Avery Dennison Monarch 9860 Instruction manual

Monarch®
Printers
TC9800PM Rev. DK 3/09
¨
9825®
¨
9855®
¨
9860ä
©1996 Avery Dennison Corp. All rights reserved.
Each product and program carries a respective written warranty, the only
warranty on which the customer can rely. Avery Dennison Corp. reserves the
right to make changes in the product, the programs, and their availability at any
time and without notice. Although Avery Dennison Corp. has made every effort
to provide complete and accurate information in this manual, Avery Dennison
Corp. shall not be liable for any omissions or inaccuracies. Any update will be
incorporated in a later edition of this manual.
©1996 Avery Dennison Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication
may be reproduced, transmitted, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into
any language in any form by any means, without the prior written permission of
Avery Dennison Corp.
WARNING
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his
own expense.
CANADIAN D.O.C. WARNING
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions
from digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les
limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la classe A prescrites dans le
Réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicte par le ministère des
Communications du Canada.
Trademarks
Monarch®, 9800®, 9825®, and 9855® are registered trademarks of Avery Dennison Retail Information
Services LLC.
MONARCH LANGUAGE INTERPRETER, MLI, MonarchNet2, 7410, 926, 928, 932, 935, 939, 939i, and 9860
are trademarks of Avery Dennison Retail Information Services LLC.
Avery Dennison® is a trademark of Avery Dennison Corporation.
Microsoft, Windows, and NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Novell and NetWare are trademarks of
Novell, Inc. in the United States and other countries. HP Jet Admin and HP Web Jet Admin are trademarks of
Hewlett-Packard, Inc. Hewlett-Packard is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard, Inc.
Centronics is a registered trademark of Centronics Data Computer Corporation. Adobe and Acrobat are
trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated. EPCglobal, Inc.ä and Electronic Product Codeä (EPC) are
trademarks of Uniform Code Council, Inc. UFST, Monotype, the Monotype logo, and CG Triumvirate are
trademarks of Monotype Imaging, Inc.
Avery Dennison Printer Systems Division
170 Monarch Lane
Miamisburg, OH 45342
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
GETTING STARTED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Creating an MPCLII Format Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Daily Startup Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Starting with a Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Determining Format Contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Determining the Print Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Drawing Rough Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Using Supply Layout Grids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Considering Field Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Considering Fonts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Interchanging Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Using the Format Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Filling in the Format Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
CONFIGURING THE PRINTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Setting Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Using Parallel Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Using MPCLII Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
MPCLII Punctuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Standard Syntax Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Using Online Configuration Packets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Configuration Packet Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Configuration Syntax Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Making Print Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Defining the System Setup Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Defining the Supply Setup Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Defining the Print Control Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
i
Defining the Monetary Formatting Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Defining the Control Characters Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Resetting Control Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Using Immediate Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Enabling Immediate Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Sending Immediate Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18
Defining the Communication Settings Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Defining the Backfeed Control Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Special Considerations When Using Backfeed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Defining the Memory Configuration Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25
Checking Current Buffer Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27
About Memory Buffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27
Buffer Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30
Buffer Allocation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30
Memory Considerations with Downloaded TrueType Fonts . . . . . 2-31
Formatting Flash Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31
Flash Memory Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-32
Clearing Packets from Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33
Using the Font Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34
Uploading Format Header Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-38
Defining a Verifier Configuration Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-39
Defining a Network Console Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40
Defining the RFID Setup Packet for UHF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-41
Defining the RFID Setup Packet for HF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42
DEFINING FIELDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Defining the Format Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Defining Text Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Defining Bar Code Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Defining Non-Printable Text Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Defining Constant Text Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Defining Line Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Line Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
ii
Defining Box Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Defining Verifier Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-33
Defining the RFID Data Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-34
DEFINING FIELD OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Applying Field Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Combining Field Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Applying Options to the RFID Data Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Option 1 (Fixed Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Option 2 (Data Type Restrictions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Option 3 (Data Entry Templates). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Option 4 (Copy Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Merging Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Sub-Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Option 5 (Define Data Entry Sources). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Option 6 (Upload Field Data). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Sample Upload Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Option 20 (Define Data Entry Prompts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Option 21 (Define Extended Field Names) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Option 30 (Pad Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Sample Use for Padding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Option 31 (Calculate Check Digit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Option 42 (Price Field) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Option 50 (Bar Code Density) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Option 51 (PDF417 Security/Truncation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
Option 52 (PDF417 Width/Length) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20
Option 53 (Optional Settings for Aztec). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Option 60 (Incrementing/Decrementing Fields). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
Fixing the First Number in the Incrementing Sequence . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
Option 61 (Re-image Field). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
Option 62 (Bypass Bar Code) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Verifier Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Option 64 (Program AFI Field for UHF RFID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
iii
Using Check Digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Sum of Products Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Sum of Digits Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
CREATING GRAPHICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Overview of Compliance Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Overview of Bitmapped Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Determining a Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Designing Compliance Labels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Designing Bitmapped Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Special Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Using the Hex Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Using the Run Length Encoding Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Determining How to Store the Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Using Flash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Using Volatile RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Using Temporary Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Creating a Graphic Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Positioning the Graphic Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Defining the Graphic Header. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Creating Bitmap Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Creating Next-Bitmap Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Creating Duplicate Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Sample Compliance Graphic Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Sample Hex Graphic Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Sample Run Length Graphic Packet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Placing the Graphic in a Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Defining the Graphic Field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Sample Compliance Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
Sample Bitmap Graphic Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25
iv
PRINTING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Downloading Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Defining the Batch Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Defining the Batch Control Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Defining Batch Data Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Using Expanded EPC Gen2 RFID Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
Using Special Characters in Batch Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
Merged or Sub-Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
Incrementing Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Special Printing Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
9855 Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
9855 RFID Printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
9860 Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Serial Bar Code Printing Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Downloading Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Sequential Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Batch Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Batch Quantity Zero Method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Modifying Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Optional Entry Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Creating DOS Batch Files for Downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
STATUS POLLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Inquiry Request (ENQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Inquiry Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Job Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Job Response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
Job Status 0, 1, 2 Response Table (Status 1 Codes) . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
Job Status 0, 1, 2 Response Table (Status 2 Codes) . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13
Status Polling Considerations for Script Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
v
DIAGNOSTICS AND ERRORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Printing a Test Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Reading a Test Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
If You Receive an Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Reading an Error Label. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
If the PC and Printer Are Not Communicating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Calling Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Additional Diagnostics Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Data Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Format Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Batch Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Option Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Online Configuration Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Check Digit Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
Graphic Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
Communication Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Data Formatting Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Machine Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
RFID Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
Script Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
Hard Printer Failure Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-26
PRINTER OPTIMIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Adjusting the Print Quality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Reducing Imaging Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
General Format Tips and Hints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
SAMPLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Sample UPCA Format Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Sample MaxiCode Packets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Mode 0 (Obsolete) Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Mode 2 Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Mode 3 Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
MaxiCode Compression Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
vi
Sample Data Matrix Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Square Data Matrix Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Rectangular Data Matrix Packet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Sample Data Matrix with Function 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Sample Quick Response Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Entering Batch Data for QR Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
QR Code Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
Structured Append Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
Structured Append QR Code Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Sample GS1 DataBar Packet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Sample GS1 DataBar with Function 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Sample Aztec Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Sample Compliance Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
Sample Format Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-16
Sample Data Entry Format Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18
RFID Data Field Samples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
Expanded C1Gen2 Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-25
FONTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
PaxarSymbols Font 56 Characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Paxar Font 70 and Font 71 Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
NAFTA Font 72 and Font 73 Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
Bitmap Font Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
Monospaced Font Magnification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6
Using 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6
Using 300 DPI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6
Proportional Font Magnification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold (9 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold (9 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-11
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (6 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-12
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (6 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-13
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (7 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-14
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (7 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (9 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-16
vii
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (9 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-17
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (11 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-18
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (11 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-19
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (15 pt.) 203 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-20
CG Triumvirateä Typeface (15 pt.) 300 DPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-21
Scalable Font Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-22
TrueType Font Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-23
Downloading TrueType Fonts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-23
Using International Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-24
Selecting a Symbol Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-25
International Font Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-26
Arabic Font Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-26
Licensing Your Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-27
Locating the Font Number in a Font Packet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-27
SYMBOL SETS/CODE PAGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Supported Symbol Sets and Code Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Selecting a Symbol Set or Code Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Using Code 128 Function Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Entering Extended Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Using International Character Sets/Code Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Internal Symbol Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
ANSI Symbol Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Bold Character Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
OCRA Character Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Code Page 100 (Macintosh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Code Page 101 (Wingdings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Code Page 850 (Latin 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-7
Code Page 852 (Latin 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-7
Code Page 855 (Russian) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8
Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8
Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
Code Page 1250 (Latin 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
viii
Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
Code Page 1252 (Latin 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
Code Page 1253 (Greek) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-11
Code Page 1254 (Turkish) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-11
Code Page 1255 (Hebrew). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Code Page 1256 (Arabic). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Code Page 1257 (Baltic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-13
Code Page 1258 (Vietnamese) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-13
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-14
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-17
Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-21
ON (Black) Dots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-21
OFF (White Dots). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-21
FORMAT DESIGN TOOLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Online Configuration Worksheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Batch Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3
Check Digit Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
PRINTER DIFFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
Printer Comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
Post-Print Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
GLOSSARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
ix
x
1
G E T T I N G S TA R T E D
Before you read this manual, review the printer information in the
Operator’s Handbook. This manual provides the necessary
information to design, write and print a Monarch® Printer Control
Language II (MPCLII) format. The following printers support this
type of format:
¨ 9825® (V. 1.0 or greater)
¨ 9855® (V. 1.0 or greater)
¨ 9860™ (V. 1.0 or greater)
See Appendix E, “Printer Differences” for a description of each
printer’s features.
About This Manual
You do not need to be a programmer to use this manual, but you
must be familiar with creating text files and using basic MS-DOS®
commands. This chapter describes how to
¨ create and download a sample MPCLII packet.
¨ use the Supply Layout Grid and Format Worksheet.
¨ categorize data into field types and select fonts to use in your format.
See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for a list of available fonts
for your printer. See Chapter 4, “Defining Field Options,” for a list
of available options for your printer.
Printer Differences 1-1
B e f o r e Yo u B e g i n
1.
Connect the printer to the host. Refer to the Quick Reference for more
information.
2.
Load supplies in the printer. Refer to the Quick Reference for more
information.
3.
Turn on the printer.
4.
Set the communication parameters and configure the printer. The
communication parameters at the printer must match those at the host.
See Chapter 2, “Configuring the Printer,” for more information.
5.
Design your format. See “Starting with a Design” for more information.
6.
Download your format to the printer. See Chapter 6, “Printing,” for more
information.
Creating an MPCLII Format Packet
A format defines which fields appear and where the fields are printed on the
label. The printer requires this information in a special form, using
Monarch® Printer Control Language II (MPCL). This section describes how
to create a sample MPCLII format packet.
Make sure supplies are loaded, the printer is connected to the host and is
ready to receive data. Refer to the Quick Reference for more information.
For detailed information about the format header, text, constant text, and
bar code fields, see Chapter 3, "Defining Fields." For information about
batch packets, see Chapter 6, “Printing.”
1.
Type the following format header in any text editor:
{F,25,A,R,E,200,200,"FMT-25" p
2.
Type the following constant text field:
C,140,40,0,1,2,1,W,C,0,0,"SAMPLE FORMAT",0 p
3.
Type the following bar code field:
B,1,12,F,85,40,1,2,40,5,L,0 p
1-2 Getting Started
4.
Type the following text field:
T,2,18,V,50,50,1,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,1 p }
You have created a format packet for your MPCLII printer. Now, a batch
packet must be created before you can print the format.
5.
Type the following batch header, after the text field line:
{B,25,N,1 p
6.
Type the following bar code data:
1,"02802811111" p
7.
Type the following text field data:
2,"TEXT FIELD" p }
8.
Save your file as SAMPLE.FMT.
9.
Type MODE COM1:9600,N,8,1 at the DOS prompt if you are using serial
communications. This sets the communication parameters at your host.
These communication parameters must match those at your printer.
See “Setting Communication Parameters,” in Chapter 2, or your host’s
documentation for more information.
Printer Differences 1-3
10. Type COPY SAMPLE.FMT COM1. The following 2 inch by 2 inch label
prints:
{F,25,A,R,E,200,200,"Fmt 25" p
C,140,40,0,1,2,1,W,C,0,0,"SAMPLE FORMAT",0 p
B,1,12,F,85,40,1,2,40,5,L,0 p
T,2,18,V,50,50,1,3,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,25,N,1 p
1,"02802811111" p
2,"TEXT FIELD" p }
See “Starting with a Design” to design your
format and Chapter 3, "Defining Fields" to
create text, bar code, and line fields.
Daily Startup Procedures
You may want to design a checklist for operators to follow each day. Here
are a few suggested items: Turn on the printer and host, make sure ribbon
and supplies are loaded, make sure communication parameters are set, and
download packets from the host to the printer.
You may want to keep records of supplies that have been printed. A good
way to do this is to design a print log for operators to complete at the end of
the day. Here are some suggestions for types of information to include in a
print log: date, operator’s name, format name, supply size, quantity printed,
evaluation of print quality, and problems/comments.
Keep backup copies of your format, batch data, check digit, and graphic
packets.
1-4 Getting Started
Starting with a Design
Before you create a format packet, you must design your label. There are
several steps to designing a custom label:
1.
Decide which fields should appear on your label. See “Determining
Format Contents” for more information.
2.
Determine your label size. Labels are available from us in a wide
variety of sizes. Your application and the amount of data you need to
print determines the supply size. Contact your Account Manager or
Technical Support for more information.
3.
Draw a rough sketch of your label. You may want to draw several
variations to see what works best. See “Drawing Rough Sketches” for
more information.
4.
Identify the field types that appear on your label. See “Considering
Field Types” for more information.
5.
Decide which fonts you want to use. See “Considering Fonts” for more
information.
6.
Fill out your Format Worksheet. See “Using the Format Worksheet” for
more information.
At this point, you are ready to send your design to the printer. To do this:
7.
Create a format packet, based on how you filled out your worksheet.
See Chapter 3, “Defining Fields,” for more information.
8.
Download your format packet to the printer. See Chapter 6, “Printing,”
for more information.
Printer Differences 1-5
Determining Format Contents
Before you lay out your format, answer these questions. How large is your
supply, which fonts do you want to use, do you want to include a bar code,
and do you want to include graphics?
Determining the Print Area
The “bottom” (or leading edge) is the edge that exits the printer first. The
0,0 point is at the bottom left corner of the label. The print area is in the
center of the label.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Max. Supply
(Wid x Len)
Max. Print Area
(WidxLen)
Min. Supply
(Wid x Len)
Min. Print Area
(Wid x Len)
9825
English
Metric
Dots
425 x 1750
1080 x 4445
863 x 3553
400 x 1600
1016 x 4064
812 x 3248
75 x 50
191 x 127
152 x 102
75 x 50
191 x 127
152 x 102
9855/
9860
English
Metric
Dots (203)
Dots (300)
425 x 1750
1080 x 4445
863 x 3553
1275 x 5250
400 x 1600
1016 x 4064
812 x 3248
1200 x 3900
75 x 32
191 x 81
152 x 65
225 x 96
75 x 32
191 x 81
152 x 65
225 x 96
9855RFMP
9855HF
English
Metric
Dots (203)
Dots (300)
400 x 1300
1016 x 3300
812 x 2639
1200 x 3900
400 x 1600
1016 x 4064
812 x 3248
1200 x 3900
400 x 100
1016 x 254
812 x 203
1200 x 300
400 x 100
1016 x 254
812 x 203
1200 x 300
Note:
You can create longer images if you reallocate memory to increase
your image buffer. See "Defining the Memory Packet" in Chapter 2
for more information.
The following non-print zones are recommended for the printers:
All Supplies
All Supplies
1-6 Getting Started
.050 inches on either edge of the label.
.020 inches at the end of the label.
If using the optional verifier, allow a minimum no-scan zone on the trailing
edge of the label of 0.5 inch (13 mm). The trailing edge is the edge of the
label that exits the printer last; regardless of how the format is designed on
the label.
Use the following formulas to convert inches to dots and metric:
Dots = inches x 203 (or 300 dots per inch)
Metric (1/10mm) = inches x 254
English (1/100 inch) = 100 x (dots/203) or (dots/300)
Dots = Metric (1/10 mm) x 799/1000 (or 1181/1000)
300 dpi depends on your printer.
Drawing Rough Sketches
After you decide what information you want to print, sketch how you want
the information to appear on the label. Note any areas that are preprinted
on the label, such as a logo.
As soon as you know what information to include on the label, and you have
a rough sketch, you can use a supply layout grid to help you layout and size
your label. If you do not want to use a grid, go to “Considering Field Types”
to choose what information you want on your label.
Printer Differences 1-7
Using Supply Layout Grids
A supply layout grid contains measurement markers. These markers help
you accurately position information on your label.
Decide whether you want to design formats using English, Metric, or Dot
measurements. Choose from the following grids:
¨ English
The English grid is
measured in 1/100
inches.
¨ Metric
The Metric grid is
measured in 1/10
millimeters (mm).
¨ Graphic
The printer uses dots to
print images on a label.
The printhead has 203
dots per inch (dpi) or an
optional 300 dots per inch
printhead depending on
your printer.
Choose English or Metric units when designing formats to use with
different printers. English or Metric units allow more direct use of
formats on printers with different density printheads.
If you want to use the supply layout grids, a copy of each is in Appendix
D, “Format Design Tools.”
1-8 Getting Started
C o n s i d e r i n g F i e l d Ty p e s
After you select a supply size, the next step in designing a format is to
decide what information you want to print on the label. For example, you
may want to print your company name, price of an item, and a bar code that
combines information from other places. Everything you want to print falls
into one of the following categories.
Field Type
Description
Examples
Text
Contains letters, numbers, or
symbols you want to print.
item number, item description,
department number, price, date
Non-Printable
Text
Holds data for use later, such as for
merging into another field. The
printer does not print non-printable
text fields.
city, state, and zip code to be
included in a bar code
Bar Code
Used for printing bar codes that can
be scanned.
item or serial numbers, zip codes,
information you don’t want to have
visible to customers
Constant Text
Prints fixed characters that print
without changing.
company name, company address
Line or Box
Highlights or separates items.
line marking out the regular price,
border around the supply
Graphic
Contains a bitmap image or a
compliance label overlay.
logos
Verifier
Specifies a verifier configuration to
use for each format.
mode 2, mode 19
RFID
Contains the RFID data you need to
program into the RFID tag.
Class 1 Gen1, Class 1 Gen2, EPC
data
All of the above field types except graphics are discussed in Chapter 3.
See Chapter 5, “Creating Graphics” for information on including graphics in
your format.
Printer Differences 1-9
Considering Fonts
When working with fonts, you have three considerations: font appearance,
font size (scalable or bitmapped), and font spacing (monospaced or
proportional).
The TrueType® scalable font, EFF Swiss Boldä (font 50) is standard on the
printers. See Appendix B, “Fonts,” for samples of each font.
Interchanging Packets
You can use an MPCLII format that was designed for another MPCLII printer
on a 9800 series printer. However, the format may appear smaller (fields
will be shorter), because most of the 9800 series printers use a 203 dpi
printhead. The 9855 and 9860 printers have an optional 300 dpi printhead.
Using the Format Worksheet
The Format Worksheet is divided into sections that list the field types. Each
section has boxes to fill in with parameters that define your format. A format
worksheet is included in Appendix D, “Format Design Tools.”
Filling in the Format Worksheet
Decide what type of field to use on your label.
1.
Make a copy of the Format Worksheet.
2.
Define the Format Header.
3.
Define all non-printable text fields before you define the ones you want
to print. See “Defining Non-Printable Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for more
information.
4.
Define options as you require them. See Chapter 4, “Defining Field
Options” for more information.
1-10 Getting Started
CONFIGURING THE PRINTER
2
This chapter discusses how to
¨
set communication parameters.
¨
upload the printer’s configuration or font information.
¨
configure the printer using online configuration packets.
¨
use immediate commands to control the printer’s operation
at any time.
Some parameters may not be available on each printer. See
Appendix E, “Printer Differences,” for a list of differences between
all the printers.
Configuring the Printer 2-1
Setting Communication Parameters
Use the following information if you are using serial communications. See
“Using Parallel Communications” for information about parallel
communications.
The communication parameters at the printer must match those at the host,
or you will not be able to communicate.
You can use the communication settings packet to set communication
parameters for your printer.
On MS-DOS computers, you can use the MODE command to set
communication values on your PC.
For example
MODE COM1:9600,N,8,1
This command sets your host to these communication values: 9600 baud,
no parity, an 8 bit word length, 1 stop bit.
Using Parallel Communications
If your printer supports parallel communications, the parallel port is
IEEE-1284 or Centronics® mode. You can set which mode to use through
the control panel. Refer to the Quick Reference for control panel
information. The communication settings are automatically configured for
you. There are no operator settings required.
We recommend waiting at least two seconds (or longer) when switching
between the serial and parallel ports to send data, because data may be
lost. Be careful when using print spoolers, because data transmission
occurs in the background of the operating system. This makes data
transmission completion difficult to determine when switching between
ports.
2-2 Configuring the Printer
Using MPCLII Conventions
Here are some guidelines to follow when using MPCLII.
MPCLII Punctuation
Use the following symbols when creating MPCLII packets:
Character
Decimal
Value
Description
{ (left bracket)
123
start of header
} (right bracket)
125
end of header
p (vertical bar)
124
field separator*
, (comma)
044
parameter separator
“ABC”
(quotation marks)
034
Quotation marks enclose character strings. Empty quotes (“”)
identify null strings or unused fields.
'comment'
(single quotation
marks)
039
Grave accents enclose comments. Any data enclosed in grave
accents is ignored. Do not embed comments within a quoted
string. Grave accents are also used to reject mainframe data.
* The field separator is the split vertical bar, which we are representing as p in this manual. The
decimal value is 124. To enter this character, use the Shift key plus the Split Vertical Bar key on your
computer’s keyboard. Depending on your text editor, it may appear as a solid vertical bar or as a split
vertical bar.
Note:
These MPCL characters are the default.
Standard Syntax Guidelines
When creating MPCLII packets:
¨ Begin each packet with a start of header ({).
¨ End each packet with an end of header (}).
¨ Define no more than 1000 fields in a format. Each p indicates one field.
However, options are not counted as fields. The actual number of fields
a format can have may be less, because the number of fields is limited
by the available memory.
¨ The field number (0 to 999) must be unique. We recommend starting at
1, instead of 0.
Configuring the Printer 2-3
¨ Do not use a field number more than once per format.
¨ Define all fields in the order you want to image/print them. The printer
does not print in field number order.
¨ Separate all parameters with a Parameter Separator (,).
¨ End each field with a Field Separator ( p ).
¨ Enter all information in CAPITAL letters, except words or phrases within
quotation marks.
¨ Include all parameters for a field unless documented as optional.
¨ Define non-printable text fields before the field to which they apply.
¨ Define options immediately after the field to which they apply.
¨ Multiple options can be used with most fields. Options can be used in
any combination except as noted with each definition. Options are
processed in the order they are received.
¨ Keep in mind that proportionally spaced fonts need wider fields than
monospaced fonts. For variable field data, use a letter “W” to determine
the maximum field size.
¨ Do not place a new line (return) or any other non-printing character
within a field definition. However, a carriage return or line break after
each p makes your formats easier to read.
T,1,20,V,30,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
T,2,10,V,50,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
¨ Spaces are ignored, except within character strings.
¨ Indenting options improves readability of your formats.
T,1,18,V,30,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
R,42,1 p
¨ Use a tilde (~) followed by a 3-digit ASCII code in a quoted string to
send function codes or extended characters or send the 8-bit ASCII
code.
You can modify formats and fields with the optional entry method. See
“Optional Entry Method” in Chapter 6 for more information.
2-4 Configuring the Printer
Using Online Configuration Packets
Use online configuration packets to change the printer’s settings. You can
send an individual configuration packet or a single packet containing all the
configuration packets. Supply all parameters for each packet. Leave the
parameters blank that you do not need to change. For example,
{ I,A,,,,1 p }
prints a slashed zero and uses the last sent online System Setup
parameters.
Make a copy of the online configuration worksheet in Appendix D, “Format
Design Tools,” and save the original. Packets A-M are listed on the
worksheet.
When you turn off the printer, all the information in the online configuration
packets is saved and used when the printer is turned back on. After you
change printer configurations, you must resend the format, batch, or graphic
to the printer before the changes take effect.
Configuration Packet Header
Always include an I , im me di ately after the left bracket { and be fore the
packet iden ti fier (A, B, C, etc.). The I pa ram e ter iden ti fies the data stream
as a con fig u ra tion packet.
Note:
Include the I pa ram e ter with each packet if you are send ing them
in di vid u ally. In clude it only at the be gin ning of a data stream if you
are send ing mul ti ple pack ets.
Configuring the Printer 2-5
This is the syntax to use when you create online configuration packets:
Syntax
{
I,
1 - 8 op tional re cords
A, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
B, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
C, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
D, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
E, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
F, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
G, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
M, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter
}
Start of Header
Con fig u ra tion Header
5
5
5
3
9
5
4
4
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
Sys tem Setup
Sup ply Setup
Print Con trol
Mon e tary For mat ting
Con trol Char ac ters
Com mu ni ca tion Set tings
Backfeed Con trol
Mem ory Con fig u ra tion
End of Header
Syntax for single packet
{
I,
A, pa ram e ter 1...pa ram e ter 5
}
Start of Header
Con fig u ra tion Header
Sys tem Setup
End of Header
You can also add a configuration to RAM or specify units for supply, print,
margin, and cut positions. If you use the optional parameters with the I
packet, any online configuration packets following the split vertical bar ( p )
must specify distances using the selected units. However, the test labels
display the units in dots, even if you entered them in English or Metrics
units.
Syntax
{header,ID#,action,device p }
1. header
Constant I.
2. ID#
ID. Use 0.
3. action
Action. Options:
A
Add configuration.
U
Upload User Configuration.
4. device
Storage Device. Use R (Volatile RAM).
2-6 Configuring the Printer
5. units
Example
Units. (Optional parameter.) Options:
E
English
M
Metric
G
Dots
{I,0,A,R,E p
C,0,25,0,0,0 p }
Adds a configuration to volatile RAM and specifies English units. It also
uses the default contrast, moves print 0.25 inches closer to the bottom of
the supply and does not change the margin adjustment, prints at the default
print speed, and uses the default printhead width.
If you do not use the optional parameters, the syntax for the online
configuration packets does not change. For example,
{I,C,0,50,0,0,0 p }
uses the default contrast, moves print 50 dots (0.25) inches closer to the
bottom of the supply and does not change the margin adjustment, prints at
the default print speed, and uses the default printhead width.
Example
{I,0,U,R p }
Uploads the printer configuration from volatile RAM and returns the
following to the host.
A,0,0,0,1,0 p
B,1,1,0,0,0 p
C,0,0,0,0,0,0 p
D,1,0,2 p
E,"~123~044~034~124~125~126","","~013~010" p
F,3,1,0,0,1 p
G,0,65,65 p
M,R,76365,45190,N,0,0 p
M,R,R,640 p
M,T,R,640 p
M,I,R,3300 p
M,D,R,640 p
M,F,R,1280 p
M,V,R,3840 p
Configuring the Printer 2-7
The parameters for each packet (A-M) are displayed. In the first line that
begins with M, 76365 is the total volatile memory available, 45190 is the
memory available in volatile RAM. There is no non-volatile RAM available.
The remaining lines beginning with M list the buffer sizes in 1/10K for the
Receive, Transmit, Image, Downloadable Fonts, Formats, and Scalable
Fonts Buffers.
Configuration Syntax Guidelines
When creating a printer configuration packet:
¨ Follow the “Standard Syntax Guidelines” listed at the beginning of this
manual.
¨ The first character after the start of header ({) is the configuration
header ( I ).
¨ Download multiple configuration packets within one packet or download
a single configuration packet.
¨ If you change any of the online configuration packets, resend the format
packet to the printer, so the configuration changes take effect.
¨ Include the first five ANSI codes, at a minimum, in the control characters
packet.
¨ Send configuration packets once per session (each time the printer is
turned off and then back on), not with every format or batch packet.
Making Print Adjustments
You can adjust where the printer prints on your supply by adjusting the
supply, print, or margin positions. However, keep in mind the following:
¨ Supply adjustments across the width of your supply, such as the margin
position, are based in dots- either 203 dpi or 300 dpi, depending on your
printhead density.
¨ Supply adjustments for the length of your supply, such as supply position
or print adjustment, are always measured in 1/203 of an inch, regardless
of your printhead density.
2-8 Configuring the Printer
Defining the System Setup Packet
Use the system setup packet (A) to select the power up mode, display
language, print separators between batches, print a “slashed zero,” and
select the symbol set.
Syntax
A1. A
{I,A,powup_mode,lan guage,sep_on,slash_zero,
sym bol_set p}
System Setup Packet
A2. powup_mode Online Mode. Options:
0
online mode (default)
1
offline mode (9855/9860).
A3. language
Display Language. Options
0
English (default)
1
French
2
German
3
Spanish - ES
4
Japanese
5
Portuguese
6
Italian
7
Swedish
8
Spanish2 - MX
9
Danish
10
Dutch
11
Finnish
12
Norwegian
A4. sep_on
Batch Separators. Options:
0
Does not print a separator (default)
1
Prints a separator
2
Double-length separator- prints 2 tags (9855/9860)
Note:
A5. slash_zero
Do not use batch separators with continuous (non-indexed) supply
or RFID supply. If using a stacker, the batch separator is 3.66
inches long.
Slash Zero. Options:
0
Print a standard zero (default)
1
Print a zero with a slash through it
Configuring the Printer 2-9
A6. symbol_set
Symbol Set. Options:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Note:
Example
Internal (default)
ANSI
Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.)
Code Page 850 (Latin 1)
Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
Code Page 1251 (Cy ril lic)
Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
Code Page 1253 (Greek)
Code Page 1254 (Turk ish)
Code Page 1255 (He brew)
Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
Code Page 1257 (Bal tic)
Code Page 1258 (Viet nam ese)
DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
DOS Code Page 855 (Rus sian)
DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turk ish)
DOS Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Por tu guese)
Wingdings
Macintosh
Unicode
BIG5
GB2312
SJIS (Shift JIS) to SJIS (Code Page 932, Jap a nese)
GB2312 to GB2312 (Code Page 936, Sim pli fied Chi nese)
BIG5 to BIG5 (Code Page 950, Tra di tional Chinese)
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font does not support Code Page 1256 (Arabic).
Code pages 852-860 and 1250-1258 may only be used with
downloaded TrueType® fonts or the scalable font. Symbol sets
19-24 require the memory expansion option and a downloaded
International TrueType font. TrueType fonts are designed to be
regionally specific; therefore, all code pages may not be supported
in a given font. See Appendix C for more information.
{I,A,0,0,1,1,0 p }
Powers up the printer in the online mode, displays prompts in English, prints
a separator after each batch, prints zeros with slashes through them, and
uses the internal symbol set.
2-10 Configuring the Printer
Defining the Supply Setup Packet
Use the supply setup packet (B) to select supply type, ribbon, feed mode,
supply position, and cut position.
Syntax
{I,B,sup ply_type,rib bon_on,feed_mode,sup ply_posn,
cut_posn,skip_in dex p}
B1. B
Supply Setup Packet
B2. supply_type
Supply Type. Options:
0
Black mark supply
1
Die Cut/edge aperture supply (default)
2
Continuous (non-indexed) supply
3
Center Aperture supply (9855/9860)
4
Reserved
5
Tag Edge Aperture (9855 RFID)
Note:
You must use continuous supply in continuous mode. Do not use
continuous supply with extended backfeed or 94x5 emulation.
If your aperture supply has holes on the edge, use 1.
If your aperture supply has holes in the center, use 3.
If your aperture supply has holes on the edge and contains an
RFID antenna, use 5.
B3. ribbon_on
Ribbon. Options:
0
Ribbon not installed
1
Ribbon installed (default)
2
High Energy Ribbon installed (9855/9860)
You must use a print speed of 2.5 IPS with the high energy ribbon. Serial
bar codes cannot be printed using the high energy ribbon. Settings for
ribbon and supply type must match the supplies loaded in the printer;
otherwise, an error occurs. To clear the error, turn off the printer and
change the configuration packet. Turn on the printer and resend the
packet.
B4. feed_mode
Feed Mode. Options:
0
Continuous operation (default)
1
On-demand mode
Configuring the Printer 2-11
B5. supply_posn Supply Position. Range: -300 to 300 in 1/203 inch. 0 is the default.
Adjusts the machine to print at the vertical 0,0 point on the supply. This
adjustment accounts for mechanical tolerances from machine to machine.
The supply position adjustment only needs to be made on the initial
machine setup. Adjust the supply position if formats do not start at the 0,0
point on the supply. Increase the supply position to move print up,
decrease to move print down on the label. To verify the 0,0 point, print a
test label. See “Printing a Test Label” in Chapter 8 for more information.
For the RFID printer, adjust the supply position according to the RFID
Setup Guide and Supply Chart.
You can not change the supply position while the printer is active.
Changing the supply position will affect the print position, dispense
position, and backfeed distance. Once the supply position is set, use the
print control packet and backfeed control packet to adjust printing and the
dispense position.
B6. cut_posn
Cut position. Range:
Adjusts where the tag
to the black marks on
supplies. Increase to
Note:
B7. skip_index
Example
-300 to 300 in 1/203 inch. Use 0 for the 9825.
is cut. The printer adjusts the cut position according
the supply. You may need to adjust for aperture
move the cut up, decrease to move the cut down.
We do not recommend setting a positive cut position for any
supply while using extended backfeed. You may cut off the
leading edge of the next tag.
Skip index mode. The 9825 printer does not support skip index mode. If
using RFID supplies, do not use skip index mode. Options:
0
Disable skip index mode (default)
1
Enable skip mode. Allows the printer to skip a
sense mark and print an image over multiple labels.
{I,B,0,0,1,10,50,1 p }
Indicates black mark and thermal direct stock has been loaded, causes the
printer to operate in on-demand mode, feeds the supply approximately .05
inches up before printing the format on each label (10/203 inches), feeds
the supply .25 inches (50/203 inches) before cutting, and enables skip index
mode.
2-12 Configuring the Printer
Defining the Print Control Packet
Use the print control packet (c) to set the contrast, print, and margin
adjustment, print speed, and printhead width.
Syntax
{I,C,con trast,print_adj,mar gin_ad just,speed_adj,
ph_width p }
C1. C
Print Control Packet
C2. contrast
Print Contrast. Range: -699 to 699. 0 is the default.
C3. print_adj
Print adjustment (position). Range: -99 to 99 (9825) or -450 to 450
(9855/9860) in 1/203 inch. 0 is the default. Adjusts where data prints
vertically on the supply. Increase the print position to move print up,
decrease to move print down.
For the RFID printer, adjust the print position according to the RFID Setup
Guide and Supply Chart.
C4. margin_adj
Margin adjustment (position). Range: -99 to 99 in 1/203 inch (or 1/300
inch for 9855/9860). 0 is the default. Adjusts where data prints
horizontally on the supply. Increase the margin position to move print to
the right, decrease to move print to the left. Margin and print position are
format adjustments. They will not effect the supply position, dispense
position, or backfeed distance.
C5. speed_adj
Print Speed in inches per second (ips). Options:
0
Default (formats with serial bar codes automatically
print at 2.5 ips)
25
2.5 ips (default for serial bar codes)
40
4.0 ips
60
6.0 ips (default)
80
8.0 ips (9855/9860)
100
10.0 ips (9855 with 203 dpi)
120
12.0 ips (9855 with 203 dpi and high speed option)
Note:
C6. ph_width
Serial bar codes with an 8-dot narrow element do not automatically
print at 2.5 ips. Serial bar codes printed at speeds greater than
2.5 ips may not scan properly. However, the 985x and 9860
printers can print 203 dpi serial bar codes with narrow elements of
3 dots (or greater) at 4.0 ips. You must use a print speed of 2.5
ips with the high energy ribbon. See “Special Printing
Considerations,” in Chapter 6 for more information.
Width of the printhead in dots. Use 0.
Configuring the Printer 2-13
Example
{I,C,0,-20,-10,0,0 p }
Uses the default contrast, moves print 0.1 inch closer to the bottom of the
supply (20/203 inches) and .05 inch to the left on the supply (10/203
inches), prints at six inches per second, and uses the default printhead
width.
Defining the Monetary Formatting Packet
The monetary formatting packet (D) selects the monetary symbols to print
for a price field. Use the monetary formatting packet to select primary and
secondary monetary symbols, and designate the number of digits to appear
at the right of a decimal.
Syntax
{I,D,cur_sym,sec ond ary,dec i mals p }
D1. D
Monetary Formatting Packet
D2. cur_sym
Currency Symbol. Options:
0
No symbol
1
USA ($, Dollar- default)
2
UK (£, Pound)
3
Japan (¥, Yen)
4
Germany (1, Deutsche Mark)
5
France (F, Franc)
6
Spain (P, Peseta)
7
Italy (L., Lira)
8
Sweden (Kr, Krona)
9
Finland (2, Markka)
10
Austria (6, Shilling)
11
India (Rs, Rupee)
12
Russian (3, Ruble)
13
Korean (4, Won)
14
Thai (5, Baht)
15
Chinese (¥, Yuan)
16
Euro-Dollar (c
Note:
D3. secondary
To use these symbols, select the internal symbol set.
Secondary Sign. Secondary symbols only print if you designate at least
one decimal place. Options:
0
No secondary sign (default)
1
Print secondary sign
2-14 Configuring the Printer
D4. decimals
Example
Number of digits to the right of the decimal. Options:
0
No digits
1
One digit
2
Two digits (default)
3
Three digits
{I,D,1,1,2 p }
Prints the dollar sign, uses a secondary symbol, and places two digits to the
right of the decimal.
Defining the Control Characters Packet
Use the control characters packet (E) to change the MPCLII control
characters, enable and disable the immediate commands, and change the
default terminator character for job requests and ENQ’s.
Changes take effect with the first character following the end of header
character } of the configuration packet. Each control character must be
unique and cannot appear anywhere else in your packet, except within
quotation marks. You can customize the trailer characters to work with your
host.
Note:
Wait two seconds for the new characters to take effect before
sending packets using the new characters.
If using symbol set 110 (Unicode UTF-8) to print International characters,
set the MPCL control characters (start of header, etc.) to decimal values
between 0 and 128; otherwise, errors may occur with the Unicode data
entered.
Use the following syntax for the control characters packet. Notice all but the
first parameter are within quotation marks.
Configuring the Printer 2-15
Syntax
{I,E,"ANSI_cd","string1","string2" p }
E1. E
Control Characters Packet
E2. “ANSI_cd”
~123
~044
~034
~124
~125
~126
def. ch.
Note:
Start of header
{
(left bracket)
Parameter
,
(comma)
separator
Quoted strings
“
(quotes)
Field separator
p
(pipe sign)
End of header
}
(right bracket)
Data escape
~~
(double tilde)
character (optional)
Immediate command character (optional).
Up to any 3 characters in the 0 to 255 decimal
range. The character must be defined before this
command can be used. The caret (~094) is
normally used.
“ANSI_cd” includes seven separate parameters. The first five
parameters are required. The other parameters are optional.
E3. “string 1"
Terminator for status requests and ENQ requests. Up to any 3 characters
in the 0-255 decimal range. The default is “013". Sending ”" disables this
sequence.
E4. “string 2"
Terminator for job requests and data uploads. Up to any 3 characters in
the 0-255 decimal range. The default is none. Sending “” disables this
sequence.
After you change these parameters, all packets, including any future
configuration packets, must use the new control characters. We
recommend using the tilde and ASCII character code sequence when
sending this packet multiple times. Also, set the packet delimiters to
characters within the 21 hex to 7E hex range.
You must send the control characters packet to enable the immediate
commands. An immediate command executes immediately, even if it is
embedded within quotation marks, and all data following the command in
the string is ignored.
Example
{I,E,"~123~063~034~124~125~126~094" p }
Changes the parameter separator character from , to ?. The other control
characters remain unchanged. It also enables the immediate commands by
defining the ^ symbol as the command identifier.
2-16 Configuring the Printer
Resetting Control Characters
You can change the characters in the previous example back to their
original settings by downloading this packet:
{I?E?"~123~044~034~124~125~126~094" p }
Notice that the parameter separator is ? in this packet. This is the
parameter separator that was set before this packet. Once the packet is
received by the printer, the new parameter separator (a comma, in this
case) is valid.
Be careful when using this feature. If you forget what the control characters
were changed to, print a test label. (The test label lists the current control
characters.) See “Printing a Test Label,” in Chapter 8 for more information.
Using Immediate Commands
Immediate commands effect printer operation as soon as the printer
receives them, even if they are included within a packet or used inside
quotation marks.
You can use immediate commands to change immediate command or status
polling control characters, reset the printer, or cancel and repeat batches.
Enabling Immediate Commands
When the printer is first turned on, these commands are not available. To
use these commands, you must first send the control characters packet and
define the immediate command control character. The immediate command
control character is saved in non-volatile RAM so it is not lost after you turn
off the printer. Once the immediate command control character is defined,
the immediate commands are enabled.
Configuring the Printer 2-17
Sending Immediate Commands
Immediate commands consist of a three- or four-character sequence you
can send in a packet or embed in your application. Each command must be
sent separately.
Syntax
control character_immediate command
The printer can accept only one immediate command at a time. Sending a
command before the previous one is completed can result in an error.
Example
^CB
Immediately cancels the batch currently printing unless an error exists in the
printer. This example assumes that the defined immediate command control
character is the caret (^).
2-18 Configuring the Printer
Command
Parameter
^CA
Cancels all the batches in the queue unless an error exists on the printer.
^CB
Cancels only the current batch being printed unless an error exists.
^DD or ^DCd
Disables the MPCL data escape character (the tilde) and inhibits MPCL from acting on
ANY data escape sequence from the host. Sets the MPCL data escape character to
the ASCII value given by the d parameter. The value can be any ASCII character.
^EA
Aborts an error condition. This command is the same as pressing ESCAPE/CLEAR to
clear an error. May need to be sent multiple times. Use ^RB to reprint batch.
CAUTION: This command causes the current batch to stop and the condition that
caused the error to remain uncorrected.
^ER
Resets the error. This command is the same as pressing FEED/CUT to acknowledge
an error. Normal operation resumes.
^FD
Feeds a label when printer is idle. Simulates the operation of pressing FEED/CUT and
dispenses the next label if printer is in the on-demand mode.
Note: Printer ignores this command if printing.
^FF1
Formats flash memory
^FF2
Returns the amount (in bytes) of the available flash memory.
^GD
Disables the conversion of formats designed in 203 dpi dot units to 300 dpi.
^GE
Enables the conversion of formats designed in 203 dpi dot units (not English or Metric)
to 300 dpi.
^ID or ^ICd
Disables the Immediate Command feature by turning off the Immediate Command
escape character. Sets the Immediate Command escape character to the ASCII value
given by the d parameter. The value can be any ASCII character. Use ^IE to enable
immediate commands.
^MC
Returns the customer ID or RPQ version to the host. (00 to 99)
^MD
Returns the printhead dot density to the host. 00 = 203 dpi
^MI
Returns the customer ID or RPQ revision level to the host. (00 to 99)
^MM
Returns the model number to the host. 17 = 9825
19 = 9860
^MP
Returns the prototype number to the host. (00 to 99)
^MR
Returns the revision number to the host. (00 to 99)
^MV
Returns the version number to the host. (00 to 99)
^PR
Resets the printer. This command takes five seconds to complete and then the printer
is ready to receive data. It has the same effect as turning off and then turning on the
printer.
Note: Command should be used only when the printer is not printing.
01 = 300 dpi
18 = 9855
Configuring the Printer 2-19
Command
Parameter
^RB
Repeats the last printed batch, printing the same number of labels as specified in the
original batch. This command does not work if using batch separators.
Note:
Printer ignores this command if printing.
^RS
Resynchronizes supply when supply roll is changed.
Note:
Printer ignores this command if printing.
^SD or ^SCd
Disables the status polling feature by turning off the status polling control character.
Sets the status polling control character to the ASCII value given by the d parameter.
The value of d can be any ASCII character.
^SFa
Loads script with host response.
^SFb
Loads script without host response.
^SFc
Enables script.
^SFd
Disables script.
^SFe
Uploads script version information.
^SFf
Deletes script.
^SFg
Turns on ENQ status polling before it reaches the script.
^SFh
Turns off ENQ status polling before it reaches the script.
^SFi
Turns on immediate commands before it reaches the script.
^SFj
Turns off immediate commands before it reaches the script.
^TP
Prints a test label.
Note:
Printer ignores this command if printing.
^VLC
Only clears the data that has been uploaded, not all the logged data. Data is cleared
with this command after a successful upload. We recommend clearing the log file after
uploading.
^VLD
Disables verifier data logging (default when the printer is reset).
^VLE
Enables verifier data logging.
^VLU
Uploads the log file to the last port that received host data (serial, parallel, USB, or
Ethernet). Repeat this command until data is successfully uploaded. Data can be
cleared after it has been uploaded.
The table represents the defined immediate command control character as ^
and the defined status polling control character as d. You may define these
characters to suit your needs.
Note:
To use the immediate command control character or the status
polling character within your data, use the tilde sequence.
2-20 Configuring the Printer
Defining the Communication Settings Packet
Use the communication settings packet (F) to set the baud rate, word
length, stop bits, parity, and flow control for serial communications. To set
parallel communications, see “Using Parallel Communications.”
Changing the communication settings takes approximately two seconds.
Communications sent during this interval will be lost. Make sure the host
communication values match the values on the printer and the host is
capable of communicating at the speed you select for the printer.
Do not add any characters, such as a carriage return/line feed, in your
communication settings packet or communications errors may occur.
Syntax
{I,F,baud,word_length,stop_bits,par ity,
flow_con trol p }
F1. F
Communication Settings Packet
F2. baud
Baud Rate. Only the 9855 and 9860 printers support baud rates greater
than 38400. Options:
0 1200
1 2400
2 4800
3 9600 (default)
4 19200
5 38400
6 57600
7 115200.
F3. word_length
Word Length. Options:
0
7-bit word length
1
8-bit word length (default)
F4. stop_bits
Stop Bits. Options:
0
1-stop bit (default)
1
2-stop bits
F5. parity
Parity. Options:
0
None (default)
1
ODD parity
2
EVEN parity
F6. flow_control
Flow Control. Options:
0
None
1
DTR (default)
Note:
2
3
(CTS)
XON/XOFF
If you use the DOS COPY command to download your formats, set
“Flow Control” to DTR (not XON/XOFF).
Configuring the Printer 2-21
Example
{I,F,3,1,0,0,1 p }
Uses 9600 baud, an 8-bit word length, one stop bit, no parity, and the DTR
mode.
Defining the Backfeed Control Packet
Use the backfeed control packet (G) to enable or disable the backfeed
option, set the dispense position and the backfeed distance. Backfeed
works by advancing each printed label to the desired dispense position.
Once that label is removed, the next label to be printed is backed up
underneath the printhead. In continuous mode, only the last label in the
batch is advanced to the dispense position. You may need to adjust the
dispense position to allow labels to be removed, die cut labels to be
removed easily, or to prevent them from falling off.
Extended backfeed is available on the 9855 printer with a knife installed.
Extended backfeed feeds a tag far enough out to be cut and backfeeds the
next tag to the printhead line. You can not change the backfeed distance
while the printer is active.
Extended backfeed eliminates printed tags being left between the printhead
and knife. Extended backfeed does not work with non-indexed (continuous)
supply/mode. We do not recommend using extended backfeed when
sensing on attacher-hole supplies.
The 9860 printer automatically backfeeds when necessary. Backfeed is also
cut-mode dependent. See “Defining the Batch Control Field” in Chapter 6 for
more information about the best cut mode for your application.
Do not use backfeed (normal or extended) with supplies less than 0.75
inches. We recommend using 0.5-inch gap supplies in peel mode when
backfeed is disabled.
The dispense position and backfeed distance are optional parameters and
do not have to be specified. However, they allow for greater precision when
positioning the supply.
2-22 Configuring the Printer
Syntax
{I,G,action,dis_pos,bkfd_dis p }
G1. G
Backfeed Control Packet
G2. action
Action. If using one-inch RFID Supplies, do not use backfeed. Options:
0
disable backfeed (default)
1
enable backfeed (use on any printer without a knife)
2
enable extended backfeed (use on any printer with a knife)
Note:
We do not recommend setting a positive cut position for any
supply while using extended backfeed. You may cut off the
leading edge of the next tag.
G3. dis_pos
Dispense Position. Adjusts the stopping point of the label. 50 to 200 dots
(default 65 dots). Use 95 dots for the printer applicator.
G4. bkfd_dis
Backfeed Distance. Amount to move label backwards. 10 to 200 dots
(default 65 dots). Use 95 dots for the printer applicator. This distance can
not be greater than the dispense position.
The backfeed distance should equal the dispense position. An exception is
if you are tearing instead of peeling. Then, the backfeed distance must be
30 dots (.150 inches) less than the dispense position. However, you will
have a 30 dot non-print zone on your supply. The 30-dot difference
accounts for improper tearing of butt cut supplies, because you do not want
any exposed adhesive under the printhead.
Example
{I,G,2 p }
Enables extended backfeed and cuts any tags remaining between the knife
and printhead and moves the supply backwards so the next tag is
underneath the printhead. Using cut mode 4, you do not have to press
FEED/CUT to cut the last tag.
Example
{I,G,1,50,10 p }
Enables backfeed and sets the dispense position to 0.25 inches (50/203)
and the backfeed distance to 0.05 inches (10/203).
Configuring the Printer 2-23
Special Considerations When Using Backfeed
Make a note of the following items:
¨ Be careful when tearing supplies, because the adhesive can adhere to
the printhead or platen roller.
¨ Backfeed affects each label in the on-demand mode or the first and last
label of the batch in continuous mode.
¨ When backfeed is enabled and multiple batches are sent, the printer may
not backfeed between each batch.
¨ Backfeed should only be used when you need to advance labels to the
desired dispense point.
¨ Backfeed does not interfere with the supply, print, or margin positions
you have set.
¨ If the supply inter-label gap is not between .07 inch to .15 inch (14 to 30
dots), you must adjust the dispense position and backfeed distance
accordingly.
See the following graphic for a representation of the following adjustments:
dispense position, backfeed distance, supply position, print position, and
margin position.
Contact Technical Support if you have problems adjusting where the format
prints on the supply.
2-24 Configuring the Printer
Defining the Memory Configuration Packet
Use the memory configuration packet (M) to customize the size of your
printer’s buffers, which gives you greater flexibility in your formats.
Memory must be allocated in 1/2K increments. The memory configuration
packet does not accept decimals, so enter whole numbers. Multiply the
amount to reallocate (in K) by 10. For example,
To reallocate (in K)
Enter this amount
1
10
1.5
15
2
20
2.5
25
153
1530
229.5
2295
Each buffer’s allocated memory remains in effect until that buffer is
reallocated. For this reason, you may want to reallocate all the buffers
when reallocating any buffer. If you reallocate more memory than you have
available, you will receive an error.
Syntax
{I,M,buffer,de vice,buffer_size p }
M1. M
Memory Configuration Packet
M2. buffer
Buffer type. Options:
D
Downloadable Fonts
F
Format
I
Image
R
Receive
T
Transmit
V
Scalable (vector) fonts
M3. device
Storage type. Options:
F
Flash Memory
R
Volatile RAM
Note:
You cannot reallocate flash memory.
Configuring the Printer 2-25
M4. buffer size
Buffer size in 1/10K ranges. The following table lists the configured buffer
sizes and min-max values for your printer. The printer’s configuration is
stored in non-volatile RAM and retained when you turn off the printer. The
max. value for each buffer is listed; however, the sum of all the buffers
cannot exceed the max. available memory of the printer.
Buffer
Type
9825*
9855/9860
Transmit
Volatile
2K (.5K- 4K)
64K (.5K- 128K)
Receive
Volatile
8K (2K- 64K)
64K (2K- 128K)
Image
Volatile
330K (41.5K- 640K)
330K (41.5K- 6144K)
Downld. Fonts
Volatile
64K (8K- 640K)
64K (8K- 8192K)
Scalable Fonts
Volatile
64K (32K-640K)
384K (32K-8192K)
Formats
Volatile
64K (16K- 640K)
128K (16K- 1024K)
Internal
NA
cannot reallocate
cannot reallocate
* The 9825, 9855, and 9860 printers do not have non-volatile RAM; however, you can store formats,
fonts, and graphics in flash memory. Change the storage device of your packets to “F” instead of “N.”
Use the following table to see how much memory is available to reallocate.
RAM*
Volatile RAM
9825
1 Meg
9855/9860
8 Meg
* You cannot reallocate more memory than what is available, or you will receive an error. Memory
expansion is an option available on the 9855 and 9860 printers.
Example
{I,M,I,R,1530 p }
Stores the image buffer in volatile RAM and allocates 153K for it.
2-26 Configuring the Printer
Checking Current Buffer Sizes
Send a configuration upload packet to check the sizes of your current
buffers. See “Configuration Packet Header” for more information. After you
check your current buffer sizes you can begin reallocating memory.
If you want to increase your image buffer and you will not be using scalable
fonts, add that memory into your image buffer.
Example
{I,M,R,R,20 p
M,T,R,10 p
M,D,R,80 p
M,V,R,160 p
M,I,R,3200 p }
Receive buffer
2K
Transmit buffer
1K
Downloadable fonts
8K
Scalable fonts buffer 16K
Image buffer
320K
Make sure memory is available before adding memory to a buffer. In the
above example, if the image buffer (M,I,R,3200) was defined before the
downloadable fonts and scalable fonts buffers (M,D,R,80 and M,V,R,160)
were defined, an error would have occurred.
About Memory Buffers
Transmit Buffer
Used to send ENQ, job, and upload responses. This
buffer must be allocated as volatile (R) RAM.
Receive Buffer
Used to save data received from the host before it is
processed by the printer. Changing this buffer size
affects the amount of data the printer can receive
without using flow control. This buffer must be allocated
as volatile (R) RAM.
Image Buffer
Used to image the current format. The printers support
two 4-inch by 8-inch buffers. You can create an image
up to 16 inches long without reallocating memory. The
Image Buffer is cleared after a printer reset.
Configuring the Printer 2-27
Use the formula below to calculate the approximate
image buffer size.
21K x Length (for 203 dpi) OR
46K x Length (for 300 dpi)
Length is the length of your label in inches.
203 DPI Example
21K x 25 = 525
(Multiply by 10 and round up to the next whole number if
necessary)
525K x 10 = 5250
Enter 5250 for your Image buffer.
300 DPI Example
46K x 26.75 = 1230.5
(Multiply by 10 and round up to the next whole number if
necessary)
1230.5 x 10 = 12305
Enter 12305 for your Image buffer.
Format Buffer
Used to store formats, batch data, and graphics. Use
the following formula to calculate the required format
buffer size:
Linecount x 50/1024
Linecount is the number of lines in your format packet
including the format header and all the options.
The result of the above calculation is in kilobytes.
Formats remain in memory when you turn off the printer.
2-28 Configuring the Printer
Downloadable
Fonts Buffer
Used to store downloaded soft (bitmapped or TrueType)
fonts. To determine the size of your downloadable
fonts, send a font packet. For TrueType fonts, the file
size, in bytes, is the minimum amount needed in this
buffer. See “Using the Font Packet” for more
information.
Scalable (Vector)
Fonts Buffer
Used to image the scalable or downloaded (TrueType or
bitmapped) font characters. Increasing this buffer size
allows more characters to be saved in cache memory,
so the characters do not have to be re-built the next
time they are printed. Use 0 if you are not using
scalable/TrueType fonts. This buffer must be allocated
as volatile (R) RAM.
The printer does not print the fonts if there is not
enough memory in this buffer to image them.
Configuring the Printer 2-29
Buffer Worksheet
Make copies of this page to use as a buffer worksheet.
Buffer Allocation Considerations
Keep these items in mind when allocating memory.
¨ Do not allocate more memory than what is available.
¨ Free memory from one buffer before you add it to another buffer.
¨ Reallocate all the buffers if you need to reallocate any buffer.
¨ Send all buffer (re)allocations in one packet. The printer evaluates each
individual buffer allocation separately. If one buffer allocation is invalid,
the entire packet is invalid. If you define a buffer size that exceeds the
maximum value, an error occurs. However, no information is lost.
¨ Whenever the printer accepts a memory configuration packet, it takes
effect immediately, causing a printer reset. Any information contained in
the buffers is lost. Resend your formats, batches, graphics, or fonts to
the printer.
2-30 Configuring the Printer
¨ If you remap your image buffer, make sure the length and width specified
in your format header are not too large for the current image buffer. In
other words, if you remap for a 4 x 4 inch label, you cannot print a 4 x 6
inch label without receiving an error, until you change your format
header or increase your image buffer.
M e m o r y C o n s i d e r a t i o n s w i t h D o w n l o a d e d T r u e Ty p e F o n t s
¨ The size of the TrueType font file, in bytes, is the minimum amount of
memory you must have available in the downloadable fonts buffer.
¨ The scalable (vector) fonts buffer is used to image the downloaded fonts
(TrueType). If you are using several downloaded TrueType fonts, you
may need 100K or more in this buffer. The printer does not print the
fonts if there is not enough memory in the scalable (vector) fonts buffer.
¨ To use large point sizes (greater than 60 point), you must reconfigure
memory and increase the size of the scalable (vector) fonts buffer.
¨ Font storage is limited on the 9825 printer, because there is no extended
memory available.
Formatting Flash Memory
Before you send packets to flash memory, it must be formatted first. This is
required once during initial printer setup. From the Main Menu, select
Setup, Flash Memory, then Format Flash. The process takes a few minutes.
Note:
When you format flash memory, all packets (formats, fonts,
graphics, etc.) stored in flash memory are deleted and must be
resent to the printer.
Configuring the Printer 2-31
Flash Memory Guidelines
Use these basic guidelines for storing files in flash memory.
¨ Your printer may have volatile RAM (packets deleted when the printer is
turned off), non-volatile RAM (packets saved when the printer is turned
off), and flash memory (packets saved when the printer is turned off).
Each printer has a different limit of available memory.
¨ Before you save any packets in flash memory, you must format flash
memory first. See “Formatting Flash Memory” for more information.
¨ Formats, graphics, and check digits can be saved in flash (but they are
also duplicated in RAM). Any packets saved in flash cannot exceed the
memory available in RAM.
¨ Packets with the same number should not be added to flash memory. If
two packets with the same number are stored in flash, only the last
packet sent can be used. For example, if you send the following packets
to flash memory, only the “Textiles” format can be used.
{F,10,A,F,E,300,200,"UPC"p}
{F,10,A,F,E,300,200,"Textiles"p}
¨ Fonts are stored differently in flash. For example, the 9825 printer has
very limited flash font memory and one TrueType font may exceed that
limit. For TrueType or double-byte fonts, use a 9855 or 9860 printer with
the memory expansion option.
¨ There is not a 1-to-1 ratio between the memory in your printer and the
memory in your PC. For example, a file that is 5K in Windows may
require 15-20K to store in your printer.
¨ When using graphics, use the lowest-resolution graphic possible. If your
printer uses a 203 dpi printhead, the graphic’s resolution should be 150
to 200 dpi. In fact, 96 dpi may work. Try to create the smallest file size
possible.
¨ Use temporary storage for graphics that are only used once or twice.
However, if you have a logo that is used on multiple formats, save the
graphic in flash. Once again, try to create the smallest file size possible
for your graphic.
2-32 Configuring the Printer
¨ Each line in a packet requires the same amount of memory. The smaller
the format, the less memory required to save it.
¨ Flash memory cannot be reallocated.
Clearing Packets from Memory
You may want to remove packets from the printer to increase memory
storage capacity or if the formats/fonts are no longer needed. In some
cases, turning the printer off may clear the packets from memory. If not,
send a format clear packet.
Syntax
{header,packet#,action,device p }
1. header
Identifies the packet. Options:
A
Check Digit Scheme
F
Format
G
Graphic
W
Font
2. packet#
Identification number of the packet to clear (1 to 999) or font number
(0 to 9999). 0 is for all fonts.
3. action
Action. Enter C to clear the packet.
4. device
Storage device. Options:
F
Flash
R
Volatile RAM
Example
{F,1,C,R p }
Clears Format #1 from volatile RAM.
Configuring the Printer 2-33
Using the Font Packet
You can use a font packet to add or clear downloaded fonts from memory,
upload your font buffer, or upload the cell size information for a particular
font. The font packet is useful when you are downloading fonts. If you are
using downloaded fonts, the font number and the number of bytes each
downloaded font uses is listed.
This packet does not list the number of bytes the standard printer fonts use.
Use the MONARCH® MPCL Toolbox Font Utility (available on our Web site)
to create the font header and data. Refer to the online help for more
information.
Syntax
{W,font#,action,device,data_length,data_record p }
W1. W
Writable Font Header.
W2. font#
The font identifier from 0 to 9999.
0 is for all fonts. 1 - 5 digits is the font number.
Example: 3 is the standard printer font, Bold.
W3. action
Action. Options:
A
Adds the specified font.
C
Clears all or specified fonts, except ones in flash.
H
Uploads font size information.
M
Uploads font memory usage information.
Note:
C does not clear (erase) fonts saved in the printer’s flash memory.
You must format flash memory to erase fonts from the printer’s
flash memory. However, when you format flash memory, ALL fonts
saved in the printer’s flash memory are deleted.
W4. device
Device. Options:
F
Flash
R
Volatile RAM
Z
All devices (use for upload).
W5. data_length
(optional)
The length of the font data. The range is 68 to 16384.
If you are creating fonts, you need to have font data included with this
packet.
W6. data_
record
(optional)
Multiple data records define the font. The first character is either an
H (hex) or an R (run-length), referring to the algorithm. The rest of the
record is up to 2710 characters of font data in double quotes. Separate the
algorthm and the data with a comma, and end the record with p .
2-34 Configuring the Printer
Example
{W,0,M,R p }
Selects all fonts and checks the memory usage in RAM. The printer returns
the following to the host:
{W,0,M,R p
Number of bytes free, Number of bytes used p }
Example
{W,0,H,Z p }
Selects all fonts and uploads the font size information for any downloaded
fonts.
The 9855 printer returns the following to the host:
{W,0,H,Z p
Font Style
Font Name
0,1,0,"Standard",0,0,0,14,22,14,22,3 p
Spacing
0,1,1,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
Baseline
0,1,437,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
Cell Width
0,1,850,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
Cell Height
0,1,945,"X5 Standard",1,0,0,15,24,16,24,0 p
0,2,0,"Reduced",0,0,0,7,14,7,14,1 p
Nominal Width
0,2,1,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
0,2,437,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
Nominal Height
0,2,850,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
0,2,945,"X5 Reduced",1,0,0,7,16,7,14,0 p
0,3,0,"Bold",0,0,0,24,34,24,34,3 p
Inter-Character Gap
0,3,945,"X5 Bold",1,0,0,30,48,26,36,0 p
0,4,0,"OCRA",0,0,0,13,24,13,24,3 p
0,5,945,"X5 OCRA",1,0,0,16,26,15,26,3 p
Type
0,5,0,"HR1",0,0,0,12,20,12,20,2 p
0,6,945,"X5 HR1",1,0,0,12,20,15,26,2 p
Printhead Density
0,6,0,"HR2",0,0,0,10,16,10,16,1 p
0,7,945,"X5 HR2",1,0,0,9,15,15,26,1 p
0,10,0,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p Symbol Set
0,10,1,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
0,10,437,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
0,10,850,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0 p
0,11,0,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
Configuring the Printer 2-35
0,11,1,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
0,11,437,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
0,11,850,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0 p
0,15,0,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0 p
0,15,1,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0 p
0,15,437,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,22,28,9,14,0 p
0,15,850,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,22,28,9,14,0 p
0,16,0,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0 p
0,16,1,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0 p
0,16,437,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,29,35,12,18,0 p
0,16,850,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,29,35,12,18,0 p
0,17,0,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0 p
0,17,1,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0 p
0,17,437,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,33,40,13,22,0 p
0,17,850,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,33,40,13,22,0 p
0,18,0,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0 p
0,18,1,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0 p
0,18,437,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,49,59,20,31,0
0,18,850,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,49,59,20,31,0
0,510,0,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0 p
0,510,1,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0 p
0,510,437,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,22,28,9,14,0 p
0,510,850,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,22,28,9,14,0 p
0,511,0,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0 p
0,511,1,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0 p
0,511,437,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,29,35,12,18,0 p
0,511,850,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,29,35,12,18,0 p
0,512,0,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0 p
0,512,1,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0 p
0,512,437,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,33,40,13,22,0
0,512,850,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,33,40,13,22,0
0,513,0,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0 p
0,513,1,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0 p
0,513,437,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,49,59,20,31,0
0,513,850,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,49,59,20,31,0
0,70,0,"Paxar15",1,0,7,32,42,22,42,0 p
0,71,0,"Paxar18",1,0,9,34,51,27,51,0 p
2-36 Configuring the Printer
p
p
p
p
p
p
0,72,0,"Nafta15",1,0,6,32,42,32,41,0
0,73,0,"Nafta18",1,0,8,48,51,46,50,0
0,21,0,"ZIAFont",0,0,0,5,9,5,9,1 p
0,22,0,"ZIBFont",0,0,0,7,11,7,11,2 p
0,23,0,"ZICFont",0,0,0,10,18,10,18,2
0,24,0,"ZIDFont",0,0,0,10,18,10,18,2
0,25,0,"ZIEFont",0,0,0,15,28,15,28,5
0,26,0,"ZIFFont",0,0,0,13,26,13,26,3
0,27,0,"ZIGFont",0,0,0,40,60,40,60,8
0,50,0,"EffSwissBold",1,1,92248 p
0,56,0,"PaxSymbols",1,1,12260 p }
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
* The CG Triumvirateä typefaces are trademarks of Monotype Imaging, Inc.
Fonts 21-27 are only for the 9855 MLIä printer.
Note:
Fonts 510, 511, 512, and 513 are the same as fonts 15, 16, 17, and
18.
Spacing
Monospaced (0) or proportional (1).
Type
Bitmapped (0) or scalable (1).
Baseline
Bottom of the font.
Cell Width
Horizontal number of dots to contain the widest
character.
Cell Height
Vertical number of dots to contain the tallest character.
Nominal Width
Average width for lower-case letters.
Nominal Height
Average height for lower-case letters.
Inter-Character
Gap
Default spacing between characters in monospaced
fonts.
Printhead Density
Displays whether a 203 (0) dpi or 300 (1) dpi printhead
is used. The scalable font (font 50) does not display
which printhead (203 dpi or 300 dpi) is used.
Configuring the Printer 2-37
Uploading Format Header Information
You can upload format header information from the formats in memory to
check the supply length and width for each format. Formats stored in Flash
memory are loaded into RAM when the 9855 or 9860 printer boots.
However, the formats remain in Flash memory when you turn off the printer.
Syntax
{header,format#,action,device p }
F1. header
Format Header
F2. format#
Format number from 0 to 999. 0 is for all formats in memory.
F3. action
Action. Options:
A
Adds the specified format
C
Clears the specified format
H
Uploads format header information
F4. device
Device. Options:
F
Flash
R
Volatile RAM
Z
All devices (use for upload)
Example
{F,0,H,Z p }
Selects all formats in memory and returns the following:
Example
{F,0,H,Z p
Fmt_1,406,406 p
Fmt_10,324,406 p
Fmt_15,812,812 p
Fmt_20,305,609 p
Fmt_25,1218,406 p }
Displays the format number, supply length and supply width (in dots) for
each format in memory.
Example
{F,1,H,Z p }
Selects format1 and returns the following to the host:
{F,1,H,Z p
Fmt_1,406,406 p }
Displays the supply length and supply width (in dots) for format1.
2-38 Configuring the Printer
D e f i n i n g a Ve r i f i e r C o n f i g u r a t i o n P a c k e t
With the verifier configuration packet you can customize the verifier for each
format you print. You can select which bar codes to scan, the acceptable
ANSI grade levels, quiet zone, X-dimension range, and more. You can
download the Monarch® Verifier Configuration Tool (from our Web site) to
create this packet or follow the syntax below.
Syntax
{V,format#,action,device,"name" p
D,"vfr_comds" p }
V1. V
Verifier Configuration Packet.
V2. format#
Number from 0 to 999 to identify the format number that corresponds to
this particular verifier configuration packet. However, you can assign a
verifier configuration packet to any format even if the format number is not
changed. See “Defining Verifier Fields” in Chapter 3 for more information.
Note:
You can specify up to 50 different verifier configurations for your
formats.
V3. action
Action. Enter A to add a verifier configuration.
V4. device
Storage device. Options:
F
Flash. Stores the verifier configuration in the printer.
Packets stored in flash memory are saved when the
power is turned off.
T
Temporary. Passes the packet through the printer
and stores the packet in the verifier. Packets stored
in temporary memory are lost when the power is
turned off.
V5. “name”
Packet name, 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation marks. The name
you enter here is shown as a custom configuration on the menu for MODE.
Refer to your verifier’s Operating Instructions (available on our Web site)
for more information.
D1. D
Non-Printable Text/Data Field.
D2. “vfr_comds”
Verifier commands. Must be enclosed within quotation marks. Refer to the
SV Series Operator’s Guide for the complete list of verifier commands.
Configuring the Printer 2-39
Example
{V,1,A,T,"BEAMON" p
D,"~LV02" p }
The verifier’s configuration packet ID is “1" and named ”BEAMON." The
verifier packet is added to temporary memory. It uses Mode 2.
Defining a Network Console Packet
The network console packet is only valid on a 9855 or 9860 Version 2.0 (or
greater) printer containing MonarchNet2ä software for the Monarch® 7410ä
or Monarch® 7411ä Ethernet Print Server. Use the network console packet
to send console commands directly to the network card via the printer’s
serial port. If the network card does not appear to be communicating with
the printer, you can use the network console packet to change the SSID, IP
Address, etc. of the network card.
Syntax
{N,number,action,device,"name" p
C,"con_comds" p }
N1. N
Network Console Packet.
N2. number
Number from 0 to 999 to identify the network console packet.
N3. action
Action. Enter A to add a verifier configuration.
N4. device
Storage device. Enter T to pass the packet through the printer and store
the packet in the network card.
N5. “name”
Packet name, 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation marks.
C1. C
Command field.
C2. “con_comds” Console commands. Must be enclosed within quotation marks. Each
command must be on a separate line. The maximum number of characters
per command is 100. Refer to the list of console commands in the
MonarchNet2 Operating Instructions for more information.
Note:
Example
The maximum number of commands per packet is twenty five (25).
{N,1,A,T,"mystore" p
C,"set ip me static"
C,"init" p
C,"exit" p }
p
Sends the network console packet 1 “my store” directly to the network card
(T) and sets the IP method to static for determining the IP Addresses. The
Init and Exit commands must be used to save changes and initialize the
network card.
2-40 Configuring the Printer
Defining the RFID Setup Packet for UHF
This packet is only valid on 9855 RFID printers. Use the RFID setup packet
(X) to set the protocol, write attempts, read power, write power, and signal
adjust.
Note:
Refer to the RFID Setup Guide and Supply Chart for the read and
write power settings and signal adjustment based on your RFID
supplies.
Syntax
{I,X,protocol,write_attem,read_power,
write_power,signal_adjust¦}
X1. X
RFID Setup Packet
X2. protocol
Select the UHF protocol. The default is 0. Options:
1
2
3
0 C1Gen2 (Class 1 Gen 2)
C1Gen1 96 (Class 1 Gen 1 96-bit)
C1Gen1 EPC64/96 (Class 1 Gen 1 EPC64/96)
EM4122
X3. write_attem
The number of times the interrogator tries to program the RFID tag in the
RF Field. The range is 1 – 5. The default is 3.
X4. read_power
The amount of power to read an RFID tag. The range is 1 – 25. For the
Japanese frequency, the range is 1 – 10. The default is 18.
X5. write_power
The amount of power to write (program) an RFID tag. The range is 1 – 25.
For the Japanese frequency, the range is 1 – 10. The default is 18.
X6. signal_adjust The strength of the RF Field emitted by the printer’s antenna. The higher
the value, the greater the power of the RF Field. The signal adjustment
varies depending on the selected protocol. The range is 2 – 10. The
default is 2.
Example
{I,X,0,3,10,10,6¦}
Uses the default protocol (Class 1 Gen 2), sets the number of write attempts
to 3, sets the read and write power to 10 and the signal adjustment to 6.
Configuring the Printer 2-41
Defining the RFID Setup Packet for HF
This packet is only valid on 9855 RFID printers. Use the RFID setup packet
(X) to set the protocol, write attempts and attenuation.
Note:
Refer to the HF Setup Guide and Supply Chart for the protocol and
attenuation settings based on your RFID supplies.
Syntax
{I,X,protocol,write_attem,attenuation¦}
X1. X
RFID Setup Packet
X2. protocol
Select the HF protocol. The default is 0. Options:
0
1
2
3
AUTO-Select
TI ISO15693
NXP ISO15693
I-CODE UID
X3. write_attem
The number of times the interrogator tries to program the RFID tag in the
RF Field. The range is 1 – 4. The default is 3.
X4. attenuation
The amount of power to read an RFID tag. The range is 1 – 4. The default
is 2.
Example
{I,X,0,3,2¦}
Uses the default protocol (AUTO-Select), sets the number of write attempts
to 3 and the attenuation to 2.
2-42 Configuring the Printer
DEFINING FIELDS
3
This chapter provides a reference for defining
¨
the format header
¨
text and constant text
¨
bar code fields
¨
line and box fields
¨
verifier fields
¨
RFID data fields.
Defining Fields 3-1
Defining the Format Header
A Format Header begins a format file.
Syntax
{F,format#,action,device,measure,length,
width,"name" p
F1. F
Format Header.
F2. format#
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the format.
F3. action
Action. Enter A to add the format to the printer.
F4. device
Format storage device. Options:
F Flash (must be formatted first. See “Formatting Flash”
and “Flash Memory Guidelines” in Chapter 2 for more information.)
R Volatile RAM
F5. measure
Unit of measure. E (English - in 1/100 inches), M (Metric -in 1/10 mm), or
G (Graphic - in dots). See the following table.
Printer
F6. length
Unit of
Measure
Supply
Length
Supply
Width
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
75-1600
191-4064
152-3248
32-400
81-1016
62-812
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
75-1200
191-3048
225-3600
32-400
81-1016
96-1200
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
75-1300
191-3302
152-2639
225-3900
75-400
191-1016
152-812
225-1200
Supply length in selected units. Measure supply from the leading edge of
one label to the leading edge of the next label. Use the table above.
Note:
You can create longer images if you reallocate memory to increase
your image buffer. See "Defining the Memory Packet" in Chapter 2
for more information.
F7. width
Width, from left to right, in selected units. Use the table above.
F8. “name”
Format name (optional), 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation marks.
The range is 1 to 256 characters for the 9855 XML-enabled printer.
3-2 Defining Fields
Example
{F,1,A,R,E,300,200,"TEXTILES" p
Adds Format 1 (“TEXTILES”) to the printer. It uses a three inch long by two
inch wide label.
D e f i n i n g Te x t F i e l d s
Create a separate definition for each text field. If text falls on two lines,
each line of text requires a separate definition.
Syntax
T,field#,# of char,fix/var,row,column,
gap,font,hgt mag,wid mag,color,alignment,
char rot,field rot,sym set p
T1. T
Text Field.
T2. field#
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify this field.
T3. # of char
Maximum number of printed characters (0 to 2710) in the field.
T4. fix/var
Fixed or variable length field. Options:
F Fixed length
V Variable length
T5. row
For monospaced fonts, distance from bottom of print area to the pivot
point. The pivot point varies depending on how text is justified.
For proportionally spaced fonts, distance from bottom of
print area to baseline of characters in field.
Defining Fields 3-3
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
T6. column
Distance from the left edge of the print area to the pivot
point to find the column location. Use previous table for
values.
T7. gap
Number of dots between characters 203 dpi (or 300 dpi
for 9855/9860 printers). Range: 0 to 99.
Note:
For monospaced fonts, the additional spacing is added to the
existing inter-character gap. This is also true for proportionally
spaced fonts, but remember that the inter-character gap varies
with character combinations.
Any number other than 0 or the default number affects your field width.
Default spacing:
Standard
Reduced
Bold
OCRA-like
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
3-4 Defining Fields
3
1
3
3
dots
dot
dots
dots
varies with each letter
varies with each letter
T8. font
Style of font. Options:
1
Standard
2
Reduced
3
Bold
4
OCRA-like
5
HR1
6
HR2
10
11
15
16
17
18
50
56
CG Triumvirateä Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
7 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
9 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
11 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
15 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
EFF Swiss Bold (TrueType® Scalable)
PaxarSymbols (version 5.0 or greater)
Or a valid downloaded font selector number.
Fonts 5 and 6 are for numeric data only.
The CG Triumvirateä typefaces support only the ANSI and DOS Code
Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets. The scalable font does not support Code
Page 1256 (Arabic). See Appendix C for more information.
T9. hgt mag
Height magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). Use a magnifier of 1 with proportionally spaced fonts,
because characters lose smoothness at higher magnifications. See
Appendix B, “Fonts,” for more information about fonts.
T10. wid mag
Width magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). Proportionally spaced fonts do not have a set width. To
estimate the size of your field, use the letter “W” for the widest field or an
“L” for an average width field. Find your selected font and the desired
width in Appendix B, “Fonts.”
Note:
T11. color
To use large point sizes (greater than 60 point), you must
reconfigure memory and increase the size of the scalable (vector)
fonts buffer.
There are two types of field color overlay attributes:
Transparent
Opaque
The overlay field (text or constant text) does not block out
(or “erase”) existing fields.
The overlay field blocks out (or “erases”) existing fields.
Options for standard printer fonts:
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
D/R/W
Opaque, Normal, White, Normal
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
Options for scalable fonts:
A/N
Opaque, Normal, Black, Bold
B/O
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
E/S
Opaque, Italics, Black, Bold
F/T
Opaque, Italics, Black, Normal
Note:
Solid black print should not exceed 30% on a given square inch of
the label, or the printhead life may be decreased.
Defining Fields 3-5
Line field
blocked out by
opaque field
using attribute B
Line field not
blocked out by
transparent field
using attribute O
Field placement in the packet is an important consideration when using
field color attributes. If a line field is defined before the overlay (text or
constant text) field, the line field is blocked out by the overlay field,
depending on the overlay field’s color attribute. If a line field is defined
after the overlay field, the line field is not blocked out by the overlay field,
regardless of the overlay field’s color attribute.
T12. alignment
Options:
L
Align on left side of field.
C
Center text within field (monospaced fonts only)
R
Align on right side of field (monospaced fonts only)
B
Align at midpoint of field
E
Align at endpoint of the field
Use L, B, or E for any font.
T13. char rot
Character rotation. The field or supply does not rotate, only the characters
do. Options:
0
Top of character points to top of field
1
Top of character points to left of field
2
Top of character points to bottom of field
3
Top of character points to right of field
3-6 Defining Fields
T14. field rot
Field rotation. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not just the characters.
Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies depending on how text
is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot point. Options:
0
Top of field points to top of supply
1
Top of field points to left of supply
2
Top of field points to bottom of supply
3
Top of field points to right of supply
T15. sym set
Symbol set. Use 0 for the Internal Symbol Set. For scalable or TrueTypeâ
fonts, use:
1
ANSI Symbol Set
100
Macintosh
101
Wingdings
102
Unicode (user input) for particular mapping
103
BIG5 (user input) for Unicode mapping
104
GB2312 (user input) for Unicode mapping
105
SJIS (user input) for Unicode mapping
Code Page 932 (Japanese Shift-JIS)
106
GB2312 (user input) for GB2312 mapping
Code Page 936 (Simplified Chinese)
107
BIG5 (user input) for BIG5 mapping
Code Page 950 (Traditional Chinese)
110
Unicode UTF-8
437
DOS Code Page 437 (Domestic)
850
DOS Code Page 850 (International)
852
DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
855
DOS Code Page 855 (Russian)
857
DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
860
DOS Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
1250 Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
1251 Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
1252 Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
1253 Code Page 1253 (Greek)
1254 Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
1255 Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
1256 Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
1257 Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
1258 Code Page 1258 (Vietnam)
Defining Fields 3-7
Note:
Example
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font (font#50) does not support Code Page 1256
(Arabic). Code pages 852-860 and 1250-1258 are for downloaded
TrueType fonts or the scalable font. Code pages 102-110 require
the memory expansion option and a downloaded International
TrueType font. TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally
specific; therefore, all code pages may not be supported in a given
font. See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/ Code Pages” for more
information.
If using symbol set 110 (Unicode UTF-8), set the MPCL control
characters (start of header, etc.) to decimal values between 0 and
128; otherwise, errors may occur with the Unicode data entered.
See Chapter 2, "Configuring the Printer" for more information
about the MPCL control characters.
T,2,10,V,250,80,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
Defines a text field (field #2) with a variable length of up to 10 characters.
The field begins at row 250, column 80. There is no additional gap between
characters, and the Standard font is used without any additional
magnification. The printing is black on white and centered. No field or
character rotation is used. The internal symbol set is used.
Defining Bar Code Fields
Each bar code field requires a separate definition.
Syntax
B,field#,# of char,fix/var,row,column,
font,density,height,text,alignment,field rot,
type,sep_height,segment p
B1. B
Bar Code Field.
B2. field#
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify this field.
B3. # of char
Maximum number of characters. If the bar code uses a check digit, allow
an extra character for the check digit. The actual maximum number of
characters is limited by the size of the label and bar code density. Range:
0 to 2710.
3-8 Defining Fields
For the GS1 DataBarä bar code, the maximum number of characters varies
based on the specific GS1 DataBar type.
Bar Code Type (B13)
Maximum Number of Characters
1 - GS1 DataBar 14
13 - no check digit input
2 - GS1 DataBar 14 Truncated
13 - no check digit input
3 - GS1 DataBar 14 Stacked
13 - no check digit input
4 - GS1 DataBar 14 Stacked Omni
directional
13 - no check digit input
5 - GS1 DataBar Limited
13 - no check digit input
6 - GS1 DataBar Expanded
*
7 - UPCA
11 - no check digit input
8 - UPCE
10 - no check digit input
9 - EAN13
12 - no check digit input
10 - EAN8
7 - no check digit input
11 - UCC/EAN128 and CC A/B
*
12 - UCC/EAN128 and CC C
*
* For more information, refer to the GS1 General Specification.
Note:
If not enough characters are entered, the bar code pads to the left
with zeros. If too many characters are entered, unpredictable
results may occur.
If FNC1 (function 1) is supported, use ~029 in the batch data to
invoke it.
Quick Response (QR Code) can use 299 to 2710 characters. DataMatrix
can use up to 2710 numeric characters or 2335 alphanumeric characters.
See Appendix A, "Samples" for more information.
Data Type
Numeric Data
Alphanumeric data
8-byte data
Kanji data
Note:
Model 1
1167
707
486
299
Model 2
2710
2710
2710
1817
The maximum number of characters depends on the selected level
of error correction. As you increase the error correction level, the
maximum number of characters decreases.
Defining Fields 3-9
B4. fix/var
Fixed (F) or variable (V) length field.
Bar Code
Number of Characters
Fixed or Variable
UPCA
12
F
UPCA+2
14
F
UPCA+5
17
F
UPCA+Price CD
12
F
UPCE
7
F
UPCE+2
9
F
UPCE+5
12
F
8
F
EAN8+2
10
F
EAN8+5
13
F
EAN13
13
F
EAN13+2
15
F
EAN13+5
18
F
EAN13+Price CD
13
F
9 or 11
F
Interleaved 2 of 5 or Interleaved
I 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar
0 - 2710
F or V
Code 39 (w/ or w/o CD) or MOD43
0 - 2710
F or V
Codabar (NW7)
0 - 2710
F or V
Code 128
0 - 2710
F or V
Code 16K
0 - 2710
V
Code 93
0 - 2710
V
0 - 14
F or V
0 - 2710
F or V
0 to 93 (alphanumeric)
0 to 128 (numeric)
F or V
0 to 2335 (alphanumeric)
0 to 2710 (numeric)
V
1167 - 2710 (numeric)
707 - 2710 (alphanumeric)
V
EAN8
POSTNET
MSI
PDF 417
Maxicode*
Data Matrix*
Quick Response*
* For more information about MaxiCode, Data Matrix, and Quick Response, see Appendix A, “Samples.”
3-10 Defining Fields
Bar Code
Number of Characters
Fixed or Variable
Aztec
0 - 2710
F or V
GS1 DataBar
0 - 2710
F or V
B5. row
Distance from bottom of the print area to the pivot point of the field. The
pivot point varies, depending on how the field is justified. Pivot points:
Left/Center/Right-Justified Fields
Balanced Fields
End-Justified Fields
Remember to include text or numbers that may appear
with the bar code for the row measurement.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
B6. column
Defining Fields 3-11
Distance from the lower left edge of the print area to
the pivot point. Use the previous table for values.
Allow a minimum of 1/10 inch between the scan edge
of bar code and label edges or other data.
If using the optional verifier, allow a minimum of 1.3
inches (33 mm) between the bar code and the top of
the label. See “Determining the Print Area” in
Chapter 1 for more information.
B7. font
Bar code.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
22
23
31
32
33
35
36
37
38
40
41
44
50
B8. density
Bar code density. Use the following table for other bar codes.
3-12 Defining Fields
Options:
UPCA
UPCE
Interleaved 2 of 5
Code 39 (no check digit)
Codabar
EAN8
EAN13
Code 128
MSI
UPCA +2
UPCA +5
UPCE +2
UPCE +5
EAN8 +2
EAN8 +5
EAN13 +2
EAN13 +5
POSTNET
Code 93
Code 16K
PDF417
MaxiCode
Data Matrix (ECC-200)
Quick Response
Aztec
GS1 DataBar
Code 39 (MOD 43 check digit)
UPCA & Price CD
EAN13 & Price CD
Interleaved 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar
203 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Element
(dots/mils)
Narrow to
Wide Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Available
Char
Set
UPCA +2/+5
Price CD
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
11 or 12
14/17
1, 5, 6, 7 or 8 0 to 9
UPCE
+2/+5
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
6 or 7
9/12
1, 5, 6, 7 or 8 0 to 9
EAN8
+2/+5
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
7 or 8
10/13
1, 5, 6,7 or 8
0 to 9
EAN13+2/+5
Price CD
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
12 or 13
15/18
1, 5, 6,7 or 8
0 to 9
Interleaved
2 of 5
or I2of5
with Barrier
Bar
1
2
3
1.1
2.1
3.2
21/103.4
12/59.1
7/34.5
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
0 to 2710
8
0 to 9
4
5
6
4.2
5.6
6.3
6/29.6
4/19.7
4/19.7
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.5
7
8
9
7.5
8.8
9.6
3/14.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
1:3.0
1:2.3
1:2.0
10
11
12
11.2
11.0
12.7
2/9.9
2/9.9
2/9.9
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
13
14.5
2/9.9
1:2.0
(Code 39 or
MOD43
(Extended
Code 39)
1
2
3
4
6
7
11
12
20
1.4
1.7
3.5
4.2
6.3
7.0
3.9
12.7
3.0
10/49.3
8/39.4
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
2/9.9
4/19.7
1/4.9
5/24.6
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.2
0 to 2710
8
SPACE
$%*+-./
0 to 9
A to Z
Codabar
(NW7)
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
2.1
3.0
4.6
5.1
8.4
9.2
10.1
8/39.4
6/29.6
4/19.7
4/19.7
2/9.9
2/9.9
2/9.9
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
0 to 26
8
$+-./
0 to 9
a to d
Code 128
or
Code 16K
4
6
8
20
3.5/7.0
4.4/8.7
5.8/11.7
8.7/11.5
5/24.6
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
N/A
0 to 2710
8
00H to 7FH
Note:
The start (*) and stop (+) characters are automatically added for
Code 39. Code 39, density 12, produces a one-dot narrow bar. This
density is intended for special U.S.P.S. ACT-tag applications only.
Synthetic supplies are recommended to produce scannable bar
codes.
Defining Fields 3-13
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Element
(dots/mils)
Narrow to
Wide Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Available
Char Set
CODE 93
3
4
5
7
10
3.7
4.5
5.6
7.5
11.2
6/29.6
5/24.6
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
N/A
0 to 2710
8
00H to
7FH
MSI
4
5
7
4.2
5.6
7.2
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
1:2.0
1:2.0
1:2.5
0 to 14
8
0 to 9
POSTNET
0 (fixed at
4.3 cpi)
24/118.2
10/49.3
4/19.7 (5
dot gap)
0,5,6,9 or
11
8
0 to 9
MaxiCode
7
N/A
N/A
N/A
99
8
00H to
FFH
Element
Width
(dot/mils)
Row Height
(dots/mils)
2/9.8
2/9.8
2/9.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
4/19.7
4/19.7
4/19.7
2/9.8
4/19.7
6/29.6
3/14.8
6/29.6
9/44.3
4/19.7
8/39.4
12/59.1
Bar Code
Type
PDF417
Density
Selector
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Bar Code Type
Quick Response
(QR Code) Models 1 and 2
Note:
3-14 Defining Fields
Density
Selector
0
Aspect
Ratio
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
Data
Length
0 to 2709
Appearance
Codes
Available
8
Data Length
Model 1: 0 - 1167 Numeric;0 - 707 Alphanumeric;
0 - 486 (8-bit); 0 - 299 (Kanji)
Model 2: 0 - 2710 Numeric, Alphanumeric and 8-bit;
0 - 1817 Kanji
Values in bold indicate the default.
Char Set
00H to
FFH
203 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Data Matrix
Square
symbols
Size
Row x Col.
Density
Selector
10 x 10
12 x 12
14 x 14
16 x 16
18 x 18
20 x 20
22 x 22
24 x 24
26 x 26
32 x 32
36 x 36
40 x 40
44 x 44
48 x 48
52 x 52
64 x 64
72 x 72
80 x 80
88 x 88
96 x 96
104 x 104
120 x 120
132 x 132
144 x 144
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
6x3
10 x 6
16 x 10
24 x 16
36 x 25
44 x 31
60 x 43
72 x 52
88 x 64
124 x 91
172 x 127
228 x 169
288 x 214
348 x 259
408 x 304
560 x 418
736 x 550
912 x 682
1152 x 862
1392 x 1042
1632 x 1222
2100 x 1573
2608 x 1954
2710 x 2335
App
Code
8
Char
Set
00H to FFH
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Bar Code
Data Matrix
Rectangular
symbols
Size
Row x Col.
8 x 18
8 x 32
12 x 26
12 x 36
16 x 36
16 x 48
Density
Selector
25
26
27
28
29
30
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
10
20
32
44
64
98
x
x
x
x
x
x
6
13
22
31
46
72
App
Code
8
Char
Set
00H to FFH
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Note:
The printers support printing a Data Matrix symbol with an
X-dimension of 13 mils or greater (3 dots @203 dpi). If you use a
denser bar code, make sure the bar code scans in your particular
application. Our “premium” supplies and increasing the print
contrast are recommended for denser bar codes. Depending on
your application, additional densities are available.
Defining Fields 3-15
203 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code Type
Density
Selector
Narrow Element
(dots/mils)
Data Length
Chart Set
GS1 DataBar
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2/9.9
3/14.8
4/19.7
5/24.6
6/29.6
7/34.5
8/39.4
0 to 2710
00H to
FFH
Aztec
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
0.0099
0.0148
0.0197
0.0247
0.0296
0.0345
0.0394
0.0444
0.0493
0.0542
0.0592
0.0641
0.069
0.074
0 to 2710
00H to
FFH
Note:
3-16 Defining Fields
Values in bold indicate the default.
300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Element
(dots/mils)
Narrow to
Wide Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Available
Char
Set
UPCA +2/+5
Price CD
2
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
11 or 12
14/17
1, 5, 6, 7 or 8 0 to 9
UPCE
+2/+5
2
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
6 or 7
9/12
1, 5, 6, 7 or 8 0 to 9
EAN8
+2/+5
2
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
7 or 8
10/13
1, 5, 6,7 or 8
0 to 9
EAN13+2/+5
Price CD
2
4
77%
103%%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
12 or 13
15/18
1, 5, 6,7 or 8
0 to 9
Interleaved
2 of 5
or I2of5
with Barrier
Bar
1
2
3
1.1
2.1
3.3
31/103.4
18/60.1
10/33.4
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
0 to 2710
8
0 to 9
4
5
6
4.2
5.6
6.2
9/30.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
1:2.4
1:3.0
1:2.5
7
8
9
8.3
9.4
9.9
4/13.3
4/13.3
4/13.3
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.3
10
11
12
11.1
11.1
13.0
3/10
3/10
3/10
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.3
13
14.3
3/10
1:2.0
(Code 39 or
MOD43
(Extended
Code 39)
1
2
3
4
6
7
11
12
20
1.4
1.7
3.4
4.7
6.2
7.1
3.8
11.5
3.1
15/50.0
12/40.0
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
3/10.0
6/20.0
2/6.7
7/23.4
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.2
0 to 2710
8
SPACE
$%*+-./
0 to 9
A to Z
Codabar
(NW7)
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
2.3
3.4
5.0
5.6
9.1
10.4
11.1
12/40.0
9/30.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
0 to 26
8
$+-./
0 to 9
a to d
Code 128
or
Code 16K
4
6
8
20
4.5
6.8
9.1
3.9
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
7/23.4
N/A
0 to 2710
8
00H to 7FH
Note:
The start (*) and stop (+) characters are automatically added for Code
39. Code 39, density 12, produces a one-dot narrow bar. This density is
intended for special U.S.P.S. ACT-tag applications only. Synthetic
supplies are recommended to produce scannable bar codes.
Defining Fields 3-17
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Element
(dots/mils)
Narrow to
Wide Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Available
Char Set
CODE 93
3
4
5
7
10
3.7
4.8
5.6
8.3
11.1
9/30.0
7/23.4
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
N/A
0 to 2710
8
00H to
7FH
MSI
4
5
7
4.2
6.2
7.5
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
1:2.0
1:2.0
1:2.3
0 to 2710
8
0 to 9
POSTNET
0 (fixed at
4.3 cpi)
24/118.2
10/49.3
6/20.0 (5
dot gap)
0,5,6,9 or
11
8
0 to 9
MaxiCode
7
N/A
N/A
N/A
99
8
00H to
FFH
Element
Width
(dot/mils)
Row Height
(dots/mils)
3/10.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
4/13.33
4/13.3
4/13.3
6/20.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
3/10.0
6/20.0
9/30.0
4/13.3
9/30.0
12/40.0
6/20.0
12/40.0
18/60.0
Bar Code
Type
PDF417
Density
Selector
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Quick Response
(QR Code) Models 1 and 2
0
Note:
3-18 Defining Fields
Aspect
Ratio
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
Data
Length
0 to 2709
Appearance
Codes
Available
8
Data Length
Model 1: 0-1167 Numeric; 0-707 Alphanumeric;
0-486 (8-Bit); 0-299 Kanji
Model 2: 0-2710 Numeric; Alphanumeric and 8-Bit;
0-1817 Kanji
Values in bold indicate the default.
Char Set
00H to
FFH
300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Data Matrix
Square
symbols
Size
Row x Col.
Density
Selector
10 x 10
12 x 12
14 x 14
16 x 16
18 x 18
20 x 20
22 x 22
24 x 24
26 x 26
32 x 32
36 x 36
40 x 40
44 x 44
48 x 48
52 x 52
64 x 64
72 x 72
80 x 80
88 x 88
96 x 96
104 x 104
120 x 120
132 x 132
144 x 144
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
6x3
10 x 6
16 x 10
24 x 16
36 x 25
44 x 31
60 x 43
72 x 52
88 x 64
124 x 91
172 x 127
228 x 169
288 x 214
348 x 259
408 x 304
560 x 418
736 x 550
912 x 682
1152 x 862
1392 x 1042
1632 x 1222
2100 x 1573
2608 x 1954
2710 x 2335
App
Code
8
Char
Set
00H to FFH
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Bar Code
Data Matrix
Rectangular
symbols
Size
Row x Col.
8 x 18
8 x 32
12 x 26
12 x 36
16 x 36
16 x 48
Density
Selector
25
26
27
28
29
30
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
10
20
32
44
64
98
x
x
x
x
x
x
6
13
22
31
46
72
App
Code
8
Char
Set
00H to FFH
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Note:
The printers support printing a Data Matrix symbol with an
X-dimension of 13 mils or greater (3 dots @203 dpi). If you use a
denser bar code, make sure the bar code scans in your particular
application. Our “premium” supplies and increasing the print
contrast are recommended for denser bar codes. Depending on
your application, additional densities are available.
Defining Fields 3-19
300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code Type
Density
Selector
Narrow Element
(dots/mils)
Data Length
Chart Set
GS1 DataBar
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
3/9.8
4/13.1
5/16.4
7/23
8/26.2
10/32.8
11/36.1
0 to 2710
00H to
FFH
Aztec
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
0.010
0.0133
0.0167
0.0233
0.0266
0.0333
0.0366
0.0433
0.0466
0.0533
0.0566
0.0633
0.0666
0.0733
0 to 2710
00H to
FFH
Note:
B9. height
Values in bold indicate the default.
Bar code height, in 1/100 inches, 1/10 mm, or dots. Minimum values:
English 19
Metric
48
203 Dots 38
300 Dots 57
POSTNET, PDF417, and MaxiCode bar codes have a fixed height.
Always use 0 for these bar codes.
For Data Matrix and QR Code, the printer determines the size of the
symbol, but the user’s scanner determines the functional size (minimum
height) of the symbol. Small Data Matrix and QR Codes may not be
scannable. The Data Matrix and QR Code’s height depends on the number
entered for this parameter. For example, if you select 80, the symbol could
be smaller than 0.80," but it will not be greater than the amount specified in
this parameter. The symbol arranges the data according to rows and
columns within the specified height.
For the GS1 DataBar bar code, the height is for the linear bar code only
used with UCC/EAN family types listed in B13.
For the Aztec bar code, use 0.
3-20 Defining Fields
B10. text
Appearance of text with bar code. For UPC and EAN only use 0 to 7. For
all others, use 8, except where noted. Options:
0
Default
MaxiCode Mode 0 (obsolete)
QR Code Model 2
1
No check digit or number system
QR Code Model 1
2
MaxiCode Mode 2 (Numeric Postal Code)
QR Code Model 2
3
MaxiCode Mode 3 (Alphanumeric Postal Code)
5
Number system at bottom, no check digit
6
Check digit at bottom, no number system
7
Check digit and number system at bottom
8
No text, bar code only
MaxiCode (autodetect modes 0, 2, or 3), Data Matrix,
GS1 DataBar, and Aztec.
B11. alignment
Choose L, R, C, B or E to align the bar code data correctly in the field. B
centers variable width bar codes, which may not allow pad-character
centering (Code 128, Code 39, etc.) E right justifies variable width bar
codes. MaxiCode, Data Matrix, QR Code, GS1 DataBar, and Aztec must
use L.
B12. field rot
Field rotation. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not just the characters.
Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies depending on how text
is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot point. Options:
0
Top of field points to top of supply
(Use for Maxicode)
1
Top of field points to left of supply
2
Top of field points to bottom of supply
3
Top of field points to right of supply
Note:
B13. type
Serial bar codes with an 8-dot narrow element do not automatically
print at 2.5 IPS. Serial bar codes printed at speeds greater than
2.5 IPS may not scan properly.
Select from the bar code family. This parameter only applies to the GS1
DataBar bar code. For other bar codes, do not include this parameter.
Options:
1
GS1 DataBar 14 (default)
2
GS1 DataBar 14 Truncated
3
GS1 DataBar 14 Stacked
4
GS1 DataBar 14 Stacked Omni directional
5
GS1 DataBar Limited
6
GS1 DataBar Expanded
7
UPCA
8
UPCE
9
EAN13
10
EAN8
11
UCC/EAN128 and CC A/B
12
UCC/EAN128 and CC C
Defining Fields 3-21
B14. sep_height
Height of the separator between the linear bar code and 2D bar code. This
parameter only applies to the GS1 DataBar bar code. For other bar codes,
do not include this parameter. The value is 1 or 2. The default is 1.
B15. segment
Width of the segment – only for use with GS1 DataBar family types listed in
B13. For other bar codes, do not include this parameter. The range is even
numbers from 2 to 22. The default is 22.
Example
B,3,12,V,50,40,1,2,80,7,L,0 p
Defines a bar code field (field #3) with 12 characters of variable length
starting at row 150, column 40. A UPCA bar code with a density of 2 and a
height of 80 is used. The check digit and number system are shown at the
bottom. The bar code is left aligned without any field rotation.
Example
B,1,30,V,5,5,38,4,0,0,L,0,1,2,22¦
Defines a bar code field (field #3) with up to 30 characters of variable length
starting at row 5, column 5. The GS1 DataBar uses a density of 4. No text
is shown with the bar code. The bar code is left-aligned with no field
rotation.
D e f i n i n g N o n - P r i n t a b l e Te x t F i e l d s
Non-printable text fields allow you to enter data without printing it in its
entered form. Typically, non-printable fields “hold” data that later combines
with other fields to form a merged field. Define non-printable text fields
before you define the field where the information prints.
When you copy this field into another field, the maximum number of
characters for the final field is 2710. Allow only as many characters as you
need, because extra characters use up space. Also, if you are copying into
a bar code field, the maximum number of characters in the destination bar
code is determined by the bar code specification (UPCA-12, EAN-13, etc.).
You need to apply field options to manipulate the text entered in this field.
For example, you may want to copy data from this field into another field.
See “Option 4 Copy Data” in Chapter 4 for more information.
3-22 Defining Fields
In the following example, data is entered into four non-printable fields and
merged to form field 5, and is then printed as a bar code. See “Merging
Fields” in Chapter 4 for more information.
Field
1
2
3
4
5
Data
20374
339
8
15
20374339815
Field Type
Non-printable
Non-printable
Non-printable
Non-printable
Bar Code
Each non-printable text field requires a separate definition.
Syntax
D,field#,# of char p
D1. D
Non-Printable Text Field.
D2. field#
Unique number from 0 to 999 assigned to this field.
D3. # of char
Maximum number of characters in this field: 0 to 2710.
Example
D,4,20 p
Defines a non-printable text field (field #4) with a maximum of 20
characters.
D e f i n i n g C o n s t a n t Te x t F i e l d s
A constant text field is a set of fixed characters that prints on all labels.
Define each constant text field separately. This field is not assigned a field
number, but is counted as a field (keep this in mind, as the printer allows a
maximum of 1000 fields per format). The characters in this field cannot be
changed by batch data. Field options do not apply to constant text fields.
Mark the pivot point of your field. This will vary, depending on how your
field is justified.
Defining Fields 3-23
Syntax
C,row,column,gap,font,hgt mag,
wid mag,color,alignment,char rot,
field rot,"fixed char",sym set p
C1. C
Constant Text Field.
C2. row
For monospaced fonts, distance from bottom of print
area to the pivot point. For proportionally spaced
fonts, distance from bottom of print area to baseline
of characters in the field. (Bottom exits the printer
first.)
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
C3. column
Distance from the lower left edge of the print area to
the pivot point. Use the previous table for values.
C4. gap
Number of dots between characters (203 dots per
inch). Range: 0 to 99.
Any number other than 0 or the default number affects
your field width. Default spacing:
Standard
Reduced
Bold
OCRA-like
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
3-24 Defining Fields
3
1
3
3
dots
dot
dots
dots
varies with each letter
varies with each letter
C5. font
Style of font. Options:
1 Standard
10
2 Reduced
11
3 Bold
15
4 OCRA-like
16
5 HR1
17
6 HR2
18
50
56
CG Triumvirateä Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
7 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
9 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
11 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
15 pt. CG Triumvirateä Typeface
EFF Swiss Bold (TrueType® Scalable)
PaxarSymbols (version 5.0 or greater)
Or a valid downloaded font selector number.
Fonts 5 and 6 are for numeric data only.
The CG Triumvirateä typefaces support only the ANSI and DOS Code
Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets. The scalable font does not support Code
Page 1256 (Arabic). See Appendix C for more information.
C6. hgt mag
Height magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). Use a magnifier of 1 with proportionally spaced fonts,
because characters lose smoothness at higher magnifications. See
Appendix B, “Fonts,” for more information about fonts.
C7. wid mag
Width magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). Proportionally spaced fonts do not have a set width. To
estimate the size of your field, use the letter “W” for the widest field or an
“L” for an average width field. Find your selected font and the desired
width in Appendix B, “Fonts.”
C8. color
There are two types of field color overlay attributes:
Transparent
Opaque
The overlay field (text or constant text) does not block out
(or “erase”) existing fields.
The overlay field blocks out (or “erases”) existing fields.
Options for standard printer fonts:
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
D/R/W
Opaque, Normal, White, Normal
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
Options for scalable fonts:
A/N
Opaque, Normal, Black, Bold
B/O
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
E/S
Opaque, Italics, Black, Bold
F/T
Opaque, Italics, Black, Normal
Note:
Solid black print should not exceed 30% on a given square inch of
the label, or the printhead life may be decreased.
Field placement in the packet is an important consideration when using
field color attributes. If a line field is defined before the overlay (text or
constant text) field, the line field is blocked out by the overlay field,
depending on the overlay field’s color attribute. If a line field is defined
after the overlay field, the line field is not blocked out by the overlay field,
regardless of the overlay field’s color attribute.
Defining Fields 3-25
C9. alignment
Alignment
L
C
R
B
E
of constant text in the field. Options:
Align on left side of field.
Center text within field (for monospaced fonts only)
Align on right side of field (for monospaced fonts only)
Align at midpoint of field
Align at end of field.
Use L, B, or E for any font.
C10. char rot
Character rotation. The field or supply does not rotate, only the characters
do. Options:
0
Top of character points to top of field
1
Top of character points to left of field
2
Top of character points to bottom of field
3
Top of character points to right of field
Note:
C11. field rot
Font 50 and downloaded TrueType fonts do not support character
rotation.
Field rotation. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not just the characters.
Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies depending on how text
is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot point. Options:
0
Top of overlay points to top of supply
1
Top of overlay points to left of supply
2
Top of overlay points to bottom of supply
3
Top of overlay points to right of supply
C12. “fixed char” Fixed characters to appear in the field. Maximum 2710 characters.
Enclose in quotation marks.
3-26 Defining Fields
C13. sym set
Symbol set. Use 0 for the Internal Symbol Set. For scalable or TrueTypeâ
fonts, use:
1
ANSI Symbol Set
100
Macintosh
101
Wingdings
102
Unicode (user input) for particular mapping
103
BIG5 (user input) for Unicode mapping
104
GB2312 (user input) for Unicode mapping
105
SJIS (user input) for Unicode mapping
Code Page 932 (Japanese Shift-JIS)
106
GB2312 (user input) for GB2312 mapping
Code Page 936 (Simplified Chinese)
107
BIG5 (user input) for BIG5 mapping
Code Page 950 (Traditional Chinese)
110
Unicode UTF-8
437
DOS Code Page 437 (Domestic)
850
DOS Code Page 850 (International)
852
DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
855
DOS Code Page 855 (Russian)
857
DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
860
DOS Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
1250 Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
1251 Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
1252 Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
1253 Code Page 1253 (Greek)
1254 Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
1255 Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
1256 Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
1257 Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
1258 Code Page 1258 (Vietnam)
Note:
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font (font#50) does not support Code Page 1256
(Arabic). Code pages 852-860 and 1250-1258 are for downloaded
TrueType fonts or the scalable font. Code pages 102-110 require
the memory expansion option and a downloaded International
TrueType font. TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally
specific; therefore, all code pages may not be supported in a given
font. See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/ Code Pages” for more
information.
If using symbol set 110 (Unicode UTF-8), set the MPCL control
characters (start of header, etc.) to decimal values between 0 and
128; otherwise, errors may occur with the Unicode data entered.
See Chapter 2, "Configuring the Printer" for more information
about the MPCL control characters.
Defining Fields 3-27
Example
C,30,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MADE IN USA",0 p
Defines a constant text field starting at row 30, column 10. It does not have
any additional inter-character gap. The Standard font is used without any
additional magnification. The printing is black on white and left justified.
No field or character rotation is used. “MADE IN USA” is printed in this
field. The internal symbol set is used.
Defining Line Fields
Use lines to form borders and mark out original prices. Define each line
separately. This field is not assigned a field number, but is counted as a
field (keep this in mind, as the printer allows a maximum of 1000 fields per
format). You can define any line length and a thickness up to 99 dots, as
long as the solid black print does not exceed 30 percent of any given square
inch of the label.
L i n e Ty p e s
You can create horizontal and vertical lines. There are two ways to define
lines.
Segments
You choose the starting point and ending point.
Vectors
You choose the starting point, the angle, and the length
of the line.
Syntax
L,type,row,column,angle/end row,length/
end col,thickness,"pattern" p
L1. L
Line Field.
L2. type
Type of line. Only vertical and horizontal lines are
supported. Options:
S Segment. You choose the starting point and
ending point.
V Vector. You choose the starting point, angle, and
ength.
L3. row
Distance from bottom of print area to the starting point.
3-28 Defining Fields
l
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
L4. column
Distance from left edge of the print area to line origin.
Use the previous table for values.
L5. angle
/end row
If Using Segments:
Row location of ending point. Measure from bottom of
print area. Ranges same as row above. On
horizontal lines, this value must match item L3.
If Using Vectors:
Angle of line. Options: 0, 90, 180, or 270.
L6. length/
end col
If Using Segments:
Column location of end point. Measure from left edge
of print area. Ranges same as column above. On
vertical lines, this value must match parameter L4.
If Using Vectors:
Length of the line in selected units. Use the previous
table for values.
Defining Fields 3-29
L7. thickness
Using the chart below for reference, write the line thickness
(1 to 99) in box L7. Line thickness fills upward on horizontal lines, or to the
right on vertical lines. Measured in dots.
L8. “pattern”
Line pattern. Enter "".
Example
L,S,110,30,110,150,10,"" p
Defines a horizontal line field as a segment starting at row 110, column 30
and ending at row 110, column 150. The line thickness is 10 dots.
Defining Box Fields
Use boxes to form borders or highlight items of interest. Define each box
field separately. This field is not assigned a field number, but is counted as
a field (keep this in mind, as the printer allows a maximum of 1000 fields per
format). You can define any line length and a thickness up to 99 dots, as
long as the solid black print does not exceed 30 percent of any given square
inch of the label.
3-30 Defining Fields
Syntax
Q,row,column,end row,end col,thickness,"pattern" p
Q1. Q
Box (Quadrilateral) Field.
Q2. row
Distance from bottom of print area to
lower left corner of box.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
Q3. column
Distance from left edge of print area to lower left
corner of box. Use the previous table for values.
Q4. end row
Distance from bottom of print area to upper right
corner of box. Ranges same as row.
Q5. end col
Distance from left edge of print area to upper right
corner of box. Ranges same as column.
Defining Fields 3-31
Q6. thickness
Using the chart below for reference, write the desired line thickness
(1 to 99) in box Q6. Boxes fill inward, so make sure your boxes do not
overwrite other fields. Measured in dots.
Q7. “pattern”
Line pattern. Enter "".
Example
Q,240,30,270,150,3,"" p
Defines a box field starting at row 240, column 30. It ends at row 270,
column 150. It has a thickness of 3 dots.
3-32 Defining Fields
D e f i n i n g Ve r i f i e r F i e l d s
The verifier field in a format references the verifier configuration packet ID
to use for this particular format. The verifier field allows you to specify a
different verifier configuration packet for each format, regardless of the
format number. See “Defining a Verifier Configuration Packet,” in Chapter 2
for more information.
The verifier field allows you to specify a different verifier configuration
packet for each of your formats.
If you do not specify a particular verifier configuration packet, the last sent
verifier configuration packet is used.
Syntax
V,vfrID p
V1. V
Verifier Field.
V2. vfrID
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the verifier configuration packet to
use with this format.
Example
F,25,A,R,M,508,508,"FMT-25" p
V,3 p
B,1,12,F,110,115,1,2,120,5,L,0 p
Specifies verifier configuration packet #3 starting with format 25 until
another verifier configuration packet is specified.
Defining Fields 3-33
Defining the RFID Data Field
The RFID Data Field contains the information you want programmed into the
RFID tag. The syntax of the RFID Data Field is similar to the standard
non-printable text field format. RFID is only supported on the 9855
printer. Printing over the RFID tag (or transponder) causes printing
irregularity. For more information about RFID, refer to the Multi-Protocol
Application Notes, available on our Web site.
¨ With version 2.8 or greater firmware, the printer supports both 64-bit and
96-bit RFID tags.
¨ With version 3.2 or greater firmware, the printer supports multi-protocol
encoding, including Class 1 Generation (Gen) 1 and Class 1 Generation
(Gen) 2 supplies.
¨ With version 5.0 or greater firmware, the printer accepts EPC data
following the guidelines in the EPCglobalä Tag Data Standards, which
conforms to the EPCä Radio Frequency Identity Protocols Class 1
Generation 2 UHF RFID Protocol for Communications at 860-960MHz
Standards (Air Interface Protocol). See “Using Expanded Gen2 Data” in
Chapter 6, “Printing,” for more information.
Syntax
X,field#,# of char,data_type p
X1. X
RFID Data Field.
X2. field#
Unique number from 0 to 999 assigned to this field.
X3. # of char
This number must be equal to or greater than the total number of
characters in the RFID Data Field. Range: 0 to 2710. The amount varies
according to your RFID data and protocol. For example, C1Gen2 can be
96-Bits, plus the access password, lock code, etc.
Note:
3-34 Defining Fields
An error 715 occurs if the printer does not receive the correct
amount of data.
You can pad data to make sure you have the correct amount of
bits. See “Option 30,” in Chapter 4 for more information.
X4. data_type
Data type. Options:
0
ASCII Hex - default (ASCII representation of Hex)
Use characters A to F and 0 to 9.
1
ASCII
2
ASCII Binary (ASCII representation of Binary)
Use characters 0 and 1.
3
Hex
We recommend using ASCII Hex for compatibility with multiple host
applications.
For example, the letter A has a decimal value of 65 in the ASCII table. The
hex (base 16) equivalent of decimal (base 10) is 41. Hex 41 in binary
notation is 01000001.
Data Type
Character
MPCL Batch Data for a 96-bit RFID tag
ASCII Hex
41
“414141414141414141414141"
ASCII
A
“AAAAAAAAAAAA”
ASCII Binary
01000001
“010000010100000101000001010000010100000101000001
010000010100000101000001010000010100000101000001"
Hex
~065
“~065~065~065~065~065~065~065~065~065~065~065~065"
Example
X,5,24,0 p
Defines an RFID Data Field (field #5) with exactly 24 ASCII Hex characters
for a 96-bit RFID tag.
Defining Fields 3-35
3-36 Defining Fields
DEFINING FIELD OPTIONS
4
This chapter provides a reference for defining
¨
field options in formats
¨
check digit packets.
Note:
When using multiple options on the printer, options are processed in
the order they are received.
Defining Field Options 4-1
Applying Field Options
Field options further define text, bar code, and non-printable text fields.
The text, constant text, or bar code field must be previously defined before
you can apply any field option to it. Define options immediately after the
field to which they apply.
Combining Field Options
You can use more than one option with most fields. For example, you can
use Option 4 to copy data from another field, and then use Option 30 to pad
the field. When you use multiple options for the same field, you must place
the options in the order you want to apply them to your format.
Restrictions
Some options cannot be used together. For example, incrementing (Option
60) and price field (Option 42) options cannot be applied to the same field.
Refer to the following sections addressing individual options for specific
combinations to avoid.
Option 4 (copy a field) is the only option that can be repeated for a single
field.
Example
R,1,3,1,3,1,1 p
Syntax
R,option#,parameter...parameter p
R1. R
Indicates field option header.
R2. option#
Option number:
1
Define fixed characters
2
Data type restrictions (9855/9860)
3
Data entry template (9855/9860)
4
Copy data from previous field
5
Define data entry sources (9855/9860)
6
Upload field data
20
Define data entry prompts (9855/9860)
21
Define extended field names (9855 XML-enabled printer)
30
Pad data to left or right with specified character
31
Generate check digit
4-2 Defining Field Options
42
50
51
52
53
60
61
62
64
Format as a price field
Define bar code densities
Define security and truncation of PDF417 bar codes
Define width or length of PDF417 bar codes
Define optional settings for Aztec bar codes
Define incrementing or decrementing field
Reimage fields
Do not scan/verify a particular bar code
Program the AFI Field for UHF RFID tags
R3. parameter(s) Varies per option. See the following option descriptions.
Applying Options to the RFID Data Field
All the normal field options (copy, merge, pad, increment, etc.) can be
applied to the RFID Data Field. However, certain restrictions may apply.
¨ To copy, merge, pad, or increment data in the RFID Data Field, the
copied/merged/padded/incremented data must be in the same format
specified in the RFID Data Field. For example, to copy data into the
RFID Data Field using ASCII Hex, the field being copied must be in
ASCII Hex format; otherwise, unexpected results may occur.
¨ When incrementing the RFID Data Field, see the following table for an
explanation of how the field increments.
Data Type
How the Field Increments
ASCII Hex
0 to F (0123456789ABCDEF), then back to 0
ASCII Binary
0 to 1 or 1 to 0
ASCII or Hex
next position in 0 to 255 range
¨ If Option 60 (Increment Field) contains the character “D” to decrement, it
is ignored and the field is instead incremented by one.
¨ When incrementing the RFID Data Field, the only valid value to
increment is by one.
¨ Use caution when incrementing an RFID field if data is coming directly
from your host because the field must be incremented in ASCII Hex (or
other specified data type).
Defining Field Options 4-3
Option 1 (Fixed Data)
Fixed data is information (a company name or store number) you want to
print on all labels. You can define fixed characters for an entire field or for
part of a field.
Syntax
R,1,"fixed char"
p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 1
Option 1.
R3. fixed char
Characters to insert. Enclose in quotation marks. If you are defining fixed
characters for part of a field, place underscores(_) in non-fixed positions.
Any spaces in the phrase are fixed characters. Range: 0 to 2710.
Note:
Example
Underscore characters are stripped out and the data is
compressed if no data is supplied by the batch and the field length
is variable.
R,1,"_ _ _%$_ _ _ _ _"
p
Uses fixed characters (%$) in positions 4 and 5. The other positions are
variable.
Example
R,1,"MONARCH"
p
“MONARCH” appears as a fixed field in this example.
To fill in the non-fixed portion of the field, see “Defining Batch Data Fields”
in Chapter 6. As an alternative, you can apply Option 4 to copy data into
the non-fixed character positions.
4-4 Defining Field Options
O p t i o n 2 ( D a t a Ty p e R e s t r i c t i o n s )
This option restricts the data type for a particular field. You can use Options
2 or 3 only once per field. Do not use with Option 3 (Data Entry Templates).
Note:
Option 2 is only available on the 9855 and 9860 printers. You must
use the Monarch® 939ä keyboard for offline data entry.
If you do batch entry only in the batch packet, you do not need to apply
Options 2 and 3. Use these options only for offline batch entry.
Syntax
R,2,char_code p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 2
Option 2.
R3. char code
Character
1
2
3
4
5
6
type for the field. Options:
Numeric only (0..9)
Letters only (A..Z,a..z)
Symbols only (printable characters other than letters
or numbers)
Letters and numbers only
Numbers and symbols only
Letters and symbols only
Spaces are permitted in all categories. You can also use a combination of
any two (letter, numbers, or symbols) character types.
Note:
Example
A use for this option is a quantity field, where the operator could
enter only numeric data.
R,2,2 p
Restricts the field data to letters only (A-Z or a-z).
Defining Field Options 4-5
O p t i o n 3 ( D a t a E n t r y Te m p l a t e s )
This option provides more specific restrictions than Option 2. This option
can be used to select certain letters (such as A through F or the numbers 1
through 4) from a character set. You can also use this option to create a
template of allowable characters for a field. Do not use with Option 2 (Data
Type Restrictions).
Use this option only for offline batch entry. You can define a template up to
30 characters long, but the printer only displays 16 characters at a time.
The character template must contain the same number of characters as the
field.
Note:
Syntax
Option 3 is only available on the 9855 and 9860 printers. You must
use the 939 keyboard for offline data entry.
R,3,code,chars p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 3
Option 3.
R3. code
Data types. Options
S
Defines a specific set of characters for the entire
field. The string length does not have to match the
field length. Maximum is 30 characters.
T
Creates a template of allowable data types by placing
character indicators in each character position. The
number of characters in the string must match the
length of the field.
Note:
R4. chars
A sample use for this option is a field on a patient record
containing blood type. Acceptable characters would be A, B, O, +,
or -.
Characters to include in a field or a specific template. Must be enclosed
within quotation marks. Indicators can be
*
any printable character
#
any digit 0-9
@
any letter a-z, A-Z
no user input for this position (for fixed data or
copied data)
4-6 Defining Field Options
Example
R,3,S,"ABC1234567890" p
Restricts the field data to letters A, B, and C, and all digits.
Example
R,3,T,"***#_ _ _ _" p
Creates a template that allows any printable character in positions 1, 2, and
3; digits in position 4; and reserves positions 5 through 8 for fixed or copied
data.
Example
R,3,T,"####_ _ _ _" p
Creates a template that allows digits only in positions 1-4, and reserves
positions 5 through 8 for fixed or copied data.
Option 4 (Copy Data)
You can create a field that uses data from another field. This is useful for
creating merged fields or sub-fields. You can copy the information from
multiple fields into one field by applying the copy procedure more than once.
Copy data is the only option you can apply to a field more than once.
The maximum number of characters defined in box T3 or B3 must allow for
the number of characters you will place in the field, including any price,
check digit, or fixed characters inserted by the printer. The maximum
number of characters in the field into which data is copied cannot exceed
2710 or the maximum number of characters permitted by the bar code.
Note:
When copying from more than one field, copy into the destination
field from left to right.
Defining Field Options 4-7
Syntax
R,4,src fld,src start,# to copy,dest start,
copy code p
R1. R
Field Option Header.
R2. 4
Option 4.
R3. src fld
Field number from which data is copied. Range: 0 to 999.
R4. src start
Position number in the source field of the first character to be copied.
Character positions are numbered 1 to 2710, starting from the left.
R5. # to copy
Number of characters to copy. Range: 1 to 2710.
R6. dest start
Position number where copied characters are to begin printing in the
destination field. Range: 1 to 2710.
R7. copy code
Copy Method.
1
Copy field as is (including price symbols,
pad characters, check digits, etc.).
2
Example
Copy unformatted data (without price characters,
pad characters, etc.).
R,4,3,1,3,1,1 p
Copies data from field #3, starting at the first position and copying three
characters. In the destination field, the information is placed in position 1
and copied as formatted data.
Example
R {F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"ASCIIHEX" p
X,2,24,0 p
T,1,50,V,10,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
R,4,2,1,16,1,2 p }
{B,2,N,2p
1,"313233343536373831323334" p
2,"313233343536373831323334" p }
This example uses Option 4 to copy data from the RFID Data Field and
displays the data in text field 1. Note the data type being used is ASCII
Hex, so the data in the RFID Data Field is in ASCII Hex format. This
example uses a 96-bit RFID tag.
4-8 Defining Field Options
Merging Fields
You can copy data to merge the contents of fields. Use the copy data option
as many times as necessary to copy all the appropriate fields into the
merged field.
In the following example, two text and two non-printable fields are shown.
Data from these fields is merged to form field 5, and is then printed as a bar
code.
Field
1
2
3
4
5
Data
Field Type
203
339
8
BLUE
2033398BLUE
Non-printable
Non-printable
Text
Text
Bar Code
To create this sequence:
1.
Define fields 1, 2, 3, and 4.
2.
Define field 5 as a bar code. Allow enough characters in the bar code
field to hold all the copied characters.
3.
Apply Option 4 to field 5 once for every source field.
Sub-Fields
You can copy a segment of data from one field into a new location, called a
sub-field. For example, extract part of the data in a bar code and display it
in text form in a sub-field. Then, use the copy data option.
Defining Field Options 4-9
Option 5 (Define Data Entry Sources)
Defines how data is entered into a field. Option 5 is required for offline data
entry. If the field holds all fixed characters or copied data only, you can
eliminate the operator prompt. Use Option 5 only once per field. You must
use the 939 keyboard for offline data entry.
Use this option to read pre-programmed data in the RFID chip embedded
within the supply. Using Option 5 stops the printer while reading each label;
regardless of the print speed. If using a batch quantity greater than one,
the data is read from each label.
Note:
Using Option 5 to read pre-programmed RFID data is supported with
the release of version 5.0 or greater printer’s software.
The EM4122 protocol requires Option 5 to read the pre-programmed
data.
When reading data, make sure the maximum number of characters in the
field is equal to or greater than the number of characters being read. If not,
the data may be incomplete.
Use option 6 (Upload Field Data) with Option 5 to upload the data from the
RFID chip to a host.
Syntax
R,5,code p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 5
Option 5.
R3. code
Input code
H
K
N
R
Note:
Example
for the data in the field. Options:
Host
Keypad
No user input for this field
RFID (read data from the RFID chip) This is ignored on
non-RFID printers.
Option 5 re-images each label in the batch.
R,5,K p
Allows data to be entered from the keypad.
Example
R,5,N p
Eliminates the user prompt for this field. Data is either fixed or copied from
another source.
4-10 Defining Field Options
Example
T,2,10,V,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0
R,5,R p
p
Reads the pre-programmed data from the RFID chip and saves that data
into the text field.
Option 6 (Upload Field Data)
You can upload data from any field using Option 6. When uploading
multiple fields of data, the data is comma separated.
Data is uploaded to the last port that received host data (serial, parallel,
USB, or Ethernet) at the end of the batch or label, depending on the other
options used as follows:
¨ When using a batch quantity of one without Option 5 or Option 60, data
is uploaded at the end of the batch.
¨ When using a batch quantity greater than one with an Option 5 and/or
Option 60, data is uploaded after each label.
Note:
To upload data on a field that did not change, apply Option 60 to
that field.
Syntax
R,6,device p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 6
Option 6.
R3. device
Last port that received host data. Use H (host).
Example
T,2,10,V,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
R,6,H p
Uploads the text field’s data to a file.
Defining Field Options 4-11
Example
B,3,12,F,50,50,1,2,60,7,L,0 p
R,6,H p
R,60,I,0 p
Uploads the UPCA bar code field’s data to a file and uploads data for each
label in the batch.
Example
T,150,V,230,130,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
R,5,R p
R,6,H p
Reads the RFID data from the RFID chip embedded in the supply. Uploads
the data to the last-used port.
Example
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"RDCI" p
X,5,24,0 p
T,6,20,V,415,270,0,50,15,15,B,L,0,2 p
R,4,5,1,16,1,0 p
R,6,H p }
Copies data from field 5 (RFID Data Field) to field 6 (Text field). Uploads
the data to the last-used port
Sample Upload Packet
Example
R,5,R p
R,6,H p
Returns the following in the upload packet:
313233343536373839303132
Example
B,3,12,F,50,50,1,2,60,7,L,0 p
R,6,H p
Returns the following in the upload packet:
123456789012
4-12 Defining Field Options
Example
R,5,R p
R,6,H p
B,3,12,F,50,50,1,2,60,7,L,0 p
R,6,H p
Returns the following in the upload packet:
313233343536373839303132,123456789012
Option 20 (Define Data Entry Prompts)
This option defines the operator prompt and it is not recommended on fields
filled entirely by fixed characters or copied data. This option must be
defined before Option 5, or the prompt does not display during data entry.
You must use the 939 keyboard for offline data entry.
Note:
Option 20 is only available on the 9855 and 9860 printers.
Syntax
R,20,"prompt" p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 6
Option 20.
R3. device
Displays the exact phrase you want to prompt the operator. Must be
enclosed within quotations. The prompt must be 15 characters or less.
Example
R,20,"Order Number" p
Displays the prompt "Order Number" for the operator when this field is
imaged.
Defining Field Options 4-13
Option 21 (Define Extended Field Names)
This option defines names for each field in a format, which can be longer
than eight characters. This option is only available on the 9855
XML-enabled printer.
Syntax
R,21,"field_name" p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 21
Option 21.
R3. “field_name” Specifies the field name. Must be enclosed within quotations. The name
can be 1 to 256 characters, excluding non-printable control characters and
the quotation mark (“). This name must match the one specified in the
variable name attribute.
Example
T,2,10,v,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
R,21,"SALEPRICE_FIELD" p
Defines the name for text field 2 as “SALEPRICE_FIELD.”
Option 30 (Pad Data)
You can add characters to one side of a field to “pad” the field. Padding
allows you to fill in the remaining spaces when the entered data does not fill
an entire field. If a variable length field is not completely filled with batch
data, this option fills the remaining positions in the field with the character
designated by Option 30.
Syntax
R,30,L/R,"character" p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 30
Option 30.
R3. L/R
Indicates type of padding:
L
Pad field on left side
R
Pad field on right side
R4. “character”
Pad character must be within the 0 to 255 decimal range and enclosed
inside quotation marks. The pad character must be in the same format
specified in the RFID Data Field. See “Defining the RFID Data Field” for
more information. Do not use on fixed length fields.
4-14 Defining Field Options
Example
R,30,L,"X" p
Pads data with an “X” on the left side of the field.
Example
X,2,24,0 p
R,30,R,"0" p
Pads the data in the RFID Data Field with a “0" on the right side.
Sample Use for Padding
If you have a variable length bar code that you want to occupy a fixed
amount of space on the supply, use pad characters. If the maximum number
of characters in the bar code is 15, but the batch record only has 10
characters, the padding option fills the remainder of the field with pad
characters.
Option 31 (Calculate Check Digit)
The printer generates a check digit if you apply Option 31 to the field. You
cannot use this option if the field contains a UPC, EAN, or Code 39 (with the
MOD43 check digit) bar code.
Syntax
R,31,gen/ver,check digit # p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 31
Option 31.
R3. gen/ver
Enter G to generate a check digit.
R4. check digit # Specifies a check digit scheme. Enter a number that identifies a check
digit scheme that has been defined. For more information, see “Using
Check Digits.” Range: 1 to 10.
Example
R,31,G,5 p
Generates a check digit using the previously defined check digit scheme 5.
Defining Field Options 4-15
Option 42 (Price Field)
You can apply options that will insert monetary symbols automatically. Do
not use this option with Option 31 (define a check digit) or Option 60
(increment or decrement a field). This option is not recommended for bar
codes. When determining the maximum number of characters, add the
maximum number of digits and the monetary symbols.
Syntax
R,42,appearance code p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 42
Option 42.
R3. appearance
code
Enter 1 to print price field in standard notation, as defined by country
setting.
Use the monetary formatting packet to select monetary notations and
symbols by country setting. See “Defining the Monetary Formatting
Packet” for more information.
See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/Code Pages,” to make sure the monetary
symbol you want to use is printable in the font selected for this field. For
monetary symbols other than the dollar sign, use the internal symbol set.
Example
R,42,1 p
Uses a price field that prints the monetary symbol and notations as defined
in the monetary formatting packet.
4-16 Defining Field Options
Option 50 (Bar Code Density)
You can apply this option to bar code fields when you want to create custom
densities. When you apply this option, it overrides the density value in the
bar code field. When using this option, set the density parameter in your
bar code field to the default value. You can only use this option once for
each bar code field.
Bar codes produced using Option 50 may not be scannable. Code 39,
density 12, produces a one-dot narrow bar. This density is intended for
special U.S.P.S. ACT-tag applications only. Synthetic supplies are
recommended to produce scannable bar codes.
The additional character gap, narrow space, and wide space parameters are
valid only with Code 39 and Codabar. If these parameters are specified for
any other bar codes, they will be ignored by the printer. Do not use Option
50 with fixed density bar codes.
Option 50 can be used with PDF417 bar codes for specific customer ratios.
With PDF417 bar codes, use only the narrow and wide parameters. The
narrow parameter defines the individual bar width in dots and the wide
parameter is used to define the height of each individual stacked bar code.
Option 50 can also be used with Option 52 to further customize the
dimensions of a PDF417 bar code. Option 52 allows customization of the
number of columns or number of rows for the bar code.
Syntax
R,50,narrow,wide,gap,nar_space,wide_space p
R1. R
Field Option Header.
R2. 50
Option 50.
R3. narrow
Dot width of the narrow element. Range:
R4. wide
Dot width of the wide element. Range: 1 to 99.
R5. gap
Additional dot space between characters. Enter a value of 1 to 99.
(Code 39 and Codabar only.)
1 to 99.
Defining Field Options 4-17
R6. nar_space
Additional dot width of the narrow bar code space.
(Code 39 and Codabar only). Range: 1 to 99.
R7. wide_space
Additional dot width of the wide bar code space.
(Code 39 and Codabar only). Range: 1 to 99.
Example
R,50,4,8,4,4,8 p
Creates a custom bar code density with a narrow element of 4 dots, a wide
element of 8 dots, a gap of 4 dots, 4 additional dot widths for the narrow bar
code space, and 8 additonal dot widths for the wide bar code space (if this
is a Code 39 or Codabar bar code).
Example
B,1,40,V,100,100,32,1,0,8,L,0 p
R,50,2,10 p
Creates a custom PDF417 bar code density for 203 dpi printers. The
narrow element width is 2 dots and the height is 10 dots.
Example
B,1,40,V,100,100,32,1,0,8,L,0 p
50,3,15 p
Creates a custom PDF417 bar code density for 300 dpi printers. The
narrow element width is 3 dots and the height is 15 dots.
4-18 Defining Field Options
O p t i o n 5 1 ( P D F 4 1 7 S e c u r i t y / Tr u n c a t i o n )
You can define a security level and choose whether or not to truncate a
PDF417 bar code. Higher security levels add data to a bar code, improving
scan reliability. Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable if the
security level is high enough. You can use this option to create standard
PDF417 bar codes or use the truncated option to create a narrower bar
code. This option can appear only once per PDF417 field, in any order,
following the bar code field.
As the security level is increased, so is the size of your PDF417 bar code.
For each level increased, the bar code will double in size.
Syntax
R,51,security,stand/default p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 51
Indicates Option 51.
R3. security
Security level ranges from 0 to 8 (0 is the default).
Higher security levels add data to a bar code, improving scan reliability.
Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable if the security level is
high enough.
R4. stand/def
Example
Truncation selector. Valid values:
S
(default) a standard PDF417 bar code
T
truncated
R,51,2,S p
Defines a security level of 2 for a standard PDF417 bar code.
Defining Field Options 4-19
Option 52 (PDF417 Width/Length)
This option defines the image width or length of a PDF417 bar code. If you
define a fixed number of columns (width), the bar code expands in length. If
you define a fixed number of rows (length), the bar code expands in width.
Column value does not include start/stop or left/right indicator columns.
If this option does not immediately follow the PDF417 bar code field, the
default settings are used. You can only use this option once per PDF417
bar code field.
Syntax
R,52,row/column,dimension p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 52
Indicates Option 52.
R3. row/column
Indicates if you are defining the number of rows or columns.
R
Row
C
Column
If you specify rows, the bar code expands in columns,
or vice versa.
R4. dimension
Example
The number of rows or columns defined for the bar code.
The default is 4. Valid values:
3-90 for rows
1-30 for columns
R,52,C,10 p
Defines the column width of 10, which expands the PDF417 bar code length
by 10.
4-20 Defining Field Options
Option 53 (Optional Settings for Aztec)
You can use Option 53 to set the error control level, enable ECI data,
enable a menu symbol, and add appended data to an Aztec bar code.
Note:
Typically, these settings are not used. When using Option 53, the
printer may take longer to image the bar code and require more time
to print the format.
Syntax
R,53,error_ctrl,ECI,menu_sym,str_append,"string"¦
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 53
Option 53.
R3. error_ctrl
Error control level. Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable if the
error control level is high enough. Options:
0
Default level
1-99
101-104
201-232
300
R4. ECI
Sets the ECI Data flag. The default is 0. Options:
0
Disable
1
Enable
R5. menu_sym
Sets the Menu Symbol flag. The default is 0. Options:
0
Disable
1
Enable
R6. str_append
Structured append information. Range: 1-26. The default is 1.
R7. “string”
String to append. Range: 0-24. The default is “”. Must be enclosed in
quotation marks.
Example
R,53,0,0,0,1,""¦
Uses option 53 to set the error control to 0, disables the ECI data and menu
symbol flags, and does not append any data to the bar code.
Defining Field Options 4-21
Option 60 (Incrementing/Decrementing Fields)
You may have an application, such as serial numbers, in which you need a
numeric field to increment (increase in value) or decrement (decrease in
value) on successive tickets within a single batch. Incrementing or
decrementing can be applied to numeric data only. If you have a field that
includes letters and digits, apply incrementing or decrementing to only the
portion of the field that contains digits. Do not use with Option 42 (price
field).
Syntax
R,60,I/D,amount,l pos,r pos p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 60
Option 60.
R3. I/D
Increment or decrement:
I
incrementing field
D
decrementing field
R4. amount
Amount to increase or decrease. Range: 0 to 999.
R5. l pos
Leftmost position in inc/dec portion of field. If this value is not entered, the
default value 1 is used. Range: 0 to 2710.
R6. r pos
Rightmost position in inc/dec portion of field. If this value is not used, the
entire field length is used as the default. Range: 0 to 2710.
Example
R,60,I,5,1,6 p
Increments a field by 5 each time the field is printed. The field increments
beginning with the first left position and ending with the sixth position.
Fixing the First Number in the Incrementing Sequence
There are two ways to enter the first number in the incrementing sequence.
You can use batch data or use Option 1 to define the first number as a fixed
character. The first number in the sequence must contain the same amount
of digits as the highest number to be counted. For example, to count the
numbers 1 to 999, the first number in the sequence must be entered as 001.
4-22 Defining Field Options
Option 61 (Re-image Field)
This option redraws (reimages) a constant field when you have a constant
field next to a variable field on your label. It can be used on text, constant
text, bar code, line, or box fields.
These printers do not redraw an area if the field data does not change.
When a field changes, that area is cleared and the new field data is imaged.
However, the new field data may require a larger area than the previous
field did. In some cases, neighboring fields that do not change (constant
fields) may be covered with white space from the changing field’s (variable
fields) area. Use this option to reimage the constant field, or it may appear
broken.
Note:
The most common use for this option is with incrementing fields on
your label, because they may cover a constant field.
Syntax
R,61 p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 61
Option 61.
Example
R,61
Reimages the constant field that appears next to a variable field.
Re-Image ON
Re-Image OFF
Re-Image ON
Re-Image OFF
In the above example, Option 61 was applied to the bar code field to keep
the incrementing field (Box #) from blocking out the bar code field.
Defining Field Options 4-23
Option 62 (Bypass Bar Code)
This option allows the optional verifier to bypass (skip) bar code(s) on a
format. The verifier does not scan any bar code with Option 62 applied to it.
Syntax
R,62 p
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 62
Option 62. The verifier does not scan the bar code associated with this
option.
Note:
Adjacent bar codes on a format need to start and end on the same
row (be the same height). Also, both adjacent bar codes (or
neither bar code) must be scanned. However, do not apply Option
62 to all bar codes on a format or 764 errors appear.
Option 62 can be applied to
any bar code on this format.
Option 62 must be applied to
BOTH adjacent bar codes.
The verifier's beam scans the entire width of the label. It cannot
scan half the label's width. The verifier errors if Option 62 is
applied to only ONE of the adjacent bar codes.
4-24 Defining Field Options
Example
B,1,12,F,110,115,1,2,120,5,L,0 p
R,62 p
The verifier does not scan or verify this UPCA bar code on the format.
Ve r i f i e r I n f o r m a t i o n
¨ There is a 0.50-inch no scan zone on the trailing edge of each label.
¨ You cannot verify adjacent bar codes that do not start and end on the
same print row. See the following graphic.
B,3,13,V,310,28,8,4,50,8,L,0 p Postal Code Bar code
B,4,13,V,355,200,8,4,50,8,L,0 p Tracking Number Bar code
Bar code begins at
row 355
Bar code begins at
row 310
The verifier cannot verify the
"postal code" and "tracking
number" bar codes, because they
do not start and end on the
same row.
Defining Field Options 4-25
Option 64 (Program AFI Field for UHF RFID)
Use Option 64 to program the AFI memory in the EPC memory bank (field)
for UHF RFID tags. Unlike the AFI field for HF tags, currently, the AFI field
cannot be locked for UHF tags.
Note:
Do not apply a lock to the EPC memory bank since the AFI memory
is part of the EPC memory bank. If the EPC memory bank is
locked, the AFI memory cannot be programmed (the printer errors).
For more information about using EPC data or locking fields, refer to the
Multi-Protocol Application Notes (available on our Web site).
Syntax
R,64,field,"code",lock¦
R1. R
Option Header.
R2. 64
Option 64.
R3. field
Memory field to program. Use A (AFI).
R4. “code”
Byte code. This is an 8-bit (1 byte) character to program, enclosed within
quotation marks. Range: 0-255. Use the ASCII character or the tilde
followed by the equivalent three-character decimal value. For example, the
letter “A” can be entered as “A” or “~041”.
R5. lock
Lock code. Use 0 (no lock).
Example
X,5,16,0,0¦
R,64,A,"A",0¦
Programs the character “A” into the AFI memory field. The data is not
locked (0).
Example
X,5,16,0,0¦
R,64,A,"~046",0¦
Programs the character “F” into the AFI memory field. The data is not
locked (0).
4-26 Defining Field Options
Using Check Digits
Check digits are typically used to ensure that a text or bar code field scans
correctly. If you apply Option 31, the printer calculates a check digit. A
check digit scheme determines how the printer calculates a check digit.
When you define a check digit scheme, you assign a number to identify it.
This number is later entered in box R4 when you apply Option 31 to a field.
You can use check digits with text or bar code fields. Check digit
calculations are performed on numeric data only.
Do not use check digits with price fields. Do not define a check digit
scheme for UPC, EAN, Code 39 (with the MOD43 check digit), and Code 93
bar codes, because they have predefined check digits.
Syntax
{A,selector,action,device,modulus,
fld_length,D/P,"weights" p }
A1. A
Check Digit Header.
A2. selector
Assign a number from 1 to 10 to this check digit formula.
A3. action
The action to perform. Enter A to add the check digit scheme.
A4. device
Format storage device. Options:
F
Flash (must be formatted first. See “Formatting Flash” and
“Flash Memory Guidelines” in Chapter 2 for more information.)
R
Volatile RAM
Note:
Check digits stored in flash are saved when the printer is
turned off.
A5. modulus
Number from 2 to 11. The modulus is used to divide the sum of products
or the sum of digits.
A6. fld_length
The maximum number of characters the field will contain.
Range: 0 to 2710.
A7. D/P
Algorithm. The algorithm determines how the check digit is calculated.
Options:
D
sum of digits
P
sum of products
A8. “weights”
String of digits used for calculation. A weight string is a group of two or
more numbers that is applied to a field. The number of digits in this string
should equal the number in fld_length. Enclose in quotation marks.
Range: 0 to 2710.
Defining Field Options 4-27
Example
{A,1,A,R,10,5,P,"65432" p }
Adds check digit scheme number 1 to the printer’s memory. The modulus is
10, the maximum number of characters in the field is 5. The check digit is
calculated by using the Sum of Products and the string of digits used in the
calculation is “65432.”
Sum of Products Calculation
This is an example of how the printer uses Sum of Products to calculate a
check digit for this data:
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
1.
Weights are applied to each digit, starting with the last digit in the
weight string. They are applied right to left, beginning at the right-most
position of the field. Remember, a weight string must contain at least
two different numbers. This example has a weight string of 1,2,3,4:
field:
weight string:
2.
Each digit in the field is multiplied by the weight assigned to it:
field:
weight string:
products:
3.
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
20 2 6 6 16 5 4 3 36
Next, the product of each digit is added together. This is the sum of the
products.
20 + 2 + 6 + 6 + 16 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 36 = 98
4.
Divide the sum of the products by the modulus (10 in this case), only to
the whole number. The balance is called the remainder.
9
10 98
90
8
4-28 Defining Field Options
5.
Subtract the remainder from the modulus.
The result becomes the check digit. In this case, the check digit is 2.
10 - 8 = 2
Sum of Digits Calculation
This is an example of how the printer uses Sum of Digits to calculate a
check digit for this data:
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
1.
Weights are applied to each digit, starting with the last digit in the
weight string. They are applied right to left, beginning at the right-most
position of the field. Remember, a weight string must contain at least
two different numbers. This example has a weight string of 1,2,3,4:
field:
weight string:
2.
Each digit in the field is multiplied by the weight assigned to it:
field:
weight string:
products:
3.
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
20 2 6 6 16 5 4 3 36
Next, the digits of the products are added together. Two-digit products
are treated as two separate digits.
This is the sum of the digits.
2 + 0 + 2 + 6 + 6 + 1 + 6 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 6 = 44
4.
Divide the sum of the digits by the modulus (10 in this case), only to the
whole number. The balance is called the remainder.
4
10 44
40
4
Defining Field Options 4-29
5.
Subtract the remainder from the modulus.
The result becomes the check digit. In this case, the check digit is 6.
10 - 4 = 6
4-30 Defining Field Options
5
C R E AT I N G G R A P H I C S
This chapter provides information on how to
¨
map out the graphic image using the hexadecimal (hex) or
run length method.
¨
create a graphic packet using a graphic header, bitmap,
duplicate, next-bitmap, text, constant text, line, and box
fields.
¨
place a graphic image into a format.
You can use graphic packets to create bitmapped images. To
include a graphic packet within your format, your format must
contain a graphic field. See “Placing the Graphic in a Format” for
more information.
Creating Graphics 5-1
Overview of Compliance Labels
You can create compliance labels by using a graphic packet for the fixed
fields and a format packet for the variable fields of your compliance label.
The fixed fields of a compliance label are composed of text, lines, or boxes,
which are repeated on each label. The variable fields are composed of text,
bar codes, and order information, which changes with each label. Using a
graphic packet for the fixed fields saves time, because the printer does not
have to image all the lines or boxes each time the compliance label is
printed.
Also, using a graphic packet for a compliance label reduces the number of
fields in your format. Formats have a maximum number of fields per packet
(0 to 999). However, you can bypass that requirement by placing your
compliance layout in a graphic packet. When you process your formats, you
only need one line in the format packet to reference the graphic packet.
The following example shows how to reference a graphic packet from within
a format packet.
{
F,1,A,R,E,400,400,"RDCI" p
G,57,0,0,0,0 p
C,40,10,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"To:",0p
B,2,13,V,310,30,8,4,50,8,L,0 p
}
start of header
format header
reference to graphic packet
constant text field
bar code field
end of header
Once you have your compliance label format set, all you need to do is add
the variable sections (bar codes, addresses, and order information) to the
format packet.
To see a sample compliance label graphic packet, see “Sample Compliance
Graphic Packet.” To see a sample compliance label using a graphic packet
within a format, see “Sample Compliance Label.”
5-2 Creating Graphics
Overview of Bitmapped Images
A printed image is formed through a series of dots. Each square on the grid
below represents a dot on the printhead. The graphic image is created by
blackening dots in a specific pattern. You can print varying shades of gray
according to the concentration of dots on the image. When the dots are
printed together, the end result is a graphic image.
Determining a Method
You can use one of two methods to map out your graphic image:
Hex Method
The dot sequences are segmented into binary numbers
and then converted to hex numbers.
A graphic using gray-scaling, several slanted lines, or
several vertical lines typically translates more efficiently
with hex representation.
Run Length
Encoding Method
The dot sequences are segmented into black and white
strings within a row. The total count of each white string
is converted to a lower-case letter, corresponding to
numeric value. The total count of each black string is
converted to an uppercase letter, corresponding to
numeric value. This method can reduce imaging time
for graphics that contain repetitive rows of dots. A
graphic with horizontal lines or very few white-to-black
borders typically translates more efficiently with run
length encoding.
The most efficient encoding method depends on how complicated your
graphic image is and whether or not imaging time is a concern. You may
want to experiment with both encoding methods to get optimal performance.
Creating Graphics 5-3
Designing Compliance Labels
To use a graphic packet to design your compliance label:
1.
Decide which fields are fixed (constant text, lines, boxes) and which
fields are variable (addresses and shipping information).
2.
Design your compliance label as you would any other format.
Designing Bitmapped Images
Once you determine the encoding method to use, you
can begin mapping out your graphic image.
Note:
The image that you map must be an upside
down mirror image of the final result.
Special Considerations
Solid black print cannot exceed 30% of any given square inch of the supply.
If the black print exceeds this limit, you may lose data or damage the
printhead.
In the first label, the large “M” logo and thick black line exceed the allowed
black to white print ratio. In the second label, the large “M” logo does not
exceed the black to white print ratio.
2 inches
2 inches
Exceeds
Limit
0.5" Does not
exceed
limit
Exceeds
Limit
Does not
exceed
limit
5-4 Creating Graphics
0.5"
Using the Hex Method
The following steps explain how to derive a hex character string from a
bitmapped graphic.
Each square on the grid represents a dot. A black square indicates the dot
is ON, and a white square indicates the dot is OFF. A sequence of binary
numbers, called a bit pattern or bitmap, determines what dots are on and
off. The numbers “0" and ”1" are used for this purpose. The number “1"
turns a dot on and ”0" turns a dot off.
All hex numbers must be two digits. For example, write hex 0 as 00, or hex
E as 0E.
1.
Assign 1 to every black square and 0 to every white square.
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111110000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111000000000000000000000000001111111110000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001111110000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000011110000000000000000111111111111111111111111110000000000000001111000000000
00000000000000000000000001111100001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111110000
00000000000000000000000110000011111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111000001100
00000000000000000000000110001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111111111000000000000000000011111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111111111100
00000000000000000000000001111111100000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000011111111110000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000010000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000011000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000001111000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000111000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000111111000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000001111000000
00000000111111100000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110001111000000
Creating Graphics 5-5
2.
Section off the grid in columns of eight. If any rows are not divisible by
8, add enough 0’s to complete a column.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000010
00000011
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
3.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11100000
11100000
11111100
11111110
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000011
01111100
10000011
10001111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011100
00000000
00000000
00000001
00111110
11000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
10000000
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
00000011
00111111
00000000
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
11111111
11111111
00111111
11000000
00000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111000
00000000
00000111
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00001111
00000000
11110000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111000
00000111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00000000
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
11111110
11111111
00000000
00000000
11100000
00011110
11100001
11111110
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00111111
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00000011
11100011
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11110000
00001100
11111110
11111110
11111110
11111100
11110000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
One row at a time, convert each group of eight binary digits to hex.
starting at position 49 ...
00111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
4.
=
=
=
=
3F
FF
FF
F0
Write the hex values for each row as a continuous string.
row 1, position 49 = 03FFFFFF00000
5.
Repeat steps 3 through 4 for each row on the grid.
6.
Insert the hex values in syntax format.
5-6 Creating Graphics
Using the Run Length Encoding Method
The following steps explain how to derive a run length character string from
a bitmapped graphic.
Each square on the grid represents a dot. A black square indicates the dot
is ON, and a white square indicates the dot is OFF.
Note:
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000010
00000011
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
1.
The following example shows “1" to indicate when a square is ON,
and ”0" to indicate when a square is OFF. You do not have to
convert your dots when using the run length method.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11100000
11100000
11111100
11111110
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000011
01111100
10000011
10001111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011100
00000000
00000000
00000001
00111110
11000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
10000000
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
00000011
00111111
00000000
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
11111111
11111111
00111111
11000000
00000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111000
00000000
00000111
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00001111
00000000
11110000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111000
00001111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00000000
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
11111110
11111111
00000000
00000000
11000000
00011110
11100001
11111110
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00111111
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00000011
11100011
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11110000
00001100
11111110
11111110
11111110
11111100
11110000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
Count the number of consecutive OFF or ON dots in a row. Write the
number of consecutive dots in sequence for the first row on the grid.
Write “ON” or “OFF” after each number to indicate ON or OFF dots.
(row 1, position 50) 26 on
(row 2, position 39) 11 on, 26 off, 9 on
(row 3, position 34) 5 on, 45 off, 6 on
2.
Replace each number you have written with its corresponding code from
the Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart provided in Appendix C, “Symbol
Sets/Code Pages.” Be sure to use CAPITAL letters for black dots and
lower-case letters for white dots.
26 on (Z)
11 on (K), 26 off (z), 9 on (I)
.
.
Creating Graphics 5-7
If the number is greater than 26, write z, followed by the letter
corresponding to the amount over 26. For example, to represent 45 off
dots, write zs.
5 on (E), 45 off (zs), 6 on (F)
.
.
3.
Write the letter codes in sequence, uninterrupted, for each row.
(row
(row
(row
(row
.
.
Note:
1,position
2,position
3,position
4,position
50)
39)
34)
30)
Z
KzI
EzsF
DpZoD
If the end of the line specifies OFF dots (lower-case letters), the
ending lower-case letters can be omitted. For example, uZFu can
be written as uZF.
4.
Repeat steps 1 through 5 for each row on the grid.
5.
Insert the code values in syntax format.
5-8 Creating Graphics
Determining How to Store the Image
Once you have mapped out your graphic image, determine how you want to
store it. You have several options:
¨ Flash
¨ Volatile RAM
¨ Temporary Storage
Using Flash
Use flash memory when the graphic image is used by several formats,
because the graphic only has to be sent once. This eliminates the need to
send the graphic image repeatedly. See “Placing the Graphic in a Format,”
for more information about using the graphic packet in a format. Format
flash memory before you can use it. From the Main Menu, select Setup,
Flash Memory, then, Format Flash. The process takes a few minutes.
Graphics stored in flash memory are saved when the printer is turned
off. You may need to clear flash memory, refer to your Operator’s
Handbook.
U s i n g Vo l a t i l e R A M
You should use RAM when the graphic image is used by several formats,
because you only have to send the graphic image once. This eliminates the
need to send the graphic image repeatedly. See “Placing the Graphic in a
Format,” for more information about using the graphic packet in a format.
Graphics smaller than approximately 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch can be stored in
printer RAM and referenced by the graphic ID number.
Note:
Graphics are stored in the format buffer and remain there until
another graphic packet is sent or the printer is turned off.
U s i n g Te m p o r a r y S t o r a g e
You should use temporary storage when the graphic image is used only in
one format or your graphic image is very large. Graphic data in temporary
storage is held in the image buffer until the graphic is printed and then it is
cleared from memory. Temporary graphics are also cleared from memory
when you send a new batch or update batch. You can use the same graphic
image multiple times on a format. Send the graphic image to the printer
after the format to which it applies.
Creating Graphics 5-9
If a graphic is stored in temporary storage, do not place a graphic field in
the format. This will cause an error. Instead, position the graphic image by
using the row and column locations in the graphic packet header. Image
memory (temporary storage) will accept a graphic packet 1218 rows long
with 811 dots per row.
Creating a Graphic Packet
Your graphic packet can contain
¨ bitmapped fields (for bitmapped images)
¨ constant text fields
¨ lines
¨ boxes
Images using hex representation or run length encoding are bitmapped
images. See “Designing Bitmapped Images” to design your bitmapped
image.
Once you design your graphic image, you are ready to define a graphic
packet. This packet generates the graphic image you use in a format.
Positioning the Graphic Image
This section explains how to position the graphic image within a graphic
packet header, a field of a graphic packet, or within a format.
Within the Graphic Packet Header
When you are using RAM, the row and column parameters in the graphic
header are usually 0,0, because placement is controlled by the graphic field
in your format. This is especially true when designing a compliance label
overlay.
When you are using temporary storage, these parameters control the
placement of the graphic image on the supply.
5-10 Creating Graphics
The area enclosed within the dotted lines
represents the graphic image starting at 0,0 (as
defined in the graphic header).
If you want a fixed amount of white space around
your graphic image, use something other than 0 for
row and/or column.
The area enclosed within the dotted lines
represents the graphic image starting at 0,0 with a
fixed amount of white space (10,10) around the
graphic image.
Within the Field
In a bitmap, constant text, line, or box field, the row
and column parameters control where an individual
field or bitmapped row begins in relation to the
coordinates defined in the graphic header.
The bottom of the triangle in this example
represents the first field of the graphic packet
starting at 10,0.
Creating Graphics 5-11
Within a Format
When you define the graphic field within your format, the row and column
parameters represent where on the format to place the graphic image.
If you are doing a compliance label, these
numbers are usually 0,0, because your
compliance label covers the entire supply. See
"Placing the Graphic in a Format," for a sample
compliance label.
If you are placing a graphic (a logo, for
example) within a certain area on your supply,
enter the starting position (bottom left corner) of
the graphic image.
This label shows the triangle “logo” beginning
(the bottom left corner) at 400, 75 as defined in
the graphic field.
Defining the Graphic Header
Every graphic packet must contain a graphic header. This is the first thing
you enter. It identifies and provides important measurement and formatting
information for the graphic. Bitmap, duplicate, next-bitmap, constant text,
line, and box fields follow the graphic header, if they are used.
Syntax
{G,graphID,action,device,units,row,col,
mode,"name" p
G1. G
Graphic Header.
G2. graphID
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the graphic image.
G3. action
Enter A to add the graphic to the printer.
5-12 Creating Graphics
G4. device
Graphic storage device:
F
Flash (saved when the printer is turned off)
R
Volatile RAM
T
Temporary storageNote:
G5. units
Unit of measure. For bitmapped graphics, G (dots) is the only valid option.
G6. row
Distance between the bottom of the graphic image area and the first bitmap
line. This is usually 0, unless you want a fixed amount of white space
around the graphic image. See “Positioning the Graphic Image,” for more
information.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
G7. column
Distance between the left edge of the graphic image area and the left edge
of first bitmap line. This is usually 0, unless you want a fixed amount of
white space around the graphic image. See “Positioning the Graphic
Image,” for more information. Use the previous table for values.
G8. mode
Imaging mode. Enter 0.
G9. “name”
Graphic name (optional), 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation marks.
Example
{G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99Wire" p
Adds a graphic image identified by number 99 to volatile RAM. The graphic
uses dot measurement. The image will be placed according to the row and
column parameters in the graphic field. The imaging mode is 0 and the
image is called 99Wire.
Creating Graphics 5-13
Creating Bitmap Fields
This defines one row of dots, starting at a specific row and column within
the graphic image. Each unique row of dots requires a bitmap field. A
bitmap field can later be repeated by using a duplicate field.
Syntax
B,row,column,algorithm,"data" p
B1. B
Bitmap Field.
B2. row
Distance (in dots) from the graphic image’s bottom margin to the bitmap
line.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
B3. column
Distance (in dots) from the graphic image’s left edge to the bitmap line.
Use the previous table for values.
B4. algorithm
Coding method for bitmap data:
H
Hex Representation
R
Run Length Encoding
B5. data
Character string made up of hex or run length encoding. Do not put spaces
or any other character between the numbers. Range: 0 to 2710.
Example
{B,39,56,H,"3FFFFFF0" p
Defines a bitmapped graphic field. The image begins 39 dots from the
bottom and 56 dots from the left edge of the graphic area. Hex
representation is used.
5-14 Creating Graphics
Creating Next-Bitmap Fields
This field uses the previous field’s row and column locations. It allows you
to use the bitmap or duplicate field data without having to recalculate row
and column locations. This field represents one row of dots on the image.
Syntax
N,adjdir,adjamt,algorithm,"data" p
N1. N
Next-Bitmap Field.
N2. adjdir
Increments or decrements the row count. Inserts the duplicate line after or
before the current row.
0
Increments (inserts after)
1
Decrements (inserts before)
For example:
B,50,35,R,"GsSsG" p
N,0,1,R,"DpZoD" p
prints a next-bitmap field on row 51 at column 35.
N3. adjamt
Amount of row adjustment in dot rows. Using 0 overwrites the same line.
Range: 0 to 999.
N4. algorithm
Coding method for bitmap data:
H
Hex Representation
R
Run Length Encoding
N5. “data”
Character string made up of hex or run length encoding. Do not put spaces
or any other character between the hex numbers or run length code letters.
Range: 0 to 2710.
Example
B,39,56,H,"3FFFFFF0" p
N,0,1,H,"000000E00000" p
Defines a next-bitmap graphic field beginning on row 40. The row count
increments by 1. Hex representation is used.
Creating Graphics 5-15
Creating Duplicate Fields
If a line of data is identical to a previous bitmap or next-bitmap field, the
duplicate field allows you to repeat the dot sequence without retyping the
data. A duplicate field represents one row of dots on the image.
Note:
Duplicate fields are useful when you have a graphic with a lot of
repetition.
Syntax
D,adjdir,adjamt,count p
D1. D
Duplicate Field.
D2. adjdir
Increments or decrements the row count. Inserts the duplicate line after or
before the current row.
0
Increments (inserts after)
1
Decrements (inserts before)
For example:
B,50,35,R,"GsSsG" p
D,0,20,2 p
inserts row 50 again at row 70 and row 90. Rows
70 and 90 do not have to be defined later.
D3. adjamt
Amount of row adjustment in dot rows. Range: 0 to 999. The above
example adjusts the duplicate field to image on row 70 and 90 (adding 20
to the current row count).
D4. count
Number of times to duplicate the line. Range: 0 to 999.
Example
B,117,24,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" p
D,0,1,2 p
Defines a duplicate field that is imaged after the bitmap line. This field
duplicates the preceding bitmap line twice (at row 118 and 119).
You can use constant text, line, or box fields in a graphic packet to create a
compliance label overlay. See Chapter 3, “Defining Fields,” for more
information about these fields.
5-16 Creating Graphics
Sample Compliance Graphic Packet
A sample compliance graphic packet is shown below.
{G,57,A,R,E,0,0,0,"OVERLAY" p
L,V,500,155,90,85,3 p
L,V,298,245,90,102,3 p
L,V,500,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,400,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,298,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,200,2,0,390,5 p
C,560,10,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"FROM:",0 p
C,560,160,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"CARRIER:",0 p
C,529,160,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"PRO NUMBER:",0 p
C,511,160,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"B/L NUMBER:",0 p
C,472,10,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"TO:",0 p
C,387,10,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"SHIP TO POSTAL CODE",0 p
C,391,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"APPOINTMENT NUMBER:",0 p
C,358,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"ORDER TYPE:",0 p
C,327,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"ITEM:",0 p
C,190,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"UPC SHIPPING CONTAINER CODE",0 p
C,548,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MONARCH MARKING SYSTEMS",0 p
C,538,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"170 MONARCH LANE",0 p
C,528,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"P.O. BOX 608",0 p
C,518,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"DAYTON, OHIO 45401",0 p
C,462,313,0,2,4,3,B,L,0,0,"#",0 p }
The sample compliance label overlay was
created with this packet, using the format
provided in “Placing the Graphic in a Format.”
Creating Graphics 5-17
Sample Hex Graphic Packet
{G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99WIRE"p
B,39,48,H,"3FFFFFF0" p
B,40,32,H,"01FFC000000FF8"p
B,41,32,H,"3E00000000000FC0" p
B,42,24,H,"03C0003FFFFFF0000F"p
B,43,24,H,"7C3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1F0" p
B,44,16,H,"0183FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF06" p
B,45,16,H,"018FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE" p
B,46,16,H,"01FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE"p
B,47,16,H,"01FFFFFF80001FFFFFFFFE" p
B,48,16,H,"01FFFFF0000000007FFFFC" p
B,49,24,H,"7F800007FFFF00003FF0" p
B,50,24,H,"1FC00007FFFF00001FC0" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,51,24,H,"1C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0"p
D,0,4,4 p
B,52,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,53,24,H,"03FFF0000000007FFE"p
D,0,4,4 p
B,70,0,H,"0400001FC00007FFFF00001FC0" p
B,71,0,H,"0600001C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0" p
B,72,0,H,"030000003FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" p
B,73,0,H,"01000003FFF0000000007FFE" p
B,74,8,H,"FC001C03FFFFFFFFFFFE00C0" p
B,75,8,H,"FE00003FFFFFFFFFFFFFE0C0" p
B,76,8,H,"1FF803FFF0000000007FFE" p
B,77,8,H,"0FFFCFFC00000000000001C0" p
B,78,16,H,"FFDF000FFFFFFFFF8003C0" p
B,79,16,H,"7FFFC00007FFFF00001FC0" p
B,80,24,H,"1C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,81,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,82,24,H,"03FFF0000000007FFE" p
D,0,4,3 p
B,83,24,H,"1FC00007FFFF00001FC0" p
D,0,4,3 p
B,98,24,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF0" p
5-18 Creating Graphics
B,99,24,H,"07FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" p
B,100,24,H,"1FF9FFFFFFFFFFFFFF" p
B,101,24,H,"3FFE0007FFFF8000FF80" p
B,102,24,H,"391E0027FFFF803FFFC0" p
B,103,24,H,"1C7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC0" p
B,104,24,H,"1FC1FFFFFFFFFFFF1FC0" p
B,105,24,H,"0FFDFFFFFFFFFFE0FF" p
B,106,24,H,"FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8" p
B,107,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE0" p
B,108,32,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFF"p
B,109,48,H,"07FFFF80" p
D,0,1,2 p
B,111,48,H,"FFFFFFFF" p
B,112,32,H,"FFFF00000000FFE0" p
B,113,24,H,"078000FFFFFFFF001F" p
B,114,24,H,"78FFFFFFFFFFFFFFE060" p
B,115,16,H,"0187FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC18" p
B,116,16,H,"027FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF2" p
B,117,16,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" p
D,0,1,2 p
B,120,16,H,"01FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8"p
B,121,24,H,"FEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE0"p
B,122,24,H,"07FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" p
B,123,32,H,"FFFFFFFFFFFFFFC0" p
B,124,32,H,"01FFFFFFFFFFF8" p }
Creating Graphics 5-19
Sample Run Length Graphic Packet
{G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99WIRE" p
B,39,50,R,"Z" p
B,40,39,R,"KzI"p
B,41,34,R,"EzsF" p
B,42,30,R,"DpZoD" p
B,43,25,R,"EdZZEdE" p
B,44,23,R,"BeZZMeB" p
B,45,23,R,"BcZZW" p
B,46,23,R,"ZZZA" p
B,47,23,R,"ZDsZE" p
B,48,24,"TzkU" p
B,49,25,"HtRqJ" p
B,50,27,"GsSsG" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,51,27,"ChZWgC" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,52,34,R,"ZZEdC" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,53,30,R,"NzkN" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,70,5,R,"AuGsSsG" p
B,71,5,R,"BtChZWgC" p
B,72,6,R,"DxZZEdC" p
B,73,7,R,"CtNzkN" p
B,74,8,R,"FmChZWhC" p
B,75,8,R,"GsZZEdC" p
B,76,11,R,"JiNzkN" p
B,77,12,R,"NbJzzeC" p
B,78,16,R,"JaElZKmD" p
B,79,17,R,"QsSsG"p
B,80,27,R,"ChZWgC" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,81,34,R,"ZZEdC" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,82,30,R,"NzkN" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,83,27,R,"GsSsG" p
D,0,4,4 p
B,98,30,R,"ZZJ" p
B,99,29,R,"ZZM" p
B,100,27,R,"JbZZE" p
5-20 Creating Graphics
B,101,26,R,"MnToI" p
B,102,26,R,"CbHnTiP"
B,103,27,R,"CcZZC" p
B,104,27,R,"GeZWcG" p
B,105,28,R,"JaZReH" p
B,106,32,R,"ZZI" p
B,107,34,R,"ZZE" p
B,108,38,R,"ZQ"p
B,109,53,R,"T" p
D,0,1,2 p
B,111,48,R,"ZF" p
B,112,33,R,"PzfK" p
B,113,29,R,"CpZBoE" p
B,114,25,R,"DcZZGfB"
B,115,23,R,"BdZZMeB"
B,116,22,R,"AbZZVbA"
B,117,22,R,"ZZZB" p
D,0,1,2p
B,120,23,R,"ZZZ" p
B,121,25,R,"ZZV" p
B,122,29,R,"ZZM" p
B,123,32,R,"ZZF" p
B,124,39,R,"ZT" p }
p
p
p
p
Creating Graphics 5-21
Placing the Graphic in a Format
To include a graphic within a format:
1.
Design the graphic image as shown in “Designing Bitmapped Images.”
2.
If you are using RAM, place a graphic field in the format file to reference
the graphic. See the following section, “Defining the Graphic Field,” for
more information.
Note:
If you are using temporary storage, you do not need a graphic field
in your format to reference the graphic image.
3.
Download all the necessary packets (check digit, format, etc.).
4.
Send the graphic file to the printer, if you have not already done so.
See “Creating a Graphic Packet” for more information.
Defining the Graphic Field
The graphic field in a format references the graphic image by the graphID in
the graphic header. This field is required only if the graphic will be
stored in RAM.
Syntax
G,graphID,row,col,mode,rotation p
G1. G
Graphic Field.
G2. graphID
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the graphic image.
5-22 Creating Graphics
G3. row
Distance between the bottom of the print area on the supply to the bottom
of the graphic image. Measured in selected units.
Printer
Unit of
Measure
Row or
End Row
Column or
End Column
9825/
9855/
9860
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
0-1599
0-4061
0-3246
0-399
0-1013
0-810
9855/
9860
English
Metric
300 dpi Dots
0-1199
0-3045
0-3597
0-399
0-1013
0-1197
9855RFMP/
9855HF
English
Metric
203 dpi Dots
300 dpi Dots
0-1299
0-3299
0-2637
0-3897
0-399
0-1013
0-810
0-1197
The row specified in the constant text, bitmap, line, or box field is added to
the row value above to determine the actual position in the format.
G4. column
Distance between the left edge of the print area on the supply and the left
edge of the graphic. Measured in selected units. Use the previous table
for values. The column specified in the constant text, bitmap, line, or box
field is added to the col value above to determine the actual position in the
format.
G5. mode
Imaging mode. Enter 0.
G6. rotation
The orientation of the graphic on the supply. Enter 0.
Example
G,57,0,0,0,0 p
Defines a graphic field that is identified by the number 57. The image
begins at 0,0. The imaging mode is 0 and there is no rotation.
Creating Graphics 5-23
Sample Compliance Label
This sample format packet uses the graphic packet in “Creating a Graphic
Packet.”
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"RDCI" p
G,57,0,0,0,0 p
T,1,15,V,529,252,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,2,15,V,511,252,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
B,3,13,V,311,28,8,4,50,8,L,0 p
B,4,14,V,17,60,50,5,110,8,L,0 p
T,5,30,V,161,080,0,3,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,6,15,V,467,40,4,1,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,7,10,V,462,330,6,2,4,3,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,8,20,V,545,160,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,9,30,V,446,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,10,30,V,426,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,11,30,V,406,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,12,20,V,368,270,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,13,5,V,335,270,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,14,15,V,304,270,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,15,15,V,366,65,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
R,1,"(420)" p }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"123456789" p
2,"987654321" p
3,"42032678" p
4,"10028028662854" p
5,"1 00 28028 66285 4" p
6,"RODGER DIST CTR" p
7,"8292" p
8,"BROADWAY" p
9,"555 WEST OAK AVE." p
10,"DAYTON, OH 45401-0608" p
11," " p
12,”999991-001" p
13,"AR" p
14,"999-999999-99" p
15,"32678" p }
5-24 Creating Graphics
Sample Bitmap Graphic Image
The following format shows the graphic packets (hex and run length) in a
sample format.
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"FMT2" p
G,99,227,35,0,0 p
Q,240,15,300,125,10," " p
T,1,5,V,285,137,0,10,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,2,5,V,255,137,0,10,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,3,15,V,180,25,0,10,1,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,4,15,V,121,35,0,1,3,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
L,S,94,15,94,235,10,"" p
B,5,12,F,50,65,1,2,40,1,L,0 p }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"Pat’s" p
2,"Parts" p
3,"3/8 inch Wire" p
4,"3.55/8 Pack" p
5,"345911871209" p }
Creating Graphics 5-25
5-26 Creating Graphics
PRINTING
6
This chapter describes how to
¨
download files to the printer
¨
define the batch header, batch control, and batch data files
¨
create DOS batch files.
This chapter also lists some special printing considerations.
Printing 6-1
Turn on the printer and make sure it is ready to receive data before you
download. See your host’s documentation, system administrator, or
“Downloading Methods” for information on ways to download.
When downloading, send your packets in this order:
1.
Memory configuration packet (M)
2.
Configuration packets (A-G)
3.
Any of the following:
* Check digit packets (see Chapter 4)
* Format packets (see Chapter 3)
* Graphic packets (see Chapter 5)
4.
Batch data (see “Defining the Batch Header”)
Downloading Files
To download from a PC:
1.
Check that the PC and the printer are connected.
2.
Check that communications have been established between the PC and
the printer.
3.
Send the communication settings packet to select the printer’s
communication settings. See “Defining the Communication Settings
Packet” in Chapter 2 for more information (only used for serial
communication). If you change the printer’s communication settings,
make sure they match those at the host before sending any packets to
the printer.
6-2 Printing
4.
Type this command at the DOS prompt:
COPY LABEL1.FMT COM1 Transmits a file called "LABEL1.FMT" to COM1.
COPY LABEL1.BCH COM1 Transmits a batch called “LABEL1.BCH” to COM1.
If you use the COPY command to download your formats, set flow control to
DTR (not XON/XOFF). Also, do not use the MS-DOS prompt from inside
Windows, because you will get a framing error.
Refer to the Operator’s Handbook or keyboard’s Operating Instructions for
offline data entry and more printing information.
Defining the Batch Header
Batch data is the actual information printed on the supply. Batch data fills in
the format’s text, bar code, and non-printable text fields.
A batch packet contains the following three parts:
batch header
identifies the format and how many labels to print.
batch control
defines the print job.
batch data
(optional)
defines the actual information printed on the label.
A batch header begins the file. It tells which format the batch uses and how
many labels to print. To record batch data, make a copy of the worksheet in
Appendix D, “Format Design Tools.”
Printing 6-3
Syntax
{B,format#,N/U,quantity p
B1. B
Batch Header.
B2. format#
Format number (1 to 999) to use.
B3. N/U
Controls how image is generated.
N
New (default). Erase image and re-image all fields using
online data. Any missing fields will be blank.
U
Update last image with one or more fields.
All other fields remain the same as the last queued batch.
B4. quantity
Quantity to print (0 to 32000). Using 0 pre-images the field to reduce the
imaging time for labels. See “Batch Quantity Zero Method” for more
information.
Example
{B,1,N,1 p
Defines a batch header that uses format #1 and reimages all fields using the
online data. One label is printed with this batch.
Defining the Batch Control Field
The batch header must precede this field. The batch control field defines
the print job and applies only to the batch that immediately follows.
Syntax
E,feed_mode,batch_sep,print_mult,multi_part,
cut_type,cut_mult,ver_mode,cable_det p
E1. E
Batch Control Field.
E2. feed_mode
Feed Mode. Options:
0
Continuous Feed (default)
1
On-Demand
E3. batch_sep
Batch Separator (striped label in between batches). Options:
0
Does not print a separator (default)
1
Prints a separator
2
Double-length separator- prints 2 tags (9855/9860)
Note:
6-4 Printing
Do not use batch separators with continuous (non-indexed) supply
or RFID supply. If using a stacker, the batch separator is always
3.66 inches long.
E4. print_mult
Number of tags (1 to 999) with the same image. 0 is the default.
E5. multi_part
Number of identical parts on one tag (1 to 5). 0 is the default.
E6. cut_type
Enables or disables the knife. Not all the printers support a knife. See the
following chart for more information. Options:
0
Does not cut (default)
1
Cuts before, during, and after last tag - printed tag(s) left
between printhead & knife.
2
Cuts in strips, not each tag - printed tag(s) left between
printhead & knife.
3
Cuts before, during, and after last tag - no printed tags left
between printhead & knife.
4
Does not cut before first tag, cuts each tag and after the last
tag - printed tag(s) left between printhead & knife.
5
Cuts in strips, not each tag - no printed tags left between
printhead & knife.
Recommended Settings for optimal performance with:
Description of cut mode operation
Cut
Mode
Cut Before
first tag in
Batch?
Cut Between Cut After
Tags?
Batch?
Straight Edge Tags
Extended
backfeed
Overstrike
w/verifier
Edge Aperture Tags
Extended
backfeed
Overstrike
w/verifier
0
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
1
Yes
Yes
Yes*
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
2
Yes
No
(Feeds strips)
Yes*
Yes
Yes
No
No
3
Yes
Yes
Yes**
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
4
No
Yes
Yes*
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
(Feeds strips)
Yes**
Yes
Yes
No
No
5
* The last tag in the batch is queued to be cut once it reaches the knife; however, there may be printed
tags left between the printhead and the knife. The user must press FEED/CUT or send another batch
to feed the last tag out far enough to be cut. Enabling extended backfeed eliminates printed tags
between the knife and printhead.
** The printer feeds the last tag in the batch out far enough to be cut. No user intervention
is required to cut the last tag.
Note:
The 9860 printer automatically backfeeds when necessary. See
“Defining the Backfeed Control Packet” in Chapter 2 for more
information. Do not use extended backfeed when sensing on
attacher-hole supplies.
Using "overstrike/continue" as the Error Action minimizes the
number of RFID tags left between the printhead and knife. To use
the least amount of RFID tags, set overstrike to five. Refer to the
printer's Operator's Handbook for more information.
Printing 6-5
E7. cut_mult
Number of tags to print before
cutting. A cut multiple of one cuts
after each tag. Range: 0 to 32,000.
0 is the default.
The cut multiple is a multiple of the
print quantity. If the cut multiple
is three and the print quantity is
16, then five sets of three tags
and one set of one tag is
produced.
Note:
The last tag in the batch is
always cut, regardless of the
multiple.
E8. ver_mode
Verifier Mode. Enables or disables
the verifier. For more information
about enabling the verifier, refer to
the Verifier’s Operating Instructions.
Not all the printers support a verifier. Options:
0
Disable verifier - not using a verifier (default)
1
Enable verifier
E9. cable_det
Verifier cable detect. The printer can be set to detect when a verifier’s
cable is disconnected. For more information about connecting the verifier’s
cables, refer to the Verifier’s Operating Instructions. Options:
0
The printer does not detect when a cable is
disconnected (default)
1
I/O cable is disconnected
2
I/O and/or data cables are disconnected
Example
E,0,1,4,2,1,4,1,2 p
Defines a batch control field. Continuous feed mode is used and a
separator prints between batches. Four tags have the same image and
there are two identical parts on one tag. The knife cuts after every four
tags. A verifier is enabled and the printer detects when either the I/O or
data cables are disconnected.
6-6 Printing
Defining Batch Data Fields
Batch data fields should be sent in field number order. Use continuation
fields for large amounts of data. If you are using N (New) in the batch
header, you must list all fields with your data in sequence. If you are using
U, you need to list only those fields and data that changes from the last
printed batch.
Syntax
field#,"data string" p
C,"continuation" p
field#
Identifies the text, bar code, or non-printable text field in which to insert the
following data. Range: 1 to 999.
“data string”
Provides the actual information to appear in fields. Enclose in quotation
marks. Length: 0 to 2710 characters.
C
Identifies information to be appended to the data string. This parameter is
optional.
“continuation”
Provides the actual information to be added to the batch packet. Enclose
in quotation marks. Use this option to break up longer fields.
Length: 0 to 2710 characters. This parameter is optional.
Example
1,"Size 12" p
2,"" p
3,"Blue" p
C,"and this would be appended." p
Defines a batch data field. “Size 12" prints in field #1, a blank line appears
in field #2, ”Blue and this would be appended" prints in field #3.
Printing 6-7
Using Expanded EPC Gen2 RFID Data
With version 5.0 or greater software, we support Expanded C1Gen2 RFID
data, which is composed of five different fields:
¨ EPC Data (64 or 96-bits)
¨ Access Password
¨ User Memory
¨ Kill Password
¨ Lock Code
The printer also accepts EPC data following the guidelines in the
EPCglobalä Tag Data Standards Specification, which conforms to the EPCä
Radio-Frequency Identity Protocols Class 1 Generation 2 UHF RFID
Protocol for Communications at 860-960MHz Standards (RFID Air Interface
protocol). Refer to the EPC Specification to create valid EPC data.
Many different RFID supplies (tags) are available and the amount of
programmable user memory varies with the chip embedded in the tag.
Depending on your tag type, all memory fields may not be available. Refer
to the RFID Setup Guide & Supply Chart for details about the available user
memory for each chip.
Note:
Incrementing an Expanded C1Gen2 RFID Data Field is not
supported.
Use the access password to control when new data can be written to a field.
The kill password sets a tag up to be inoperable. The lock code contains
the locking method.
6-8 Printing
One of the four locking methods can be selected for each memory field
(EPC, access password, and kill password). Depending on the locking
method specified, the memory field may or may not be readable or writable.
There are four locking methods.
Value
Note:
EPC Lock Name
Description
0
No lock
The selected memory fields are readable and writable.
The tag can be programmed multiple times.
1
Permalock
Permanently locked in a readable and writable state.
The tag can be programmed multiple times.
2
Password lock
Requires access password to rewrite the selected
memory fields. The tag can be programmed multiple
times with the password.
3
Permalock and
Password lock
Never rewritable, but always readable. The tag can
never be rewritten, once locked.
The EPC field is always readable, no matter what locking method is
assigned.
The following tables describe the locking method for each memory field.
EPC Memory
Description
0
EPC is readable and writable.
1
EPC is permanently writable (can never be locked).
2
EPC is only writable with password, but is readable.
3
EPC is never rewritable, but is readable.
User Memory
Description
0
User memory is readable and writable.
1
U s e r m e m o r y i s p e r m a n e n t l y w r i ta b l e ( c a n n e v e r b e
locked), but is readable.
2
U s e r m e m o r y i s o n l y wr i t a b l e w i t h p a s s w o r d , b u t i s
readable.
3
User memory is never rewritable, but is readable.
Printing 6-9
Access Password
Description
0
Access password is readable and writable.
1
Access password is permanently writable (can never be locked).
2
Access password is never readable.
3
Access password is never readable or rewritable.
Kill Password
Description
0
Kill password is readable and writable.
1
Kill password is permanently writable (never locked), but is readable.
2
Kill password is only writable with password.
3
Kill password is never readable or rewritable.
To use the Expanded C1Gen2 data, you need to modify the RFID Field’s
batch data.
Syntax
field#
field#,"EPC_data~028" p
C,"User_Mem~028" p
C,"~028" p
C,"Acs_Pwd~028" p
C,"Kill_Pwd~028" p
C,"Lock_Code" p
Identifies the RFID Data Field number for the following data.
Range: 1 to 999.
“EPC_data~028" EPC data. Enclose in quotation marks. To create EPC data, follow the
guidelines in the EPC Global Generation 1 Tag Data Standards
Specification. The data must be in the same format (ASCII Hex, ASCII,
etc.) specified in the RFID Data Field (data_type).
The printer can program 96-bits of data (24 ASCII Hex characters).
The data must end with the ASCII field separator (decimal 028).
“User_Mem~028" User Memory. Enclose in quotation marks. The amount of programmable
user memory varies with the tag types. Refer to the RFID Setup Guide &
Supply Chart for details about the available user memory for each chip.
The printer (version 6.2 or greater) can program up to 512-bits of data
(128 ASCII Hex characters). The data must be ASCII Hex characters and
end with the ASCII field separator (decimal 028).
Note:
6-10 Printing
Do not enter more characters than the user memory space
available. For example, if your tag has 96-bit user memory
available, you cannot enter more than 96-bits of data for this field.
However, you can enter less than 96-bit without an error.
“~028"
Identifies information to be appended. Reserved for future use. Only
include the field separator (decimal 028) in this field.
“Acs_Pwd~028"
Access Password. This must be 8 ASCII Hex characters. No password is
assigned if this field is left blank. The data must end with the ASCII field
separator (decimal 028).
“Kill_Pwd~028"
Kill Password. This must be 8 ASCII Hex characters. No password is
assigned if this field is left blank. The data must end with the ASCII field
separator (decimal 028).
“Lock_Code~028" Five-digit locking method for each field in this order:
EPC Data, User memory, Reserved, Access password, and Kill password.
Use 0 for the reserved field. Locking options:
0
No lock (default)
1
Permalock
2
Password lock
3
Permalock & password lock
Note:
Example
Use only one locking method per field. The printer is not capable
of unlocking a field. Depending on the locking method used for
each field, the EPC data may be programmable by sending the
access password with the batch data.
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"PERMLOCK" p
X,1,100,0 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"313233343536373831323334~028" p
C,"ABCDEF~028" p
C,"~028" p
C,"73737373~028" p
C,"CAD01234~028" p
C,"11001" p }
The EPC data is 313233343536373831323334, the user memory data is
ABCDEF, the access password is 73737373, and the kill password is
CAD01234. Selects permalock (1) as the locking method for the EPC, user
memory, and kill field. Selects no lock (0) for the access password field.
The EPC, user memory, and kill fields are permanently readable/writable.
Printing 6-11
Using Special Characters in Batch Data
There are two ways to specify special characters in batch data:
¨ Place a tilde (~) before each character
¨ Use a tilde with the decimal ASCII equivalent
For example, you can use “” or ~034 to print the “ character in your batch
data; otherwise, the tilde characters are ignored. You can also use ~XXX
where XXX is the decimal equivalent of an unprintable character.
Sample Batch Data with Special Characters
{B,1,N,1 p
Decimal Character
What Prints
1,"123~034456789" p
~034 is “
123"456789
2,"~094983~’126LG4451" p
~094 is ^
~126 is ~
^983~’LG4451
Merged or Sub-Fields
If a field is completely filled by data copied from other fields, use quotation
marks without spaces between them for the "data string" parameter.
6-12 Printing
Incrementing Fields
In incrementing fields, the first number in the sequence must contain the
same number of digits as the highest number to be counted. For example,
to increment the numbers in a field from 1 to 999, enter the starting number
in the batch as 001.
Special Printing Considerations
Keep in mind the following special printing considerations when using a
9855 or 9860 printer.
9855 Printer
Print
Speed
Printing
Printhead
Density
Knife
Peel Mode
Verifier
2.5/4.0/6.0 ips
direct
transfer
203/300 dpi
supported
supported
supported
8.0 ips
direct
transfer
203/300 dpi
not supported
supported
supported
10.0 ips
direct
transfer
203 dpi only
not supported
not supported
supported
12.0 ips
direct
transfer
203 dpi only
not supported
not supported
supported
* The minimum label feed length is 0.75 inches using 8, 10, or 12 ips printing. 94x5 emulation is not
supported using 300 dpi. The maximum supply and image length with the optional 300 dpi printhead
is 12.0 inches (305 mm). The recommended print speed using linerless supplies is 2.5 or 4.0 ips.
Contact your Monarch Representative for supply requirements in high temperature and high humidity
environments.
9855 RFID Printer
The RFID printer pauses while programming the RFID tag.
9860 Printer
Print
Speed
Printing
Printhead
Density
Knife
Verifier
2.5/4.0/6.0 ips
direct
transfer
203/300 dpi
supported
supported
8.0 ips*
direct
transfer
203/300 dpi
supported
supported
* The 9860 printer allows cutting 1.2 inch feed length tags at 8.0 ips; however optimal cut quality may
not be achieved.
Printing 6-13
Serial Bar Code Printing Information
Keep in mind the following serial bar code printing information when using a
9855 or 9860 printer.
Print
Speed
Printhead
Density
Minimum Bar Code Narrow
Element
2.5 ips
203/300 dpi
less than 3 dots
4.0 ips
203 dpi
3 dots
6.0/8.0/10.0 ips
203 dpi
4 dots or more
Downloading Methods
You can download the format and batch data using one of three methods:
sequential, batch, and batch quantity zero.
Sequential Method
Using the sequential method, you send all your format and batch data at
one time. Use this method when your application does not require operator
intervention to input data. All data is sent down at one time, and the printer
then images each field. As soon as the last field is imaged, your labels
begin to print.
Example
{Format}
{Batch Packet}
Batch Method
This is similar to the sequential method, but it is used when you want to
send multiple batches. All data for the first batch is sent at one time, and
the printer then images each field. As soon as the last field for the first
batch is imaged, labels begin to print. This process is repeated for each
subsequent batch.
Example
6-14 Printing
{Format}
{Batch Packet}
{Batch Packet}
Batch Quantity Zero Method
You may use the batch quantity zero method when your application requires
operator intervention to enter data. While the operator is entering data, the
previous field is sent with a batch quantity of zero. The printer images the
field, but does not print it. After the operator enters the data for the last
field, the batch quantity can be specified. The last remaining field is
imaged, and the label prints almost immediately.
To use the batch quantity zero method:
1.
Send the format and a batch header in one file. The first time you send
the batch header, use the parameter N (new batch), and the parameter
0 for (zero quantity). This ensures the label is properly positioned.
The printer images constant text, line, and box fields, but does not print
them.
2.
Input data for each field, and send it with a batch header using the
parameter U (batch update) and a quantity of zero. When the printer
receives the data, it immediately images the field, but does not print it.
At this time, the printer is imaging all associated fields, including fields
that copy from other fields.
3.
Repeat step 2 for each field except the last one.
4.
For the last field, input data and send a batch header with the quantity
of labels you want printed. When the printer receives input for the last
field, it immediately prints the labels. See “Reducing Imaging Time” in
Chapter 9 for an example using the batch quantity zero method.
Modifying Formats
The optional entry method is a quick way to modify your format fields, check
digit fields and configuration packets.
Optional Entry Method
This method enables you to reset only the parameters you want to change.
Commas act as placeholders for unchanged parameters. The optional entry
method reduces file size and increases the speed at which files are sent to
the printer.
Printing 6-15
Creating DOS Batch Files for Downloading
If you are downloading from an MS-DOS system, you can create batch files
to set communication values and download formats. It is a good idea to
create a subdirectory to hold your format files.
Here is a DOS batch file that sets a serial port, changes to a subdirectory,
and downloads a check digit file, format file, and batch data file.
MODE COM1: 9600,N,8,1,P
CD\PAXAR
COPY LABEL1.CDS COM1
COPY LABEL1.FMT COM1
COPY LABEL1.BCH COM1
Refer to your DOS manual for more information on creating batch files.
6-16 Printing
7
S TAT U S P O L L I N G
This chapter explains how to use status polling.
There are two types of Status Polling:
¨
Inquiry Request—information about the readiness of the
printer.
¨
Job Request—information about the current (or last
received) job downloaded to the printer.
Status Polling
7-1
Inquiry Request (ENQ)
An ENQ character acts as a request for printer status information. You can
send an ENQ in front of, in the middle of, or immediately following any
packet downloaded to the printer. An ENQ is a command that can be
executed as part of a packet or sent on its own (using a communications
program). An ENQ is processed immediately. The ENQ character is user
defined.
The ENQ character does not appear as a visible character; however, we are
representing the ENQ character as E .
Inquiry Response
Printer status is returned to the host in a 3-byte (3-character) sequence.
The first byte is the non-printable user-defined ENQ character, which is not
visible on the response. The second and third bytes are printer status
codes. See the ENQ Reference Tables for the meaning of bytes 2 and 3.
Example:
E AB
The status codes (A and B in this case) are ASCII equivalents to the hexadecimal
bits that represent the various types of status responses. This response indicates
that the printer is online (Character A) and that there is a stock fault (Character B).
Example:
E ??
Indicates that this is the first ENQ response since the printer was turned on.
Send another ENQ immediately to receive the printer’s status.
Example:
E @@
Indicates the printer is offline.
7-2
Status Polling
The following graphics can be used as a quick reference for the Status of
Byte #2 and Byte #3. Byte #1 is the non-printable user-defined ENQ
character.
Status Polling
7-3
E N Q R e f e r e n c e Ta b l e - B y t e # 2
Char
Note:
7-4
Const.
OFF
Const.
ON
Comp.
Failure
Corr.
Error
Online
Data
Error
Busy
Active
Online
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
@
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
A
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
C
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
D
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
E
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
F
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
G
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
H
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
I
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
J
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
K
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
L
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
M
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
N
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
O
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
P
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Q
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
R
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
S
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
T
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
U
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
V
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
W
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
X
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Y
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
Z
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
[
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
\
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
]
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
^
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
_
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
`
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling
E N Q R e f e r e n c e Ta b l e - B y t e # 2 ( c o n t i n u e d )
Char
Note:
Const.
OFF
Const.
ON
Comp.
Failure
Corr.
Error
Online
Data
Error
Busy
Active
Online
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
a
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
b
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
c
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
d
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
e
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
f
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
g
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
h
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
i
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
j
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
k
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
l
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
m
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
n
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
o
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
p
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
q
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
r
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
s
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
t
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
u
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
v
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
w
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
x
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
y
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
z
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
{
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
|
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
}
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
~
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Dec 127
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling
7-5
E N Q R e f e r e n c e Ta b l e - B y t e # 3
Char
Note:
7-6
Const.
OFF
Const.
ON
Low
Battery
Format
Error
Waiting Ribbon
to
Fault
Dispense
Label
Stock
Fault
Online
Error
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
@
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
A
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
C
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
D
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
E
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
F
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
G
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
H
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
I
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
J
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
K
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
L
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
M
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
N
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
O
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
P
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Q
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
R
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
S
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
T
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
U
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
V
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
W
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
X
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Y
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
Z
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
[
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
\
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
]
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
^
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
_
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
`
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling
E N Q R e f e r e n c e Ta b l e - B y t e # 3 ( c o n t i n u e d )
Char
Note:
Const.
OFF
Const.
ON
Low
Battery
Format
Error
Waiting Ribbon
to
Fault
Dispense
Label
Stock
Fault
Online
Error
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
a
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
b
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
c
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
d
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
e
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
f
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
g
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
h
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
i
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
j
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
k
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
l
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
m
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
n
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
o
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
p
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
q
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
r
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
s
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
t
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
u
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
v
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
w
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
x
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
y
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
z
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
{
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
|
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
}
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
~
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Dec 127
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling
7-7
Job Request
A Job Request returns status information about the most recently processed
print job. You can send a job request after an ENQ or batch. You can send
two levels of Job Requests:
¨ Numeric Error Codes Only (0, 1, or 2)
¨ Verbose (3 or 4)
Syntax
{J,#}
Field Type
Valid Options
Identifier
J
Job Status Request
request#
0
1
2
3
4
Returns ASCII coded strings or
numeric error codes
Example
Description
Returns error number
Returns number of labels printed in batch
{J,3}
The job response may not be immediate. If the printer has an error (out of
supplies, ribbon problem, etc.), is in pause mode, or has insufficient
memory, correct the problem and then resend the job request. If the
problem is not corrected, no response is returned. If a formatting error has
occurred, the job request will return the status. The printer must first
interpret the format and batch data before returning the response.
Note:
You may need to press FEED/CUT before the job response is
returned.
To clear an error, press ESCAPE/CLEAR. An ENQ can also clear errors
numbered less than 500. Once the error is corrected, a job request can be
sent. The printer cannot accept another job request until the error is
resolved.
7-8
Status Polling
Job Response
The Job Response varies, depending on the type of request sent to the
printer. The following syntax is the response for a Job 0, 1,or 2 request.
Syntax
{J,Status1,Status2,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Status1
These errors stop the print job. Examples include out of
stock, supply faults, or data formatting errors. These
errors are numbered less than 24 on the “Job Status 0,
1, 2 Response Table,” later in this chapter.
Status2
These are errors in the syntax of the MPCL data stream.
Printing does not stop, but the information may not print
properly. These errors are numbered greater than 24 on
the “Job Status 0, 1, 2 Response Table,” later in this
chapter.
FMT-1/BCH-2
The format or batch number is returned.
Here is an example of a response returned to a J 0, 1, 2 request:
{J,8,0,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Indicates that a portion of the format extends off the tag in format 1, batch
2. Refer to the “Job Status 0, 1, 2 Response Table” later in this chapter for
brief explanations for J, 0, 1, 2 requests. In the above example, refer to
error 8 for an explanation.
Status Polling
7-9
The following syntax is the response for a Job 3 request. You may need to
press FEED/CUT before the job response is returned.
Syntax
{J,"Status1 A,B","Status2
A,B,C,D,E","FMT-1","BCH-2"}
“Status1 A,B”
Status1 A contains the field number, in the format or
batch, where an error was found. If the error is not in
the format or batch, a “0" is returned.
Status1 B contains an error number, which represents
the actual printer error. The error numbers can be
found in Chapter 8, ”Diagnostics and Errors."
Example
{J,"2,612",}
2 is the field number where an error was found. 612 is the error number,
indicating that data is missing or does not match the format definition for
that field.
Note:
Error numbers found in Status1 B, always have a value equal to or
greater than 500. These are considered very serious errors.
“Status2 A,B,C,D,E” contains the packet type, field type, field number,
parameter, and error number.
Status2
A- Packet Type
represents the MPCLII packet that the error occurred
on. The packet could be Format (F), Batch (B), Check
Digit (A), Graphic (G), or Font (W).
Status2
B- Field Type
represents the MPCLII field that the error occurred on.
If the packet has no fields, Status2 A will be replicated.
If the error occurs before the field is identified a
question mark is sent. Since the batch data is variable,
a D is sent to indicate data.
Status2
C- Field Number
represents the field number within each packet. The
packet header is the first field and each subsequent
field is indicated by the field separator.
7-10
Status Polling
Status2
D- Parameter
represents the parameter within the field that the error
occurred. The numbering begins after the field
identifier.
Status2
E- Error Number
is the error that coincides with the error numbers
presented in Chapter 8, “Diagnostics and Errors.”
“FMT-1/BCH-2"
The format or batch number is returned.
Note:
If more than one error occurred, only the most serious error is
acknowledged.
{J,"","F,B,4,6,33","FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Indicates that an error occurred on a bar code (B) field within a format (F)
packet. The bar code field is the fourth (4) field in the packet. The error
occurred in the sixth (6) parameter of the field. Error number 33 means the
bar code density is invalid.
To clear an error, press ESCAPE/CLEAR. An ENQ can also clear errors
numbered less than 500. Once the error is corrected, a job request can be
sent. The printer cannot accept another job request until the error is
resolved.
The following syntax is the response for a Job 4 request.
Syntax
{J,printed,total,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
printed
the number of tags or labels already printed in the
batch.
total
the total number of tags or labels to be printed in the
current batch.
“FMT-1/BCH-2"
The format or batch number is returned.
Example
{J,8,25,"FMT-3","Bch-2"}
8 out of 25 tags or labels have been printed from format number 3.
Use a Job Request 4 when printing in the on-demand mode with a large
number of tags or labels from a single batch. A Job Request 4 may not be
accurate if tags or labels are printed in continuous mode, because of the
response time involved. A Job Request 4 is not useful in single ticket
batches (printing 1 of 1) or multiple single ticket batches.
Status Polling
7-11
Note:
A batch has to be printing when you send the job request. You
cannot use this job request on batches printing formats with
incrementing fields.
J o b S t a t u s 0 , 1 , 2 R e s p o n s e Ta b l e ( S t a t u s 1 C o d e s )
Number
Meaning
0
No error
1
Stacker fault
2
Supply problem
4
Hot printhead
5
Printhead open
6
Insufficient memory
7
Ribbon problem
8
Field ## extends off tag
9
Field ## has a bad font/bar code
10
Field ## contains invalid data
11
Field ## has a graphic missing
12
Invalid communication channel
13
Invalid file type
14
All communication channels are busy
15
Receive overrun error
16
Receive parity error
17
Receive framing error
18
Receive buffer full
19
Label waiting
21
Bad dots (verifier detected a failure)
23
Low battery
24
Memory configuration packet error
Numbers 25 through 50 are not currently in use.
7-12
Status Polling
J o b S t a t u s 0 , 1 , 2 R e s p o n s e Ta b l e ( S t a t u s 2 C o d e s )
Number
Meaning
51
Invalid command
52
Invalid separator value
53
Graphic not found
54
Format for batch not found
55
Quantity/Multiples out-of-range
56
Name descriptor too long
57
Invalid cut value
58
Invalid number-of-parts value
59
Invalid orientation value
60
Invalid thickness value
61
Invalid text field
62
Invalid bar code field
63
Data string too long
64
Invalid data field
65
Row greater than stock length
66
Row greater than format length
67
Column greater than printhead width
68
Column greater than format width
69
Invalid label length
70
Invalid label width
71
Invalid increment/decrement value
72
Identifier out-of-range
73
No field to create format
74
Stop location of a line is out of range
75
Syntax error
80
Can’t use offline format for online batch
81
Can’t queue graphic batch
82
Can’t store online format
83
Can’t queue online batch
84
Can’t queue online clear command
Status Polling
7-13
Status Polling Considerations for Script Mode
The following table shows the effects of the I Packet and the printer’s front
panel (or keyboard) on status polling and immediate commands.
I Packet Printer
Configuration Packet
(inside the script or sent
online to the printer)
Status Polling
Immediate Commands
While Running in Script Mode ONLY
(set through printer’s front panel)
Disabled
Enabled
OFF (status polling not
enabled by I packet)
OFF (status polling not
enabled through
printer’s front panel)
OFF (status polling
enabled through
printer’s front panel)
ON (status polling
enabled by I packet)
OFF (status polling not
enabled through
printer’s front panel)
ON (status polling
enabled through
printer’s front panel)
OFF (immediate
commands not enabled
by I packet)
OFF (immediate
commands not enabled
through printer’s front
panel)
OFF (immediate
commands enabled
through printer’s front
panel)
ON (immediate
commands enabled by I
packet)
OFF (immediate
commands not enabled
through printer’s front
panel)
ON (immediate
commands enabled
through printer’s front
panel)
If status polling and immediate commands are NOT enabled through the I
Packet, enabling status polling and immediate commands at the printer’s
front panel has NO effect.
7-14
Status Polling
DIAGNOSTICS AND ERRORS
8
This chapter explains how to
¨
print diagnostics labels
¨
reset the printer
¨
call Technical Support.
Before you call Service, print a test label. The label contains
information to help diagnose mechanical and setup problems.
This chapter also provides explanations of your printer’s errors.
The errors are classified by type and are listed in order. If you
have trouble loading supplies or performing maintenance, refer to
the Operator’s Handbook.
Some errors numbered 400-438 and 500-574 are internal software
errors. Errors numbered 703-758 are supply errors. Follow the
directions provided with the error description to correct the
problem. Errors numbered 900-999 are Hard Printer Failures. If
you cannot clear an error, turn off the printer, wait several seconds
and then turn on the printer. Call Technical Support if you receive
any error message not listed in this chapter.
To clear a data error, press ESCAPE/CLEAR. If a formatting error
occurs, the label prints; but data may be missing. Correct the
format or batch and resend them to the printer. If a data error
occurs, press FEED/CUT to queue and print an error label.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-1
P r i n t i n g a Te s t L a b e l
1.
From the User Diagnostics menu, press the right arrow until you see
USER DIAG
Test Label
2.
Press ENTER/PAUSE.
The test label shows the model number, software version, total number of
inches printed, voltage, print contrast, printhead resistance, code page,
MPCL control characters, ENQ and RS232 characters.
R e a d i n g a Te s t L a b e l
The first label shows the printer’s configuration by packet (A-M). See
Chapter 2, “Configuring the Printer,” for more information. The lines
beginning with M show the printer’s memory allocation, which can be
changed. The units for supply position, etc. are displayed in dots, even if
you entered them in English or Metric units.
The second label shows the model number, software version, total number
of inches printed, number of inches printed by current printhead, voltage,
print contrast, printhead resistance, number of bad dots, and installed
options (see the following table). The test label for the 9855 and 9860
printers show an inch count for the high energy ribbon. The one-dot rule
line at the bottom of the test label indicates the vertical 0,0 point.
8-2 Diagnostics and Errors
Installed Options
Description
A
Network Control Language (NCL)
B
Battery
C
Cutter (Knife)
H
High Speed (12 ips)
L
Smart Relay
P
Peel mode
R
RS-232 option (Keypad)
S
Stacker
V
Verifier
I f Yo u R e c e i v e a n E r r o r M e s s a g e
Any time you receive a message that is not described in this manual, or the
recommended action does not solve the problem, call Technical Support.
Some errors are the result of communication problems. In this case, reset
your printer and reboot your computer. If you change any of the online
configuration packets, resend the format packet to the printer, so the
configuration changes take effect.
Reading an Error Label
An error label queues and prints when you press
FEED/CUT after a data error (0-499) occurs. The
error label contains the packet type, field type, line
number, and error number. The packet and field
type return the first letter after the { or p . A “?” is
returned if the letter cannot be determined. The
line number refers to which line in the packet the
error occurs. The error number is the three-digit
error code. Use this information to correct the
format, batch, font, check digit, graphic, or online
configuration packet.
The first label shows an error in line 8, which is a
constant text field within the format packet. The
error number is 18.
The second label shows an error in line 1 of the
batch packet. The error number is 101.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-3
If the PC and Printer Are Not Communicating
If your PC is having trouble communicating with your printer, follow these
steps:
¨ Check any messages that occur at the printer and at the computer. See
the following error message listing in this chapter for more information.
¨ Make sure you are using the correct printer cable.
¨ Make sure the cable is plugged into the correct port on the computer.
¨ Compare your printer’s communications settings (especially flow control)
with the settings on your PC. Your printer and PC communications
should match. Print a test label to identify the printer’s communication
settings.
¨ Make sure the printer is online (ready to receive data).
If all of the above are correct, reset your printer. Try the function again. If
you still can not establish communications, call Technical Support.
Resetting Printers
Sometimes, the printer receives mixed signals and loses its ability to
communicate. If this happens, reset the printer and attempt communication
again. To reset the printer, turn off the printer, wait 15 seconds, and turn it
back on.
When you turn off the printer, all the information set through the online
configuration packets (A-M) is saved. See the sections in Chapter 2,
“Configuring the Printer,” for more information about each packet.
8-4 Diagnostics and Errors
C a l l i n g Te c h n i c a l S u p p o r t
Technical support representatives are available Monday through Friday
during regular business hours. Follow these steps before you call:
1.
Make sure your PC and printer are properly connected.
2.
Record any error messages that occurred.
3.
Recreate the problem, if you can.
4.
Check your port settings. Your problem may be corrected simply by
changing the communication settings.
5.
List any changes that have recently been made to the system. Try to
record what you were doing when the problem occurred.
6.
Reset your printer. For information on resetting your printer, see
"Resetting Printers."
7.
Reboot your computer. Refer to your computer documentation for
specific instructions.
8.
Print a test label, see “Printing a Test Label” for more information.
Have the following information ready before you call: computer brand name
and model, version of DOS, printer model, other peripheral devices on your
system, support agreement, contract number, or invoice information,
customer number, and printer serial number.
Additional Diagnostics Information
For detailed printer diagnostics information, refer to the Operator’s
Handbook. See Chapter 7, “Status Polling,” for information on requesting
printer and job status. See the following error message listing in this
chapter for more information.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-5
Data Errors
Errors 001 to 499 are data errors. These errors are returned in response to
a J,3 request. See Chapter 7, “Status Polling,” for more information. A data
error indicates that incorrect data was received from the host, causing the
printer to ignore the entire print job. After checking the packet and
correcting the problem, transmit the print job again.
The following is a list of data errors. These errors occur because data in
the format, batch, check digit, font, or graphic packet is invalid.
Format Errors
Error
Code
Description
001
Packet ID number must be 1 to 999.
002
Name must be 1 to 8 characters (excluding non-printable control
characters) inside quotes. The range is 1 to 256 characters for
the 9855 XML-enabled printer.
003
Action must be A (add) or C (clear).
004
Supply length is invalid. See “Defining the Format Header” in
Chapter 3 for valid lengths.
005
Supply width is invalid. See “Defining the Format Header” in
Chapter 3 for valid widths.
006
Storage device must be F (Flash), R (volatile RAM), or T
(temporary for graphics).
007
Unit of measure must be E (English), M (Metric), or G (Dots). See
“Defining the Format Header” in Chapter 3 for more information.
010
Field ID number is outside the range 0 to 999.
011
Field length exceeds 2710.
012
Row field position is greater than the maximum stock dimension.
See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for valid row lengths.
8-6 Diagnostics and Errors
013
Column field position is greater than the maximum stock
dimension. See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for valid
column widths.
014
Font style must be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 50, or
56. See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 or Appendix B,
“Fonts,” for more information.
015
Character rotation must be 0 (0 degree), 1 (90 degree),
2 (180 degree), or 3 (270 degree). See “Defining Text Fields” in
Chapter 3 for more information.
016
Field rotation must be 0 (0 degree), 1 (90 degree), 2 (180 degree),
or 3 (270 degree). See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for
more information.
017
Field restriction must be V (variable) or F (fixed).
018
Code page/symbol set selection defined in the field must be 0
(Internal), 1 (ANSI), 100 (Macintosh), 101 (Wingdings), 102
(Unicode), 103 (BIG5 for Unicode), 104 (GB2312 for Unicode),
105 (SJIS for Unicode), 106 (GB2312), 107 (BIG5), 437 (DOS
Page 437), 850 (DOS Page 850), 852 (Latin 2), 855 (Russian),
857 (Turkish), 860 (Portuguese), 1250 (Latin 2), 1251 (Cyrillic),
1252 (Latin 1), 1253 (Greek), 1254 (Turkish), 1255 (Hebrew),
1256 (Arabic), 1257 (Baltic), or 1258 (Vietnamese). See “Defining
Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for more information.
020
Vertical magnification must be 1 to 7 or 4 to 255 (point size) for
the scalable or downloaded TrueType fonts.
021
Horizontal magnification must be 1 to 7 or 4 to 255 (point size) for
the scalable or downloaded TrueType fonts.
022
Color must be A, B, D, E, F, N, O, R, S, T, or W. See “Defining
Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for more information.
023
Intercharacter gap must be 0 to 99 dots.
024
Field justification must be B (balanced), C (centered), E (end),
L (left), or R (right). See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for
more information.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-7
025
String length is outside the range 0 to 2710.
030
Bar code height must be at least 19 (English), 48 (Metric), 38 (203
dpi Dots), 57 (300 dpi Dots), or is not within the supply
dimensions.
031
Human readable option must be
0
default
1
no CD or NS
5
NS at bottom, no CD
6
CD at bottom, no NS
7
CD and NS at bottom
8
no text
032
Bar code type is invalid. See “Defining Bar Code Fields” in
Chapter 3 for valid options.
033
Bar code density is invalid. See “Defining Bar Code Fields” in
Chapter 3 for the bar code density chart.
040
Line thickness must be 0 to 99 dots.
041
Line direction must be 0, 90, 180, or 270.
042
End row is invalid. Line segment or box end row is defined
outside of printable area.
043
End column is invalid. Line segment or box end column is defined
outside of printable area.
044
Dot pattern for line or box must be “”.
045
Line length is defined beyond the maximum length. See “Defining
Line Fields” in Chapter 3 for valid lengths.
046
Line type must be S (segment) or V (vector).
051
Imaging mode in the graphic header must be 0.
052
Data type in the RFID Data Field must be 0, 1, 2, or 3. See
“Defining the RFID Data Field” in Chapter 3 for more information.
8-8 Diagnostics and Errors
Batch Errors
Error
Code
Description
101
The format referenced by batch is not in memory.
102
Print quantity is outside the range 0 to 32000.
104
Batch mode must be N (new) or U (update).
105
Batch separator in a batch control field must be 0 (Off), 1 (On), or
2 (Double).
106
Print multiple is outside the range 1 to 999.
107
Cut multiple is outside the range 0 to 999. Only valid for printers
with a knife.
108
Multiple part supply is outside the range 1 to 5.
109
Cut type is outside the range 0 to 5.
Option Errors
Error
Code
Description
200
Option number must be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 20, 21, 30, 31, 42, 50, 51,
52, 60, 61, or 62.
201
Copy length is outside the range 0 to 2710.
202
Copy start position must be 1 to 2710.
203
Destination start position must be 1 to 2710.
204
Source field must be 0 to 999.
205
Copy type must be 1 (copy after rules) or 2 (copy before rules).
206
Increment/Decrement selection must be I (increment) or
D (decrement).
Diagnostics and Errors 8-9
207
Incrementing start position must be 0 to 2710.
208
Incrementing end position must be 0 to 2710.
209
The incrementing amount must be 0 to 999.
210
Security value for a PDF-417 bar code must be 0 to 8. Correct
the value and resend the format to the printer.
211
Narrow element value is less than 1 or greater than 99. Correct
the value and resend the format to the printer.
212
Wide element value is less than 1 or greater than 99. Correct the
value and resend the format to the printer.
213
Dimension must be 1 to 30 for a column or 3 to 90 for a row on a
PDF417 bar code.
214
Truncation code must be S (standard) or T (truncated bar code).
215
Aspect code must be C (columns) or R (rows).
216
Option definition must be S (set) or T (template).
217
Input device device must be D (Default), H (Host), K (Keyboard),
N (None), or S (Scanner).
218
Pad direction must be L (from left) or R (from right).
219
Pad character is outside the range 0 to 255.
220
Check digit selection must be G to generate check digit.
221
Primary or secondary price format is outside the range 1 to 16.
222
Data type restriction is outside the range of 1 to 6.
223
Option is not valid for the field.
224
Bar code intercharacter gap must be 0 to 99 dots. (This is also
known as the additional character gap when using Option 50,
Defining Bar Code Densities.)
8-10 Diagnostics and Errors
226
Rule (option) Record Line xx. The upload device must be H (host)
for Option 6.
Online Configuration Errors
Error
Code
Description
251
Power up mode must be 0 (online) or 1 (offline).
252
Language selection must be 0 (English), 1 (French), 2 (German),
3 (Spanish-ES), 4 (Japanese), 5 (Portuguese), 6 (Italian), 7
(Swedish), 8 (Spanish2-MX), 9 (Danish), 10 (Dutch), 11 (Finnish),
or 12 (Norwegian).
253
Batch separator code in a system setup packet must be 0 (off), 1
(on), or 2 (Double).
254
Slash zero selection must be 0 (standard zero) or 1 (slashed
zero).
255
Supply type must be 0 (black mark), 1 (die cut), 2 (non-indexed),
or 3 (aperture).
256
Ribbon selection must be 0 (direct), 1 (transfer) or 2 (High
Energy).
257
Feed mode must be 0 (continuous) or 1 (on-demand).
258
Supply position must be -300 to 300 dots.
259
Contrast adjustment must be -699 to 699 dots.
260
Print adjustment (position) must be -99 to 99 dots (9825) or -450
to 450 dots (9855/9860).
261
Margin adjustment (position) must be -99 to 99 dots.
262
Speed adjustment must be 0 (default), 25 (2.5 ips), 40 (4.0 ips),
60 (6.0 ips), 80 (8.0 ips), 100 (10.0 ips), or 120 (12.0 ips).
Diagnostics and Errors 8-11
263
Primary monetary symbol must be 0 (None), 1 (Dollar), 2 (Pound),
3 (Yen), 4 (Deutsche Mark), 5 (Franc), 6 (Peseta), 7 (Lira), 8
(Krona), 9 (Markka), 10 (Schilling), 11 (Rupee), 12 (Ruble), 13
(Won), 14 (Baht), 15 (Yuan), or 16 (Eurodollar).
264
Secondary symbol selection must be 0 (none) or 1 (print
secondary sign).
265
Monetary decimal places must be 0 to 3.
266
Character string length in the control characters packet must be 5
(MPCL control characters) or 7 (ENQ/IMD command character).
267
Baud rate selection must be 0 (1200), 1 (2400), 2 (4800), 3
(9600), 4 (19200), 5 (38400), 6 (57600), or 7 (115200). Resend
the communication settings packet.
268
Word length selection must be 0 (7 bits), or 1 (8 bits). Resend the
communication settings packet.
269
Stop bits selection must be 0 (1 bit), or 1 (2 bits). Resend the
communication settings packet.
270
Parity selection must be 0 (none), 1 (odd), or 2 (even). Resend
the communication settings packet.
271
Flow control selection must be 0 (none), 1 (DTR), 2 (CTS/RTS), or
3 (XON/XOFF). Resend the communication settings packet.
272
Symbol set (code page) in the System Setup packet must be
0 (Internal), 1 (ANSI), 2 (DOS 437), 3 (DOS 850), 4 (1250- Latin
2), 5 (1251- Cyrillic), 6 (1252- Latin 1), 7 (1253- Greek), 8 (1254Turkish), 9 (1255- Hebrew), 10 (1256- Arabic), 11 (1257- Baltic),
12 (1258- Vietnamese), 13 (852- Latin 2), 14 (855- Russian), 15
(857- IBM Turkish), 16 (860- DOS Portuguese), 17 (Wingdings),
18 (Macintosh), 19 (Unicode), 20 (BIG5), 21 (GB), 22 (SJIS to
SJIS), 23 (GB to GB), 24 (BIG5 to BIG5), or 25 (KSC to KSC).
273
Cut adjustment must be -300 to 300 dots.
282
RS232 Trailer string is too long. Use a maximum of 3 characters.
283
ENQ Trailer string is too long. Use a maximum of 3 characters.
8-12 Diagnostics and Errors
284
The buffer type must be D (Downloadable Fonts), F (Format), I
(Image), R (Receive), T (Transmit), or V (Scalable Fonts).
285
The storage device type in the memory configuration packet must
be F (flash) or R (volatile RAM).
286
The buffer size is invalid.
287
The printhead width must be 0.
288
The battery voltage must be 0 (15-volt battery) or 1 (12-volt
battery).
289
The printer address specified in the communication settings
packet must use exactly six characters.
290
Action must be 0 (disable), 1 (enable), or 2 (extended) for the
backfeed control packet or the printer is active.
291
Dispense position must be 50 to 200 dots or the printer is active.
292
Backfeed distance must be 10 to 200 dots or the printer is active.
The backfeed distance can not be greater than the dispense
position.
293
The skip index selection defined in the field must be 0 (disabled)
or 1 (enabled). Correct the packet and resend to the printer.
294
The verifier mode must be 0 (disable) or 1 (enable).
295
The verifier’s cable detect mode must be 0 (no detect), 1 (I/O
cable detect), or 2 (I/O and data cable detect).
Check Digit Errors
Error
Code
Description
310
Check digit scheme number must be 1 to 10.
311
Modulus must be 2 to11.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-13
314
Check digit algorithm must be D (sum of digits) or P (sum of
products).
Graphic Errors
Error
Code
Description
325
Duplicating direction must be 0 (insert after) or 1 (insert before) in
duplicate fields for graphics.
327
Amount of row adjustment must be 0 to 999 dots in duplicate
fields for graphics.
328
Duplicate count must be 0 to 999.
340
Bitmap line encoding must be H (hex) or R (run length).
350
Font selector must be 1 to 9999.
351
Font data length must be 68 to 16384.
352
Insufficient font memory is available for the downloaded font.
380
Job request is outside the range 0 to 4.
400
The character immediately following { is invalid.
402
Field separator is not in the expected location.
403
Field separator was not found.
404
The number (greater than five digits/732,000), string (greater than
2710), or tilde sequence (greater than 255) currently being
processed is out of range.
405
Too many fields exist in the format. You cannot have more than
1000 fields in the format. Lines, boxes, and constant text fields
count as fields.
406
Parser error. Format or graphic is already in use. Make sure your
packet not missing p or {} characters.
8-14 Diagnostics and Errors
Communication Errors
Error
Code
Description
409
The printer memory is full. Delete unnecessary formats or
graphics from memory. If you are using a graphic file that is very
large, consider using another mapping method (such as run length
encoding) to reduce the required memory. To use flash memory,
you must format it first. See “Formatting Flash Memory” in
Chapter 2 for more information.
410
Parity on the printer does not match the parity on the host. Check
the parity setting under SETUP options.
411
Framing error. The printer cannot communicate with the host.
Make sure the host is turned on, communication cables are
connected correctly, port settings are correct, and
communications are active. Check the baud rate, word length,
and stop bits to make sure they match those at the host. Do not
toggle between Microsoftâ Windowsâ and MS-DOS while using
the COPY command, or you will receive a framing error. Exit
Windows before using the COPY command. Re-transmit the
data.
412
There is a problem with flow control between the printer and the
host. Make sure the printer and the host flow control settings
match (both are DTR or both are XON/XOFF). If the error
persists, call Technical Support.
413
Online receive buffer is full. Check your printer’s XON/XOFF or
DTR SETUP values to be sure there is not a flow control problem.
414
The internal keyboard buffer is full or you need a new keypad.
Call Technical Support.
415
The buffer size you defined exceeds the total available in your
machine.
416
Flash/PC board error. Call Technical Support.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-15
417
Flash memory is full. Clear flash. Resend the format, graphic,
and check digit packets. If the error reappears, call Technical
Support.
420
Internal software list error. Call Technical Support.
421
Internal software list error. Call Technical Support.
422
Duplicate internal name. Call Technical Support.
423
Internal software error. Call Technical Support.
424
Internal software list error. Call Technical Support.
425
Internal software list error. Call Technical Support.
426
Internal software list error. Call Technical Support.
427
Format name is invalid. Valid name is 1 to 8 characters inside
quotes or “” for a printer-assigned name. Press ESCAPE/CLEAR
and try to continue. If the error reappears, call Technical Support.
428
Batch name is invalid or graphic not found. Press
ESCAPE/CLEAR and try to continue. If the error reappears, call
Technical Support.
429
A field number appears more than once in a format.
430
The format uses a graphic or verifier configuration packet that
cannot be found.
433
The batch references a field number that does not exist in the
format.
497
An error occurred during the loop back test on the parallel port.
Call Service.
499
An error occurred during the loop back test on the serial port.
Call Service.
8-16 Diagnostics and Errors
Data Formatting Failures
Formatting errors indicate that a field will print incorrectly. After you have
checked the data stream and corrected the data, retransmit the format and
batch.
Note:
For errors 571-622, the batch still prints, but the field, font, bar
code, or density may be incomplete, missing or contain incorrect
data.
Error
Code
Description
571
UPC or EAN bar code data length is invalid. The bar code data
length in the batch does not fit the format.
572
A copy field, padded field, or incrementing field length is invalid.
The field length in the batch does not fit the format or the field
contains blanks. Or, the fixed length field does not contain the
specified number of characters.
573
Price field length is invalid. The price field length in the batch
does not fit the format or the field contains blanks.
574
No CD scheme or room for CD. The CD scheme in the batch does
not fit the format or the field contains blanks.
575
The graphic included in your format could not be found. Resend
the graphic packet. If the error persists, call Technical Support.
600
The printer could not image the batch, because the batch was
refused. Call Technical Support.
601
An error occurred while the batch was imaging. Resend the
format, batch, font, and/or any graphic packets. If the error
persists, call Technical Support.
603
The batch was not found while imaging. Resend the batch packet.
If the error persists, call Technical Support.
611
Font, bar code or density is invalid. The font, bar code or density
in the batch does not fit the format.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-17
612
The data in this line of the batch is either missing or does not
match the format.
613
Reference point off tag.
614
Portion of field off tag. There may be an invalid character in the
packet. Make sure you did not enter O for Ø.
615
Bar code width is greater than 16 inches or the number of
keywords for your PDF 417 bar code exceeds 928. Decrease the
density or shorten the amount of data to print the bar code.
616
A bad dot falls on a bar code and the dot cannot be shifted. A
gray box is printed instead of the bar code. However, 2D bar
codes still print on the 9825 printer when bad dots are present
within the bar code field.
618
Magnification must be 1 to 7 or 4 to 255 (point size) for the
scalable font.
619
The JIS (16-bit) code for Kanji is invalid.
620
Font and printhead dot density mismatch. A 300 dpi font is
specified in the format, but a 203 dpi printhead is used in the
printer or vice-versa. Check the font or change the printhead to
correct the error.
621
An error occurred opening the TrueType font file. Select a
different font to download. If the error message persists, call
Technical Support.
622
Not enough memory to create the downloaded TrueType
characters in the scalable (vector) fonts buffer. Reconfigure the
printer’s memory and increase the scalable (vector) fonts buffer.
Resend the font, format, and batch packet after reconfiguring the
memory. If the error message persists, call Technical Support.
8-18 Diagnostics and Errors
Machine Faults
These errors occur when there is a problem with the printer.
Error
Code
Description
703
The printer sensed a calibration of different-sized black marks.
Make sure the correct supply is loaded.
704
Printer has not sensed a supply mark within the specified number
of inches or out of supplies.
Check the
¨
supply tracking
¨
supply marks
¨
black mark sensor position
¨
supply roll for binding.
Press ESCAPE/CLEAR. If the error continues to appear, change
the supply.
710
Band out of data. Call Technical Support.
711
UART receiving communication error (framing, parity, etc.). Call
Technical Support.
712
Receiving failure or command overrun error. Call Technical
Support.
713
Receiving failure or illegal command. Call Technical Support.
714
Receiving failure or undefined command. Call Technical Support.
715
Invalid data length/data mismatch. The data in the RFID Data
Field has an incorrect data length or there is a data type mismatch
between the selected data type and the actual data entered. See
“Defining the RFID Data Field” in Chapter 3 for more information
on the data length and for selecting the appropriate data type for
the data being entered. This error also occurs if any of the
Expanded C1Gen2 fields is invalid. The printer does not
recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID error.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-19
730
A memory allocation error occurred during initialization.
732
RFID Hardware Error. A non-RFID printer received a format
containing an RFID Data Field.
RFID Errors
These errors occur when there is an RFID problem.
Error
Code
Description
740
Command, hardware, inventory, or memory allocation error.
There may be an RFID hardware or memory allocation error. The
printer does not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID
error.
741
RFID tag missing. Tag not found in RF Field. The RFID tag was
not found in the RF Field (area inside the printer where RFID tag
is programmed.) Check supply loading. If you changed the
supply or print position, make sure the RFID tag was not moved
out of the programmable range. The printer does not recalibrate
(feed a blank label) after any RFID error.
742
Tag erase failed. The RFID tag was found in the RF Field, but
could not be erased. Increase the number of write retries. If this
error occurs consecutively, increase or decrease the write power
setting. If the write power is set too low, you may affect the data
programmed in adjacent labels. The printer does not recalibrate
(feed a blank label) after any RFID error. For more information,
refer to your RFID Setup Guide & Supply Chart.
743
Program tag failed. The RFID tag was found in the RF Field, but
could not be programmed. Increase the number of write retries.
If this error occurs consecutively, increase or decrease the write
power setting by one. If the write power is set too low, you may
affect the data programmed in adjacent labels. The printer does
not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID error. For more
information, refer to your RFID Setup Guide & Supply Chart.
8-20 Diagnostics and Errors
744
Tag locked fail. The RFID tag is unable to be programmed,
because it is already locked. This is considered a bad RFID tag.
The printer does not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any
RFID error.
746
Lock tag fail. The RFID tag has not been locked to prevent
reprogramming. This is considered a bad RFID tag. The printer
does not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID error.
747
Time out failure. Any RFID command (read, program, etc.) has
failed to complete in the maximum amount of allowed time. The
printer does not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID
error.
748
Invalid data length/data mismatch from RFID interrogator module.
The RFID interrogator module found a problem with the data
received from the printer. The printer does not recalibrate (feed a
blank label) after any RFID error.
749
RFID verify fail. The RFID verification process failed after writing
(programming) the tag. This is considered a bad RFID tag. The
printer does not recalibrate (feed a blank label) after any RFID
error.
Machine Faults (continued)
Error
Code
Description
750
Printhead is overheated. Turn off the printer to let the printhead
cool. If the error persists, call Technical Support.
751
Printer did not sense a black mark when expected. The supply
may be jammed. For errors 751-753, check the
¨
supply tracking
¨
supply marks
¨
black mark sensor position
¨
supply roll for binding.
Press ESCAPE/CLEAR and try to continue printing. If the error
continues to appear, change the supply
Diagnostics and Errors 8-21
752
Printer sensed a mark in the wrong place.
753
Printer sensed a mark that is too long.
754
Printer has a ribbon problem. Check the ribbon for a jam or
remove any slack by turning the take-up reel clockwise. Load a
new ribbon.
755
Printhead is open. Close the printhead before continuing. If the
error persists, call Technical Support.
756
The printer is out of supplies. Load supplies.
757
Load supplies. The calibrated supply length differs by plus or
minus .25 inches from the format. Press FEED/CUT to print on
the current supply or load new supply and press ENTER/PAUSE.
758
Check supply. Either the supply is not seen, or the on-demand
sensor is broken (purchase optional). Check for a label jam.
Clear the supply path or reload supplies. This error may occur if
you remove a label too quickly in on-demand mode. The printer
does not recalibrate after this error.
759
Knife is not moving. Call Technical Support.
760
Knife jam. Call Technical Support.
761
The stacker is full or jammed. Empty the stacker or clear the jam
before continuing. The printer does not recalibrate after this error.
762
Low Voltage. For DC-powered printers, recharge the external
battery. For AC-powered printers, check the power inlet where
the printer is connected. The acceptable voltage range is between
90-132 V RMS and 180-264 V RMS . If more or less power is received,
unpredictable results may occur.
763
Waiting to dispense label. Press FEED/CUT.
764
Verifier scan error (bad scan) on label when using normal (no
overstrike) mode. Press ESCAPE/CLEAR to clear the error and
continue printing. Make sure you did not apply Option 62 (do not
scan a particular bar code) to all bar codes on a format.
8-22 Diagnostics and Errors
765
The printhead has less than 8 bad dots. The printer can shift bar
code fields to avoid bad dots. You may need to press
ESCAPE/CLEAR to continue printing. Print a test label to confirm
the number of bad dots.
766
Backfeed/overfeed error. There is a problem with the backfeed or
overfeed distance.
767
Incorrect AD value. Call Technical Support.
768
Printhead has more than 8 bad dots within the format area or is
not connected. Make sure the printhead is connected.
769
The printhead is not receiving enough volts. Call Technical
Support.
770
The print motor is not ready. Call Technical Support.
771
The format specified by the application was not found. Reload
your application and format, and try again. If the problem
continues, call Technical Support.
772
Verifier scan error (bad scan) on label or multiple labels in a row
when using overstrike and continue mode. Press
ESCAPE/CLEAR to clear the error and continue printing.
773
Verifier Failure - the verifier is enabled, but not connected. The
printer can detect if the I/O and/or serial cables are connected to
the verifier. Refer to your verifier’s Operating Instructions for
more information.
781
The voltage is too low. Call Technical Support.
782
The voltage is too high. Call Technical Support.
783
The printer is printing too fast for the verifier to accurately scan
the bar codes. Increase the bar code height in your formats or
slow the print speed.
784
No power to stacker. Check connections between the stacker and
the printer. Make sure the printer is connected to an AC outlet.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-23
785
The internal liner take-up reel is full. Remove the liner take-up
reel and dispose of the liner. Press ESCAPE/CLEAR to continue
printing.
790
Wait until the printer is idle (no batch waiting to print or not
receiving data) before you send any packets. This error may
occur when you try to print a test label if the printer is busy.
791
The printer has an error pending. Turn off the printer. Wait 15
seconds and turn it back on. Resend the packets. If the problem
continues, call Technical Support.
792
The printer is not initialized. Call Technical Support.
793
The printer job queue is full. Turn off the printer. Wait 15
seconds and turn it back on. Resend the packets. If the problem
continues, call Technical Support.
794
The backfeed mode is not set.
795
Print engine lock-up. Call Technical Support.
Script Errors
These errors occur when there is a script (application) problem.
Error
Code
Description
850
Invalid script packet or not enough flash memory for the script.
The script download failed. Format flash memory and download
the script using the COPY command from DOS or the ADK2
software.
851
Invalid lookup table or not enough flash memory for the script.
The lookup table download failed. Check the data in the lookup
table. Format flash memory and download the script using the
COPY command from DOS or the ADK2 software.
8-24 Diagnostics and Errors
852
Invalid buffer definition packet or not enough flash memory for the
script. One or more of the following buffers were invalid: input
buffer, temporary buffer, lookup buffer, printer, or array buffer.
Check the buffer definitions. Format flash memory and download
the script using the COPY command from DOS or the ADK2
software.
853
Invalid version string or not enough flash memory for the script.
The version information in the APPVERSION command is missing
or invalid. Make sure the information is enclosed in double
quotation marks. Format flash memory and download the script
using the COPY command from DOS or the ADK2 software.
854
Invalid table (string and numeric) data or not enough flash
memory for the script. Check the data. Format flash memory and
download the script using the COPY command from DOS or the
ADK2 software.
855
Invalid start/clear command. The script is missing the start or
clear command {S space}.
856
Invalid quit command. The script is missing the quit command
{Q space}.
857
Illegal command in the script. Your script may include commands
that have been removed from the ADK2 scripting language.
858
Check sum error. Each packet has a four-digit checksum at the
beginning of the packet. Compile the script again using the ADK2
software.
859
Script download buffer overflow. The image buffer is used as the
SCRATCH buffer. Increase the size of the image buffer.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-25
Hard Printer Failure Errors
These errors are hard printer failures. Call Technical Support if you receive
these messages.
Error
Code
Description
900
RAM test failure.
901
ROM/EPROM checksum failure.
902
Software timer failure.
903
Software interrupt failure.
905
Illegal interrupt.
906
Non-maskable interrupt. Check format packet for font clear or
format clear packets.
907
Low RAM error.
908
Non Volatile RAM checksum failure.
909
RAM corrupted.
910
Warm restart.
911
Version string mismatch.
930
Flash erase error.
931
Flash write error.
932
RAM write error.
933
Parity error.
934
Framing error.
935
Buffer overrun.
936
Invalid record type.
8-26 Diagnostics and Errors
937
Invalid hex data.
938
Invalid checksum.
939
Invalid record count.
940
Invalid flash address.
Errors numbered 900-911 occur when you turn on the printer. They may
indicate a circuit board failure. Errors numbered 930-940 are errors that
may occur during the loading of flash memory. Errors numbered 950-999
indicate a circuit board failure. Call Technical Support if you receive any of
these messages.
When a HARD failure (errors 900-999) occurs on the printer, the printer
displays WARNING or POWER DOWN on the top line of the keypad display.
If this happens, record the displayed message and turn off the printer. If the
problem reoccurs when you turn the printer on again, call Technical Support.
If the problem does not reoccur after you turn your printer on again, reset
your printer’s SETUP options. Retransmit your packets.
Printer
Display
Description
WARNING
RAM Test Failure
RAM check failed on power up. Reset your SETUP
options. Transmit your packets again.
POWER DOWN
ROM Sum Failure
ROM checksum test failed.
POWER DOWN
Timer Failure
Timer test failed.
POWER DOWN
Intr Test Failure
Interrupt test failed.
POWER DOWN
Low System RAM
Not enough RAM for system. Reset your SETUP
options. Transmit your packets again.
POWER DOWN
Illegal Intr#
Illegal interrupt occurred.
Diagnostics and Errors 8-27
POWER DOWN
NMI Received
Non-maskable interrupt occurred. Reset your
SETUP options. Transmit your packets again.
POWER DOWN
Low Appl RAM
Not enough RAM for application. Reset your SETUP
options. Transmit your packets again.
POWER DOWN
NVRAM Sum Fail
RAM checksum test failed. Reset your SETUP
options. Transmit your packets again.
POWER DOWN
RAM Corrupt
Item storage RAM failed. Reset your SETUP
options. Transmit your packets again.
8-28 Diagnostics and Errors
P R I N T E R O P T I M I Z AT I O N
9
This chapter provides information on how to improve your printer’s
performance by
¨
adjusting the print quality
¨
reducing the imaging time for printing
¨
providing general tips and hints for designing formats.
This printer uses “smart imaging” to image and print fields on
supplies. Smart imaging remembers the exact boundaries and
locations of each field and places a boundary box (white space)
around each field. When a field changes that particular boundary
box is cleared and the new field data is imaged. However, the new
field data may require a larger boundary box than the previous
field did. In some cases, neighboring fields that do not change
may be covered with white space from the changing field’s
boundary box. To prevent existing fields from being covered by a
changing field, see “Option 61 (Reimage Field)” in Chapter 4.
Note:
Smart imaging is automatically disabled on formats with a Data
Matrix bar code.
Adjusting the Print Quality
Many factors affect print quality: type of supplies, print speed, print
contrast, and the type of printer’s application. This printer supports both
thermal transfer and thermal direct supplies. The type of supply should
match the printer’s application.
¨ If you want to print at high speeds, you should use premium supplies.
Using premium supplies reduces smudged images, hard to read labels,
and faded print. Supply type, print speed, and print contrast work
together to improve the print quality of labels. Contact your Sales
Representative for more information.
¨ Select the print speed based on desired throughput and print quality. If
print quality is more important, reduce the print speed, because a lower
print speed increases the print quality of labels. If throughput is more
important, increase the print speed as high as it will go to give you the
needed print performance. See “Increasing Throughput” for more
information.
Printer Optimization 9-1
¨ If the print quality is too light or too dark, adjust the print contrast. The
correct contrast setting is important because it effects how well your bar
codes scan and how long the printhead lasts.
Be sure to check the print quality of bar codes with a bar code verifier or
scanner. If you do not have a verifier or scanner, check the bar code
visually. A bar code that is IN SPEC will have complete bars and clear
spaces. Small alphanumeric characters will look complete. A bar code
that is IN SPEC may not look as good as one that is too dark, but it will
have the highest scan rate.
Dark
Note:
IN SPEC
Light
For highest scan rates, make sure there is adequate white space
before and after the bar code. Also, a darker bar code does not
mean it will scan better.
The following non-print zones are recommended:
All Supplies
All Supplies
.050 inches on either edge of the label.
.020 inches at the end of the label.
If using the optional verifier, allow a minimum no-scan zone on the trailing
edge of the label of 0.5 inches (13 mm).
9-2
Printer Optimization
Reducing Imaging Time
Imaging time is the time it takes the printer to image the data for the first
label after the printer receives the format and batch packet. There are
several ways to reduce the imaging time: send formats and configurations
once, use a batch quantity of zero, or update batch fields.
¨ If the formats use the same check digit scheme, you only need to send
the check digit scheme once.
¨ Send formats once and use the batch update field to change information
on the label. Using a batch update field reduces the imaging time,
because only the fields that change are imaged. All other fields remain
the same as the last queued batch.
¨ Use the batch quantity zero method when your application requires
operator intervention to enter data. While the operator is entering data,
the previous field is sent with a batch quantity of zero. The printer
images the field, but does not print it. After the operator enters the data
for the last field, the batch quantity can be specified. The last remaining
field is imaged, and the label prints almost immediately.
To pre-image a label:
1.
Send the format and a batch header in one file. The first time you send
the batch header, use the parameter N (new batch), and the parameter
0 for (zero quantity).
Example
{B,1,N,0 p }
The printer images constant text, line, box, and graphic fields, but does
not print them.
2.
Input data for each field, and send it with a batch header using the
parameter U (update) and a quantity of zero. When the printer receives
the data, it immediately images the field, but does not print it.
Example
{B,1,U,0 p
1,"RODGER DIST CTR" p }
{B,1,U,0 p
2,"8292" p }
At this time, the printer is imaging all associated fields, including fields
that copy from other fields.
Printer Optimization
9-3
3.
Repeat step 2 for each field except the last one.
{B,1,U,0 p
3,"BROADWAY" p }
{B,1,U,0 p
4,"555 WEST OAK AVE." p }
4.
For the last field, input data and send it with the quantity of labels you
want printed. When the printer receives input for the last field, it
immediately prints the labels.
Example
{B,1,U,10 p
5,"DAYTON, OHIO" p }
Increasing Throughput
Reducing the imaging time increases throughput. You can also increase the
baud rate to increase the transmission time and increase throughput. Make
sure the communication settings at the printer match those at the host.
Using a baud rate of 19200 is almost twice as fast as 9600 baud. Using a
baud rate of 38400 is almost twice as fast as 19200 baud.
General Format Tips and Hints
The following tips and hints are helpful to keep in mind when designing
MPCLII formats.
With Packets
¨ Leave parameters blank that you do not need to change when sending
online configuration packets. For example, {I,A,,,,1 p } prints a
slashed zero and uses the last sent online system setup parameters.
You can group fields with similar parameters. For example
T,1,10,V,250,50,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0 p
T,2,15,,,75 p
T,3,,,,100 p
The first text field sets all the parameters for that field. The second text
field’s number of characters and column location changes from what was
defined in the first field. In the third text field, only the column location is
changed. This method can be used on bar code and constant text fields as
well.
9-4
Printer Optimization
Note:
You should understand the basics of each field before using this
method.
After you modify any fields or parameters with the optional entry method,
resend the format, batch, or configuration packet to the printer.
With Bar Codes
¨ Be careful when rotating or placing a UPC/EAN bar code with human
readable characters, because the bottom reference point is at the bottom
of the bars, not at the bottom of the human readable characters.
With Fields
¨ Data that remains the same for each label should be in a constant text
field. Data that varies for each label should be in a text field.
¨ Check for trailing spaces in text or constant text fields if you receive a
“field off tag” error. An easy way to see trailing spaces is to print the
field in the reverse font.
¨ Make sure if you magnify a field, it does not go off the label or cover
another field. Magnifying a field increases the distance between the
printed character and the edge of the cell.
Printer Optimization
9-5
9-6
Printer Optimization
A
SAMPLES
This appendix contains sample formats. You can customize any of
these formats to meet your needs.
Samples A-1
Sample UPCA Format Packet
{F,25,A,R,E,200,200,"Fmt 25" p
C,140,40,0,1,2,1,W,C,0,0,"SAMPLE FORMAT" p
B,1,12,F,85,40,1,2,40,5,L,0 p
T,2,18,V,50,50,1,3,1,1,B,L,0,0 p }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,25,N,1 p
1,"02802811111" p
2,"TEXT FIELD" p }
A-2 Samples
Sample MaxiCode Packets
MaxiCode is a two-dimensional bar code developed by UPS (United Parcel
Service, Inc.). Data must be defined in a specific way for UPS. Refer to the
Guide to Bar Coding with UPS or the AIM MaxiCode Specification for more
details about data requirements.
The printer supports modes 0, 1, 2, and 3. Contact us for information about
additional MaxiCode modes.
Mode
Description
0
Obsolete
1
Obsolete
2
Structured Message
3
Structured Message
You can select which mode to use in the bar code field or allow the printer
to auto-select the mode (0, 2, or 3) based on your data. See “Defining a
Bar Code Field” for more information. MaxiCode automatically pads data
with the “!” character.
Note:
MaxiCode does not support the NULL character.
Modes 2 and 3 are defined by the way the postal code, class of service, and
country code fields are arranged. (The postal code, class of service, and
country code are required fields.) Begin with the message header, then the
primary data (15 characters), followed by the secondary message (up to 78
characters). Or, begin with the primary data, then the message header,
followed by the secondary data. If the postal code data characters are all
numeric then the MaxiCode symbol is set to Mode 2. If the characters are
alphanumeric, or only contain ASCII characters 65 to 90, then the MaxiCode
symbol is set to Mode 3.
If you receive an error 612, check your MaxiCode data. You may have not
correctly structured or left out one of the three required fields (postal code,
class of service, and country code) or the “~029" character.
Samples A-3
Mode 0 (Obsolete) Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,0200,0200,"MAXICODE" p
B,1,93,V,020,20,33,7,0,8,L,0 p }
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"450660000" p
C,"001" p
C,"840" p
C,"[)~030" p
C,"01~02996" p
C,"1Z12345678~029" p
C,"UPSN~029" p
C,"12345A~029" p
C,"070~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"1/1~029" p
C,"15~029" p
C,"Y~029" p
C,"60 SADDLEBROOK CT.~029" p
C,"DAYTON~029" p
C,"OH~030" p
C,"~004" p }
A-4 Samples
MaxiCode bar code (33)
Batch header
Postal code- zip code
(This field determines Mode)
Country code
Class of service
Message header
Transportation header
Tracking number
Origin carrier SCAC
UPS shipper number
Julian day of pickup
Shipment ID (empty)
Package count
Weight (lb.)
Address validation
Street address (empty)
City (empty)
State
EOT
Mode 2 Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"MAXI_M2" p
B,1,93,V,020,020,33,7,0,8,L,0 p
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"[)>~030" p
C,"01~02996" p
C,"068100000~029" p
C,"840~029" p
C,"001~029" p
C,"1Z12345675~029" p
C,"UPSN~029" p
C,"12345E~029" p
C,"089~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"1/1~029" p
C,"10~029" p
C,"Y~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"CT~030" p
C,"~004" p }
}
MaxiCode bar code (33)
Message header
Transportation header
Postal Code
(This field determines Mode)
Country code
Class of service
Tracking number
Origin carrier SCAC
UPS shipper number
Julian day of pickup
Shipment ID (empty)
Package count
Weight (lb.)
Address validation
Street address (empty)
City (empty)
State
EOT
Samples A-5
Mode 3 Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"MAXI_M3" p
B,1,93,V,020,020,33,7,0,8,L,0 p
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"[)>~030" p
C,"01~02996" p
C,"M5E1G45~029" p
C,"124~029" p
C,"066~029" p
C,"1Z12345679~029" p
C,"UPSN~029" p
C,"12345E~029" p
C,"089~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"1/1~029" p
C,"10~029" p
C,"Y~029" p
C,"~029" p
C,"TORONTO~029" p
C,"ON~030" p
C,"~004" p }
A-6 Samples
}
MaxiCode bar code (33)
Message header
Transportation header
Postal Code
(This field determines Mode)
Country code
Class of service
Tracking number
Origin carrier SCAC
UPS shipper number
Julian day of pickup
Shipment ID (empty)
Package count
Weight (lb.)
Address validation
Street address (empty)
City (empty)
State
EOT
MaxiCode Compression Sample
Once the data is properly encoded in the compressed format as rendered by
the UPS.dll, the UPS scanners and software do the translating of the
compressed data when reading the symbol. Our printers take the input data
as-is and encode it as a standard MaxiCode symbol. Without the UPS
encoded scanners and software, generic scanners interpret the encoded
data exactly as it appears in the symbology without decompressing its
contents.
28,"[)>~030" p
C,"01~02996" p
C,"453420000~029" p
C,"840~029" p
C,"013~029" p
C,"1Z12121212~029" p
C,"UPSN~029" p
C,"564W65~030" p
C,"07’4N%KKL8X5~044" p
C,"9T#VO:Z+Z 0~028" p
C,"SFBH3R#&ZAT/~028" p
C,"87EPJ)~028" p
C,"S~013" p
C,"~030" p
C,"~004" p
Samples A-7
Sample Data Matrix Packets
Data Matrix (ECC-200) is a two-dimensional bar code which is made up of
square modules arranged within a perimeter finder pattern. There are 24
square symbol sizes available ranging from 10 rows by 10 columns to 144
rows by 144 columns. There are six rectangular symbol sizes available
ranging from 8 rows by 8 columns to 16 rows by 48 columns. The symbol
size is data dependent. Data Matrix automatically pads data.
Make sure you do not overlay other fields when designing your Data Matrix
symbol. Smart imaging is automatically disabled on formats with a Data
Matrix bar code. You should also allow a 3 or 4 dot “quiet zone” (blank
space around the bar code’s perimeter) for scanning. See “Defining a Bar
Code Field” for more information.
Sample Batch Data with Special Characters
To use this character in the bar code
enter these characters in the batch data
null character
~~@
~ (tilde)
~126~126
FNC1
~~1
Square Data Matrix Packet
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX1" p
B,1,50,V,50,100,35,0,100,8,L,0 p }
{B,36,N,1 p
1,"1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST" p }
This example prints a one-inch wide by one-inch tall (100) square Data
Matrix symbol using the default density (0) without any field rotation (0).
Rectangular Data Matrix Packet
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX2" p
B,1,400,V,100,200,35,29,50,8,L,1 p }
{B,36,N,1 p
1,"1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST" p }
This example prints a one-inch by a half-inch tall (50) rectangular 16 rows
by 36 columns (density 29) Data Matrix symbol rotated 90 (1).
A-8 Samples
Sample Data Matrix with Function 1
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX1" p
B,1,50,V,10,50,35,0,50,8,L,0 p}
{B,36,N,1 p
1,"~~110012345678902" p}
This example prints a 0.50-inch wide by 0.50-inch tall (50) square Data
Matrix symbol using the default density (0) without any field rotation (0).
FNC1 appears in the batch data as ~~1.
Sample Quick Response Packets
Quick Response (QR Code) is a two-dimensional bar code, which is made
up of square modules arranged in an overall square pattern. A unique
finder pattern is located at three corners of the symbol. Four levels of error
correction are available, along with a wide range of symbol sizes.
¨ Model 1 is the original specification.
¨ Model 2 is an enhanced form that includes additional features.
The maximum number of characters depends on the type of characters
entered for the batch data and differs for the two models of QR Code.
Data Type
Model1
Model2
Numeric data
1167
2710
Alphanumeric data
707
2710
8-Bit data
486
2710
Kanji data
299
1817
QR Code can accommodate Japanese Kana and Kanji characters and has a
variety of applications, including marking spark plugs, radiators, printed
circuit boards, and test tubes. Refer to the AIM International Symbology
Specification for more details about data requirements.
Samples A-9
Entering Batch Data for QR Code
QR Code requires certain parameters at the beginning of all batch data.
Syntax
error_cor
"error_cor mask# data_input, char"
Level of error correction. Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable
if the error correction is high enough. Options:
H
Ultra high reliability level
Q
High reliability level
M
Standard level
L
High density level
Note:
As you increase the error correction level, the maximum number of
characters (in the field) decreases.
mask#
Mask number. Undefined. Leave blank or use 0.
data_input
Type of data input. Options:
A
Automatic
M
Manual
char
Type of characters. Options:
A
Alphanumeric
B
Binary
K
Kanji
N
Numeric
Note:
Example
In binary mode, the number of characters must be represented by
the 4-digit number in decimal.
1,"HM,N0123456789012345" p }
Defines the following batch data for the QR Code: The error correction level
is H, which provides very high reliability. Leave the mask number blank.
The data input mode is Manual. The type of characters are Numeric and the
data is 0123456789012345.
QR Code Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"QRCODE" p
B,1,200,V,50,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 p
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"HM,N0123456789012345" p }
A-10 Samples
Structured Append Mode
QR Code offers a mode called structured append (or concatenated) that
allows you to collect data from multiple QR Code symbols and use that data
elsewhere. For example, the components of a sub-assembly can have
individual QR Codes and the QR Code for the entire assembly contains all
the data from the individual codes. This mode also requires certain
parameters at the beginning of all batch data.
Syntax
"mode_id code# #of_div parity, error_cor mask#
data_input char"
mode_id
Mode identifier. Use D to indicate the structured append (or concatenated)
mode.
code#
Code number of the individual symbol in the concatenated set. You must
use a two-digit number in decimal.
#of_div
Total number of symbols in this concatenated set. You must use a two-digit
number in decimal.
parity
Parity byte. You must use a two-digit number in hexadecimal. There is no
standard parity byte.
error_cor
Level of error correction. Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable
if the error correction is high enough. Options:
H
Ultra high reliability level
Q
High reliability level
M
Standard level
L
High density level
Note:
As you increase the error correction level, the maximum number of
characters (in the field) decreases.
mask#
Mask number. Undefined. Leave blank or use 0.
data_input
Type of data input. Options:
A
Automatic
M
Manual
char
Type of characters. Options:
A
Alphanumeric
B
Binary
K
Kanji
N
Numeric
Note:
In binary mode, the number of characters must be represented by
the 4-digit number in decimal.
Samples A-11
Example
1,"D0205E9,Q0A," p
C,"B006qrcode," p }
Defines the structured append mode (D) for QR Code. This is symbol (02)
of a concatenated set containing (05) symbols. The parity byte is E9. The
error correction level is Q, which provides a high reliability. Use 0 for the
mask number. The data input mode is Automatic. The type of characters
are binary (B) and there will be six (06) data characters (qrcode).
Structured Append QR Code Packet
{F,2,A,R,E,200,200,"QRCODE2" p
B,1,200,V,50,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"D0202E9,Q0A" p
C,"0123456789ABCD+__âôû~129~064~159~252~224~064" p }
Sample GS1 DataBar Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,400,400,""¦
B,1,30,V,5,5,38,4,0,0,L,0,1,2,22¦}
{B,1,N,1¦
1,"123456|Monarch Brand Printers"¦}
Sample GS1 DataBar with Function 1
{F,1,A,R,E,400,400,"UCC AB"¦
B,1,30,V,5,65,38,4,35,0,L,0,11,2,22¦}
{B,1,N,1¦
1,"~02910ABC¦~029Monarch Brand Printers"¦}
Sample Aztec Packet
{F,1,A,R,G,3000,832,"TEST"¦
B,1,2000,V,50,300,37,7,0,0,L,0¦
R,53,0,0,0,1,""¦}
{B,1,N,1¦
1,"Monarch Brand Printers"¦}
A-12 Samples
Sample Compliance Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"RDCI" p
L,V,500,115,90,85,3 p
L,V,298,245,90,102,3 p
L,V,500,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,400,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,298,2,0,390,3 p
L,V,200,2,0,390,5 p
C,568,8,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"FROM:",0 p
C,568,125,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"CARRIER:",0 p
C,529,124,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"PRO NUMBER:",0 p
C,511,125,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"B/L NUMBER:",0 p
C,472,8,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"TO:",0 p
C,387,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"(420) SHIP TO POSTAL CODE",0 p
C,391,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"APPOINTMENT NUMBER:",0 p
C,358,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"ORDER TYPE:",0 p
C,327,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"ITEM:",0 p
C,190,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"UPC SHIPPING CONTAINER CODE",0 p
C,557,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MONARCH",0 p
C,547,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"170 MONARCH LANE",0 p
C,537,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"P.O. BOX 608",0 p
C,527,6,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"DAYTON, OHIO 45401",0 p
C,462,313,0,2,4,3,B,L,0,0,"#",0 p
T,1,15,V,529,220,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,2,15,V,511,220,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
B,3,13,V,311,28,8,4,50,8,L,0 p
B,4,14,V,17,60,50,5,130,8,L,0 p
T,5,30,V,161,080,0,3,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,6,15,V,467,40,4,1,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,7,10,V,462,330,6,2,4,3,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,8,20,V,549,124,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,9,30,V,446,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,10,30,V,426,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,11,30,V,406,40,4,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,12,20,V,368,255,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,13,5,V,335,270,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,14,15,V,304,270,0,2,3,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
T,15,15,V,366,65,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
R,1,"(420)ÿ" p
T,16,27,V,270,10,0,3,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
T,17,27,V,240,10,0,3,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
R,1,"WELCOMES GUEST # " p
T,18,27,V,210,10,0,3,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p }
Samples A-13
Sample Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"1234567890" p
2,"0987654321" p
3,"~20142032678" p
4,"10028028662854" p
5,"1 00 28028 66285 4" p
6,"RODGER DIST CTR" p
7,"8292" p
8,"BROADWAY" p
9,"555 WEST OAK AVE." p
10,"DAYTON, OH 45401-0608" p
11,"" p
12,"08292 123456-123" p
13,"AR" p
14,"999-999999-99" p
15,"32678" p
16,"WYSIWYG" p
17,"99999" p
18,"TO A PRODUCT DEMO" p }
A-14 Samples
Samples A-15
Sample Format Packet
{F,5,A,R,G,576,768,"1HDREC1" p
L,S,19,39,499,39,38,"" p
L,S,19,93,499,93,15,"" p
L,S,19,124,499,124,15,"" p
L,S,19,155,499,155,38,"" p
C,461,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,"PO NUMBER
",1 p
C,426,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”STORE
" p
C,391,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”CTNS SHOPPED" p
C,357,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,"CTNS RECVD " p
C,320,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”CARRIER
" p
C,259,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”FRT BILL # " p
C,196,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”FRT TERMS
" p
C,159,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”KEYREC#
" p
C,125,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”FRT CLAIM # " p
C,090,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”RECVD BY
" p
C,056,232,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”DATE RECVD " p
C,461,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”:" p
C,426,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,391,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,357,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,320,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,259,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,196,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,159,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,125,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,090,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
C,056,445,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,":" p
T,01,08,V,461,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,02,08,V,426,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,03,08,V,391,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,04,08,V,357,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,05,18,V,290,289,0,1,1,1,B,R,0,0 p
T,06,12,V,230,395,0,1,1,1,B,R,0,0 p
T,07,08,V,196,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,08,08,V,159,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,09,08,V,125,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,10,08,V,090,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,11,08,V,056,458,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
T,12,11,V,259,762,0,1,2,2,B,B,0,1 p
R,1,"*_________*" p
B,13,09,V,259,720,4,4,145,8,B,1 p
R,4,12,2,9,1,1 p
R,50,3,8 p }
A-16 Samples
Sample Zero Batch Packet
{B,5,N,0 p }
{B,5,U,1 p
1,"6005710" p
2,"106" p
3,"3" p
4,"3" p
5,"ALLIED FREIGHT1234" p
6,"123456789012" p
7,"P" p
8,"10650337" p
9,"0" p
10,"VIC" p
11,"1/6/94" p
12,"106503378" p }
Samples A-17
Sample Data Entry Format Packet
This packet uses Option 5 (Data Entry Sources) and Option 20 (Data Entry
Prompts). After the printer receives the format packet, the operator can go
into Batch Entry Mode at the printer and enter the batch data.
{F,1,A,R,E,300,200,"TEXTILES" p
T,1,10,V,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 p
R,20,"PART NUMBER:" p
R,5,K p
B,2,12,V,150,40,1,2,80,7,L,0 p
R,20,"UPC NUMBER:" p
R,5,K p
D,3,20 p
R,20,"FIBER#1:" p
R,5,K p
D,4,3 p
R,20,"PERCENTAGE:" p
R,5,K p
T,5,30,V,80,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
R,1,"
%
" p
R,4,3,1,20,5,1 p
R,4,4,1,3,1,1 p
R,5,N p
D,6,20 p
R,20,”FIBER #2:" p
R,5,K p
D,7,3 p
R,20,"PERCENTAGE:" p
R,5,K p
T,8,30,V,65,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
R,1,"
%
" p
R,4,6,1,20,5,1 p
R,4,7,1,3,1,1 p
R,5,N p
C,30,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,”MADE IN USA",0 p
L,S,110,30,110,150,10," " p
Q,240,30,270,150,3," " p }
Depending on the operator-entered batch data, a label similar to this one
prints.
A-18 Samples
RFID Data Field Samples
The ellipsis indicate additional fields that are not shown.
RFID Data Field with a Copy Option
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"RDCI" p
L,V,500,115,90,85,3 p
L,V,298,245,90,102,3 p
C,568,8,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"FROM:",0 p
C,568,125,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,"CARRIER:",0 p
C,387,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"(420) SHIP TO POSTAL CODE",0 p
C,391,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"APPOINTMENT NUMBER:",0 p
C,327,250,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"ITEM:",0 p
C,190,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"UPC SHIPPING CONTAINER CODE",0 p
T,1,15,V,529,220,0,2,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 p
B,3,13,V,311,28,8,4,50,8,L,0 p
B,4,14,V,17,60,50,5,130,8,L,0 p
X,5,24,0 p
T,6,20,V,415,270,0,50,15,15,B,L,0,2 p
R,4,5,1,16,1,0 p
...}
Sample Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 p
1,"RFID TEST" p
3,"1005678" p
4,"67-90-32" p
5,"3123456789ABCDEF12345678" p
6,"ABCDEFG" p
...}
The RFID Data Field contains exactly 24 characters of data in ASCII Hex
format for a 96-bit RFID tag.
Samples A-19
96-Bit RFID Data Field Samples
The following examples can be used for C1Gen1 and C1Gen2 (without
locking).
The 96-bit data that can be displayed using the printer’s Setup, RFID menu
for all these examples is the same: “313233343536373839303132.”
Refer to your RFID Multi-Protocol Application Notes for more information
about displaying what is programmed into an RFID tag.
ASCII HEX Sample
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"ASCIIHEX" p
T,1,50,V,10,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
X,2,24,0 p }
{B,2,N,2 p
1,"313233343536373839303132" p
2,"313233343536373839303132" p }
ASCII Hex data type is selected in the RFID Data Field and the batch data is
entered as ASCII Hex.
ASCII Sample
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"ASCII" p
T,1,50,V,10,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
X,2,12,1 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"123456789012" p
2,"123456789012" p }
ASCII data type is selected in the RFID Data Field and the batch data is
entered as ASCII.
A-20 Samples
ASCII BINARY Sample
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"ASCIIBIN" p
T,1,96,V,10,10,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
X,2,96,2 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"00110001001100100011001100110100001101010011011000110111
0011100000110001001100100011001100110100" p
2,"00110001001100100011001100110100001101010011011000110111
0011100000110001001100100011001100110100" p }
Note:
The ASCII Binary data needs to be entered on one line. Do not use
line breaks to wrap the data. This data is shown on several lines
because of the font size and margins.
ASCII Binary data type is selected in the RFID Data Field and the batch
data is entered as ASCII Binary.
HEX Sample
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"HEX" p
T,1,50,V,10,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0 p
X,2,12,3 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"~049~050~051~052~053~054~055~056~057~048~049~050" p
2,"~049~050~051~052~053~054~055~056~057~048~049~050" p }
Hex data type is selected in the RFID Data Field and the batch data is
entered as Hex.
Note:
Tilde numbers are decimal 0 to 255, which is how Hex values must
be entered.
Samples A-21
SSCC96 Sample
{F,45,A,R,E,600,400,"SSCC96" p
C,45,220,0,50,10,10,B,L,0,2,"_" p
C,75,385,0,50,40,30,B,L,0,2,"Monarch RFID" p
C,110,385,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"SHIP TO RFID USER" p
C,110,150,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"CARRIER" p
C,150,150,0,50,9,9,B,L,0,2,"PRO:" p
C,165,150,0,50,9,9,B,L,0,2,"B/L:" p
C,200,380,0,50,18,15,B,L,0,2,"PAXAR AMERICAS, Inc." p
C,235,380,0,50,14,12,B,L,0,2,"EMAIL: RFID@PAXAR.COM" p
C,255,380,0,50,14,12,B,L,0,2,"PHONE: 1 800 543-6650" p
C,275,345,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"VENDOR STK NO:" p
C,275,110,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"PACK/UNITS:" p
C,360,330,0,50,10,10,B,L,0,2,"EPC Pure Identity:" p
C,275,190,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"COLOR:" p
C,315,110,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"SIZE/STYLE:" p
C,415,390,0,50,12,12,B,L,0,2,"EPC#:" p
L,S,098,005,098,395,6,"" p
L,S,170,005,170,395,6,"" p
L,S,098,155,170,155,6,"" p
L,S,260,005,260,395,6,"" p
L,S,390,005,390,395,6,"" p
T,1,15,V,130,335,0,50,13,12,B,L,0,2 p
B,2,15,V,165,365,8,4,25,0,L,2 p
T,3,20,V,130,150,0,50,13,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,4,20,V,150,110,0,50,10,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,5,20,V,165,110,0,50,10,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,12,10,V,295,370,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,13,10,V,295,110,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,14,50,V,380,385,0,50,12,11,B,L,0,2 p
T,15,10,V,295,200,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,16,10,V,335,155,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,18,30,V,550,330,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
B,17,20,V,530,340,50,6,110,0,L,2 p
X,19,24 p
T,20,40,V,415,330,0,50,12,13,B,L,0,2 p
R,4,19,1,40,1,1 p }
A-22 Samples
Sample Batch Packet
{B,45,N,1 p
1,"VENDOR USA" p
2,"42060512" p
3,"PAXAR AMERICAS" p
4,"0987764356" p
5,"0020545640" p
12,"0075687332" p
13,"3600" p
14,"urn:epc:tag:sscc-96:1.0028028.0000001235" p
15,"RED" p
16,"48~"/TOUGH" p
17,"009280287586887" p
18,"0 09 28028 75688 7" p
19,"313401B5F0000004D3000000" p
20,"0" p }
Samples A-23
SGTIN 96 Sample
{F,46,A,R,E,600,400,"SGTIN96" p
C,45,220,0,50,10,10,B,L,0,2,"_" p
C,75,385,0,50,40,30,B,L,0,2,"Monarch RFID" p
C,110,385,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"SHIP TO RFID USER" p
C,110,150,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"CARRIER" p
C,150,150,0,50,9,9,B,L,0,2,"PRO:" p
C,165,150,0,50,9, 9,B,L,0,2,"B/L:" p
C,200,380,0,50,18,15,B,L,0,2,"PAXAR AMERICAS, Inc." p
C,235,380,0,50,14,12,B,L,0,2,"EMAIL: RFID@PAXAR.COM" p
C,255,380,0,50,14,12,B,L,0,2,"PHONE: 1 800 543-6650" p
C,275,345,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"VENDOR STK NO:" p
C,275,110,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"PACK/UNITS:" p
C,360,330,0,50,10,10,B,L,0,2,"EPC Pure Identity:" p
C,275,190,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"COLOR:" p
C,315,110,0,50,6,6,B,L,0,2,"SIZE/STYLE:" p
C,415,390,0,50,12,12,B,L,0,2,"EPC#:" p
L,S,098,005,098,395,6,"" p
L,S,170,005,170,395,6,"" p
L,S,098,155,170,155,6,"" p
L,S,260,005,260,395,6,"" p
L,S,390,005,390,395,6,"" p
T,1,15,V,130,335,0,50,13,12,B,L,0,2 p
B,2,15,V,165,365,8,4,25,0,L,2 p
T,3,20,V,130,150,0,50,13,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,4,20,V,150,110,0,50,10,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,5,20,V,165,110,0,50,10,12,B,L,0,2 p
T,12,10,V,295,370,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,13,10,V,295,110,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,14,50,V,380,385,0,50,12,11,B,L,0,2 p
T,15,10,V,295,200,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,16,10,V,335,155,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
T,18,30,V,550,330,0,50,15,18,B,L,0,2 p
B,17,20,V,530,340,50,6,110,0,L,2 p
X,19,24 p
T,20,40,V,415,330,0,50,12,13,B,L,0,2 p
R,4,19,1,40,1,1 p }
A-24 Samples
Sample Batch Packet
{B,46,N,1 p
1,"VENDOR USA" p
2,"42060512" p
3,"PAXAR AMERICAS" p
4,"0987764356" p
5,"0020545640" p
12,"0075687332" p
13,"3600" p
14,"urn:epc:tag:sgtin-96:1.0028028.001234.2" p
15,"RED" p
16,"48~"/TOUGH" p
17,"009280287586887" p
18,"0 09 28028 75688 7" p
19,"303401B5F001348000000002" p
20,"0" p }
Expanded C1Gen2 Samples
Password Lock
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"PWDLOCK" p
X,1,100,0 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"313233343536373831323334~028" p
C,"ABCDEFGH01234567UserMemorySample~028" p
C,"~028" p
C,"73737373~028" p
C,"CAD01234~028" p
C,"22022" p }
The EPC data is 313233343536373831323334, the user memory data is
ABCDEFGH01234567UserMemorySample, the access password is
73737373, and the kill password is CAD01234. Selects password lock (2)
as the locking method for the EPC, user memory, access, and kill fields. To
change the EPC, user memory, or kill fields, the access password must be
sent with the batch data.
Samples A-25
Permalock and Password Lock
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"BOTHLOCK" p
X,1,100,0 p }
{B,2,N,1 p
1,"313233343536373831323334~028" p
C,"~028" p
C,"~028" p
C,"73737373~028" p
C,"CAD01234~028" p
C,"30033" p }
The EPC data is 313233343536373831323334, the access password is
73737373, and the kill password is CAD01234. Selects permalock and
password lock (3) as the locking method for the EPC, access, and kill fields,
which means these fields are permanently un-writable. The EPC data can
only be programmed ONE time.
A-26 Samples
B
FONTS
Our printers support two types of fonts: Bitmapped (traditional
printer fonts such as Standard and Reduced) and
Scalable/TrueType® (Font 50). This appendix gives a brief
overview of each type of font and how your printer interprets fonts.
It also shows examples of the fonts loaded in your printer.
Number
Font Size and Appearance
Type of
Spacing
# of Dots Between
Characters
1
Standard
monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
2
Reduced
monospaced
1 (203 dpi)
2 (300 dpi)
3
Bold
monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
4
OCRA-like
monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
5
HR1 - only for numeric data
monospaced
2 (203 dpi)
3 (300 dpi)
6
HR2 - only for numeric data
monospaced
1 (203 dpi)
2 (300 dpi)
10
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
(9 pt. at 203 dpi or 8 pt. at 300 dpi)
proportional
varies w/ each letter
11
6 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Type face
proportional
varies w/ each letter
15
7 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Type face
proportional
varies w/ each letter
16
9 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Type face
proportional
varies w/each letter
17
11 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Type face
proportional
varies w/each letter
18
15 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Type face
proportional
varies w/each letter
50
EFF Swiss Bold
scalable
varies w/each letter
56
PaxarSymbols
proportional
varies w/each letter
70
15 pt. Paxar
proportional
varies w/each letter
71
18 pt. Paxar
proportional
varies w/each letter
72
15 pt. NAFTA
proportional
varies w/each letter
73
18 pt. NAFTA
proportional
varies w/each letter
* The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces support only ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font does not support Code Page 1256 (Arabic). The Euro-dollar symbol at position
~192 is only available in the Standard, Reduced, and Bold fonts.
Fonts
B-1
These samples were printed using the Internal Symbol set.
Standard Font
Reduced Font
Bold Font
EFF Swiss Bold Font*
OCRA-like Font
* Printed with ANSI Symbol Set
B-2 Fonts
These samples were printed using Code Page 437.
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Fonts
B-3
PaxarSymbols Font 56 Characters
A (decimal 65) =
Paxar Font 70 and Font 71 Characters
32
33
!
34
_
35
36
37
38
39
#
$
%
&
$
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
(
)
*
+
,
-
.
/
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
8
=
>
?
@
;
<
9
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
B-4 Fonts
N A F TA F o n t 7 2 a n d F o n t 7 3 C h a r a c t e r s
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
!
"
#
$
%
&
'
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
(
)
*
+
,
-
.
/
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
f
g
$`
a
b
c
d
e
104
105
106
107
108
109
h
i
j
k
l
m
Bitmap Font Information
Our bitmap fonts are either monospaced (each character occupies the same
amount of space) or proportional (each character is a different width). Use
monospaced fonts for price fields and data you want to list in a column.
With proportionally spaced fonts, you may be able to place more characters
on a line. However, you may need to experiment with these fonts and adjust
field measurements in your format. The bitmapped fonts (either
monospaced or proportional) appear jagged when magnified.
The magnification range is 1 to 7.
Use the MONARCH® MPCL™ Toolbox (Soft Font Utility), available on our
Web site, to convert a bitmap font to Hex or Run-Length encoding for the
printer. Select the point size and characters to print. Bitmap fonts may
image faster than a TrueType font, but you are limited to the point size and
characters you downloaded.
Fonts B-5
Monospaced Font Magnification
Monospaced characters occupy the same amount of space within a
magnification. Use monospaced fonts for price fields and data you want to
list in a column. Decide how wide and tall you want the characters to
appear on the labels. The following two tables show the width and height of
each of the monospaced fonts after magnification.
This table includes the default (3 dots for Standard, 1 dot for Reduced, 3
dots for Bold) spacing.
Using 203 DPI
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Standard
Reduced
Bold
Units
Character
Width
Sample
Character
Width
Sample
Character
Width
Sample
1/100 in.
8.37
3.9
13.3
1/10 mm
21.26
9.9
33.78
Dots
17
8
27
1/100 in.
49.75
24.63
84.24
1/10 mm
126.37
62.56
214
Dots
101
50
171
Using 300 DPI
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Standard
Reduced
Bold
Units
Character
Width
Sample
Character
Width
Sample
Character
Width
Sample
1/100 in.
8.7
4
13.7
1/10 mm
22
10.2
34.7
Dots
26
12
41
1/100 in.
50.7
25
85.7
1/10 mm
128.7
63.5
217.6
Dots
152
75
257
Only the 1x width can be scanned with the OCRA-like font. Using a
printhead with 203 dpi, the character widths are as follows: 7.9 (English),
20.1 (Metric), and 16 (Dots).
B-6 Fonts
To calculate other font widths, multiply the font dots (14 dots for Standard, 7
dots for Reduced, 24 dots for Bold) by the magnification and add the default
spacing (3 dots for Standard, 1 dot for Reduced, 3 dots for Bold) between
characters.
Example
14 (Standard font dots) x 5 (magnification) = 70 + 3 (default spacing
between characters). There are 73 dots in the Standard font at 5x.
203 DPI Height Magnification
1x
7x
1/100 in.
10.8
75.9
1/10 mm
27.4
192.8
dots
22
154
1/100 in.
6.9
48.28
1/10 mm
17.5
122.6
dots
14
98
Standard
Reduced
Fonts
B-7
Bold
1/100 in.
16.7
117.24
1/10 mm
42.4
297.8
dots
34
238
OCRA-like (1x only)
1/100 in.
11.8
1/10 mm
30
dots
24
1x
7x
1/100 in.
11
77
1/10 mm
28
195.6
dots
33
231
1/100 in.
7
49
1/10 mm
17.8
124.5
dots
21
147
300 DPI Height Magnification
Standard
Reduced
B-8 Fonts
Bold
1/100 in.
18.7
130.7
1/10 mm
47.4
332
dots
56
392
OCRA-like (1x only)
1/100 in.
12
1/10 mm
30.5
dots
36
Fonts
B-9
Proportional Font Magnification
Each character in a proportionally spaced font is a different height and
width. You may be able to place more characters on a line using
proportionally spaced fonts. You may want to experiment with these fonts
and adjust field measurements in your format as needed. The bitmapped
fonts (either monospaced or proportional) appear jagged when magnified.
The magnification range is 1 to 7. The following tables provide height and
width magnification of sample characters.
C G Tr i u m vi r a t e™ Ty p e f a c e B o l d ( 9 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1.48
6.4
10.8
1/10 mm
3.76
16.26
27.4
Dots
3
13
22
1/100 in.
10.3
44.8
75.9
1/10 mm
26.2
114
192.8
Dots
21
91
154
To calculate other font widths, multiply the font dots (3 dots for Minimum, 13
dots for Average, 22 dots for Maximum) by the magnification.
Example
13 (Average font dots) x 5 (magnification) = 65 dots in an average letter of
the CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold at 5x.
Height Magnification 203 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface Bold
1x
7x
1/100 in.
8.87
56
1/10 mm
22.5
158
dots
18
126
B-10 Fonts
C G Tr i u m vi r a t e™ Ty p e f a c e B o l d ( 9 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1.5
8
11
1/10 mm
3.8
20.3
28
Dots
4.5
24
331
1/100 in.
10.5
56
77
1/10 mm
26.7
142.2
195.6
Dots
31.5
168
231
Height Magnification
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface Bold
1x
7x
1/100 in.
9
63
1/10 mm
22.9
160.2
dots
27
189
Fonts
B-11
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 6 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
.99
2.96
5.9
1/10 mm
2.51
7.52
15
Dots
2
6
12
1/100 in.
6.9
20.7
41.4
1/10 mm
17.5
52.6
105.2
Dots
14
42
84
Height Magnification 203 DPI
1x
7x
1/100 in.
5.9
41.38
1/10 mm
14.99
105.1
dots
12
84
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
B-12 Fonts
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 6 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1
3
6
1/10 mm
2.54
7.62
15.2
Dots
3
9
18
1/100 in.
7
21
42
1/10 mm
17.8
53.3
106.7
Dots
21
63
126
Height Magnification 300 DPI
1x
7x
1/100 in.
6.7
46.7
1/10 mm
16.9
118.5
dots
20
140
CG Triumvirateä Typeface
Fonts
B-13
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 7 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
.99
2.96
5.9
1/10 mm
2.51
7.52
15
Dots
2
6
12
1/100 in.
6.9
20.7
41.4
1/10 mm
17.5
52.6
105.2
Dots
14
42
84
Height Magnification 203 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
8.87
56
1/10 mm
22.5
158
dots
18
126
B-14 Fonts
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 7 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1
3
7.3
1/10 mm
2.54
7.62
18.6
Dots
3
9
22
1/100 in.
9
21
51.3
1/10 mm
22.9
53.3
130.4
Dots
27
63
154
Height Magnification 300 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
9
63
1/10 mm
22.9
160.2
dots
27
189
Fonts
B-15
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 9 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
.99
2.96
5.9
1/10 mm
2.51
7.52
15
Dots
2
6
12
1/100 in.
6.9
20.7
41.4
1/10 mm
17.5
52.6
105.2
Dots
14
42
84
Height Magnification 203 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
8.87
68
1/10 mm
22.5
172.7
dots
18
138
B-16 Fonts
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 9 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1.3
4.7
9.6
1/10 mm
3.4
11.8
24.5
Dots
4
14
29
1/100 in.
9.3
32.7
67.7
1/10 mm
23.7
83
171.8
Dots
28
98
203
Height Magnification 300 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
10.7
74.7
1/10 mm
27.1
189.6
dots
32
224
Fonts
B-17
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 1 1 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
.99
2.96
5.9
1/10 mm
2.51
7.52
15
Dots
2
6
12
1/100 in.
6.9
20.7
41.4
1/10 mm
17.5
52.6
105.2
Dots
14
42
84
Height Magnification 203 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
8.87
68
1/10 mm
22.5
172.7
dots
18
138
B-18 Fonts
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 1 1 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
1.7
5.3
10.7
1/10 mm
4.2
13.5
27.1
Dots
5
16
32
1/100 in.
11.7
37.3
74.7
1/10 mm
29.6
94.8
189.6
Dots
35
112
224
Height Magnification 300 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
11.7
81.7
1/10 mm
29.6
207.4
dots
35
245
Fonts
B-19
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 1 5 p t . ) 2 0 3 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
.99
2.96
5.9
1/10 mm
2.51
7.52
15
Dots
2
6
12
1/100 in.
6.9
20.7
41.4
1/10 mm
17.5
52.6
105.2
Dots
14
42
84
Height Magnification 203 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1/100 in.
8.87
68
1/10 mm
22.5
172.7
dots
18
138
B-20 Fonts
C G T r i u m v i r a t e ä Ty p e f a c e ( 1 5 p t . ) 3 0 0 D P I
Width Mag.
1x
7x
Minimum
Average
Maximum
1/100 in.
2
7.6
15.7
1/10 mm
5.1
19.4
39.8
Dots
6
23
47
1/100 in.
14
53.7
47
1/10 mm
35.5
136.3
119.4
Dots
42
161
141
Height Magnification 300 DPI
CG Triumvirateä
Typeface
1x
7x
1/100 in.
17.7
8123.7
1/10 mm
44.8
314.1
dots
53
371
Fonts
B-21
Scalable Font Information
The scalable font is smooth at any point size. There are no jagged edges
because the font is created from an equation every time it is used. The field
width varies with each letter.
When you define formats using scalable fonts, remember to set the
character rotation to 0, because it is not supported. However, field rotation
is supported for text or constant text fields using the scalable font. The
scalable font does not print a slashed zero.
Scalable fonts perform better in constant text fields, because those fields
are imaged only once per batch, not once per label as in text fields. The
transparent overlay allows closer field placement when using scalable fonts.
To use large point sizes (greater than 60), you must reconfigure memory
and increase the size of the scalable (vector) fonts buffer.
The height and width magnification are defined in point size.
72 points = one inch. One inch = cell size. The cell size is the built-in
space around the individual characters of the scalable font. The point size
range is 4 to 255. If the height and width are not set to the same point size,
the printed characters look tall and thin or short and thick, which allows for
greater flexibility in the appearance of the font.
The 72 point EFF Swiss Bold sample shows the one inch cell size.
6pt
Sample
10pt
Sample
24pt Sample
48pt
72pt
B-22 Fonts
Sample
Sample
1"
T r u e Ty p e F o n t I n f o r m a t i o n
TrueType fonts follow the TrueType outline font standard. These fonts are
smooth at any point size. There are no jagged edges, because the font is
created from an equation every time it is used. The height and width
magnification are defined in point size. 72 points = one inch.
One inch = cell size. The cell size is the built-in space around the individual
characters of the scalable font. The point size range is 4 to 255. The field
width varies with each letter. The printer can accept downloaded TrueType
fonts.
D o w n l o a d i n g T r u e Ty p e F o n t s
The MONARCH® MPCL™ Toolbox (Font Utility) is available on our Web site
and converts TrueType fonts to Hex or Run-Length encoding for the printer.
When downloading a TrueType font, you download the entire font, not
particular characters or one point size. You can print a variety of symbol
sets with International (Turkish, Latin, Spanish, etc.) characters. TrueType
fonts are designed to be regionally specific; therefore, all symbol sets may
not be supported in a given font.
These font files are large and may image slower than bitmap fonts. The
size of the font file, in bytes, is the minimum amount of memory you must
have available for fonts in the printer’s downloadable fonts buffer.
You may need to reallocate memory to use downloaded TrueType fonts.
After reallocating memory, resend the font, format, and batch packets. See
“Defining the Memory Configuration Packet” in Chapter 2 for more
information. Also, Chapter 2 lists some special considerations when
defining memory for downloaded TrueType fonts.
Fonts
B-23
Using International Fonts
International fonts are available as bitmap or TrueType fonts. See "Bitmap
Font Information" or "TrueType Font Information" for more details. To use
these fonts, you must purchase the memory expansion option and download
the font to the printer.
Version 6.0 or greater (9855/9860) and version 3.0 or greater (9825) have a
new font rasterizer, which allows for an additional symbol set
(110 – Unicode UTF-8). To use this symbol set, you must download an
International TrueType font. An International TrueType font containing
Chinese or Japanese characters requires the high memory option
(purchased separately). The high memory option is only available with the
9855/9860 printers. An International TrueType font containing Arabic
characters may not require the high memory option.
Note:
Because the 9825 printer’s memory is limited, only Latin fonts
(smaller than 256K) may fit in the printer’s flash memory. There is
not enough memory to store an Asian font.
To use International fonts, consider the following information:
¨ All fonts contain an internal character mapping. The mapping is
organized by one or more standards, such as BIG5. These mapping
standards can provide over 65,000 characters, which are not
represented in this manual.
The printer supports several mapping standards:
¨
Unicode (UCS-2)
¨
BIG5
¨
GB2312
¨
SJIS
¨ Specify a symbol set based on the characters to print and one that is
compatible with the font's character mapping. For example, to print
Japanese characters, select symbol set 932 (Japanese Shift JIS) and a
font compatible with that symbol set. See "Selecting a Symbol Set" for
more information.
¨ To enter batch data, use the method specified by the font's character
mapping and a compatible symbol set.
B-24 Fonts
Selecting a Symbol Set
Specify a symbol set based on the characters to print and one that is
compatible with the font's character mapping. The symbol set parameter
identifies the character mapping used in the text field or constant text field,
for example, Unicode, BIG5, etc. If no symbol set is selected, the default
symbol set (Internal Symbol Set) is used.
The printer automatically translates some character mappings to others.
For example, if you need a BIG5 font, it is possible to use Unicode text
data. Use Unicode in the symbol set parameter to indicate the text mapping
and select the BIG5 font needed in the font parameter (T8 or C5). The
printer automatically translates the Unicode character values into BIG5
values before printing the character.
The following table lists the compatible mappings and symbol sets.
Font Character Mapping
Symbol Set Parameter (T15, C13, or A6)
Batch Data*
TrueType Font
Character Mapping
use in text or constant text fields
Unicode
BIG5
Unicode
SJIS
Unicode
KSC5601
102 - Unicode
If you are unsure which character mapping to select, use
this symbol set, because the printer automatically
translates the character mappings.
Unicode
GB2312
Unicode
Unicode
BIG5
Unicode
103 - BIG5
GB2312
Unicode
104 - GB2312
SJIS
SJIS
105 - SJIS (Code Page 932 - Japanese Shift-JIS)
GB2312
GB2312
106 - GB2312 (Code Page 936 - Simplified Chinese)
BIG5
BIG5
107 - BIG5 (Code Page 950 - Traditional Chinese)
UTF-8
Unicode
BIG5
SJIS
KSC5601
GB2312
110 - Unicode UTF-8
If you are unsure which character mapping to select, use
this symbol set, because the printer automatically
translates the character mappings.
Note: UTF-8 is very common. We recommend using it
for compatibility with different host applications and data
streams.
* Characters in batch data must be entered based on their mapping (Unicode, BIG5, etc.).
Note:
Symbol sets 102-110 require the memory expansion option and a
downloaded International TrueType font.
Fonts
B-25
International Font Sample
{F,3,A,R,E,150,200,"SIMPLE" p
T,1,5,V,10,10,0,100,30,30,B,L,0,0,102 p }
{B,3,U,1 p
1,"~125~000~125~002~125~004~125~005" p }
Symbol Set Parameter
Font Number
This example prints these four characters with Unicode batch data of
~125~000, ~125~002, ~125~004 and ~125~005.
Arabic Font Sample
{F,3,A,R,E,220,400,"SIMPLE"¦
T,1,250,V,40,380,0,1000,24,24,B,E,0,0,110¦
T,2,250,V,90,380,0,1000,24,24,B,E,0,0,110¦}
{B,3,N,1¦
1,"%5
95%
"¦
2,"5% polyester 95% cotton"¦}
This example prints on the 9855 printer with a downloaded Arabic font and
the printer's Numeric Format set as Default.
Refer to the Internet for a listing of the characters in each code page.
Search on a particular code page, such as “codepage 936" to view the
characters in that code page.
B-26 Fonts
L i c e n s i n g Yo u r F o n t s
We provide you with tools to create and download TrueType fonts.
However, it is your responsibility to purchase and license any fonts you
download to your printer. Contact your font supplier for licensing
information. Additional fonts that are compatible with the printer can be
purchased from:
The Electronic Font Foundry
11 Silwood Road; Ascot; SL5 OPY; England
(0)1344 875 201
www.eff.co.uk
Korean, Chinese, and Japanese fonts can be purchased from:
Dynalab Inc.
2055 Gateway Place; Suite 400; San Jose, CA 95110
408-490-4224
www.dynalab.com
Locating the Font Number in a Font Packet
If you are creating font packets, the font number is the second parameter in
the packet. Software is available to create the font data and packet. Call
Technical Support for more information.
Example
{W,200,A,M,68 p
font data p
font data p }
Font Number
Use this number in T8 or in C5. See “Defining Text Fields” or “Defining Constant
Text Fields” in Chapter 2 for more information.l
Font Number
Example
T,1,10,V,30,10,0,200,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 p
C,50,30,0,200,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MONARCH",0 p
Font Number
Defines a text and constant text field using the downloaded (#200) font.
Fonts
B-27
B-28 Fonts
S Y M B O L S E T S / C O D E PA G E S
C
This appendix contains a listing of the symbol sets, code pages,
and extended character sets the printer supports.
Use the charts in this appendix to convert dot sequences from the
image dot pattern to codes you can use in the fields. Use the
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart to convert Binary dot sequences to
Hexadecimal numbers for bitmap files. Use the Dot to Run Length
Encoding Chart to convert dot sequences to alphabetic characters
for bitmap files.
Supported Symbol Sets and Code Pages
The printers support these symbol sets and code pages: Internal,
ANSI, Bold, OCRA Character Set, DOS Code Page 437 and 850.
Additional Code Pages are supported with downloaded TrueType
or Unicode (double-byte) fonts.
The printer defaults to the internal symbol set. See “Defining the
System Setup Packet” in Chapter 2 to change the symbol set.
Selecting a Symbol Set or Code Page
The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces support only the ANSI and DOS
Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets. These fonts print a slashed
zero when using the ANSI symbol set.
Internal
Use this symbol set to print international monetary
symbols, the trademark (™) symbol, and for formats that
may be used on other MPCLII printers.
ANSI
Use this symbol set with proportionally spaced
fonts.
DOS Code
Pages 437 or 850
Use this symbol set for extended and international
characters with proportionally spaced fonts.
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-1
Using Code 128 Function Codes
This table lists the characters for Bar Code 128 function codes. These
functions are used with scanners.
Code
Function Code
~201
F1
~202
F2
~203
F3
~204
F4
Entering Extended Characters
When using extended characters in your batch data file, type a tilde in front
of the three-digit code. For example, if you want to include the character Ä
in a text field using the Internal Symbol Set, type:
1,"~142" p
Using International Character Sets/Code Pages
Symbol sets 100, 101, 852-860, and 1250-1258 may only be used with the
scalable font (font#50) or downloaded TrueType fonts. TrueType fonts are
designed to be regionally specific; therefore, all symbol sets may not be
supported in a given font. For example, to print Hebrew characters, you
need to find a font (such as Arial) that supports Hebrew characters; convert,
and then download the font to your printer. Make sure the correct symbol
set for Hebrew characters is selected.
Font 50 does not print the slashed zero or support Code Pages 101
(Wingdings) and 1256 (Arabic). The Euro-dollar symbol at position ~192 is
only available in the Standard, Reduced, and Bold fonts.
Code pages 102-107, 932, 936, and 950 contain thousands of characters,
which are not represented in this manual. These code pages require the
memory expansion option and a downloaded International TrueType font.
The Code Pages (100 and greater) on the following pages were printed
using Arial or a similar downloaded TrueType font. To determine the
character code, add the column number and row number for the character.
For example, to produce the ÿ character with the ANSI character set, you
would press Alt 255 (column 15 + row 240).
C-2 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Internal Symbol Set
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-3
ANSI Symbol Set
Bold Character Set
C-4 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
OCRA Character Set
Code Page 100 (Macintosh)
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-5
Code Page 101 (Wingdings)
Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.)
C-6 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Code Page 850 (Latin 1)
Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-7
Code Page 855 (Russian)
C o d e P a g e 8 5 7 ( I B M Tu r k i s h )
C-8 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-9
Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
C-10 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Code Page 1253 (Greek)
C o d e P a g e 1 2 5 4 ( Tu r k i s h )
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-11
Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
C-12 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
Code Page 1258 (Vietnamese)
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-13
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart
Use the chart below to translate the characters printed on your test label.
The chart lists ASCII characters and their hexadecimal and decimal
equivalents.
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
NUL
00
0
DC2
12
18
SOH
01
1
DC3
13
19
STX
02
2
DC4
14
20
ETX
03
3
NAK
15
21
EOT
04
4
SYN
16
22
ENQ
05
5
ETB
17
23
ACK
06
6
CAN
18
24
BEL
07
7
EM
19
25
Backspace
08
8
SUB
1A
26
Tab
09
9
Escape
1B
27
linefeed
0A
10
cursor right
1C
28
home
0B
11
cursor left
1D
29
form feed
0C
12
cursor up
1E
30
carriage return
0D
13
cursor down
1F
31
SO
0E
14
space
20
32
SI
0F
15
!
21
33
DLE
10
16
“
22
34
DC1
11
17
#
23
35
C-14 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
$
24
36
;
3B
59
%
25
37
<
3C
60
&
26
38
=
3D
61
‘
27
39
>
3E
62
(
28
40
?
3F
63
)
29
41
@
40
64
*
2A
42
A
41
65
++
2B
43
B
42
66
,
2C
44
C
43
67
-
2D
45
D
44
68
.
2E
46
E
45
69
/
2F
47
F
46
70
0
30
48
G
47
71
1
31
49
H
48
72
2
32
50
I
49
73
3
33
51
J
4A
74
4
34
52
K
4B
75
5
35
53
L
4C
76
6
36
54
M
4D
77
7
37
55
N
4E
78
8
38
56
O
4F
79
9
39
57
P
50
80
:
3A
58
Q
51
81
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-15
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
R
52
82
i
69
105
S
53
83
j
6A
106
T
54
84
k
6B
107
U
55
85
l
6C
108
V
56
86
m
6D
109
W
57
87
n
6E
110
X
58
88
o
6F
111
Y
59
89
p
70
112
Z
5A
90
q
71
113
[
5B
91
r
72
114
\
5C
92
s
73
115
]
5D
93
t
74
116
^^
5E
94
u
75
117
_
5F
95
v
76
118
`
60
96
w
77
119
a
61
97
x
78
120
b
62
98
y
79
121
c
63
99
z
7A
122
d
64
100
{
7B
123
e
65
101
p
7C
124
f
66
102
}
7D
125
g
67
103
~
7E
126
h
68
104
delete
7F
127
C-16 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
00000000
00
00100000
20
00000001
01
00100001
21
00000010
02
00100010
22
00000011
03
00100011
23
00000100
04
00100100
24
00000101
05
00100101
25
00000110
06
00100110
26
00000111
07
00100111
27
00001000
08
00101000
28
00001001
09
00101001
29
00001010
0A
00101010
2A
00001011
0B
00101011
2B
00001100
0C
00101100
2C
00001101
0D
00101101
2D
00001110
0E
00101110
2E
00001111
0F
00101111
2F
00010000
10
00110000
30
00010001
11
00110001
31
00010010
12
00110010
32
00010011
13
00110011
33
00010100
14
00110100
34
00010101
15
00110101
35
00010110
16
00110110
36
00010111
17
00110111
37
00011000
18
00111000
38
00011001
19
00111001
39
00011010
1A
00111010
3A
00011011
1B
00111011
3B
00011100
1C
00111100
3C
00011101
1D
00111101
3D
00011110
1E
00111110
3E
00011111
1F
00111111
3F
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-17
Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
01000000
40
01100000
60
01000001
41
01100001
61
01000010
42
01100010
62
01000011
43
01100011
63
01000100
44
01100100
64
01000101
45
01100101
65
01000110
46
01100110
66
01000111
47
01100111
67
01001000
48
01101000
68
01001001
49
01101001
69
01001010
4A
01101010
6A
01001011
4B
01101011
6B
01001100
4C
01101100
6C
01001101
4D
01101101
6D
01001110
4E
01101110
6E
01001111
4F
01101111
6F
01010000
50
01110000
70
01010001
51
01110001
71
01010010
52
01110010
72
01010011
53
01110011
73
01010100
54
01110100
74
01010101
55
01110101
75
01010110
56
01110110
76
01010111
57
01110111
77
01011000
58
01111000
78
01011001
59
01111001
79
01011010
5A
01111010
7A
01011011
5B
01111011
7B
01011100
5C
01111100
7C
01011101
5D
01111101
7D
01011110
5E
01111110
7E
01011111
5F
01111111
7F
C-18 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
10000000
80
10100000
A0
10000001
81
10100001
A1
10000010
82
10100010
A2
10000011
83
10100011
A3
10000100
84
10100100
A4
10000101
85
10100101
A5
10000110
86
10100110
A6
10000111
87
10100111
A7
10001000
88
10101000
A8
10001001
89
10101001
A9
10001010
8A
10101010
AA
10001011
8B
10101011
AB
10001100
8C
10101100
AC
10001101
8D
10101101
AD
10001110
8E
10101110
AE
10001111
8F
10101111
AF
10010000
90
10110000
B0
10010001
91
10110001
B1
10010010
92
10110010
B2
10010011
93
10110011
B3
10010100
94
10110100
B4
10010101
95
10110101
B5
10010110
96
10110110
B6
10010111
97
10110111
B7
10011000
98
10111000
B8
10011001
99
10111001
B9
10011010
9A
10111010
BA
10011011
9B
10111011
BB
10011100
9C
10111100
BC
10011101
9D
10111101
BD
10011110
9E
10111110
BC
10011111
9F
10111111
BF
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-19
Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
11000000
C0
11100000
E0
11000001
C1
11100001
E1
11000010
C2
11100010
E2
11000011
C3
11100011
E3
11000100
C4
11100100
E4
11000101
C5
11100101
E5
11000110
C6
11100110
E6
11000111
C7
11100111
E7
11001000
C8
11101000
E8
11001001
C9
11101001
E9
11001010
CA
11101010
EA
11001011
CB
11101011
EB
11001100
CC
11101100
EC
11001101
CD
11101101
ED
11001110
CE
11101110
EE
11001111
CF
11101111
EF
11010000
D0
11110000
F0
11010001
D1
11110001
F1
11010010
D2
11110010
F2
11010011
D3
11110011
F3
11010100
D4
11110100
F4
11010101
D5
11110101
F5
11010110
D6
11110110
F6
11010111
D7
11110111
F7
11011000
D8
11111000
F8
11011001
D9
11111001
F9
11011010
DA
11111010
FA
11011011
DB
11111011
FB
11011100
DC
11111100
FC
11011101
DD
11111101
FD
11011110
DE
11111110
FE
11011111
DF
11111111
FF
C-20 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart
ON (Black) Dots
# of Dots
Code
# of Dots
Code
1
A
14
N
2
B
15
O
3
C
16
P
4
D
17
Q
5
E
18
R
6
F
19
S
7
G
20
T
8
H
21
U
9
I
22
V
10
J
23
W
11
K
24
X
12
L
25
Y
13
M
26
Z
# of Dots
Code
# of Dots
Code
1
a
14
n
2
b
15
o
3
c
16
p
4
d
17
q
5
e
18
r
6
f
19
s
7
g
20
t
8
h
21
u
OFF (White Dots)
9
i
22
v
10
j
23
w
11
k
24
x
12
l
25
y
13
m
26
z
Symbol Sets/Code Pages
C-21
C-22 Symbol Sets/Code Pages
F O R M AT D E S I G N T O O L S
D
Use copies of these worksheets and grids to create formats, batch
data, and check digit schemes. You may want to keep copies of
the completed forms for your records:
¨
Online Configuration Worksheet
¨
Batch Worksheet
¨
Check Digit Worksheet
¨
Supply Layout Grids (English, Metric, Dots)
¨
Format Worksheet
¨
Sample Format Worksheet
Format Design Tools D-1
Online Configuration Worksheet
D-2 Format Design Tools
Batch Worksheet
Format Design Tools D-3
Check Digit Worksheet
D-4 Format Design Tools
8.0
SUPPLY LAYOUT (Inches)
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
FEED
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0 4.25
203
200
SUPPLY LAYOUT (Metric)
190
180
170
160
150
140
130
FEED
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100 108
192
1536
203
Supply Layout (dpi)
1624
1440
1523
1344
1421
1248
1320
1152
1218
1056
1117
960
1015
864
914
768
812
672
711
576
609
480
508
384
406
288
305
192
203
96
102
0.0
0.0
192
203
0.0
96
192
288
384
480
576
672
768 806
0.0
102
203
305
406
508
609
711
812 853
203 Supply Layout (dpi)
300
1624
2400
1523
2250
1421
2100
1320
1950
1218
1800
1117
1650
1015
1500
914
1350
812
1200
711
1050
609
900
508
750
406
600
305
450
203
300
102
150
0.0
0.0
203
300
0.0
102
203
305
406
508
609
711
0.0
150
300
450
600
750
900
1050 12001275
812 853
L IN E S
L
L
L
L
E N D R O W
E N D
C O L U M N
T H IC K N E S S
P A T T E R N
Q 4
Q 5
Q 6
Q 7
P A T T E R N
L 8
1
R
4
R
G
G
F o rm a t N a m e
S u p p ly T y p e
F o rm a t #
G
C u s to m e r N a m e
D a te
S o ftw a r e V e r s io n
G
S u p p ly S iz e
R O T A T IO N
R
C O D E #
S R C F IE L D
S R C S T A R T
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
C O P Y C O D E
R 2
R 3
R 4
R 5
R 6
R 7
R
4
R
1
R
4
4
X
O P T IO N
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
X
R
X
R
5
R
6
H
R
3 0
R
6 0
X
R
4
R
5
R
6
H
R
3 0
R
6 0
R
# 4
R
4
O P T IO N
4
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
4
R
R
# 5
5
5
R
R
6
6 2
5 2
R
5 2
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
O P T IO N
# 6
6
H
H
R
R
3 0
O P T IO N
C O D E #
C H A R C O D E
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
H E A D E R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
R 1
C O D E #
R 2
H E A D E R
F IE L D R O T .
S Y M . S E T
T 1 4
T 1 5
R 1
A L IG N M E N T
C H A R . R O T .
C O L O R
T 1 1
T 1 3
W ID . M A G .
T 1 0
T 1 2
H G T . M A G .
T 9
C O L U M N
T 6
G A P
R O W
T 5
F O N T
F IX /V A R
T 4
T 7
# O F C H A R .
T 3
T 8
H E A D E R
F IE L D #
T 1
T 2
H E A D E R
C O D E #
S R C F IE L D
S R C S T A R T
R 4
R 1
R 2
R 3
R 4
C O D E #
" F IE L D N A M E "
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
H E A D E R
P R O M P T
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
R 1
C O D E #
R 2
H E A D E R
D E V IC E
R 3
R 1
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
C O D E
R 3
R 2
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 7
R 1
C O P Y C O D E
R 6
R 2
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
R 5
C O P Y
C O D E
" C H A R A C T E R "
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
H E A D E R
C O D E #
A P P C O D E
H E A D E R
R 1
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
R
6 1
3 0
# 3 0
3 0
R
R
4 2
4 2
R
R
R
In c r e m e n tin g
D a ta
# 6 0
6 0
R
6 0
R
P a d D a ta
T C 9 8 0 0 F W
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
R
R e im a g e
F ie ld
O P T IO N
# 6 1
6 1
O P T IO N
R
6 1
R
R e v . A A
C O D E #
L / R
" C H A R A C T E R "
R 3
R 4
4 2
R
C O D E #
R
H E A D E R
O P T IO N
R
4 2
R 2
R
R 1
R
C O D E #
P D F 4 1 7
A s p e c t R a tio
R
R 2
R
3 0
H E A D E R
R
3 0
R 1
2 1
3 0
L P O S
# 1
R
O P T IO N
# 4 2
R P O S
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
2 1
3 0
R 5
R
R
2 1
R
P r ic e F ie ld
R 6
6 1
5 1
2 1
R
A M O U N T
R
R
2 1
3 0
I /D
6 0
R
R P O S
6 1
3 0
R 4
R
5 1
R 6
R
3 0
# 3 0
R 3
5 2
5 0
O P T IO N # 5 2
P a d D a ta
C O D E #
P D F 4 1 7 S e c u r ity /
T r u n c a tio n
L P O S
4 2
R
H E A D E R
R
R
# 5 1
R
O P T IO N
R 2
5 1
5 0
2 0
R
A M O U N T
O P T IO N
R
2 0
R
R 5
R
2 1
R 1
O P T IO N
# 5 0
H
R
2 0
R
R 4
O P T IO N
R
2 0
R
I /D
B a r C o d e D e n s itie s
6
H
2 0
R 3
3 0
R
C O D E #
# 3 1
R
6
H
R
H E A D E R
R
2 0
R 2
D e fin e
C h e c k D ig it
5
R
6
H
R
R 1
2 1
R
R
L / R
# 4
R
5
R
6
H
D IM E N S IO N
N U M B E R
R
2 1
" C H A R A C T E R "
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
4
R
5
R
6
R 4
R
4
R
5
R
/C O L U M N
3
R
4
R
5
C O D E #
3
R
4
R
R O W
2 0
R
R 2
R
H
R 3
H
6
H E A D E R
6
R
R 1
3
R
4
S T A N D A R D
/D E F A U L T
3
R
S E C U R IT Y L E V E L
3
R 4
R
5
R 3
5
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
R 1
R
4
R 2
A D D IT IO N A L
W ID E S P A C E
4
R
R 3
R
R
R 7
R
2 0
# 2 1
R 4
5 0
3 1
A D D IT IO N A L
N A R . S P A C E
3
R
D e fin e
E x te n d e d
F ie ld N a m e s
C O D E #
R
R
R 6
R
3
O P T IO N
R 2
3 1
3 1
A D D IT IO N A L
C H A R . G A P
O P T IO N
R 5
R
D O T W ID T H
W ID E E L E M E N T
2
R
R 4
2
R
D O T W ID T H
N A R . E L E M E N T
2
R
R 3
2
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
R 1
D IG IT #
2
R 2
C H E C K
2
R
# 2 0
H E A D E R
R
R
R 4
R
R
D a ta E n try
P ro m p ts
R 1
3 0
R
G E N /V E R
1
H
D E V IC E
R
3 0
C O D E #
# 3 0
R 3
P a d D a ta
R 2
R
6
R 3
2 1
3 0
H E A D E R
" C H A R A C T E R "
R 4
O P T IO N
R 1
C O D E #
L / R
T
R
O P T IO N
H E A D E R
R
R
R 3
2 1
5
# 6
C O D E #
H
2 1
H E A D E R
R
2
O P T IO N
R 1
6
R
R 2
2 0
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
R 2
R
2 1
R 1
N A M E "
R
4
# 5
C O D E
O P T IO N
" F IE L D
H
4
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
R 3
# 1
R 3
6
R
R
O P T IO N
H E A D E R
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
H E A D E R
R
3
# 4
C O D E #
5
R
C O D E #
5
3
R
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
R 1
R
H
R 1
R
R
O P T IO N
R 2
4
6
R 2
2
2
# 3
D E S T . S T A R T
R
R
R
D a ta E n try
T e m p la te s
C O P Y C O D E
1
5
R
O P T IO N
R 6
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
R 2
R
R
# 2
R 7
R
R
D a ta T y p e
R e s tr ic tio n s
C O P Y
B
H
# 2 1
# T O
6 2
6
D e fin e
E x te n d e d
F ie ld N a m e s
R 5
R
R
O P T IO N
S R C S T A R T
6 1
5
# 6
S R C F IE L D
R
R
O P T IO N
R 4
6 0
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
R 3
R
4
# 5
D E V IC E
C O D E
R 3
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
R 3
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
O P T IO N
R
C O D E #
5 2
4
R 2
C O P Y C O D E
R 7
C O P Y
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
R 5
R 6
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
1
R 2
R
S R C S T A R T
# 4
R
R
H E A D E R
5 1
R 4
R
1
R 1
R
S R C F IE L D
T
R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
5 0
R 3
T
1
R 3
R
C O D E #
R
O P T IO N
T Y P E
3 1
H E A D E R
T
1
D A T A
R
R 2
R
X 4
3 0
R 1
T
1
# O F C H A R .
R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R
X 3
2 1
R 3
T E X T
F IE L D S
1
R
#
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
N A M E .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 8
R
1
F IE L D
H
R 2
R 1
F IE L D
B 1 2
R O T .
T E X T
A L IG N M E N T
B 1 0
B 1 1
W ID T H
F 7
L E N G T H
T
R
X 2
H E IG H T
B 9
F 6
M E A S U R E
T
T
1
H E A D E R
D E N S IT Y
B 8
F 5
A C T IO N
D E V IC E
R
# 1
X 1
F O N T
B 7
F 4
F O R M A T #
H E A D E R
V e r ifie r F ie ld #
H E A D E R
O P T IO N
R F ID D A T A
F IE L D S
C O L U M N
B 6
F 3
F 2
F 1
F O R M A T
H E A D E R
V 2
V 1
T
C O P Y
H E A D E R
R 1
O P T IO N
G 6
D
1
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
6
R
M O D E
1
R 3
R
1
G 5
R
C O D E #
5
4
C O L U M N
D
R
R 2
R
R
G 4
C
D
D
H E A D E R
1
R
R O W
C
# O F C H A R .
R
1
G 3
C
R 1
R O W
B 5
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
G R A P H ID
C
O P T IO N
G 2
C
# 1
H E A D E R
C
D 3
B
R
F IE L D #
B
D 2
S Y M . S E T
C 1 3
R
H E A D E R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
C 1 2
B
D 1
F IE L D R O T .
C 1 1
F IX /V A R
B 4
O P T IO N
G 1
C
N O N -P R IN T A B L E
T E X T F IE L D S
C H A R . R O T .
A L IG N M E N T
C 9
C 1 0
W ID . M A G .
C O L O R
C 7
H G T . M A G .
C 6
C 8
F O N T
C 5
# O F C H A R .
B 3
R
G R A P H IC S
F IE L D S
Q
Q
Q
C O L U M N
T H IC K N E S S
L 7
Q
Q 3
L E N G T H /
E N D C O L .
L 6
G A P
C 4
F IE L D
B 2
#
H E A D E R
B 1
V E R IF IE R
F IE L D S
F
R O W
A N G L E /
E N D R O W
L 5
C O L U M N
C 3
B A R C O D E
F IE L D S
V
Q 2
C O L U M N
L 4
R O W
C 2
V
H E A D E R
R O W
L 3
H E A D E R
C 1
V
Q 1
T Y P E
L 2
V
B O X E S
H E A D E R
L 1
C O N S T A N T T E X T
F IE L D S
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
O P T IO N
# 6 1
R e im a g e
F ie ld
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
O P T IO N
# 6 2
B y p a s s
B a r C o d e
6 2
6 2
In c r e m e n tin g
D a ta
# 6 0
6 0
6 0
F O R M A T W O R K S H E E T
2 /0 7
L IN E S
L
L
L
L
E N D R O W
E N D
C O L U M N
T H IC K N E S S
P A T T E R N
Q 4
Q 5
Q 6
Q 7
P A T T E R N
L 8
1
R
4
R
G
G
F o rm a t N a m e
S u p p ly T y p e
F o rm a t #
G
C u s to m e r N a m e
D a te
S o ftw a r e V e r s io n
G
S u p p ly S iz e
R O T A T IO N
R
C O D E #
S R C F IE L D
S R C S T A R T
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
C O P Y C O D E
R 2
R 3
R 4
R 5
R 6
R 7
R
4
R
1
R
4
4
X
O P T IO N
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
X
R
X
R
5
R
6
H
R
3 0
R
6 0
X
R
4
R
5
R
6
H
R
3 0
R
6 0
R
# 4
R
4
O P T IO N
4
F O R M A T W O R K S H E E T
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
4
R
R
# 5
5
5
R
R
6
6 2
5 2
R
5 2
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
O P T IO N
# 6
6
H
H
R
R
3 0
O P T IO N
C O D E #
C H A R C O D E
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
H E A D E R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
R 1
C O D E #
R 2
H E A D E R
F IE L D R O T .
S Y M . S E T
T 1 4
T 1 5
R 1
A L IG N M E N T
C H A R . R O T .
T 1 2
T 1 3
W ID . M A G .
C O L O R
T 1 0
T 1 1
H G T . M A G .
T 9
C O L U M N
T 6
G A P
R O W
T 5
F O N T
F IX /V A R
T 4
T 7
# O F C H A R .
T 3
T 8
H E A D E R
F IE L D #
T 1
T 2
H E A D E R
C O D E #
S R C F IE L D
S R C S T A R T
R 1
R 2
R 3
R 4
C O D E #
" F IE L D N A M E "
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
H E A D E R
P R O M P T
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
R 1
C O D E #
R 2
H E A D E R
D E V IC E
R 3
R 1
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
C O D E
R 3
R 2
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 7
R 1
C O P Y C O D E
R 6
R 2
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
R 5
C O P Y
C O D E
" C H A R A C T E R "
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 3
R 4
H E A D E R
C O D E #
A P P C O D E
H E A D E R
R 1
R 2
R 3
R 1
R 2
R
6 1
3 0
# 3 0
3 0
R
R
4 2
4 2
R
R
R
In c r e m e n tin g
D a ta
# 6 0
6 0
R
6 0
R
P a d D a ta
T C 9 8 0 0 F W
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
4 2
R
R
R e im a g e
F ie ld
O P T IO N
# 6 1
6 1
O P T IO N
R
6 1
R
R e v . A A
C O D E #
L / R
" C H A R A C T E R "
R 3
R 4
4 2
R
C O D E #
R
H E A D E R
O P T IO N
R
4 2
R 2
R
R 1
R
C O D E #
P D F 4 1 7
A s p e c t R a tio
R
R 2
R
3 0
H E A D E R
R
3 0
R 1
2 1
3 0
L P O S
# 1
R
O P T IO N
# 4 2
R P O S
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
2 1
3 0
R 5
R
R
2 1
R
P r ic e F ie ld
R 6
6 1
5 1
2 1
R
A M O U N T
R
R
2 1
3 0
I /D
6 0
R
R P O S
6 1
3 0
R 4
R
5 1
R 6
R
3 0
# 3 0
R 3
5 2
5 0
O P T IO N # 5 2
P a d D a ta
C O D E #
P D F 4 1 7 S e c u r ity /
T r u n c a tio n
L P O S
4 2
R
H E A D E R
R
R
# 5 1
R
O P T IO N
R 2
5 1
5 0
2 0
R
A M O U N T
O P T IO N
R
2 0
R
R 5
R
2 1
R 1
O P T IO N
# 5 0
H
R
2 0
R
R 4
O P T IO N
R
2 0
R
I /D
B a r C o d e D e n s itie s
6
H
2 0
R 3
3 0
R
C O D E #
D e fin e
C h e c k D ig it
R
6
H
R
H E A D E R
R
2 0
R 2
O P T IO N # 3 1
5
R
6
H
R
R 1
2 1
R
R
L / R
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
R
5
R
6
H
D IM E N S IO N
N U M B E R
R
2 1
" C H A R A C T E R "
# 4
4
R
5
R
6
R 4
R
4
R
5
R
/C O L U M N
3
R
4
R
5
C O D E #
3
R
4
R
R O W
2 0
R
R 2
R
H
R 3
H
6
H E A D E R
6
R
R 1
3
R
4
S T A N D A R D
/D E F A U L T
3
R
S E C U R IT Y L E V E L
3
R 4
R
5
R 3
5
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
R 1
R
4
R 2
A D D IT IO N A L
W ID E S P A C E
R 7
4
R
R 3
R
R
A D D IT IO N A L
N A R . S P A C E
R
2 0
# 2 1
R 4
5 0
3 1
R 6
3
R
D e fin e
E x te n d e d
F ie ld N a m e s
C O D E #
R
R
A D D IT IO N A L
C H A R . G A P
R
3
O P T IO N
R 2
3 1
3 1
R 5
R
D O T W ID T H
W ID E E L E M E N T
2
R
R 4
2
R
D O T W ID T H
N A R . E L E M E N T
2
R
R 3
2
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
R 1
D IG IT #
2
R 2
C H E C K
2
R
# 2 0
H E A D E R
R
R
R 4
R
R
D a ta E n try
P ro m p ts
R 1
3 0
R
G E N /V E R
1
H
D E V IC E
R
3 0
C O D E #
# 3 0
R 3
P a d D a ta
R 2
R
6
R 3
2 1
3 0
H E A D E R
" C H A R A C T E R "
R 4
O P T IO N
R 1
C O D E #
L / R
T
R
O P T IO N
H E A D E R
R
R
R 3
2 1
5
# 6
C O D E #
H
2 1
H E A D E R
R
2
O P T IO N
R 1
6
R
R 2
2 0
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
R 2
R
2 1
R 1
N A M E "
R
4
# 5
C O D E
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
" F IE L D
H
4
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
R 3
O P T IO N
R 3
6
R
R
O P T IO N
H E A D E R
# 1
H E A D E R
R
3
# 4
C O D E #
5
R
C O D E #
5
3
R
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
R 1
R
H
R 1
R
R
O P T IO N
R 2
4
6
R 2
2
2
# 3
D E S T . S T A R T
R
R
R
D a ta E n try
T e m p la te s
C O P Y C O D E
1
5
R
O P T IO N
R 6
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
R 2
R
R
# 2
R 7
R
R
D a ta T y p e
R e s tr ic tio n s
C O P Y
B
H
# 2 1
# T O
6 2
6
D e fin e
E x te n d e d
F ie ld N a m e s
R 5
R
R
O P T IO N
S R C S T A R T
6 1
5
# 6
S R C F IE L D
R
R
O P T IO N
R 4
6 0
R
U p lo a d F ie ld
D a ta
R 3
R
4
# 5
D E V IC E
C O D E
R 3
D a ta E n try
S o u rc e
R 3
H E A D E R
C O D E #
R 1
O P T IO N
R
C O D E #
5 2
4
R 2
C O P Y C O D E
R 7
C O P Y
# T O
D E S T . S T A R T
R 5
R 6
# 4
1
R 2
R
S R C S T A R T
C o p y D a ta
fr o m P r e v io u s F ie ld
R
R
H E A D E R
5 1
R 4
R
1
R 1
R
S R C F IE L D
T
R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
5 0
R 3
T
1
R 3
R
C O D E #
R
O P T IO N
T Y P E
3 1
H E A D E R
T
1
D A T A
R
R 2
R
X 4
3 0
R 1
T
1
# O F C H A R .
R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R
X 3
2 1
R 3
T E X T
F IE L D S
1
R
#
R
C O D E #
H E A D E R
N A M E .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
R 8
R
1
F IE L D
H
R 2
R 1
F IE L D
B 1 2
R O T .
T E X T
A L IG N M E N T
B 1 0
B 1 1
W ID T H
F 7
L E N G T H
T
R
X 2
H E IG H T
B 9
F 6
M E A S U R E
T
T
1
H E A D E R
D E N S IT Y
B 8
F 5
A C T IO N
D E V IC E
R
# 1
X 1
F O N T
B 7
F 4
F O R M A T #
H E A D E R
V e r ifie r F ie ld #
H E A D E R
O P T IO N
R F ID D A T A
F IE L D S
C O L U M N
B 6
F 3
F 2
F 1
F O R M A T
H E A D E R
V 2
V 1
T
C O P Y
H E A D E R
R 1
O P T IO N
G 6
D
1
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
6
R
M O D E
1
R 3
R
1
G 5
R
C O D E #
5
4
C O L U M N
D
R
R 2
R
R
G 4
C
D
D
H E A D E R
1
R
R O W
C
# O F C H A R .
R
1
G 3
C
O P T IO N
G R A P H ID
C
# 1
G 2
C
R 1
R O W
B 5
O P T IO N
H E A D E R
C
D 3
B
R
F IE L D #
B
D 2
S Y M . S E T
C 1 3
R
H E A D E R
F IX E D C H A R .
(" IN Q U O T E S " )
C 1 2
B
D 1
F IE L D R O T .
C 1 1
F IX /V A R
B 4
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
G 1
C
N O N -P R IN T A B L E
T E X T F IE L D S
C H A R . R O T .
A L IG N M E N T
C 9
C 1 0
W ID . M A G .
C O L O R
C 7
H G T . M A G .
C 6
C 8
F O N T
C 5
# O F C H A R .
B 3
R
G R A P H IC S
F IE L D S
Q
Q
Q
C O L U M N
T H IC K N E S S
L 7
Q
Q 3
L E N G T H /
E N D C O L .
L 6
G A P
C 4
F IE L D
B 2
#
H E A D E R
B 1
V E R IF IE R
F IE L D S
F
R O W
A N G L E /
E N D R O W
L 5
C O L U M N
C 3
B A R C O D E
F IE L D S
V
Q 2
C O L U M N
L 4
R O W
C 2
V
H E A D E R
R O W
L 3
H E A D E R
C 1
V
Q 1
T Y P E
L 2
V
B O X E S
H E A D E R
L 1
C O N S T A N T T E X T
F IE L D S
F ix e d C h a r a c te r s
O P T IO N
# 6 1
R e im a g e
F ie ld
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
6 1
O P T IO N
# 6 2
B y p a s s
B a r C o d e
6 2
6 2
In c r e m e n tin g
D a ta
# 6 0
6 0
6 0
(S A M P L E )
2 /0 7
E
PRINTER DIFFERENCES
Here are the major features and differences between each printer.
Earlier printer versions may not support all features.
Printer Comparison
Feature
9825 Printer
9855/9860 Printer
Printhead Density DPI
(dots per inch)
203 DPI
203 DPI
300 DPI (optional)
Print speed IPS
(inches per second)
2.5, 4.0, or 6.0 IPS
2.5, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, 10.0, or 12.0 IPS
(optional)
9860 max. is 8.0 IPS
Maximum print area
4.0" x 16.0"
4.0" x 16.0"
4.0" x 13.0" (w/300 dpi)
Non-Print Zone
Recommended: all supplies .05" on either edge and .02" at
the end
Butt cut supplies - .15" at the
beginning
Recommended: all supplies - .05"
on either edge and .02" at the end
Location of Print Area
Center
Center
Supply Width
.75" x 4.25"
.75" x 4.25"
Supply Length
.50" x 17.5"
.32" x 17.5"
Power Up Mode
Online
Online/Offline
Feed Mode
On demand/Continuous/
Peel Mode (optional)
On demand/Continuous/
Peel Mode (optional)
9860 does not support peel mode
Supplies
Labels or Perforated Tags
Labels or Tags
Supply Type
Edge Aperture/Black mark/
Die cut/ Continuous
Aperture/Black mark/Die cut/
Continuous
9860 does not support continuous
supply
Keypad
Feed/Cut
Enter/Pause
Escape/Clear buttons
Feed/Cut
Enter/Pause
Escape/Clear buttons
9860 printer comes with an external
keyboard
Display
2-line 16 characters per line
2-line 16 characters per line
Serial Port Speed
1200/2400/4800/9600/
19200/38400 Baud
1200/2400/4800/9600/
19200/38400/57600/
115200 Baud
Butt cut supplies - .15" at the
beginning
Printer Differences E-1
Feature
9825 Printer
9855/9860 Printer
Field Number Range
0-999
0-999
Batch Separator
Yes
Yes
High Energy Ribbon
No
Yes
Standard Fonts
Standard/Reduced/Bold
Standard/Reduced/Bold
OCRA/CG Triumvirateä Typeface OCRA/CG Triumvirateä Typeface
Bold 9 pt/CG Triumvirateä
Bold 9 pt/CG Triumvirateä
Typeface 6, 7, 9, 11, or 15 pt
Typeface 6, 7, 9, 11, or 15 pt
Scalable Font Standard Yes
(EFF Swiss Bold)
Yes
(EFF Swiss Bold)
Downloadable Fonts
Yes
Yes
Memory Allocation
Yes
Yes
RAM
4 Meg
2 Meg (Flash)
16 Meg
4 Meg (Flash)
Storage on
Power-down
512K (Flash)
In Flash
Extended Memory
No
Yes
2D bar codes
MaxiCode/PDF417
POSTNET/Data Matrix/Quick
Response
MaxiCode/PDF417
POSTNET/Data Matrix/Quick
Response
Parallel Port
IEEE-1284 or Centronics Mode
IEEE-1284 or Centronics Mode
94x5 Emulation
No
Yes
Backfeed
Yes
Yes
Offline Batch Entry
No
Yes, with keyboard
Status Polling
Yes
Yes
Immediate Commands Yes
Yes
Test Label
Two labels for user and printer
configuration
Two labels for user and printer
configuration
Ethernet Print Server
Yes- supports IPX (NetWare),
TCP/IP, LAT, AppleTalk, and
NetBios/NetBEUI.
Yes- supports IPX (NetWare),
TCP/IP, LAT, AppleTalk, and
NetBios/NetBEUI.
RF Print Server
Yes
Yes
External Knife
No
Optional on 9855
Standard on 9860
Stacker
No
Yes
Verifier
No
Yes
External Rewind
Yes
Yes
Tear Bar
Yes (optional)
Optional on 9855
NA on 9860
12 IPS
No
Optional on 9855
NA on 9860
300 DPI
No
Yes (optional)
RFID support
No
Yes for 9855; No for 9860
E-2 Printer Differences
Post-Print Options
The following post-print options are available:
Printer
9855â
926ä
Knife
Yes
9860ä
No
(includes
knife)
928ä
932ä
935ä
Stacker Stacker Rewind
938ä
Verifier
939ä
Keyboard
945ä
Unwinder
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Included
Yes
with printer
Yes
Tear
Bar
Peel
Mode
Yes
Yes
No
No
It may be desirable to install the printer, knife, and stacker on
sound-absorbing material in office, commercial, or industrial environments.
¨ The verifier cannot be used with the 926 Knife and/or 928 Stacker
combination.
¨ The 9855 “knife ready” printer does not support on-demand/peel mode or
the optional tear bar.
¨ The 926 knife must be installed before you can use the 928 stacker.
¨ To use the 938 verifier, the printer must be ordered “verifier ready” to
receive the correct cut-out cover, which allows room for the verifier’s
beam and for tearing supplies.
Printer Differences E-3
E-4 Printer Differences
GLOSSARY
Batch Data
2,"Monarch" p
Defines the actual information (as fields within { })
printed on the label.
Batch Control
E,0,1,4,2 p
Defines the print job (as a field).
Batch Header
{B,1,N,1}
First line of a batch, immediately following ({). Identifies
the format and batch quantity.
Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 p
2,"Monarch" p }
Contains a batch header and the batch data. Enclosed
within { }.
Bitmapped Fonts
Reside in the printer’s memory. If you change the point
size, you have changed the font. Magnifying these fonts
causes some jaggedness to occur.
Buffer
Storage area in the printer’s memory that holds specific
data (images, formats, etc).
Field
Can be text, bar codes, lines, boxes, constant, or
non-printable text. It is the result of a field definition.
Field Definition
Any string of parameters that pertain to one field. A
field definition begins with a field identifier (such as T,
B, D, C, etc.).
T,1,10,V,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0 p
Field Parameters
Parameters that apply to a field and are separated by
commas. (In the above example, B is a field element
for black print on a white background.)
Flash Memory
Contains information that is SAVED when the printer is
turned off. Flash memory needs to be formatted before
it can be used.
Format
Layout or design for your printed label.
Format Header
First line of a format, immediately following the start of
packet ({). A format header must begin with F, followed
by various header elements.
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"Fmt-1" p
Monospaced Fonts All characters have the same width and are easy to
center justify. (Standard, bold, and reduced are
monospaced.)
Non-volatile RAM
Contains information that is SAVED when the printer is
turned off.
Option
R,4,6,1,3,1 p
Any line within a format that applies special formatting
to a field. This line always begins with R and must
immediately follow the field it applies to.
Packet
{B,1,N,1 p
2,"Monarch" p }
Any string of characters within ({ }).
Pre-image
A way to optimize the printer, because it images the
fields while data is collected. After the last field is
imaged, the label prints almost immediately.
Proportionally
Spaced Fonts
All characters have different widths and are difficult to
center justify (CG Triumvirate™ Typefaces).
Scalable Fonts
All characters are scalable and smooth at any point
size. There are no jagged edges at any point size
because the font is created from an equation every time
it is used.
Soft (Downloaded) Reside in the printer’s RAM. They can be erased or
Fonts
overwritten.
TrueType Fonts
All characters follow the TrueType outline font standard.
All characters are scalable and smooth at any point
size.
Volatile RAM
Contains information that is LOST when the printer is
turned off.
INDEX
A
access password
adding custom fonts
adjustments, print
algorithm,in sum of digits
algorithm,in sum of products
alignment
bar code
allocating
memory
Aztec bar code
optional settings
using option 53
6-8, 6-11
2-34
2-8
4-29
4-28
3-21
2-25
4-21
4-21
B
backfeed
packet syntax
backing up
bar code
alignment
defining aspect ratios
PDF417 options
rotating
bar code density
syntax
bar codes
character lengths
customizing density
defining
defining densities
determining distance
generating check digits
justification
list of types
placing human readables
selecting a density
selecting human readables
2-22
1-4
3-21
4-20
4-20
3-21
4-18
3-10
4-17
3-8
4-18
3-11
4-15
3-21
3-12
9-5
3-12
3-21
batch
canceling printing
clearing data from memory
downloading sample
overview of packet
sample
batch control
definition of term
batch control field
defining
syntax
sample
batch data
definition of term
sample with special chars
using special chars in
batch data field
defining
syntax
sample
using entered/copied data
batch header
syntax
defining
definition of term
sample
using zero quantities
batch method of downloading
explained
batch packet
definition of term
batch quantity zero
downloading explained
syntax
batch quantity, defined
batch separator
baud rate selection
2-18
2-33
6-3
6-3
A-14
G-1
6-4
6-4
6-4
G-1
6-12
6-12
6-7
6-7
6-7
6-12
6-3
6-3
G-1
6-3
9-3
6-14
G-1
6-15
A-16
6-3
2-9, 6-4
2-21
Index 1
bitmap
defining fields
5-14
defining next fields
5-15
defining the header
5-12
hexadecimal chart
C-17
hexadecimal method
5-3, 5-5
overview
5-3
run length chart
C-21
run length method
5-3, 5-7
storing the image
5-9
bitmapped fonts
definition of term
G-1
black to white print ratio
5-4
boxes
defining
3-30
determining distance
3-31
buffer
definition of term
G-1
scalable font
2-29
buffer selection
2-25
buffer size selection
2-25
bypass bar code, using option 62
4-24
C
calling technical support
8-5
changing
backfeed control
2-22
bar code density
4-17
communication settings
2-21
control characters
2-15
memory configuration
2-25
security level of PDF417
4-19 - 4-20
character rotation
in constant text field
3-26
in text field
3-6
characters
magnifying font size
B-6
number in RFID data field
3-34
number of in bar code
3-8
number of in non-printable field
3-23
number of in text
3-3
padding
4-14
placement of human readables
9-5
chart
hexadecimal conversion
C-17
run length conversion
C-21
Index 2
check digit option
syntax
4-15
check digit schemes
syntax
4-27 - 4-28
using sum of digits
4-29
using sum of products
4-28
check digit worksheet
D-3
check digits
clearing scheme from memory
2-33
customizing a scheme
4-27
generating
4-15
checking
ENQ trailer characters
8-2
ENQ/IMD characters
8-2
job status
7-8
packet control characters
8-2
printer status
7-2
RS232 trailer characters
8-2
clearing packets
2-33
code pages
C-1
100 table
C-5
101 table
C-6
1250 table
C-9
1251 table
C-10
1252 table
C-10
1253 table
C-11
1254 table
C-11
1255 table
C-12
1256 table
C-12
1257 table
C-13
1258 table
C-13
437 and 850
C-1
437 table
C-6
850 table
C-7
852 table
C-7
855 table
C-8
857 table
C-8
860 table
C-9
ANSI table
C-4
Bold table
C-4
entering
C-2
International characters
2-10
OCRA table
C-5
selecting
C-1
color options of text
3-5, 3-25
communication
checklist for trouble
8-4
packet syntax
2-21
resetting printer
8-4
using a mode command
2-2
compatibility
considering unit of measure
1-8
compliance
format sample
A-13
compliance label
including in a format
5-4
overview
5-2
compliance label overlay
sample
5-17
compliance label overlay sample
5-24
configuration
uploaded from printer
2-7
configuration packets
backfeed control packet G
2-22
comm settings packet F
2-21
control characters packet E
2-15
guidelines
2-8
header
2-5
memory config packet M
2-25
monetary formatting packet D
2-14
overview
2-5
print control packet C
2-13
sample
2-6
supply setup packet B
2-11
system setup packet A
2-9
constant text fields
character rotation
3-26
defining
3-23
determining distance
3-24
justification
3-26
modifying character height
3-25
modifying character width
3-25
rotating
3-26
sample
3-23, 3-28
control characters
factory defaults
2-3
resetting
2-17
selecting
2-15
selecting new
2-15
syntax
2-15
copy command
sample
6-3
copy data
in partial form
merging fields
source field
syntax
copying data, using option 4
creating
DOS batch files
cut
each tag
in strips
multiple
options
type
Cyrillic characters
4-9
4-9
4-8
4-4, 4-8
4-7
6-16
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-5
6-5
C-10
D
daily checklist
data
copy option 4
deciding on a field type
entry prompts option 20
entry sources option 5
entry templates option 3
for batch
list of errors
padding option 30
type restrictions option 2
data entry
prompts, defining as option 20
sample
sources, defining as option 5
templates, defining as option 3
data error
label
data stream
examples
Maxicode
data type restrictions
defining as option 2
decimal point selection
decrementing fields
fixing the first number
syntax
using option 60
1-4
4-7
1-9
4-13
4-10
4-6
6-7
8-6
4-14
4-5
4-13
A-18
4-10
4-6
8-3
A-3
A-3
4-5
2-14
4-22
4-22
4-22
Index 3
defining
backfeed control packet G
bar code type
bar codes
batch control field
batch data field
batch header
bitmap fields
boxes
check digit scheme w/sod
check digit scheme w/sop
comm settings packet F
configuration header
constant text fields
control characters packet E
duplicate fields
font upload packet
graphic header
lines
memory configuration packet M
monetary formatting packet D
network packet
next-bitmap fields
non-printable fields
print control packet C
RFID (HF) setup packet X
RFID (UHF) setup packet X
supply setup packet B
system setup packet A
text fields
verifier configuration packet
definition of terms
density
using option 50 to customize
design tools
about the grid
check digit worksheet
format worksheet
online configuration worksheet
worksheet overview
designing a format
drawing a sketch
field type considerations
filling in worksheets
print area
using grids
worksheet overview
device selection
Index 4
2-22
3-12
3-8
6-4
6-7
6-3
5-14
3-30
4-29
4-28
2-21
2-5
3-23
2-15
5-16
2-34
5-12
3-28
2-25
2-14
2-40
5-15
3-22
2-13
2-42
2-41
2-11
2-9
3-3
2-39
G-1
4-17
1-8
D-3
D-1
D-3
1-10
1-7
1-9
1-10
1-6
1-8
1-10
2-25
diagnostics
list of data errors
list of data format errors
list of hard printer failure errors
list of machine fault errors
list of RFID errors
list of script errors
other resources
printing test label
resetting printers
direction of
bar code field
constant text character
constant text field
of lines
text character
text field
disable backfeed
disabling
knife
verifier
DOS batch files
creating
double-byte fonts
downloadable fonts
buffer
downloading
batch method
batch quantity zero method
methods
order packets should be received
overview
sample
sequential method
to the printer (overview)
8-6
8-17
8-26
8-19
8-20
8-24
8-5
8-2
8-4
3-21
3-26
3-26
3-29
3-6
3-7
2-22
6-5
6-6
6-16
B-24
2-29
6-14
6-15
6-14
6-2
6-1
6-3
6-14
6-16
E
EM4122
protocol
4-10 - 4-11
enable backfeed
2-22
enabling
verifier
6-6
enabling immediate commands
2-17
ENQ
printing existing config
reference table for byte 2
reference table of byte 3
requesting status
Response
EPC data
lock
erasing packets
error
label
errors
data, description of
display
format
hard printer failures
how to reset printers
machine faults
RFID faults
script faults
8-2
7-4
7-6
7-2
7-2
6-8, 6-11
2-33
8-3
8-6
8-27
8-17
8-26
8-4
8-19
8-20
8-24
F
feed mode selection
field
bitmap, defining
definition of term
duplicate,defining
names
next-bitmap, defining
options
field definition
definition of term
field elements
definition of term
field options
AFI field RFID (UHF)
Aztec bar code
brief list of
calculating check digits
copy data
customized bar code density
data entry prompts
data entry templates
data type restrictions
incrementing/decrementing fields
no scan
ordering
6-4
5-14
G-1
5-16
4-14
5-15
4-20
G-1
G-1
4-26
4-21
4-2
4-15
4-7
4-17
4-13
4-6
4-5
4-22
4-24
4-2
overview
4-2
padding data
4-14
price field
4-16
restrictions
4-2
security/truncation for PDF417
4-19
using multiple
4-2
width/length for PDF417
4-20
field, options
data entry sources
4-10
fields
bar code rotation
3-21
batch control syntax
6-4
batch data syntax
6-7
constant text rotation
3-26
deciding a type
1-9
finding trailing spaces
9-5
padding
4-14
repeating parameters
9-4
RFID Data
3-34
text field rotation
3-7
types briefly described
1-9
using data entry/copied fields
6-12
verifier
3-33
fixed data
in constant text field
3-26
in text field
3-3
syntax
4-5 - 4-6, 4-10 - 4-11, 4-13 4-14
flash
storing images
5-9
flash memory
2-31
definition of term
G-1
guidelines
2-32
flow control selection
2-21
font
legal information
B-27
scalable
B-22
TrueType
3-5, 3-25, B-1, B-23, B-27,
C-2
font packets
clearing from memory
2-33
font upload packet
defining
2-34
fonts
double-byte
B-24
monospaced magnification
B-6
optimizing
9-4
proportional magnification
B-10
Index 5
format
buffer
definition of term
flash memory
format header
definition of term
format worksheet
overview
formats
clearing from memory
decisions to make
defining bar codes
defining boxes
defining constant text fields
defining lines
defining RFID field
defining text fields
defining the header
designing
determining content
downloading sample
field types described briefly
filling in worksheets
referenced in batch packet
sample
sample of compliance
using grids
formats, modifying
formatting errors
list of
2-28
G-1
2-31
G-2
D-1
1-10
2-33
1-6
3-8
3-30
3-23
3-28
3-34
3-3
3-2
1-5 - 1-7
1-6
6-3
1-9
1-10
6-3
A-2
A-13
1-8
6-15
8-17
G
generating check digits
with option 31
graphic
defining bitmap fields
defining duplicate fields
defining next-bitmap fields
defining the header
hexadecimal chart
hexadecimal method
including in a format
overview of bitmap
run length chart
run length method
storing the image
Index 6
4-15
5-14
5-16
5-15
5-12
C-17
5-3, 5-5
5-22
5-3
C-21
5-3, 5-7
5-9
graphic packets
clearing from memory
grid
overview
guidelines
flash memory
2-33
1-8
2-32
H
hard printer failure errors
list of
help, getting
hex graphic packet
sample
human readable characters
placement considerations
selecting
8-26
8-5
5-18
9-5
3-21
I
image buffer
imaging
repeating parameters
using zero batch headers
imaging time
when to use scalable fonts
IMD
printing existing config
immediate commands
enabling
sending
table
when to use
incrementing fields
fixing the first number
restrictions
syntax
using option 60
information
printing
inital printer setup
inquiry request
explanation of
inquiry response
explanation of
International code pages
2-27
9-4
9-3
9-4
8-2
2-17
2-18
2-18
2-17
4-22
4-2
4-22
4-22
6-13
2-31
7-2
7-2
2-10
J
job request
syntax
job response
explanation of
syntax for 0-2
syntax for 3
syntax for 4
job status
explanation of response
requesting
table
justification
of bar code
of constant text fields
of text field
7-8
7-9
7-9
7-10
7-11
7-9
7-8
7-12
3-21
3-26
3-6
K
kill password
knife
enabling
options
6-8, 6-11
6-5
6-5
L
label
error
8-3
language, printer
2-9
Latin characters
C-6 - C-7, C-10
layout
decisions to make
1-6
designing a label
1-5
grid
1-8
print area
1-6
rough sketches
1-7
length
of a bar code field
3-8
of a non-printable field
3-23
of a text field
3-3
lines
defining
3-28
defining as segment
3-28
defining as vectors
3-28
determining distance
3-28
thickness
3-30
lock
code, RFID tag
EPC data
RFID tag
lock code
6-8
6-8, 6-11
6-8, 6-11, A-25 - A-26
6-11
M
machine errors
list of
8-19
magnification
considerations
9-5
of monospaced fonts
B-6
of proportional fonts
B-10
mapping
method, hexadecimal
5-3, 5-5
method, run length
5-3, 5-7
margin adjustment selection
2-13
Maxicode
data stream
A-3
MaxiCode information
A-3
measurement
on a grid
1-8
using multiple printer types
1-8
memory
allocating
2-25
clearing packets
2-33
packet syntax
2-25
storing images in flash
5-9
storing images in RAM
5-9
user
6-9
memory buffer
downloadable fonts
2-29
format
2-28
image
2-27
receive
2-27
scalable font
2-29
transmit
2-27
merging
copied data
4-9
fields with option 4
4-7
mode command sample
2-2
modifying formats
6-15
modulus
description of check digit calc
4-27
in sum of digits
4-29
in sum of products
4-28
Index 7
monetary
decimal selection
formatting syntax
list of options
symbol selection
symbol setting
using price formatting
monospaced fonts
definition of term
magnification of
multiple part
supply
2-14
2-14
2-14
2-14
2-14
4-16
G-2
B-6
6-5
N
network
packet
non-printable fields
defining
sample
2-40
3-22
3-23
O
online configuration worksheet
online mode selection
opaque overlay
explanation
optimizing
compatibility for multiple printers
print quality
print speed
repeating field parameters
using zero batch quantities
option
21 (extended field names)
5 (data entry sources)
6 (upload data)
definition of term
read RFID data
verifier cable
optional entry method
options
cut
field
Index 8
D-3
2-9
3-5
1-8
9-1
9-1
9-4
9-3
4-14
4-10
4-11
G-2
4-10
6-6
6-15
6-5
4-20
options,field
AFI field RFID (UHF)
Aztec bar code
brief list of
bypass bar code
calculating check digits
copy data
customized bar code density
data entry prompts
data entry sources
data entry templates
data type restrictions
general overview
incrementing/decrementing fields
ordering
padding data
price formatting
restrictions
security/truncation for PDF417
using multiple
width/length for PDF417
4-18
4-26
4-21
4-2
4-24
4-15
4-7
4-17
4-13
4-10
4-6
4-5
4-2
4-22
4-2
4-14
4-16
4-2
4-19
4-2
4-20
P
packet
definition of term
error
packet A
syntax
packet B
syntax
packet C
syntax
packet control characters
factory defaults
printing existing config
resetting
syntax
packet D
syntax
packet E
syntax
packet F
syntax
packet G
syntax
packet M
syntax
G-2
8-3
2-9
2-11
2-13
2-3
8-2
2-17
2-15
2-14
2-15
2-21
2-22
2-25
packets
batch
6-3
check digit scheme
4-27
clearing from memory
2-33
configuration
2-5
configuration upload
2-6 - 2-7
guidelines
2-3
padding data
4-14
syntax
4-14
parallel communication
2-2
parameters
definition of term
G-1
for batch control field
6-4
for batch data field
6-7
for batch header
6-3
repeating
9-4
parity selection
2-21
password
access
6-8, 6-11
kill
6-8, 6-11
password lock
sample
A-25
PDF417 bar codes
security/truncation
4-19
width/length
4-20
permalock
sample
6-11
permalock and password lock
sample
A-26
placing
human readables
9-5
point size
B-22
polling for status
overview
7-1
positioning
graphic image in a field
5-11
graphic image in a format
5-12
graphic image in a packet
5-10
pre-image
definition of term
G-2
price fields
formatting option
4-16
monetary formatting
2-14
restrictions with check digits
4-16
restrictions with incrementing
4-2
syntax
4-16
print adjustments
2-8
print area
1-6
maximum size
1-6
print control
in batch control field
6-4
syntax
2-13
print multiple
6-5
printer
communication
2-2
features
1-2
printer configuration
backfeed control packet G
2-22
comm settings packet F
2-21
control characters packet E
2-15
header
2-5
memory config packet M
2-25
monetary formatting packet D
2-14
packet C
2-13
packet guidelines
2-8
packet overview
2-5
packet sample
2-6
supply setup packet B
2-11
system setup packet A
2-9
upload syntax
2-6 - 2-7
printer differences
E-1
printer status
explanation of response
7-2
overview
7-1
requesting
7-2
syntax
7-2
printers
communication checklist
8-4
data errors
8-6
data formatting errors
8-17
hard printer failure errors
8-26
machine fault errors
8-19
resetting
8-4
RIFD fault errors
8-20
script errors
8-24
ways to configure
2-2
printhead
unit of measure compatibility
1-8
Index 9
printing
black to white ratio
5-4
canceling
2-18
considerations
6-13
horiz adjustment
2-8
information
6-13
ordering packets to download
6-2
overview
6-1
test label
8-2
vert adjustment
2-8
problem
running out of printer memory
2-33
problems
check digit miscalculated
4-16
communication checklist
8-4
dpi varies with printer
1-8
framing error while downloading
6-3
getting technical support
8-5
human readables cut off
9-5
image time and changing data
9-4
image time and unchanging data
9-3
imaging time and repeating field
parameters
9-4
incorrect symbols print
3-27
invalid packet syntax
2-3
list of data errors
8-6
list of format errors
8-17
list of hard printer failure errors
8-26
list of machine fault errors
8-19
list of RFID fault errors
8-20
list of script errors
8-24
missing/overlapping due to
magnification
9-5
no check digit generated
4-15
off tag errors
9-5
other resources
8-5
poor print quality
9-1
procedures
backing up
1-4
daily checklist
1-4
print logs
1-4
program AFI field RFID (UHF)
option 64
4-26
programming conventions
2-3
proportionally spaced fonts
definition of term
G-2
magnification of
B-10
Index 10
protocol
EM4122
4-10 - 4-11
R
RAM
storing images
receive buffer
requesting job status
explanation of
requesting printer status
explanation of
overview
resetting packet control characters
resetting printers
response
to job request 0-2
to job request 3
to job request 4
RFID (HF) setup
packet
RFID (UHF) setup
packet
RFID data field
number of chars
types of data
RFID errors
list of
RFID field
defining
RFID tag
lock
6-8,
ribbon selection
rotating
bar codes
constant text characters
constant text fields
text characters
text fields
rough sketches
RS232 trailer characters
printing existing config
run length graphic packet
sample
5-9
2-27
7-8
7-2
7-1
2-17
8-4
7-9
7-10
7-11
2-42
2-41
3-34
3-35
8-20
3-34
6-11
2-11
3-21
3-26
3-26
3-6
3-7
1-7
8-2
5-20
S
sample
bar code density option
4-18
batch control field
6-4
batch data field
6-7
batch header
6-3
batch method downloading
6-14
batch packet
A-14
calculate check digit option
4-15
check digit scheme packet 4-27 - 4-28
comm settings packet F
2-21
compliance formats
A-13
compliance label
5-24
compliance label overlay
5-17
configuration packet
2-6
control characters packet E
2-15
copy field
4-8
data entry format
A-18
font packet
2-35
font, bold style
B-8 - B-9
font, OCRA style
B-9
font, standard style
B-7 - B-8
format
A-2
format header
3-2
hex graphic packet
5-18
immediate command
2-18
inc/dec field option
4-22
inquiry response
7-2
job request
7-8
job response 0-2
7-9
job response 3
7-10
job response 4
7-11
memory configuration packet F
2-25
mode command
2-2
monetary formatting packet D
2-14
monospaced font magnification
B-6
network packet
2-40
padding data
4-15
password lock
A-25
permalock
6-11
permalock and password lock
A-26
price field option
4-16
print control packet C
2-13
printer configuration uploaded
2-7
proportional font magnification
B-10
RFID (HF) setup packet X
2-42
RFID (UHF) setup packet X
2-41
run length graphic packet
sequential method downloading
supply setup packet B
system setup packet A
text field
verifier configuration packet
zero batch packet
scalable font
buffer
schemes
customizing check digits
script errors
list of
security/truncation
using option 51
segments
defining
selecting bar code type
selector, check digit
description of
sending immediate commands
sequential downloading
explained
serial communication
setting
backfeed distance
battery voltage
baud rate
dispense position
feed mode
flow control
format number
language
margin position
monetary symbol
number of decimal places
online mode
parallel communication
parity
print contrast
print position
print speed
printhead width
ribbon
serial communication
stop bits
supply position
supply size
5-20
6-14
2-11
2-9
3-3
2-39
A-16
B-22
2-29
4-27
8-24
4-19
3-28
3-12
4-27
2-18
6-14
2-2
2-22
2-13
2-21
2-22
2-11
2-21
3-2
2-9
2-13
2-14
2-14
2-9
2-2
2-21
2-13
2-13
2-13
2-13
2-11
2-2
2-21
2-11
3-2
Index 11
supply type
unit of measure
word length
size of
monospaced fonts
proportaional fonts
slashed zero
smart imaging
soft fonts
definition of term
source field, of copy data
special characters
using in batch data
speed adjustment selection
status polling
overview
stop bits selection
storage device
storing
images
images in flash
images in RAM
sum of digits calculation
sum of products calculation
supply
about the layout grid
measurement on a grid
multiple part
supply setup
syntax
supply type/position selection
symbol set
ANSI
entering
Internal table
options
selecting
symbols
monetary
Index 12
2-11
3-2
2-21
B-6
B-10
2-9
9-1
G-2
4-8
6-12
2-13
7-1
2-21
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-9
4-29
4-28
1-8
1-8
6-5
2-11
2-13
2-10, C-1
C-1
C-2
C-3
3-7
C-1
4-16
syntax
backfeed control packet G
2-22
comm settings packet F
2-21
constant text field
3-23, 3-28
font upload packet
2-34
format header
3-2
memory configuration packet M
2-25
monetary formatting packet D
2-14
network packet
2-40
non-printable field
3-23
packet control characters packet E2-15
print control packet C
2-13
printer configuration upload
2-6 - 2-7
RFID (HF) setup packet X
2-42
RFID (UHF) setup packet X
2-41
supply setup packet B
2-11
system setup packet A
2-9
verifier configuration packet
2-39
system setup
syntax
2-9
T
table
bar code lengths
3-10
ENQ reference byte 2
7-4
ENQ reference byte 3
7-6
fixed/variable bar codes
3-10
hexadecimal conversion
C-17
immediate commands
2-18
job status 0-2
7-12
run length conversion
C-21
special chars, sample batch data 6-12
technical support
8-5
terms defined
G-1
test label
list of information
8-2
printing
8-2
text fields
character rotation
3-6
color attributes
3-5, 3-25
defining
3-3
determining distance
3-3
justification
3-6
modifying character height
3-5
modifying character spacing 3-4, 3-24
modifying character width
3-5
proportional chars
3-3
rotating
3-7
syntax
3-3
thickness
line
3-30
trailing spaces
finding
9-5
transmit buffer
2-27
transparent overlay
explanation
3-5
troubleshooting
8-3
TrueType font 3-5, 3-25, B-1, B-23, B-27,
C-2
types of data
in RFID data field
3-35
types of fields
brief description
1-9
U
unit of measure
setting
unsuccessful communication
upload
RFID data
uploading
configuration
font packet
user memory
using flash
using verifier
V
variable length
padding for
vector fonts buffer
vectors
defining
verifer
mode
verifier
cable detect option
defining
verifier configuration
packet
verifier field
defining
Vietnamese characters
volatile RAM
definition of term
voltage selection
4-15
2-29
3-28
6-6
6-6
3-33
2-39
3-33
C-13
G-2
2-13
W
3-2
8-4
4-11
2-6 - 2-7
2-34
6-9
2-32
4-24
width/length
using option 52
word length selection
worksheet
check digit
contents
format
online configuration
4-20
2-21
D-3
1-10
D-1
D-3
Index 13
Index 14