
If piston does not operate and pressure is 75 psig, Solenoid
Valve is defective and must be replaced.
5.
Repeat for each valve operating on and off. Allow at least 1
second between depressions.
The following specifications are applicable to the Solenoid Valves.
Function
2-28
Specification
Switching Speed (Maximum response
time on/off ms)
4-port – 15 ms
Operating Voltage
24 VDC
Pressure Range, 3-port
25 to 100 psi
Pressure Range, 4-port
25 to 100 psi
Maximum PSI
100 psi
Vacuum Range
0 to 27" of Hg
Ambient Temperature Range
-18°C to 65°C
-0.4°F to 149°F (dry air)
Leakage
Not greater than 50 micro
Liter/min, air @ 69.8°F (21°C)
with 50 psig on the common port.
3-port non latching – 15 ms
A5E31405710001
Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module
Description
The Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module reduces oven set-up time
by using precise pressure control without restrictors or needle valves.
This module also allows programmed pressure control for faster
chromatography and modern applications. It allows for precise resetting
of pressures. The EPC can be used for both carrier and fuel gas supply,
which eliminates the less reliable mechanical regulation. Four
independent EPCs can be installed in one Maxum II.
Each EPC provides two independently regulated pressures for use on
carrier and flame fuel sources in the oven. Gas connection is located in
the regulator section. Regulated pressure range is 5-100 psig.
Figure 2-19: Pressure Control Module (with Attached Manifold)
Mechanical
The EPC is mounted to right side wall of the Electronic Enclosure. For
mounting location, refer to Figure 2-20. Up to three (a total of 6 EPC
channels) can be installed in a single Electronic Enclosure for Maxum II
Modular Oven. The EPC is easily field replaceable using common tools.
EPCM on Right
Side Wall
Figure 2-20: EPC Component Location
A5E31405710001
2-29
Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module, Continued
Electrical
The EPC is made up of a printed circuit board with two pressure
transducers, two proportional valves with associated electronic circuitry,
manifold for pneumatic connections, PC connector for communication
signals and a DC power connector. Refer to Figure 2-20.
The EPC provides electrically controlled pressure for helium, hydrogen
and nitrogen carriers etc., as well as low flow and low pressure (<100
psi) applications such as flame detector fuel. The EPC operates from
+24VDC at 4 watts. Electrical connections are made using plug type
connectors.
The EPC receives commands from the Embedded Sensor Near
Electronics (EMSNE) software via I2C bus regarding timing and pressure
setpoint. The timing of messages from the EMSNE software controls
timing within the EPC. There is no time base in the EPC. Module control
is established by sending parameters, such as setpoint pressures and
ramp rates to the EPC. The EPC is used in the Maxum II to control the
carriers and/or fuels for the detector modules. The EPC can also be
used in field-mounted installations.
The EPC communicates with other components via the I2C bus and
communicates actual pressure back to the EMSNE software. Regulated
pressure range is 5-100 psig.
Channels
Each EPC channel consists of a pressure sensor amplifier and analog
filter followed by an A/D Converter. The converter is read by the local
controller that calculates a new control value used to control the
proportional solenoid valve.
Control parameters, such as set-point pressures are sent, via the I2C, to
the EPC. Status and diagnostic data is available via the I2C bus.
Non-Volatile Memory
The initial control parameters and calibration parameters are stored in
CIM On-Board non-volatile memory. With this type of memory, data is
not lost in the event of a power failure or turning system power off.
Diagnostics
EPC diagnostics are read-back of setpoint pressure via the software, DC
power within operating limits, monitoring of line and short-term pressure
variations with respect to the setpoint regulation, out of range pressure
alarm and a diagnostic failure.
2-30
A5E31405710001
Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module, Continued
Location ID Switch
Settings
As shown in the figure below, the EPC has a set of four DIP switches.
These are used to set the unique location ID for the specific EPC, which
is used in software as part of the hardware ID string. The location ID is
set using a binary counting of the switches from right to left (as
numbered on the board and not on the actual switches).
Location IDs for installed EPC boards count from the bottom up, with
ID#1 on the bottom and ID#4 on the top.
Figure 2-21: DIP Switches on the EPC
Location ID #1
1st switch set
(binary 1)
Location ID #2
Second switch
(binary 2)
Location ID #3
1st & 2nd switch
set (binary 3)
Location ID #4
3rd switch set
(binary 4)
Table 2-7: DIP Switches on the EPC
A5E31405710001
2-31
Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Module, Continued
Specifications
The following specifications are applicable to the Electronic Pressure
Control Module (EPC):
Topic
Specification
Maximum inlet pressure
120 psig
Pressure output range
5-100 psig
Minimum differential between EPC
inlet and outlet
5 psi
Flow range from EPC
5-500 sccm
(see note below)
Controlled pressure stability over
temperature range
+/-0.5% of setpoint
Short-term pressure stability
+/-0.0005 psi over 30 seconds
Typical response time for step
change in setpoint.
Stable to within 0.1% of final value
within 0.5 seconds*
* (For hydrogen the response time is
~ 1 second).
Note: When running applications with column flow rates of less than
5 sccm, a separate bleed flow path is recommended in order to reduce
the time required to achieve pressure stability when variable setpoints
are used. Depending on the volume involved, a bleed flow rate of 5-10
sccm is recommended.
2-32
A5E31405710001
24 Volt Power Supply
Overview
The 24V Power Supply for the Maxum II Modular Oven configuration is
comprised of a 110/230 VAC power supply manufactured by Delta
Electronics. It provides 24 VDC operating system voltages from a wide
range of AC inputs. It is mounted on a DIN rail on the back of the EC.
Refer to the figure below.
Figure 2-22: Power System Module (PSM)
Input Connections
The 24V power supply functions over a wide range of AC inputs to allow
for nearly universal compatibility throughout the world with no extra
configuration. Specifications for AC input power are detailed in the power
specifications sections of the specifications table found at the beginning
of chapter 1 of this manual. Refer to the Maxum II Installation Manual
(2000595-001) for information regarding proper connection of external
power to the 24V power supply.
Although the 24V power supply is equipped with an internal fuse, this
fuse is not replaceable in the field. The device must be replaced and
returned for service.
Output Connections
A5E31405710001
The right side connections supply the 24V output. The power supply has
short circuit and overload protection and over voltage protection limited
to 35VDC. Output is factory set for 24V. Adjustment using the access
point on the front should not be necessary. The green DC OK LED is lit
when the output is functioning correctly.
2-33
Chapter 3
CIM Display Panel Operation
Overview
Introduction
This chapter is intended for operating and maintenance personnel.
All of the Maxum II’s operational and daily routine maintenance tasks can
be performed from the CIM color touch screen display. The CIM Display
is the physical hardware that is installed in the door of the Maxum II. It is
controlled by a processor board called the CIM Board. The combination
of board and display is referred to as the CIM (Control Interface Module).
The CIM runs an enhanced version of the HMI software that is used to
control the Maintenance Panel in older versions of Maxum. Because this
chapter deals primarily with the operation of the software, the term HMI
may be used at times to refer to the software even though the hardware
is the CIM or CIM Display. In addition, the display emulator in the
workstation software is referred to as the HMI emulator.
The HMI software on the CIM utilizes interactive display screens, menus,
and icons for common functions. In addition, the software is equipped
with context sensitive help for most functions. This makes the device
intuitive and simple to use once the user is familiar with the basic
operation.
Before You Begin
The information in this chapter is written for the color touch screen CIM
Display running the latest software version. Some versions of Maxum
may be equipped with the older Maintenance Panel. Information for that
version of the Maintenance Panel can be found in the Maintenance
Manual for the Maxum II Airbath/Airless Oven Configuration.
Since it is also possible to install a CIM display in an existing Maxum
(including Airbath/Airless oven configuration), it may be possible that the
CIM Display has a different software version. In this case some screens
and menus may appear different.
However, all versions of display are designed to look and operate in a
similar manner, including both the CIM Display and the Maintenance
Panel running the most recent software versions. All versions 4.0 and up
have a menu tree of the HMI that is organized into 3 functional levels.
These levels allow different levels of access to analyzer control and
configuration.
A5E31405710001
3-1
Overview, Continued
Emulator
A PC-based graphical simulation of the physical CIM Display, known as
the HMI emulator, is available using the PC based workstation software.
This emulator is capable of performing all of the functions that are
available with the physical unit. The emulator is a graphical
representation of the physical display. Because of this, some aspects of
the emulator appear slightly different than they appear on the physical
unit.
Chapter Highlights
Topic
Overview
3-1
Introduction
3-1
Before You Begin
3-1
Emulator
3-2
CIM Display Hardware
3-3
Overview
3-3
Status LEDs
3-3
Screen Characteristics
3-4
Description
3-4
Main Navigation Bar
3-4
Status Bar
3-5
Content Area
3-5
Toolbar
3-5
Softkey Bar
3-5
Using the CIM Display
3-6
Navigating the Menus
3-6
Entry of Data
3-7
Accessing Help
3-8
Password Restrictions
3-2
Page
3-10
Description
3-10
Checking Your Access
3-10
Password Format
3-10
Obtaining/Changing a Password
3-11
Privilege
3-11
A5E31405710001
CIM Display Hardware
Overview
The CIM display contains a back-lit color graphic display screen layered
with a touch screen sensor. It is part of the Control Interface Module
(CIM) assembly that includes the display, the CIM-BASE board, and the
Communication and Control (CAC3) board (which is mounted on the
CIM-BASE). Refer to chapter 2 of this manual for more information.
Figure 3-1: CIM Display
Status LEDs
The four LEDs next to the screen indicate the analyzer systems status.
These are physically attached to the color display, although they are
controlled by a separate control cable from the CIM Board.
•
•
•
•
Green “Power” LED
Yellow “Warning” LED
Red “Fault” LED
Red “Purge” LED
The green "Power" LED lights when the power supply is on.
The yellow "Warning" LED lights when the "Maintenance request" status
signal is active.
The red "Fault" LED lights when the "Failure" status signal is active.
The red "Purge" LED lights when purge pressure is lost as detected by
the PECM-DC.
A5E31405710001
3-3
Screen Characteristics
Description
The screen is in color and back-lit for easy reading, and it is divided into
several functional areas:
•
•
•
•
•
Main Navigation Bar
Status Bar
Content Area
Toolbar
Softkey Bar
Main Navigation
Bar
Status Bar
Content Area
Toolbar
Softkeys
Figure 3-2: Screen Layout
Main Navigation Bar
The main navigation bar allows the user to return to the home menu
screen, go back to a previous menu screen, or launch the interactive
help function (all denoted by easy to understand icons).
The help function on the main navigation bar is an interactive feature that
provides context sensitive assistance. It is accessed by clicking the help
icon on the far upper right and then clicking the area of the screen for
which help is desired.
The main navigation bar also contains information regarding the current
level of password access (default is “configure”). This information is
located next to the help icon in the far right side of the bar.
3-4
A5E31405710001
Screen Characteristics, Continued
Status Bar
The status bar shows various data about the analyzer, including the
name, date and time, and run/hold status. It also shows information
about the current application, stream, method, and cycle clock. In
addition, the status bar contains gray buttons that permit the user to
change the run/hold status or to select the current analyzer, stream,
application, and method.
Content Area
The middle part of the screen is the general content area. It contains
menu lists or parameters with the applicable values, as well as alarm
messages and operator hints. The content area is where the primary
information for a selected screen is displayed. The top left of the content
area is usually a general name or description of the screen.
Toolbar
The toolbar allows the user to navigate directly to commonly used
screens. This includes access to the alarm screen as well as settings for
valves, temperature, pressure and streams. It also allows the user to
navigate to the different menu levels (monitor, maintenance, and
configure).
The Softkey Bar
The softkey bar appears at the lower edge of the screen. Its gray
background distinguishes it from the content area. The softkey bar
associates different actions with the softkeys located below the screen.
The actions vary depending on the screen shown.
A5E31405710001
3-5
Using the CIM Display
Navigating the Menus
As mentioned previously, the menu tree of the CIM Display is organized
into three functional levels. This structure is used to allow different levels
of access to analyzer control and configuration operations. The three
functional menu levels are as follows.
•
Monitor Menu – This menu level allows minimal control of the
analyzer and viewing of analyzer status with minimal control of
analyzer function. This level is intended for operations
personnel. All password levels have access to the Monitor Menu;
however, higher access is necessary for some functions.
•
Maintenance Menu – This menu level allows detailed application
and stream control and is intended for engineering personnel. A
password with “Maintain” level access is needed to access the
Maintenance Menu and all of its functions.
•
Configure Menu – This menu level allows system configuration
control and is intended for use of system administrators and
engineers. A password with “Configure” level access is needed
to access the Maintenance Menu. Higher (“Super”) access is
needed to access user and password functions.
These different menu levels can be selected using the tool bar icons.
The three options show up anytime any one of the main three menus is
displayed. Select the Home icon in the far upper right corner of the CIM
Display in order to display the default menu, which will display the menu
icons.
The Toolbar
The Softkey Bar
The toolbar allows the user to navigate directly to commonly used
screens. In addition to selections described above, this includes access
to the alarm screen as well as settings for valves, temperature, pressure
and streams. To navigate to a screen using the toolbar, simply tap on the
desired icon (or click if using the HMI emulator).
At the bottom of the screen, below the content area, is the softkey bar.
When a menu is displayed, a series of softkeys appears on the softkey
bar. As the user navigates through the different screens, the softkeys
that appear will depend on the particular screen being displayed. The
function of each softkey is identified by a label on the softkey.
To operate a softkey, simply touch it on the display screen (or click on it
if using the HMI emulator).
3-6
A5E31405710001
Using the CIM Display, Continued
Entry of Data
The original Maintenance Panel for Maxum was equipped with a numeric
keypad for data entry. The touch screen function of the CIM Display
eliminates the need for this. When data entry is required on the physical
CIM Display, a pop-up window with numeric keypad appears on the
screen as shown below.
Figure 3-3: Window for Data Entry on CIM Display
When the HMI emulator is used, the data entry window does not appear
because the numeric keys on the computer keyboard can be used.
A5E31405710001
3-7
Using the CIM Display, Continued
Accessing Help
The online help function of the CIM Display represents a large leap
forward in usability over the original HMI. It allows the user to obtain a
help description for virtually every element displayed on the screen. It
also allows the user to obtain detailed descriptions of alarms as well as
possible causes and suggested corrective actions.
Context Sensitive
Screen Help
To access help touch the help icon ( ) on the upper right corner of the
CIM display (or click on the icon if using the emulator). This puts the
software in an interactive help mode. This mode is context sensitive. This
means that for the next item you touch (or click), the software will display
a help window for that item.
In the figure below, the help icon was selected and then the “Temp” icon
on the toolbar. This displayed the help text window in the middle of the
screen.
Figure 3-4: Window for Data Entry on CIM Display
Click OK to remove the window and continue. Note that once the window
is removed, the software is no longer in the help mode. Clicking a
selection will have the normal effect.
3-8
A5E31405710001
Using the CIM Display, Continued
Alarm Help
One useful feature of the online help function of the CIM display is the
ability to get detailed descriptions of alarms as well as possible causes
and suggested corrective actions.
To access alarm help, first load the alarm screen by selecting it from the
menu or from the toolbar on the right side of the screen. Next, touch the
help icon ( ) on the upper right corner of the CIM display (or click on
the icon if using the emulator). This puts the software in the interactive
help mode. To see help for an alarm, click the “Description” field for that
alarm. This will display the alarm help screen.
In the figure below, the help icon was selected and then the “Description”
field for the first alarm on the list. This displayed the help text window in
the middle of the screen.
Figure 3-4: Window for Data Entry on CIM Display
Note that this help box is displayed only when the “Description” field is
selected while in help mode. Selecting other fields for the alarm provides
help information describing what the field is used for (context sensitive
help described on the previous page), rather than information about the
alarm.
A5E31405710001
3-9
Password Restrictions
Description
It is possible to configure the CIM Display for different levels of password
access. By default, six different levels of password access are available.
By default, the display is preset for a “configure” level of access, which
allows the user to perform almost all analyzer functions except password
administration. If the access level of the current active password is not
sufficient for a requested operation, a screen will appear stating that the
required level of password must be entered. By default, when a
password is entered, the session remains active for 60 minutes unless a
different time period has been set; see description of “SET TIME” softkey
below.
Checking Your
Access
To see if you are authorized to perform a specific function, use the
appropriate menu path to navigate to that function.
If the following screen appears, then password entry is necessary to
perform that function (i.e. the current level of access is not sufficient to
perform the function). Select the “LOGIN” softkey and then enter the
appropriate password and press OK. If the password is correct and has
sufficient access, access level will change (seen in the upper right corner
of the display next to the help icon). You are now logged on and can
execute the required function. If the password is incorrect, the screen will
revert back to the home menu and the access level will not change.
Password Format
3-10
A password consists of one to six numerical digits and is entered via the
numeric keypad.
A5E31405710001
Password Restrictions, Continued
Obtaining/Changing a
Password
Passwords can be modified from the User’s Passwords screen on the
Configure menu. To change a password you must be logged on with
“Super” level access. To change a password, select the table entry for
the user and then tap (click) the “SELECT” softkey. This will display a
window to modify the password.
Privilege
If your password is accepted you can modify any menu items or
parameters assigned to your user level (or lower user levels). There are
six predefined user levels (levels 0-4 and 99). The items that can be
modified at these user levels are predefined and cannot be changed by
the user.
By default six users are defined. These are “public”, “operate”,
“calibrate”, “maintain”, “configure”, and “super”. The default access level
for each of these users matches their names. In addition, multiple
individual users may be defined. These users must have unique names
and they can be created with either “operate”, “calibrate”, “maintain”, or
“configure” access levels. Creation and deletion of users must be
performed using the workstation software. (Refer to the System Manager
chapter of this manual for instructions on creating and deleting users).
The change privilege remains in effect if the user presses any key before
the timeout limit (default 60 minutes). In this manner the user does not
have to re-enter a password repeatedly while browsing through menu
screens. However, the analyzer automatically logs out (back to the
default user), if the user has not pressed a key within the timeout limit.
A5E31405710001
3-11
Chapter 4
Maintenance
Overview
Description
Procedures in this Chapter are for use by maintenance personnel.
Safety First
When performing maintenance procedures in this chapter, observe all
warnings, cautions and notes to prevent physical injury to yourself or
unnecessary damage to the equipment.
WARNING
Observe all plant safety requirements before performing any repair
or maintenance on the Maxum II.
Chapter Highlights
The following maintenance information is provided:
Topic
A5E31405710001
Page
Overview
4-1
General Maintenance
4-4
Control Interface Module (CIM)
4-6
Power Entry Control Module – Direct Current (PECM-DC)
4-13
24V Power Supply (PS)
4-15
Solenoid Valves
4-17
Model 50 Valve
4-19
Intrinsically Safe Thermal Conductivity Detector (IS-TCD)
4-26
Analytical Modules
4-28
Analytical Module Hardware Test Box
4-36
4-1
Overview, Continued
Help
If technical assistance is required during performance of maintenance
functions, or if parts are being returned, the customer should contact
Siemens at the addresses and/or phone numbers provided at the
beginning of this manual.
How to Use This
Chapter
Before performing a procedure first read it through. It is recommended
that a regular scheduled daily, weekly or monthly maintenance program
be established. By doing so, the downtime of the Maxum II analyzer will
be reduced and the system will operate at optimum analytical efficiency.
Siemens recommendations for routine maintenance are listed in table
4-1. These recommendations are intended as a guideline. Actual
maintenance may change depending on application and the environment
in which the Maxum II operates.
Note: The tasks described below are provided as a suggested guideline
for routine maintenance. Requirements for a particular analyzer
will depend on environment, location of the analyzer, available
resources, and the specific characteristics of the application.
Task
Frequency
Backup of database
Weekly as well as before
performing any maintenance that
requires the analyzer to be
powered down.
Status Check – Includes checking
alarms, utility bottle pressures, flow
rates, and oven temperature.
Daily.
Visual Inspection (walk by)
Daily or weekly (may vary
depending on location, application
and. environment)
Interior Electronic Enclosure Visual
Inspection (open cabinet and
check for moisture and/or
contamination)
Monthly (may vary depending on
location, application and
environment)
Table 4-1: Recommended Routine Maintenance
4-2
A5E31405710001
Overview, Continued
Note: The tasks described below are provided as a suggested guidleine
for routine maintenance. Requirements for a particular analyzer
will depend on environment, location of the analyzer, available
resources, and the specific characteristics of the application.
Task
Valve Inspection
Frequency
Gas Samples –
Model 50 – Yearly
Routine maintenance schedule for
valves will vary greatly depending
on sample properties, application
(including temperature and
pressure) and environment.
Verification of Calibration
Monthly (may vary greatly
depending on application). When
validation is included automatically
as part of the method, the results
should be checked daily if
possible.
Sample Transport Filters
Replace as necessary. Note that
wet/dirty samples require more
frequent attention than dry/clean
samples.
Lithium Battery on SYSCON
Replace every 5 years
Table 4-1 (Continued): Recommended Routine Maintenance
A5E31405710001
4-3
General Maintenance
Scheduled
Maintenance
It is important that a preventative maintenance schedule be established
to examine the Maxum II for internal and external cleanliness, damage,
and proper operation. Refer to Table 4-1 for suggestions regarding
maintenance intervals. However, maintenance schedules for a particular
analyzer will depend on the application, operating environment,
maintenance resources, and geographical location of the analyzer.
Even though the Maxum II is tightly sealed against moisture and foreign
contamination, it is recommended that the electronic enclosure door be
opened periodically and internal components examined for moisture
and/or contamination. If contamination is found, the system should be
shutdown and corrective procedures performed. If such contamination is
not removed, it could render the Maxum II inoperable.
Component Interface
Cabling and
Connectors
Modular components within the Maxum II are interfaced together via
miniature ribbon cables, miniature wiring and connectors. It is therefore
important that maintenance personnel follow the information presented in
the following sections to prevent their damage.
Removing Connectors
Internal components and modules are interfaced together using
miniature wiring and associated connectors. It is therefore important that
when a module and/or component is to be removed and replaced, that
the connector be grasped and gently rocked, back and forth. DO NOT
REMOVE A CONNECTOR BY PULLING ON ASSOCIATED
CONNECTOR WIRING.
Nut and Bolt
Mounting Hardware
With very few exceptions, nut and bolt hardware used to secure modules
and/or components in their mounting locations are in metric.
WARNING
Observe all plant safety requirements before performing any repair
or maintenance on the Maxum II.
4-4
A5E31405710001
General Maintenance, Continued
Opening Doors
To gain access to the modules, the electronic enclosure door must be
opened. It will be necessary to use a #4mm Allen wrench to open the
door if the Allen screw on the latch has been tightened.
Inspection After
Maintenance
After performing any maintenance function(s), check to be certain there
is no loose hardware left within the electronic enclosure. Such items can
create electrical shorts causing damage to internal components. This
increases system downtime for performing of corrective maintenance.
Field Tool Kit
Recommended tools for performing maintenance are as follows:
•
Maxum II Tool Kit
or
•
Set of metric Allen wrenches
•
Set of metric wrenches or nut drivers
Note: Special tools required for specific procedures within this section
are noted within the procedure (example: torque wrenches
required for valve assembly).
Use of Solvents and
Detergents
It is important for proper procedures to be used when cleaning valve and
detector parts. All foreign contamination adhering to the part should be
removed using an appropriate cleaning solvent, such as hexane,
acetone, or methanol and a dust/lint free cloth. Use of an ultrasonic
cleaner is often helpful. After cleaning, it is necessary remove excess
cleaning fluid from the components by blowing with clean air or shaking.
Components must be air dry before reassembling.
It is also possible and often better to use an appropriate detergent, such
as Alconox®, for cleaning instead of solvent. However, after cleaning
with a detergent, it is necessary to rinse the part thoroughly with
deionized water (distilled water is also acceptable) in order to remove
detergent residue. All water must then be removed by blowing with
clean air or shaking. Components must be completely dry before
reassembling.
A5E31405710001
4-5
Control Interface Module (CIM)
Description
This section presents the procedures for removal and installation of
Maxum II door mounted Control Interface Module (CIM). This includes
the CAC3 board, the CIM-Base Board, and the CIM Display. Three
procedures are presented in this section:
•
•
•
•
CAC3 Removal and Installation
CIM-Base Board Removal and Installation
CIM Display/Touchscreen Removal and Installation
Battery Replacement
WARNING
Voltage dangerous to life exists. Before performing the removal and
installation procedures, it is important that primary AC power to the
Maxum II be turned off from the main circuit breaker. Observe all
plant safety requirements before performing any repair or
maintenance on the Maxum II.
CAUTION
When the components of the CIM Display are removed from their
mounting location, they must be placed on a clean dirt free work surface.
This is to prevent scratching of panel viewing surface. Interface ribbon
cable must not be bent or crimped when disconnecting from connectors.
CAUTION
The CIM hardware contains intrinsically safe circuits. It is important that
these circuits not be compromised during operation or maintenance.
Black covers used to enclose intrinsically safe circuits must not be
opened. Refer to the Explosion Protection Safety Standards Manual
(A5E02220442001) for more information on Intrinsically Safe Circuits.
Procedures
The following procedures should be followed for removal and installation
of CIM related hardware.
CAC3 Removal and
Installation
4-6
Step
Procedure
1.
Before beginning replacement, if possible, save the current
Maxum .amd database file to be reloaded after the CAC3
board is replaced. Note that if the CAC3 is faulty, backup
may not function. In this case it will be necessary to use the
most recent backup file.
2.
Once the database is saved, power off the Maxum.
3.
Open electronic enclosure door, using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary.
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
Step
Note:
A5E31405710001
Procedure
The CAC3 is mounted on the CIM-Base board, which is
located on the inside of the Maxum door. The CAC3 is
highlighted in the blue box in the image below.
4.
Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the CAC3 board. It is not
necessary to disconnect the other end of this cable.
5.
Remove the CAC3 board by grasping both sides firmly and
pulling up. Do not touch board mounted components.
6.
Place the CAC3 in an anti-static bag for return to Siemens.
7.
Install the new CAC3 board by pressing it firmly into the
connectors, taking care not to touch any components or
connections on the board. Then, reconnect the Ethernet
cable to the CAC3.
8.
Apply power to the Maxum and allow it to boot.
9.
Using either Gas Chromatograph Portal (GCP) or System
Manager software, restore the analyzer database using the
.amd file that was saved before beginning the procedure.
10.
When the CAC3 is removed, current date and time
information is lost. If the analyzer is configured to obtain date
and time information from a central server, then it will update
automatically. If no time server is set, it will be necessary to
manually set the date and time on the analyzer.
4-7
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIM-Base Removal and
Installation
4-8
Step
Procedure
1.
Before beginning replacement, if possible, save the current
Maxum .amd database file to be reloaded after the CAC3
board is replaced. Note that if the CAC3 is faulty, backup
may not function. In this case it will be necessary to use the
most recent backup file.
2.
Once the database is saved, power off the Maxum.
3.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
4.
Label and disconnect all cables from the CIM-Base and the
CAC3 mounted on the CIM-Base. This includes all cables
running to other devices in the Electronics Enclosure as well
as cables connecting to the CIM Display assembly.
5.
Using a 5.5 mm wrench or nut driver, remove the 8 nuts that
secure the CIM-Base to the metal plate. These are located
around the edge of the board. Carefully remove the flat
washers from each stud as well.
6.
Remove the CIM board from the plate. Verify that all switch
settings from the old CIM-Base and new CIM-Base match.
7.
If the CAC3 is to be moved from the old board to the new
board, do so at this time. Install the CAC3 board on the new
CIM-Base by pressing it firmly into the connectors, taking
care not to touch any components or connections on the
board.
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
Note:
Cable Routing: When replacing the cables on the CIM-Base
in the following step, take note of the routing. The display
backlight cable runs behind the board standoff as shown on
the left image below. In addition, the display control interface
cable is routed behind the board as shown in the right image
below.
8.
Install the new CIM-Base back onto the door by repeating
the previous steps in reverse order, including reinstallation of
flat washers and nuts and then reconnection of all cables to
the CIM.
9.
Apply power to the Maxum and allow it to boot.
10.
If necessary, restore the analyzer database using the .amd
file that was saved before beginning this procedure.
11.
If the CAC3 is unplugged, current date and time information
is lost. If the analyzer is configured to obtain date and time
information from a central server, then it will update
automatically. If no time server is set, it will be necessary to
manually set the date and time on the analyzer.
4-9
Control Interface Module, Continued
CIM Display/Touch Screen
Removal and Installation
4-10
Step
Procedure
Note:
Although the CIM color display and the touch screen are
separate parts, they are shipped as one assembly attached
to a metal mounting plate. Due to the need for special tools
to correctly align the two devices, the display and touch
screen should NOT be disassembled on-site. This procedure
describes the steps to remove and replace the entire
CIM Display assembly.
1.
Because this procedure involves removing the CIM-Board,
save the current Maxum .amd database file before
beginning. Once the database is saved, power off the
Maxum.
2.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
3.
Remove the CIM-Board (combination of CIM-Base and
CAC3) as described previously in the procedure titled,
CIM-Base Removal and Installation.
4.
Using a 7 mm nut driver or wrench, remove the six nuts that
secure the display assembly to the door. Note: There are
several nuts on the surface of the metal mounting plate. Only
the 7 mm nuts secure the assembly to the door.
5.
Carefully remove the display assembly from the door. In
order to break the seal, it may be necessary to carefully pull
the edges of the display away from the door.
6.
Remove the cables from the old display and plug them into
the new display. Note: The display control interface cable
should be secured to the mounting plate using a tie-wrap as
shown below. This must be cut and the cable secured to the
new display using a similar tie-wrap.
A5E31405710001
Control Interface Module, Continued
CAUTION
When installing the CIM Display assembly, it is necessary to use a
torque wrench ensure a proper seal while at the same time preventing
damage to the display.
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
7.
Before installing the new display, remove the protective film
from the display surface.
8.
Install the new display on the door. Using a torque wrench
(Siemens part number A5Exxxxxxxx), tighten the six nuts to
a value between 0.34 to 0.56 NM (3 to 5 in lb). Failure to
properly torque the fasteners could result in either loss of
purge or damage to the display.
Note:
Cable Routing: When replacing the cables on the CIM-Base
in the following step, take note of the routing. The display
backlight cable runs behind the board standoff as shown on
the left image below. In addition, the display control interface
cable is routed behind the board as shown in the right image
below.
9.
Reinstall the CIM-Board hardware, referring back to the
previous procedure titled, CIM-Base Removal and
Installation.
10.
Close the door to the Maxum and reapply power.
4-11
Control Interface Module, Continued
The battery should only be replaced with an approved spare. Contact
Siemens for a replacement.
IMPORTANT
Battery Replacement
Step
1.
Procedure
Power off the Maxum and then open electronic enclosure
door, using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen wrench if necessary.
Before removal of battery, note location of its positive end when installed
in battery holder. The positive and negative terminals are marked on the
battery.
CAUTION
2.
Remove the battery from its mounting bracket located on the
left side of the module. Refer to picture below.
3.
When installing the new Lithium Battery in its holder, place
the positive (+) end so it installs per marking on the board
(positive terminal facing up).
4.
Before closing door and reapplying AC power, be certain the
battery is securely installed in its holder and polarity, within
holder, is correct.
5.
After battery is replaced, current date and time information is
lost. If the analyzer is configured to obtain date and time
information from a central server, then it will update
automatically. If no time server is set, it will be necessary to
manually set the date and time on the analyzer.
Battery
Figure 4-1: CIM Board Battery Location
4-12
A5E31405710001
Power Entry Control Module – Direct Current (PECM-DC)
Description
This section references procedures for the Power Entry Control Module
–Direct Current (PECM-DC), which is specific to the Modular Oven
configuration.
The PECM-DC is mounted to the back wall of the Electronic Enclosure.
The PECM-DC assembly consists of a printed circuit board that controls
the distribution of 24V power throughout the EC as well as distributing
the internal I2C bus and controlling oven temperature. This section
covers replacement of the PECM-DC.
WARNINGS
Voltage dangerous to life exists. Before performing the removal and
installation procedures, it is important that primary AC power to the
Maxum II be turned off from the main circuit breaker. Observe all
plant safety requirements before performing any repair or
maintenance on the Maxum II.
Figure 4-2: PECM-DC Board Layout
A5E31405710001
4-13
Power Entry Control Module – Direct Current (PECM-DC), Continued
PECM-DC
Removal and
Installation
4-14
The following procedure should be used for replacement of the PECMDC in the Maxum II Modular Oven configuration.
Step
Procedure
1.
Turn off power to the Maxum II at the main circuit breaker.
2.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
3.
Remove all other cables connected to PECM-DC. These
include 24V input power, CIM power, purge control, oven
power, oven heater control, solenoids, and I2C cables. Label
each cable with its connection location as it is removed.
4.
Unplug the atmospheric reference tube from the purge
switch. (Tubing connection on the bottom right side of the
PECM-DC). Refer to Figure 4-2.
5.
Remove the 8 screws that secure the board to the EC, and
remove the board. Note that solenoid tubes run behind the
PECM-DC board. These should remain in the same location
with the new board.
6.
On the replacement PECM-DC verify that the Purge Disable
jumper JP2 is set to match the board that was removed.
7.
Install the replacement PECM-DC using the 8 screws.
8.
Reattach the atmospheric reference tube from the purge
switch (tubing connection on the bottom right side of the
PECM-DC).
9.
Reattach all cables to the PECM-DC. Make sure that plug
in locations and labels match. Refer to Figure 4-2.
10.
After verifying all connections are correct, apply power to
the analyzer.
A5E31405710001
24V Power Supply
Description
This section presents the procedures for removal or installation of the
24V Power Supply. This power supply is mounted to the back wall of the
Electronic Enclosure on a DIN rail. It provides 24 VDC operating system
voltages from a wide range of AC inputs.
WARNING
Voltage dangerous to life exists. Before performing the removal and
installation procedures, it is important that primary AC power to the
Maxum II be turned off from the main circuit breaker. Observe all
plant safety requirements before performing any repair or
maintenance on the Maxum II.
Procedure
The following procedure should be followed for removal and installation
of power supply. Refer to Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3: Power Supply Mounting Configuration and Wiring
A5E31405710001
4-15
Power Supply, Continued
Power Supply
Removal and
Installation
4-16
Step
Procedure
1.
Turn off power to the Maxum II at the main circuit breaker.
2.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
3.
Label and disconnect any cables that run from the power
supply to other devices. This includes the internal power to
the PECM-DC, the internal chassis ground, and the external
power from the main. It also includes any other device that
may be connected. Wires are disconnected by loosening,
but not removing, the bus screws.
4.
The power supply is mounted on a DIN rail using a quick
disconnect bracket. To release the bracket, insert a flat
head screwdriver into the tab at the back bottom of the
power supply and push the tab down. As you do this, pull
the bottom of the power supply forward. See below.
5.
After the bottom of the power supply is pulled forward, it can
be lifted off the DIN rail by pulling it straight up.
6.
Install the new power supply by reversing the process used
to remove the old power supply. Hook the top of the power
supply’s bracket over the top of the DIN rail, with the bottom
out. Then, snap the bottom into place.
7.
Reconnect wires, using caution to make sure that all
connections are secure and in their proper locations.
8.
Before closing electronic enclosure door and reapplying AC
power, be certain all interface cables are correctly
connected from the power supply to other modules within
the analyzer.
A5E31405710001
Solenoid Valves
Description
This section presents the procedures for removal or installation of a
Solenoid Valve. The valves are mounted on either the floor or back of the
electronic enclosure, depending on configuration. Valves are replaced
individually using the valve kit noted in the spare parts section of this
manual.
WARNING
Voltage dangerous to life exists. Before performing the removal and
installation procedures, it is important that primary AC power to the
Maxum II be turned off from the main circuit breaker. Observe all
plant safety requirements before performing any repair or
maintenance on the Maxum II.
Procedure
The following procedure should be followed for removal and installation
of a Solenoid.
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
1.
Turn off power to the Maxum II at the main circuit breaker.
2.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
3.
Unplug the cable to the solenoid to be replaced, as shown
below.
4-17
Solenoid Valves, Continued
Step
4-18
Procedure
4.
As show below, use a small screwdriver to remove the two
screws that fasten the solenoid to the manifold. If the black
gasket adheres to the manifold after removing the solenoid,
then remove the gasket manually.
5.
Install the new solenoid, using a new gasket from the kit.
6.
Reattach the cable to the solenoid.
7.
Close the door and reapply power to the device.
A5E31405710001
Model 50 Valve
Description
This section provides maintenance instructions for the Model 50 Valve.
The Model 50 is a pneumatically operated diaphragm valve specifically
designed for process gas chromatography. It uses pressure-ondiaphragm activation with no other moving parts. The valve can inject
vapor samples and switches columns simultaneously. It is capable of
switching gasses up to 75 psig (515 kPa).
The Model 50 valve is equipped as part of the Analytical Module that
installs in a Modular Oven. Depending on configuration, multiple Model
50 valves may be equipped on a Module. This section describes the
Model 50 valve and its detailed maintenance instructions. For
information regarding the overall Analytical Module, refer to the section
relating to the Analytical Module later in this chapter.
Figure 4-4: Model 50 Valve
Repair Kits & Fixtures
The following equipment is required to repair the Model 50 Valve:
•
•
•
Preventing Port to
Port Leaks
Model 50 Repair Kit: Siemens PN 2020164-001 (includes 10
diaphragms, 10 screws with washers, and 12 Valco fittings).
Valve Assembly Fixture: Siemens PN 2020281-001
Torque screwdriver with Allen head bit: Siemens PN
1631005-003
Particulates introduced to the valve either from the sample or from the
columns can prevent the diaphragms from sealing against the center
plate of the valve. Also, to insure proper sealing of the diaphragms, the
actuation pressure should be 25 psig higher than the carrier gas or
sample gas pressure.
To help prevent leaks always turn the Sample and Carrier Gas off before
the Actuation Gas is turned off. Without Actuation Gas the Model 50
Valve is in an undefined state and the flow path of the carrier or sample
cannot be controlled. Leaks in the Actuation Gas lines could result in a
lower Actuation Gas pressure which could result in port to port leaks.
The symptoms can include small peaks, repeatability problems,
contaminated columns and noise on the detector.
A5E31405710001
4-19
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Figure 4-5: Exploded View of Model 50 Valve
4-20
A5E31405710001
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Maintenance
Personnel
If customer maintenance personnel are not technically trained to repair
the Model 50 Valve on site, it is recommended that the valve be returned
to Siemens for repair or direct replacement.
Direct Valve Replacement
If it is determined that the problem is directly related to the Model 50
Valve system performance, the customer must make a determination if
the valve can be repaired on site or if it should be returned to Siemens
for repair or replacement.
Repair of Valve
To repair the Model 50 Valve on site, the customer must have the
necessary maintenance tools and replacement parts. Recommended
valve spare parts can be obtained from Siemens.
Maintenance Facility
When cleaning the Model 50 Valve and associated components, it is
imperative that the maintenance be performed in a clean and
contaminant free facility. Components should be placed on a lint free
cloth to prevent impurities from contaminating the valve and its
components. Hands should be clean and free of contaminants.
If Model 50 Valve maintenance is to be performed on site, the area must
be clean and free of foreign contaminants. Presence of any foreign
contamination can cause additional valve problems after reinstallation.
All foreign contamination adhering to valve must be removed using
cleaning solvent, such as hexane, acetone, or methanol and a dust/lint
free cloth. After cleaning Model 50 Valve components, shake or blow
with clean air the excess cleaning fluid from the individual components.
Ensure that the components are air dry before reassembling.
CAUTION
Do not allow Model 50 Valve polished surfaces to rest on any surface
other than a lint free cloth. Clean sample flow openings in top plate,
center plate, bottom plate and Valco fitting nuts using a syringe filled with
cleaning solvent such as hexane, acetone, or methanol.
Removal of Analytical
Module
To repair the Model 50 Valve on site the Analytical Module must be
removed from the Modular Oven. Note that for ease of maintenance it
is possible to remove and install an Analytical Module while the
device is powered up. This should not damage the components on the
module.
A5E31405710001
4-21
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Maintenance
Procedures
Valve Removal and
Disassembly
(see Figure 4-5)
The valve is serviced by disassembling and then thoroughly cleaning the
components to remove all particulates. Ultrasonic cleansing with a
suitable solvent works very well. During the cleaning and re-assembly
process, care must be taken to avoid scratching or damaging the
polished surfaces of the valve. After cleaning, the valve is
reassembled using new Teflon® coated stainless steel diaphragms. DO
NOT attempt to reuse old diaphragms. Notice the alignment marks on
the three sections of the valve near the actuation ports. The valve should
be reassembled so that these marks line up. If the marks do not line up it
is possible that the center plate is upside down. The screws should be
tightened evenly to 6-8 inch pounds using the appropriate torque
screwdriver with an Allen head bit.
Step
Procedure
1.
Remove the Analytical Module from the Oven as described in
the Analytical Module section of this chapter. It is not required
to power off the analyzer or remove power to the oven.
2.
Once the Analytical Module is removed, to remove Model 50
Valve from the module, first disconnect all tubing connected to
the valve.
CAUTION
When disconnecting Valco fastening nuts from Model 50 Valve, exercise
caution not to bend or crimp the stainless steel tubing.
NOTE
Before removing Model 50 Valve from module make note of its
orientation on the module.
CAUTION
4-22
3.
Remove the valve from the oven by unscrewing the two M3 x 35
socket head cap screws securing the Model 50 Valve. These
mounting screws are located between ports 2 and 3 and ports 8
and 9. Refer to Figure 4-5 for port locations.
4.
Place the valve on a clean dust and lint free cloth within a clean
work environment.
Do not place polished top plate, center plate or bottom plate against any
abrasive surface. Place components on a lint free cloth free of foreign
contaminants.
A5E31405710001
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Step
Procedure
5.
Place the valve bottom plate on a lint free cloth. Using a 2.5 mm
Allen wrench, remove the five component socket head fastening
cap screws. Refer to Figure 4-5.
6.
Separate valve Top, Center and Bottom plates, placing them on
a lint-free cloth.
Both diaphragms are visible.
Valco & Swagelok
Fittings
The ports are machined for a 1/16” Valco internal nut. The Valco ferrule
or the 2-piece Swagelok ferrule can be used. It is important to follow the
manufacturer’s procedures when cutting tubing and seating ferrules to
ensure that the fitting does not leak.
Valco & Swagelok
Assembly Instructions
Use a wheel-cutting tool (Supelco 58692-U) to score the tubing, and then
with a pair of straightening pliers (Supelco 58646) and a pair of needle
nose pliers snap the tubing at the score line. Make certain that all tubing
ends are cut square with the tube axis, and that both the ID and the OD
are thoroughly deburred, use a deburring tool (Supelco 58804). Inspect
the end of the tubing where the ferrule will seat for scratches along its
length. Visible scratches along the tubing where the ferrule will seat are
not acceptable, but those behind the front edge of the ferrule will not
interfere with the integrity of the fitting.
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
1.
Slide the nut and ferrule onto the tubing.
2.
Insert this assembly in the fitting detail (valve body), screwing
the nut 2 or 3 turns by hand.
3.
Push the tubing all the way forward into the details so that it
seats firmly.
4.
Manually turn the nut until it is finger tight.
4-23
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Step
Replacing Diaphragms
5.
Turn the nut ¼ turn (90 degrees) past the point where the
ferrule first starts to grab the tubing.
6.
Remove the fitting and inspect it. The ferrule may be free to spin
axially on the tubing but should have no lateral movement along
the tubing. If it does, reinstall the fitting and tighten it another 1/8
turn past finger tight. Remove, re-inspect and repeat if
necessary.
Use the Valve Assembly Fixture, Siemens PN 2020281-001, properly
align the Diaphragms when rebuilding the Model 50 Valve. The fixture
consists of a base (1), 2 guide pins (2) and a diaphragm placement disc
(3). This fixture will allow the user to place the diaphragm in the center of
the valve. If the diaphragm is not in the center it may leak.
Step
4-24
Procedure
Procedure
1.
Remove the old diaphragms from the plates. DO NOT attempt
to reuse the old diaphragms.
2.
With the pins installed in the fixture base, place the bottom plate
of the valve on the base. The pins should fit in the mounting
holes on the bottom plate and hold it in place.
3.
Position the placement disc on the bottom plate and set the
diaphragm in place.
4.
Carefully remove the placement disc without moving the
diaphragm. Inspect the diaphragm for proper alignment.. If the
diaphragm is not in the center of the plate, repeat the placement
procedure using the placement disc.
5.
Place the middle plate on the valve taking care to use the
correct holes. Check the alignment mark on the side of the
plate. It should align with the mark on the bottom plate. If not,
the middle plate is upside down and must be removed, turned
over, and reinstalled correctly.
A5E31405710001
Model 50 Valve, Continued
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
6.
Repeat steps 3 and 4 with the middle plate.
7.
Place the top plate on the valve, verifying alignment using the
alignment marks.
8.
Install the 5 screws and washers finger tight.
9.
Tighten the screws down evenly (2.5mm Allen wrench) to 6 to 8
inch-pounds of torque. (It is recommended to use the torque
wrench available from Siemens, PN 1631005-001, which is
calibrated at 7.2 inch pounds). Remove the assembled valve
from the valve fixture.
10.
Reinstall the valve in the Analytical Module and connect all
tubing.
11.
Check for leaks.
12.
Reinstall the Analytical Module in the Modular Oven as
described in the section of this chapter relating to the Analytical
Module. Verify valve operation by running chromatograms.
4-25
Intrinsically Safe Thermal Conductivity Detector (ISTCD DPM)
Description
This section provides removal and installation procedure for the
Intrinsically Safe Thermal Conductivity Detector (ISTCD) Detector
Personality Module (DPM). This board is mounted on the floor of the
electronics enclosure in the center of the enclosure.
WARNING
Voltage dangerous to life exists. Before performing the removal and
installation procedures, it is important that primary AC power to the
Maxum II be turned off from the main circuit breaker. Observe all
plant safety requirements before performing any repair or
maintenance on the Maxum II.
WARNING
The ISTCD DPM contains intrinsically safe circuitry. The ground to
the board must remain connected while the board is in operation. In
addition, the board is sealed in black casing that must not be
opened. The board cannot be serviced on site. It must be returned
to the factory for service. Maintenance is limited only to
replacement. Failure to follow these instructions will violate the
safety protection of the device. Refer to the Maxum II Explosion
Protection Safety Standards Manual (A5E02220442001) for more
information on the safe use of intrinsically safe circuitry in the
Maxum II.
Procedure
The following procedure should be followed for removal and installation
of ISTCD DPM.
Step
4-26
Procedure
1.
Turn off power to the Maxum II at the main circuit breaker.
2.
Open electronic enclosure door (using a 4mm (5/32”) Allen
wrench if necessary).
3.
Note the plug in location for each of the oven cables running
to the DPM. Then, disconnect the cables as well as the I2C
cable (white connector).
4.
Use a 2.5 MM Allen wrench to disconnect the screw for the
ground wire. Note that the ground wire screw is equipped
with a metal standoff
A5E31405710001
ISTCD DPM, continued
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
5.
Remove DPM, along with its mounting bracket, using an
8 mm socket wrench or nut driver. There are two nuts
securing the metal mounting bracket to the enclosure. One
is visible in the front and one is at the back of the module.
6.
If required, the DPM board can be removed from the bracket
by removing the two screws that mount the board to the
bracket (not the screws that connect the black cover
together). If required, the new DPM can be mounted on the
same bracket.
7.
Verify that all external switch settings on the new board
match the old board exactly. Refer to chapter 2 of this
manual for further information relating to switch settings on
the ISTCD DPM.
8.
Install the new board into the analyzer. Secure both nuts
using an 8 mm socket wrench or nut driver.
9.
Connect the ground wire, taking care to reinstall the standoff
correctly as shown below.
10.
Reconnect the I2C and Oven cables.
11.
Close the door and reapply power to the device.
4-27
Analytical Modules
Description
This section describes repair procedures for the Analytical Modules for
the Modular Oven. The Maxum Modular Oven configuration is designed
for ease of repair. The primary aspect of this design is the removable
Analytical Module. This design allows the operator to quickly remove the
analytics package which is secured with only one or two bolts. The
module can then be taken back to a central location for troubleshooting
and repair. In addition, if available, the user may install a spare that is
equipped with the same hardware and columns. This allows the analyzer
to be down for a minimal amount of time while the original analytical
module is repaired (either by the customer or by Siemens).
As part of the quick repair design concept, the analytical modules are
designed to be removed from the oven while the analyzer is powered up.
Analytical Module
Construction
Analytical Modules for the Maxum Modular Oven are equipped with
Model 50 valves, columns, tubing, and either one or two center posts
that are equipped with TCD beads. These components comprise the
needed hardware for a fully functioning chromatographic application. The
components are mounted and plumbed on a manifold that interfaces to a
manifold within the modular oven of the Maxum II.
Two primary types of Analytical Modules exist, the single module and the
double module (see figure below). The single module has a single post
mounted on a small manifold. The double module has two posts
mounted on a larger manifold. When installed, both are encased in an
aluminum cover.
Double Module
Single Module
Figure 4-6: Analytical Modules
Multiple configurations are possible for each type Analytical Module. The
configuration for a particular customer module, including plumbing
diagrams, will be detailed in the custom documentation supplied with the
analyzer.
The analytical module plumbing interfaces to the modular oven through
the equipped manifolds. There are two oven manifold configurations,
large and small. The plumbing of the manifolds and connections for
these two configurations is detailed in the following drawings.
4-28
A5E31405710001
Analytical Modules, continued
Figure 4-7: Manifold and Pneumatic Diagram of Large Modular Oven (rear view)
A5E31405710001
4-29
Analytical Modules, continued
Figure 4-8: Manifold and Pneumatic Diagram of Small Modular Oven (rear view)
4-30
A5E31405710001
Analytical Modules, continued
Caution
Removal of Analytical
Module
A5E31405710001
It is not required to power down the analyzer to remove an analytical
module. However, it is important to place the analyzer in Hold and block
gas flows.
Step
Procedure
1.
Place the analyzer in Hold and block gas flows.
2.
Open the door to the oven compartment.
3.
There will be either one or two ovens installed. For the desired
oven, remove the four thumbscrews that secure the interior
oven door and then pull out the door to expose the analytical
modules.
Note:
When handling analytical modules it is important that the
manifold surfaces not get dirty or scratched. Place only on a
clean dry surface. Note that uninstalled modules may be
equipped with a reusable peel off manifold covering. If possible,
reuse this covering when a module is not installed in an
analyzer.
4.
Using a 17 mm wrench, remove the bolt(s) that secure the
analytical module, and then pull the module out.
Note:
When replacing module in the following step, ensure that all
o-rings on the oven manifold are in place and intact.
5.
If a replacement module is available, install it. Secure using the
bolts. To prevent leaking around the manifold bolts should be
tightened to a range of 7.8 to 11.0 ft lbs. A torque wrench is
recommended (Siemens part number A5E31368510). After a
replacement is installed, the analyzer can be placed back into
operation.
6.
The removed module can now be repaired on-site, tested using
the Module Hardware Tester, or returned to Siemens for repair.
7.
To remove the cover from an analytical module, simply loosen
(but don’t remove) the screws around the base of the module
and lift the cover off.
8.
Columns, tubing, and connectors may be replaced using
standard tools. Refer to the Model 50 repair section of this
chapter for repairs to the Model 50 valve. Refer to the
procedures on the next page for steps to replace detector
beads or detector wiring harness
4-31
Analytical Modules, continued
Replacement of
Thermistor Board
Step
Procedure
1.
Making note of the connection location for each wire, remove
the wiring that is connected to the Thermistor/Filament Board
that is to be removed. Remove the wires by carefully pulling on
the end of the metal connector.
2.
Remove the Thermistor Board by removing the Button Head
Hex Screw, the Lockwasher, and the Flat Washer as shown in
figure 4-9.
3.
Discard O-rings (13). Do not attempt to reuse old O-rings.
4.
Remove the two metal inserts. These CAN be reused.
5.
Before installing new board, examine the mounting surface and
the holes for the Thermistors to verify there is no contamination
or scratches on the machined surface.
If there is contamination on the surface, clean it using lint free
cloth and a cleaning solvent such as acetone or hexane. If the
surface is scratched it may be necessary to replace the
complete assembly.
CAUTION: The elements on the board are exposed and are
very delicate. Handle the board only by its edges.
Hands and tools must be clean.
6.
4-32
Install the metal inserts in the detector block. These inserts
should be installed with the groove perpendicular to the tube
holes in the block (so that air cannot flow in a straight path
between the holes). Refer to Figure 4.10
A5E31405710001
Analytical Modules, continued
Figure 4-9: Thermistor Bead Board (Exploded View)
Figure 4-10: Proper Alignment of Metal Inserts
Step
7.
Procedure
Install the new O-Rings in hole in the Detector Block.
It is also possible to install the O-Rings on the thermistor board
instead of in the hole. If installing the O-Rings on the board, be
careful not to damage the element.
8.
A5E31405710001
Install the Board into the Detector Block. When installing the
board, exercise caution not to damage the exposed elements.
4-33
Analytical Modules, continued
Step
Procedure
9.
Reinstall the Flat Washer, Lock Washer, and Button Head Hex
Screw. Do not over tighten the screw as this can damage the
Board.
10.
Reconnect wiring to the board. Wiring MUST be connected to
the same cells as before. Verify all termination points.
Note: The length of the wiring is such that color coded wires can
connect only to their specified bead. Also note that there are
two wires of each color. Technically, for a specific cell it does
not matter which wire is connected to which lead as long as the
color is correct. However, the wires should be connected as
shown in figure 4-11.
Figure 4-11: Wiring Connections to Thermistor Boards
4-34
A5E31405710001
Analytical Modules, continued
Replacement Thermistor
Wiring Harness
Step
Procedure
1.
Making note of the connection location for each wire, remove
the wiring that is connected to the Thermistor/Filament Board
that is to be removed. Remove the wires by carefully pulling on
the end of the metal connector.
2.
Remove the wiring harness by removing the 2 mm button head
hex screws that secure the 9-pin connector to the manifold.
3.
Install the new wiring harness using the 2 mm button head hex
screws.
4.
Reconnect wiring to the thermistor boards. Wiring MUST be
connected to the same cells as before. Verify all termination
points.
Note: The length of the wiring is such that color coded wires can
connect only to their specified bead. Also note that there are
two wires of each color. Technically, for a specific cell it does
not matter which wire is connected to which lead as long as the
color is correct. However, the wires should be connected as
shown in figure 4-11.
A5E31405710001
4-35
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box
Description
This section provides describes the Module Hardware Tester device and
its use for troubleshooting Modular Oven Analytical Modules. The
Module Hardware Tester is used to check for leaks in a module and to
test the electrical characteristics of the Thermal Conductivity Detector
beads.
Requirements for Use
The Module Hardware Tester is encased in a hard plastic carrying case
for mobility. It requires no outside power source. Requirements for
proper use of the device are as follows.
•
•
•
•
•
Tool kit need to secure Analytical Module to the tester and to
fix any problems that may be found. To prevent leaks at the
manifold, a torque wrench is recommended (Siemens part
number A5E31368510)
Clean, dry, and well ventilated area to use the device.
Test meter (ohm meter or multimeter) for connecting to the
TCD bead test points.
Gas supply, such as helium, capable of supplying up to 100
psi (690 kPa).
Method of detecting leaks, such as a gas detecting
instrument (such as GOW-MAC®) or liquid detector (such as
Snoop®).
Warning
Exercise caution with gas supply, as failure to use in a properly vented
area could deplete oxygen supply.
Important
When removing materials from the analyzer, all items must be placed on
a clean, non-abrasive surface. Use a clean lint-free cloth.
Storage
The Module Hardware Tester should be stored with the MAIN VALVE set
to VENT and with both supplied blank manifold plates installed using the
M10 x 25 mm bolts supplied with the Tester.
4-36
A5E31405710001
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Figure 4-12: Module Hardware Tester
Components
A5E31405710001
As shown above, the Module Hardware Tester is equipped with the
following components:
•
Bead Select Switch – Used to choose which TCD bead to test. A
single module will have beads 1-4 and a double module will have
beads 1-8. Position 9 is used to check for short between beads
and ground.
•
Gas Supply Connection – This is a 1/8” port that connects
external gas to the device for use for leak checking.
•
Main Valve – This switch is used to regulate whether the
pressure within the system. When set to Inlet, the gas supply is
connected. When set to Block, the pneumatic system of the test
box is isolated so that pressure cannot escape. When set to
Vent, the pneumatic system of the box is vented to release
pressure.
4-37
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Note
•
Gas Pressure Gauge – Shows the internal pressure of the
pneumatic system of the test box.
•
Vent Line – This connection is used to release pressure from the
box when the main valve setting is set to vent.
•
Valve 1 Switch – This is used to test for leaks on the actuation
lines of the Model 50 as well as manifold ports 1 and 2 on the
module.
•
Valve 2 Switch – This is used to test for leaks on the detector
reference path as well as manifold ports 10 and 12 on the
module.
•
Valve 3 Switch – This is used to test for leaks on all Model 50
valve ports as well as manifold ports 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, and 11 on the
module.
•
Ohm Meter Connection – These jacks are used to connect an
external Ohm meter or multimeter to the device in order to check
the electrical integrity of the TCD beads.
When blank manifold plates are removed in order to install a module,
they should be placed on a clean dry surface such that they will not get
damaged.
•
Note
4-38
Manifold – The manifold is where the analytical module mounts
for testing. When the Module Tester is shipped it has two blank
plates installed on the manifold. When a single module is tested,
the right manifold is removed. When a double module is tested,
both manifolds are removed. When the device is stored both
blank plates are to be installed on the device in order to protect
the manifold.
The Module Tester manifold is equipped with several o-rings. These
must remain in place for the leak check to work. If an o-ring is damaged
or missing it must be replaced. Refer to spare parts list for appropriate
replacements.
A5E31405710001
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Setup of Hardware
Tester
The following procedure should be used to set up the device for use.
Refer back to figure 4-12.
Step
Procedure
1.
Place the test box in a clean dry area that is well ventilated.
2.
Set the switches labeled VALVE 1, VALVE 2, and VALVE 3
to OFF. Set switch labeled MAIN VALVE to VENT.
3.
For leak checking, connect 1/8” gas supply line to the port
labeled GAS SUPPLY. Turn on gas at supply end.
4.
If using a test instrument to detect for leaks, such as a
GOW-MAC, then the vent line on the Module Tester must
be extended away from the box to avoid contamination of
the area being leak checked. The vent line is connected to a
Teflon®) tube that can extend approximately 2 feet away
from the box.
5.
If testing TCD beads, connect a test meter (ohm meter or
multimeter set to check resistance) to the jacks labeled
OHM METER.
6.
If testing a “single” analytical module (smaller module
configured with one post), then remove the right side blank
plate from the device by removing the M10 x 25 mm bolt.
If testing a “double” analytical module (larger module
configured with two posts), then remove both blank plates.
Notes:
To prevent manifold leaks when attaching the Analytical
Module in the following step, ensure that all o-rings are in
place before attaching the module. In addition, torque the
module bolts to between 7.8 and 11.0 ft-lbs.
7.
Attach the Analytical Module to the test box using the M10 x
120 mm bolts supplied with the module.
If testing a single module, verify that the blank manifold
plate is properly secured and with proper torque to prevent
leaks.
8.
A5E31405710001
The device is now prepared for testing.
4-39
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Electrical Test
The following procedure should be used to test the electrical
characteristics of the TCD beads. Refer back to figure 4-12.
Bead Select
Switch Setting
Expected
Resistance at 25°C
1-8
27-33 kΩ
9
> 2 MΩ
Table 4-2: Module Hardware Tester
Step
Procedure
1.
With the external test meter connected as previously
described, set the BEAD SELECT switch to position 1.
2.
Read the measurement on the meter. Verify that the value is
within the range shown in table 4-2.
3.
Repeat for 2-8 (for double module) or 2-5 (for single
module).
Note:
If an out of range reading is found, then the selected bead is
suspected faulty. Replace the bead pair using the procedure
described in the Analytical Module section of this chapter.
Note that positions 1-2 and 5-6 relate to the bottom bead
pair on the respective post and positions 3-4 and 7-8 relate
to the top bead pair on the respective post.
4-40
4.
Set external test meter to its highest range and then set
BEAD SELECT switch to position 9. Verify that an open
circuit is measured (greater than 2 MΩ).
Note:
A value less than 2 MΩ found on position 9 indicates that
there is a short between the metal hardware of the module
and the TCD beads. This could be due to a faulty wiring
harness or some other fault. Troubleshoot as needed.
5.
After electrical test, the external meter can be disconnected.
A5E31405710001
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Leak Test
The following procedure should be used to test for internal leaks within
an analytical module. Refer back to figure 4-12 during this procedure.
Checking for leaks using the Module Tester is accomplished by
pressurizing different parts of the module to a specific pressure (typically
100 psig) using input gas. Then, the pressurized volume is sealed off
and the gas pressure gauge is monitored to determine if there is a
pressure loss over time.
The amount of pressure loss over time depends on the size of the leak
or leaks that exist as well as the size of the analytical module. Very small
leaks may take several minutes to leak enough gas to be detectable on
the gauge.
All pneumatic fittings are likely to leak a very small amount. The amount
of acceptable leakage depends on where on the module a leak is and
also on specific customer requirements. For example, a leak on a valve
actuation tube is not likely to affect analytical results, but could increase
utility costs.
The steps in the procedure below are designed to allow the user to
quickly detect cumulative leaks of 0.5 ml per minute within the largest
possible analytical module. This is considered the minimum requirement
and is usually sufficient to prevent significantly affecting chromatographic
results. If a customer requires a lower level of leakage, then the test
times can be extended. The customer may also choose to leak test each
fitting directly with a leak detector instead of waiting to detect a pressure
loss.
Step
A5E31405710001
Procedure
Note:
Leak checking is accomplished using the VALVE switches
on the Module Tester. During leak checking only one of
these switches is used at a time. Turning on more than one
switch may prevent the test from functioning correctly.
1.
Verify that the test box is set up as described previously in
this section. Ensure that the switches labeled VALVE 1,
VALVE 2, and VALVE 3 are all set to OFF.
2.
Turn MAIN VALVE to INLET. This supplies gas pressure to
the valve switches on the test box.
4-41
Use of Analytical Module Hardware Test Box, continued
Step
3.
Procedure
VALVE 1 pressurizes the control ports for the Model 50
valve(s).
Turn VALVE 1 to ON. Wait about 5 seconds for the pressure
to stabilize.
4.
Set MAIN VALVE to BLOCK. This isolates the pressurized
ports.
5.
Allow the test to sit for about 1 minute. There should be no
pressure drop over this time. If a leak is present, use a leak
detector to find the source. Note that there may be more
than one leak.
6.
After VALVE 1 leak test is complete, turn MAIN VALVE to
VENT.
7.
When pressure has dissipated, turn VALVE 1 to OFF.
8.
VALVE 2 pressurizes the reference path(s) for the module,
which are already blocked off on the vent side of the
module.
Repeat steps 2-7 for VALVE 2.
9.
VALVE 3 pressurizes all ports in the Model 50 valve.
Repeat steps 2-7 for VALVE 3, with the following
differences.
With VALVE 3 allow 30 seconds for pressure to stabilize
before setting the MAIN VALVE to BLOCK and allow 3-5
minutes wait time to determine if there is any pressure loss.
10.
4-42
After leak test, the gas supply can be shut off and
disconnected and the vent line can be retracted.
A5E31405710001
Chapter 5
Parts
Introduction
Overview
This chapter provides maintenance personnel with information
concerning parts and assemblies for the Maxum II.
Chapter Highlights
How to Place an
Order
Topic
Page
Introduction
5-1
Maxum II Modular Oven Acronyms
5-2
Available Parts
5-3
Parts can be ordered using the contact information at the beginning of
this manual:
To ensure an immediate response to your request, you should provide
the following:
A5E31405710001
•
Purchase order number. If ordering by phone, a confirming P.O.
should be sent.
•
Address where the parts are to be shipped.
•
Address where the invoice is to be sent.
•
Siemens part numbers as listed.
•
Quantity needed of each part.
•
Equipment Serial number or project number of the system
(especially for warranty related orders).
•
Preferred method of shipment.
5-1
Introduction, Continued
Maxum II Acronyms
Modular Oven
ADIO
AIO
CAC3
CIM
DIO
DPM
EC
EPC
EmSNE
GC
NAU
PECM-DC
SVCM
ISTCD
5-2
I2C Combined Analog/Digital Input Output Board
I2C Analog Input Output Board
Communication and Analytical Control board
Version 3 (processor board of SYSCON2, mounts
on SIB)
Control Interface Module assembly, consisting of
CIMBASE, CIMBOARD (CIMBASE + CAC3), and
CIM Display (color display with touchscreen
interface)
I2C Digital Input Output Board
Detector Personality Module; amplifies and digitizes
detector signals
Electronics Enclosure
Electronic Pressure Control Module
Embedded Sensor Near Electronics
Gas Chromatograph
Network Access Unit
Power Entry and Control Module – Direct Current
Solenoid Valve Control Module
Intrinsically Safe Thermal Conductivity Detector
A5E31405710001
Available Parts
Description
Part Number
1671004-103
2015946-002
2020164-001
2020165-001
2020166-001
2020176-001
2021185-001
2022021-001
A5E03251957001
A5E03467866001
A5E03467983001
A5E03660721001
A5E03660722001
A5E03660723001
A5E03881071001
A5E03896485001
A5E03896485002
A5E03896485003
A5E03919676001
A5E30174254
A5E30366979
S81804
A5E03959533001
A5E03989070001
A5E03989098001
A5E03989426001
A5E03989448001
A5E03989451001
A5E03989574001
A5E03989577001
A5E03990228001
A5E03990569001
A5E03990579001
A5E03990581001
A5E03990587001
A5E03990594001
A5E03990603001
A5E03990607001
A5E03990609001
A5E03990615001
A5E03990623001
A5E03990623002
A5E31405710001
Description
Sample Shut-off Valve (replacement)
GASKET, SVCM, 1/16" NEOPRENE
MODEL 50 REPAIR KIT
KIT, EPC MODULE REPLACMENT, MODULAR
OVEN
SVCM MODULE W/O-RINGS
TCD-2, THERMISTOR BEAD KIT
MANIFOLD, TUBING, SVCM #3
KIT, SOLENOID VALVE, MAX II
ASSEMBLY, PCBA, CIMBASE, CONT, I/F
THERMISTOR, DPM V3, NORMAL
POWER ENTRY CONTROL MODULE, DC (PECMDC)
KIT, I2C ADIO BOARD
KIT, I2C AIO BOARD
KIT, I2C DIO BOARD
PLUG, HEATER TERMINATION, MODULAR
REGULATOR ASSEMBLY, PURGE
REGULATOR ASSEMBLY, VALVE GAS
REGULATOR ASSEMBLY, REGULATED AIR
CAC3 (programmed f/ Beta)
POWER SUPPLY, for SiSSI
POWER SUPPLY, PRIMARY SWITCHED MODE
SWITCH PRES 100 PSI N.O.
Module Hardware Tester
KIT, SPARE, AIR INLET MANIFOLD
KIT, SPARE, I/O BRACKET
KIT, SPARE, LARGE OVEN DOOR
KIT, SPARE, SMALL OVEN DOOR
KIT, SPARE, SINGLE MODULE COVER
KIT, SPARE, DOUBLE MODULE COVER
KIT, SPARE, CIM REPLACEMENT CABLES
KIT, SPARE, TOUCH SCREEN ASSEMBLY
KIT, SPARE, DOOR ASSEMBLY W/ CIM
KIT, SPARE, 2-STATION SVCM, SMALL OVEN
KIT, SPARE, 4-STATION SVCM, LARGE OVEN
KIT, SPARE, DIN RAIL
KIT, POWER & GROUND CABLES, MODULAR
OVEN
KIT, HEATER REPLACEMENT, SM MODULAR
OVEN
KIT, HEATER REPLACEMENT, LG MODULAR
OVEN
KIT, RTD REPLACEMENT, MODULAR OVEN
KIT, SAMPLE IN/OUT BRACKET ASSEMBLY
KIT, ISTCD BEAD WIRE HARNESS (NON-FLOAT)
KIT, ISTCD BEAD WIRE HARNESS (FLOAT)
5-3
Available Parts (continued)
A5E31277202001
A5E03607125001
A5E03607139002
A5E03607149002
A5E03607150002
A5E31273922001
A5E31273922002
A5E31273922003
A5E31273922004
A5E31273922005
A5E31273922006
A5E31273924001
5-4
KIT, SPARE PARTS, MODULE HARDWARE
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST,
HARDWARE ONLY
DOUBLE MODULE REPLACEMENT, 1 M50,
HARDWARE ONLY
DOUBLE MODULE REPLACEMENT, 2 M50,
HARDWARE ONLY
DOUBLE MODULE REPLACEMENT, 3 M50,
HARDWARE ONLY
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, LIGHT
GASES 101/102
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, AIR,
104/105
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST,
PROPYLENE, 106/107
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, BTU,
108/109
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, ETHYLENE,
110/111
SINGLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, H2 103
DOUBLE MODULE, PRESSURE TEST, C4
OLEFINS, 112/113
A5E31405710001
10/2012 Edition A5E31405710001
Siemens Industry Inc.
7101 Hollister Road, Houston, TX 77040
United States
Phone +1 (713) 939-7400
Fax +1 (713) 939-9050
www.usa.siemens.com/ia
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