Allen-Bradley Powerflex Reference manual

Allen-Bradley Powerflex Reference manual

Adjustable

Frequency AC Drive

www.abpowerflex.com

Reference Manual

Important User Information

Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. “Safety Guidelines for the Application,

Installation and Maintenance of Solid State Controls” (Publication SGI-1.1

available from your local Allen-Bradley Sales Office or online at

http:// www.ab.com/manuals/gi

) describes some important differences between solid state equipment and hard-wired electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of uses for solid state equipment, all persons responsible for applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.

In no event will the Allen-Bradley Company be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this equipment.

The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements associated with any particular installation, the Allen-Bradley Company cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and diagrams.

No patent liability is assumed by Allen-Bradley Company with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this manual.

Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of the Allen-Bradley Company is prohibited.

Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.

!

ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.

Attentions help you:

• identify a hazard

• avoid the hazard

• recognize the consequences

Important: Identifies information that is especially important for successful application and understanding of the product.

Shock Hazard labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert people that dangerous voltage may be present.

DriveExplorer, DriveTools32, and SCANport are trademarks of Rockwell Automation.

PLC is a registered trademark of Rockwell Automation.

ControlNet is a trademark of ControlNet International, Ltd.

DeviceNet is a trademark of the Open DeviceNet Vendor Association.

COLOR-KEYED is a registered trademark of Thomas & Betts Corporation.

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Table of Contents

Specifications & Dimensions

PowerFlex 70/700 Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

Input/Output Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

Heat Dissipation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

Derating Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3

PowerFlex 70 Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8

PowerFlex 700 Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16

Detailed Drive Operation

Accel Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

AC Supply Source Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

Analog Inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18

Auto / Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22

Auto Restart (Reset/Run). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24

Bus Regulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26

Cable, Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30

Cable Entry Plate Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30

Cable, Motor Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31

Cable, Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33

Cable, Standard I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-36

CabIe Trays and Conduit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-36

Carrier (PWM) Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-36

CE Conformity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-37

Copy Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-39

Current Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40

Datalinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42

DC Bus Voltage / Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44

Decel Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-45

Digital Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-46

Digital Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-63

Direction Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-67

DPI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-68

Drive Overload. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-71

Drive Ratings (kW, Amps, Volts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-75

Economizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-76

Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-76

Fan Curve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77

Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-77

Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-78

Flying Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-81

Fuses and Circuit Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-83

Grounding, General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-86

HIM Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-88

HIM Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-88

Input Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-89

Input Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-90

Input Power Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-91

Jog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-91

Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-91

Masks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-92

MOP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-94

Motor Nameplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-96

ii

Table of Contents

Motor Overload. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-97

Motor Start/Stop Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-100

Mounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-100

Output Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-101

Output Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-101

Output Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-102

Output Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-102

Output Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-102

Overspeed Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-103

Owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-104

Parameter Access Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-106

PET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-106

Power Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-107

Preset Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-115

Process PI Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-116

Reflected Wave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-127

Reset Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-129

Reset Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-129

RFI Filter Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-129

S Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-130

Scaling Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-133

Shear Pin Fault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-134

Skip Bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-135

Sleep Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-137

Speed Control, Speed Mode, Speed Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-139

Speed Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-144

Start Inhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-147

Start Permissives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-148

Start-Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-149

Stop Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-158

Test Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-161

Thermal Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-161

Torque Performance Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-162

Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-168

Unbalanced or Ungrounded Distribution Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-169

User Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-170

Voltage class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-171

Watts Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-172

Appendix A

Dynamic Brake Selection Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

Section 1

What This Guide Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

How Dynamic Braking Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

Dynamic Brake Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

Section 2

How to Determine Dynamic Brake Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

Determine Values of Equation Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Example Calculation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9

Section 3

Evaluating the Capability of the Internal Dynamic Brake Resistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

Section 4

How to Select an External Dynamic Brake Resistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1

Index

Chapter

1

Specifications & Dimensions

PowerFlex 70/700

Specifications

Category

Protection

Agency

Certification

Specification

PowerFlex 70 Drive

AC Input Overvoltage Trip:

AC Input Undervoltage Trip:

Bus Overvoltage Trip:

Bus Undervoltage Trip:

Nominal Bus Voltage:

PowerFlex 700

AC Input Overvoltage Trip:

AC Input Undervoltage Trip:

Bus Overvoltage Trip:

Bus Undervoltage Trip:

Nominal Bus Voltage:

All Drives

Heat Sink Thermistor:

Drive Overcurrent Trip

Software Current Limit:

Hardware Current Limit:

Instantaneous Current Limit:

Line transients:

Control Logic Noise Immunity:

Power Ride-Thru:

Logic Control Ride-Thru:

Ground Fault Trip:

Short Circuit Trip:

200-208V

Drive

240V

Drive

380/400

Drive

480V

Drive

600V

Drive

247VAC 285VAC 475VAC 570VAC 690VAC

120VAC 138VAC 233VAC 280VAC 345VAC

350VDC 405VDC 675VDC 810VDC 1013VDC

176VDC 204VDC 339VDC 407VDC 998VDC

281VDC 324VDC 540VDC 648VDC 810VDC

See PowerFlex 70 above

Adjustable

See PowerFlex 70 above

Monitored by microprocessor overtemp trip

20-160% of rated current

200% of rated current (typical)

220-300% of rated current (dependent on drive rating) up to 6000 volts peak per IEEE C62.41-1991

Showering arc transients up to 1500V peak

15 milliseconds at full load

0.5 seconds minimum, 2 seconds typical

Phase-to-ground on drive output

Phase-to-phase on drive output

690V

Drive

The drive is designed to meet the following specifications:

NFPA 70 - US National Electrical Code

NEMA ICS 3.1 - Safety standards for Construction and Guide for Selection,

Installation and Operation of Adjustable Speed Drive Systems.

NEMA 250 - Enclosures for Electrical Equipment

IEC 146 - International Electrical Code.

UL and cUL Listed to UL508C and CAN/CSA-C2.2 No. 14-M91

c

U

L

US

Marked for all applicable European Directives

(1)

EMC Directive (89/336/EEC)

Emissions

EN 61800-3 Adjustable Speed electrical power drive systems Part 3

Immunity

EN 61800-3 Second Environment, Restricted Distribution

Low Voltage Directive (73/23/EEC)

EN 60204-1 Safety of Machinery –Electrical Equipment of Machines

EN 50178 Electronic Equipment for use in Power Installations

1-2

Input/Output Ratings

Category Specification

Environment Altitude: 1000 m (3300 ft) max. without derating

Ambient Operating Temperature without derating:

Open Type:

IP20:

NEMA Type 1:

IP56, NEMA Type 4X

0 to 50 degrees C (32 to 122 degrees F)

0 to 50 degrees C (32 to 122 degrees F)

0 to 40 degrees C (32 to 104 degrees F)

0 to 40 degrees C (32 to 104 degrees F)

Storage Temperature (all const.): –40 to 70 degrees C (–40 to 158 degrees F)

Relative Humidity:

Shock:

Vibration:

5 to 95% non-condensing

15G peak for 11ms duration (

±

1.0 ms)

0.152 mm (0.006 in.) displacement, 1G peak

Electrical

Voltage Tolerance:

Frequency Tolerance:

Input Phases:

–10% of minimum, +10% of maximum.

47-63 Hz.

Three-phase input provides full rating for all drives. Single-phase operation provides 50% of rated current.

Displacement Power Factor

PF70 - C & D Frame Drives:

PF70 - A & B Frame Drives:

PF700

Efficiency:

Max. Short Circuit Current Rating:

Using Recommended Fuse or

Circuit Breaker Type

Method:

0.92 lagging (entire speed range)

0.64 lagging

TBD

97.5% at rated amps, nominal line volts.

Maximum short circuit current rating to match specified fuse/circuit breaker capability.

Control

(1)

Sine coded PWM with programmable carrier frequency. Ratings apply to all drives (refer to the Derating Guidelines on

page 1-3

). The drive can be supplied as 6 pulse or 12 pulse in a configured package.

Carrier Frequency

PF70 - A-D Frame Drives:

PF700 - 0-3 Frames:

Output Voltage Range:

Output Frequency Range:

Frequency Accuracy

Digital Input:

Analog Input:

Speed Regulation - Open Loop with Slip Compensation:

Selectable Motor Control:

2-10 kHz. Drive rating based on 4 kHz

2-10 kHz. Drive rating based on 4 kHz

0 to rated motor voltage

0 to 400 Hz.

Within

Within

±

±

±

0.01% of set output frequency.

0.4% of maximum output frequency.

0.5% of base speed across a 40:1 speed range.

Stop Modes:

Accel/Decel:

Intermittent Overload:

Sensorless Vector with full tuning. Standard V/Hz with full custom capability. PF700 adds flux vector.

Multiple programmable stop modes including - Ramp, Coast, DC-Brake,

Ramp-to-Hold and S-curve.

Two independently programmable accel and decel times. Each time may be programmed from 0 - 3600 seconds in 0.1 second increments

110% Overload capability for up to 1 minute

150% Overload capability for up to 3 seconds

Current Limit Capability: Proactive Current Limit programmable from 20 to 160% of rated output current. Independently programmable proportional and integral gain.

Electronic Motor Overload

Protection

Class 10 protection with speed sensitive response. Investigated by U.L.

to comply with N.E.C. Article 430. U.L. File E59272, volume 12.

Applied noise impulses may be counted in addition to the standard pulse train causing erroneously high [Pulse Freq] readings.

Input/Output Ratings

Each PowerFlex Drive has normal and heavy duty torque capabilities. The listings can be found in Tables

2.O

through

2.S

.

Heat Dissipation

See

Watts Loss on page 2-172 .

Derating Guidelines

1-3

Derating Guidelines

PowerFlex 70 Ambient Temperature/Load

PowerFlex70, A Frame 400V Class. Derating, Ambient Temperature and Load. Open, NEMA1, IP20.

62

60

58

56

54

52

50

10kHz

8kHz

6kHz

4kHz

2kHz

48

40 50 60 70

% of Full Load, Amps

80 90

PowerFlex70, B Frame 400V Class. Derating, Ambient Temperature and Load. Open, NEMA1, IP20

100

65

60

55

50

10kHz

8kHz

6kHz

4kHz

2kHz

55

50

60

58

45

40 50 60 70

% of Full Load Amps

80 90 100

PowerFlex70, C Frame 400V Class, Derating, Ambient Temperature and Load. Open, NEMA1 and IP20

62

56

54

52

50

10kHz

8kHz

6kHz

4kHz

2kHz

48

40 50 60 70

% of Output FLA

80 90

PowerFlex70, D Frame 400V Class. Derating, Ambient Temperature and Load. Open, NEMA1, IP20

60

100

10kHz

8kHz

6kHz

4kHz

2kHz

45

40

40 50 60 70

% of Full Load Amps

80 90 100

1-4

Derating Guidelines

Altitude

1

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

0

0 1000

PowerFlex 70 Altitude Derating Factor - All Frames.

2000 3000

Altitude (m)

4000 5000 6000

Efficiency

1

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.5

25 50 75 100

1 HP

0.5 HP

PowerFlex 70 Dimensions

1-5

PowerFlex 70

Dimensions

A

B

Figure 1.1 PowerFlex 70 Frames A-D

F

C D

E

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

C

D

A

B

Frame

(see

Table 1.A

)

A B C D E F Weight

121.9 (4.80) 94.2 (3.71) 211.6 (8.33) 225.8 (8.89) 5.8 (0.23) 179.8 (7.08) 3.56 kg (7.85 lb)

171.2 (6.74) 122.7 (4.83) 220.2 (8.67) 234.6 (9.24) 5.8 (0.23) 179.8 (7.08) 4.49 kg (9.9 lb)

185.9 (7.32) 137.6 (5.42) 285.6 (11.25) 300.0 (11.81) 5.8 (0.23) 179.8 (7.08) 7.60 kg (16.75 lb)

220.4 (8.68) 169.0 (6.65) 335.7 (13.21) 350.0 (13.78) 5.8 (0.23) 180.4 (7.10) 9.75 kg (21.5 lb)

Table 1.A PowerFlex 70 Frames

Frame

A

B

C

D

3

2

240/208V AC Input 400V AC Input

ND HP HD HP ND kW HD kW

480V AC Input

ND HP HD HP

600V AC Input

ND HP HD HP

0.5

1

0.33

0.75

0.37

0.75

0.25

0.55

0.5

1

0.33

0.75

0.5

1

0.33

0.75

1.5

2

1.5

2.2

4

5.5

1.1

1.5

3

4

2

3

5

7.5

1.5

2

3

5

2

3

5

7.5

1.5

2

3

5

5

7.5

10

3

5

7.5

7.5

11

15

5.5

7.5

11

10

15

20

7.5

10

15

10

15

20

7.5

10

15

1-6

PowerFlex 70 Dimensions

Figure 1.2 PowerFlex 70 Bottom View Dimensions - Frame A

41.9

(1.65)

35.6

(1.40)

80.0

(3.15)

86.4

(3.40)

22.2

(0.88)

99.3

(3.91)

137.4

(5.41)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.3 PowerFlex 70 Bottom View Dimensions - Frame B

66.5

(2.62)

45.5

(1.87)

104.6

(3.40)

85.6

(3.37)

123.7

(4.87)

22.2

(0.88)

99.3

(3.91)

137.4

(5.41)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

PowerFlex 70 Dimensions

1-7

Figure 1.4 PowerFlex 70 Bottom View Dimensions - Frame C

34.5

(1.36)

65.5

(2.58)

96.5

(3.80)

22.2

(0.88)

96.0

(3.78)

118.3

(4.65)

140.5

(5.53)

Number of fans will vary depending on drive size.

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.5 PowerFlex 70 Bottom View Dimensions - Frame D

52.2

(2.06)

80.3

(3.16)

106.8

(4.20)

123.4

(4.86)

37.2

(1.46)

22.2

(0.88)

22.2

(0.88)

F G

102.6

(4.04)

140.3

(5.52)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-8

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

PowerFlex 70 Flange

Mount Dimensions

Drive Catalog Number

20AB2P2F

20AB4P2F

20AC1P3F / 20AD1P1F

20AC2P1F / 20AD2P1F

20AC3P5F / 20AD3P4F

20AE0P9F

20AE1P7F

20AE2P7F

20AB6P8F

20AC5P0F / 20AD5P0F

20AC8P7F / 20AD8P0F

20AE3P9F

20AE6P1F

20AB9P6F

20AB015F

20AC011F / 20AD011F

20AC015F / 20AD014F

20AE9P0F

20AE011F

20AB9P6F

20AB015F

20AC011F / 20AD011F

20AC015F / 20AD014F

20AE9P0F

20AE011F

Figure

Knockout Dimensions

Figure 1.7

Figure 1.8

Figure 1.9

Figure 1.10

Figure 1.6 Overall Dimensions

A

Cutout Dimensions

Figure 1.11

Figure 1.12

Figure 1.13

Figure 1.14

C

B

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

B

C

Frame

A

D

A

156.0 (6.14)

205.2 (8.08)

219.0 (8.62)

248.4 (9.78)

B

225.8 (8.89)

234.6 (9.24)

300.0 (11.81)

350.0 (13.78)

C

178.6 (7.03)

178.6 (7.03)

178.6 (7.03)

178.6 (7.03)

Figure 1.7 A Frame Knockout Dimensions

96.1

72.4

59.6

(2.35)

(2.85)

(3.78)

101.9

(4.01)

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

1-9

22.2 dia.

(0.87 dia.)

43.2

(1.70)

70.5

(2.78)

76.6

(3.02)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.8 B Frame Knockout Dimensions

92.4

70.9

(2.79)

(3.64)

102.7

(4.04)

130.5

(5.14)

140.6

(5.54)

22.2 dia.

(0.87 dia.)

41.4

(1.63)

65.9

(2.59)

76.6

(3.02)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-10

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

Figure 1.9 C Frame Knockout Dimensions

92.2

111.2

(4.38)

73.0

(3.63)

53.1

(2.87)

(2.09)

22.2 dia.

(0.87 dia.)

40.6

(1.60)

68.7

(2.70)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.10 D Frame Knockout Dimensions

107.3

135.5

(5.33)

78.3

(4.22)

51.9

(3.08)

(2.04)

2x 22.2 dia.

(0.87 dia.)

2x 28.5 dia.

(1.12 dia.)

74.1

42.3

(1.67)

(2.92)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.11 A Frame Cutout Dimensions

156.0

(6.14)

140.7

(5.54)

70.4

(2.77)

6.9

(0.27)

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

1-11

127.0

(5.00)

195.1

(7.68)

210.6

(8.29)

225.8

(8.89)

105.3

(4.15)

8x 4.0 +0.13 -0.03 dia.

(0.16 +.005 -.001 dia.)

4x 3.0R

(0.12R)

7.7

(0.31)

58.8

(2.31)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-12

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

6.9

(0.27)

Figure 1.12 B Frame Cutout Dimensions

205.2

(8.08)

190.0

(7.48)

95.0

(3.74)

176.3

(6.94)

205.5

(8.09)

109.7

(4.32)

219.3

(8.64)

234.6

(9.24)

8x 4.0 +0.13 -0.03 dia.

(0.16 +.005 -.001 dia.)

4x 3.0R

(0.12R)

6.9

(0.27)

58.8

(2.31)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

6.3

(0.25)

Figure 1.13 C Frame Cutout Dimensions

219.0

(8.62)

202.0

(7.95)

101.0

(3.98)

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

1-13

271.8

(10.70)

12x 4.0

±

0.13 dia.

(0.16

±

.005 dia.)

189.4

(7.46)

4x 3.0R

(0.12R)

41.5

(1.63)

5.6

(0.22)

141.5

(5.57)

241.5

(9.51)

283.0

(11.14)

300.0

(11.81)

58.8

(2.31)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-14

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

4.5

(0.18)

40.7

(1.60)

Figure 1.14 D Frame Cutout Dimensions

248.4

(9.78)

231.4

(9.11)

190.7

(7.51)

115.7

(4.56)

319.8

(12.59)

222.4

(8.75)

14x 4.0

±

0.13 dia.

(0.16

±

.005 dia.)

4x: 3.0R

(0.12R)

61.5

(2.42)

131.5

(5.18)

201.5

(7.93)

271.5

(10.69)

333.0

(13.11)

350.0

(13.78)

6.0

(0.24)

58.8

(2.31)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.15 Flange Mounting

PowerFlex 70 Flange Mount Dimensions

1-15

1

M4 x 8 x 25

(#10-24 x .75)

2

3

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-16

PowerFlex 700 Dimensions

PowerFlex 700

Dimensions

Figure 1.16 PowerFlex 700 Frames 0-3

(0 Frame Shown)

15.0 (0.59)

5.8 (0.23) dia.

A

D

5.5 (0.22)

C

B

E

CAUTION

HOT surfaces can cause severe burns

5.5 (0.22)

8.0

(0.31)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches).

2

3

5

0

1

Frame

(see

Table 1.B

)

Weight

(1)

kg (lbs.)

A B C D E Drive

Drive &

Packaging

110.0 (4.33) 336.0 (13.23) 200.0 (7.87) 80.0 (3.15) 320.0 (12.60) 5.22 (11.5) 8.16 (18)

135.0 (5.31) 336.0 (13.23) 200.0 (7.87) 105.0 (4.13) 320.0 (12.60) 7.03 (15.5) 9.98 (22)

222.0 (8.74) 342.5 (13.48) 200.0 (7.87) 192.0 (7.56) 320.0 (12.60) 12.52 (27.6) 15.20 (33.5)

222.0 (8.74) 517.5 (20.37) 200.0 (7.87) 192.0 (7.56) 500.0 (19.69) 18.55 (40.9) 22.68 (50)

300.0 (11.81) 583.0 (22.95) 270.3 (10.64) 225.0 (8.86) 625.0 (24.61)

(2)

(2)

(1)

(2)

Weights include HIM and Standard I/O.

Not available at time of publication

Table 1.B PowerFlex 700 Frames

Frame

0

1

2

3

5

15

20

5

7.5

10

2

3

208/240V AC Input 400V AC Input 480V AC Input

ND HP HD HP ND kW HD kW ND HP HD HP

0.5

1

0.33

0.75

0.37

0.75

0.25

0.55

0.5

1

0.33

0.75

1.5

2

1.5

2.2

4

5.5

0.75

1.5

2.2

4

2

3

5

7.5

1.5

2

3

5

3

5

7.5

10

15

7.5

11

15

18.5

22

30

55

5.5

7.5

11

15

18.5

22

45

10

15

20

25

30

40

75

25

30

60

7.5

10

15

20

PowerFlex 700 Dimensions

1-17

Figure 1.17 PowerFlex 700 Bottom View Dimensions – Frame 0

96.0 (3.78)

75.0 (2.95)

55.0 (2.17)

35.0 (1.38)

22.2 (0.87) Dia. – 4 Places

30.2

(1.19)

187.5

(7.38)

132.9

(5.23)

185.0

(7.28)

41.9 (1.65)

56.1 (2.21)

75.9 (2.99)

96.0 (3.78)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.18 PowerFlex 700 Bottom View Dimensions – Frame 1

108.5 (4.27)

87.5 (3.44)

67.5 (2.66)

47.5 (1.87)

28.6 (1.13) Dia.

22.2 (0.87) Dia.

3 Places

25.5

(1.00)

187.6

(7.39)

133.3

(5.25)

185.1

(7.29)

43.0 (1.69)

70.0 (2.76)

75.9 (2.99)

96.0 (3.78)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

1-18

PowerFlex 700 Dimensions

Figure 1.19 PowerFlex 700 Bottom View Dimensions – Frame 2

167.5 (6.59)

156.9 (6.18)

22.4 (0.88) Dia.

2 Places

28.7 (1.13) Dia.

3 Places

184.8

(7.28)

157.5

(6.20)

150.9

(5.94)

112.1

(4.41)

39.3 (1.55)

57.2 (2.25)

72.7 (2.86)

106.0 (4.17)

139.4 (5.49)

177.4 (6.98)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Figure 1.20 PowerFlex 700 Bottom View Dimensions – Frame 3

105.3 (4.15)

94.7 (3.73)

22.2 (0.87) Dia.

28.6 (1.13) Dia.

2 Places

37.3 (1.47) Dia.

2 Places

165.1

(6.50)

160.1

(6.30)

151.1

(5.95)

127.7

(5.03)

184.5

(7.26)

22.7 (0.89)

29.0 (1.14)

66.0 (2.60)

97.0 (3.82)

137.2 (5.40)

187.0 (7.36)

Dimensions are in millimeters and (inches)

Chapter

2

Detailed Drive Operation

Accel Time

AC Supply Source

Considerations

This chapter explains PowerFlex drive functions in detail. Explanations are organized alphabetically by topic. Refer to the Table of Contents for a listing of topics.

[Accel Time 1, 2]

The Accel Time parameters set the rate at which the drive ramps up its output frequency after a Start command or during an increase in command frequency (speed change). The rate established is the result of the programmed Accel Time and the Minimum and Maximum Frequency, as follows:

Maximum Frequency – Minimum Frequency

Accel Time

= Accel Rate

Two Accel Times exist to allow the user to change acceleration rates “on the fly” via PLC command or Digital Input. The selection is made using the 1st

/ 2nd Accel inputs shown below or a similar pattern of Accel Time select bits in the Logic Control word used via PLC communications.

Times are adjustable in.1 second increments from 0.0 seconds to 3600.0

seconds.

In its factory default condition, when no Accel select inputs are closed and no Accel Time bits are “1”, the default acceleration time is Accel Time 1 and the rate is determined as above.

PowerFlex 700 drives are suitable for use on a circuit capable of delivering up to a maximum of 200,000 rms symmetrical amperes, 600V.

!

ATTENTION: To guard against personal injury and/or equipment damage caused by improper fusing or circuit breaker selection, use only the recommended line fuses/circuit breakers specified in

Tables

2.O

through

2.S

.

If a system ground fault monitor (RCD) is to be used, only Type B

(adjustable) devices should be used to avoid nuisance tripping.

2-2

Alarms

Alarms

Alarms are indications of situations that are occurring within the drive or application that should be annunciated to the user. These situations may affect the drive operation or application performance. Conditions such as

Power Loss or Analog input signal loss can be detected and displayed to the user for drive or operator action.

There are two types of alarms:

Type 1 Alarms are conditions that occur in the drive or application that may require alerting the operator. These conditions, by themselves, do not cause the drive to “trip” or shut down, but they may be an indication that, if the condition persists, it may lead to a drive fault.

Type 2 Alarms are conditions that are caused by improper programming and they prevent the user from Starting the drive until the improper programming is corrected. An example would be programming one digital input for a 2-wire type control (Run Forward) and another digital input for a 3-wire type control (Start). These are mutually exclusive operations, since the drive could not determine how to properly issue a

“Run” command. Because the programming conflicts, the drive will issue a type 2 alarm and prevent Starting until the conflict is resolved.

Alarm Status Indication

[Drive Alarm 1]

[Drive Alarm 2]

Two 16 bit Drive Alarm parameters are available to indicate the status of any alarm conditions. Both Type 1 and Type 2 alarms are indicated.

A “1” in the bit indicates the presence of the alarm and a “0” indicates no alarm is present

Configuration

In order for a drive alarm to be annunciated to the “outside” world, it must first be “configured” or activated. Configuration parameters contain a configuration bit for each Type 1 alarm. Type 2 alarms are permanently configured to annunciate. The configuration word is a mirror image of the

Drive Alarm word; that is, the same bits in both the Drive Alarm Word and the Alarm Configuration Word represent the same alarm.

Drive Alarm

1 1 1

Alarm Config

1 0 0

X X

Active

Alarm

Inactive

Alarm

Inactive

Alarm

Alarms

2-3

The configuration bits act as a mask to block or pass through the alarm condition to the active condition. An active alarm will be indicated on the

LCD HIM and will cause the drive alarm status bit to go high (“1”) in the

Drive Status word (Bit 6, parameter 209). This bit can then be linked to a digital output for external annunciation. As default, all configuration bits are high (“1”). Note that setting a configuration bit to “0” to “mask” an alarm does not affect the status bit in the Drive Alarm parameter, only its ability to annunciate the condition.

Application

A process is being controlled by a PowerFlex drive. The speed reference to the drive is a 4 –20 mA analog signal from a sensor wired to Analog Input

1.

The input is configured for mA by setting the corresponding bit in [Anlg In

Config] to “1”

320 [Anlg In Config]

Selects the mode for the analog inputs.

322

325

323

326 x

15 x

14 x

13 x

12 x

11 x

10 x

9

Bit #

Factory Default Bit Values x

8 x

7 x

6 x

5 x

4 x

3 x

2

0

1

A nalo

0

0

2 g In

A na log

In 1

1 =Current

0 =Voltage x =Reserved

Analog In Config

0 1

Speed Ref A Sel

1

The input is scaled for 4-20 mA by setting [Analog In 1 Lo] to “4” mA and

[Analog In 1 Hi] to “20” mA.

The signal is designated as the active speed reference by setting [Speed Ref

A Sel] to its factory default value of “1”

090 [Speed Ref A Sel]

Selects the source of the speed reference to the drive unless [Speed Ref

B Sel] or [Preset Speed 1-7] is selected.

Default:

Options:

(1)

See Appendix B for DPI port locations.

2

18

19

20

21

14

15

16

17

22

23

10

11

12

13

1

2

3-8

9

“Analog In 2”

“Analog In 1”

“Analog In 2”

“Reserved”

“MOP Level”

“Reserved”

“Preset Spd1”

“Preset Spd2”

“Preset Spd3”

“Preset Spd4”

“Preset Spd5”

“Preset Spd6”

“Preset Spd7”

“DPI Port 1”

(1)

“DPI Port 2”

(1)

“DPI Port 3”

(1)

“DPI Port 4”

(1)

“DPI Port 5”

(1)

“DPI Port 6”

(1)

117 thru

120

192 thru

194

213

272

273

320

361 thru

366

002

091 thru

093

101 thru

107

2-4

Alarms

By setting Speed Ref A Hi to 60 Hz and Speed ref A Lo to 0 Hz, the speed reference is scaled to the application needs. Because of the Input scaling and link to the speed reference, 4 mA represents minimum frequency (0

Hz.) and 20 mA represents Maximum Frequency (60 Hz.)

Scale Block

P322

20mA

P325

4mA

P091

60 Hz

P092

0 HZ

The input is configured to recognize a loss of signal and react accordingly to the programming.

324

327

[Analog In 1 Loss]

[Analog In 2 Loss]

Selects drive action when an analog signal loss is detected. Signal loss is defined as an analog signal less than 1V or 2mA. The signal loss event ends and normal operation resumes when the input signal level is greater than or equal to 1.5V or 3mA.

Default:

Options:

5

6

3

4

0

1

2

0

0

“Disabled”

“Disabled”

“Disabled”

“Fault”

“Hold Input”

“Set Input Lo”

“Set Input Hi”

“Goto Preset1”

“Hold OutFreq”

091

092

The loss action is chosen as Hold Input, meaning that the last received signal will be maintained as the speed reference.

Finally, a Digital Output relay is configured to annunciate an alarm by turning on a flashing yellow light mounted on the operator panel of the process control area.

380

384

[Digital Out1 Sel]

[Digital Out2 Sel]

Selects the drive status that will energize a (CRx) output relay.

Default:

Options:

(1)

Contacts shown on page 1-12 are in drive powered state with condition not present. For functions such as “Fault” and “Alarm” the normal relay state is energized and N.O. / N.C. contact wiring may have to be reversed.

1

4

13

14

15

16

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

21

22

23

24

17

18

19

20

25

26

“Fault”

“Run”

“Fault”

(1)

“Alarm”

(1)

“Ready”

“Run”

“Forward Run”

“Reverse Run”

“Auto Restart”

“Powerup Run”

“At Speed”

“At Freq”

“At Current”

“At Torque”

“At Temp”

“At Bus Volts”

“At PI Error”

“DC Braking”

“Curr Limit”

“Economize”

“Motor Overld”

“Power Loss”

“Input 1 Link”

“Input 2 Link”

“Input 3 Link”

“Input 4 Link”

“Input 5 Link”

“Input 6 Link”

381

385

382

386

383

002

001

003

004

218

012

137

157

147

053

048

184

Alarms

2-5

While the process is normal and running from the analog input, everything proceeds normally. However, if the wire for the analog input should be severed or the sensor malfunction so that the 4-20mA signal is lost, the following sequence occurs:

1. the drive will sense the signal loss

2. an active Type 1 Alarm is created and the last signal value is maintained as the speed reference

3. the alarm activates the Digital output relay to light the alarm light for the operator

4. The operator uses the HIM to switch the drive to Manual Control (see

Auto/Manual)

5. The operator manually brings the process to a controlled stop until the signal loss is repaired.

Alarm Queue (PowerFlex 700 Only)

A queue of 8 parameters exists that capture the drive alarms as they occur. A sequential record of the alarm occurrences allows the user to view the history of the eight most recent events.

262

263

264

265

266

267

268

269

[Alarm 1 Code]

[Alarm 2 Code]

[Alarm 3 Code]

[Alarm 4 Code]

[Alarm 5 Code]

[Alarm 6 Code]

[Alarm 7 Code]

[Alarm 8 Code]

A code that represents a drive alarm.

The codes will appear in the order they occur (first 4 alarms in – first 4 out alarm queue). A time stamp is not available with alarms.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

Read Only

0/256

1

261

2-6

Analog Inputs

Analog Inputs

Possible Uses of Analog Inputs

The analog inputs provide data that can be used for the following purposes:

Provide a value to [Speed Ref A] or [Speed Ref B].

Provide a trim signal to [Speed Ref A] or [Speed Ref B].

Provide a reference when the terminal block has assumed manual control of the reference

Provide the reference and feedback for the PI loop. See

Process PI

Loop on page 2-116

.

Provide an external and adjustable value for the current limit and DC braking level

Enter and exit sleep mode.

Analog Input Configuration

[Anlg In Config]

[Current Lmt Sel] allows an analog input to control the set point while [DC

Brk Levl Sel] allows an analog input to define the DC hold level used when

Ramp-to-Stop, Ramp-to-Hold, or Brake-to-Stop is active.

To provide local adjustment of a master command signal or to provide improved resolution the input to analog channel 1 or 2 can be defined as a trim input. Setting [Trim In Select] allows the selected channel to modify the commanded frequency by 10%.The speed command will be reduced by

10% when the input level is at [Anlg In x Lo] with it linearly increasing to

10% above command at [Anlg In xHi].

Feedback can be used to control an operation using the “Process PI”

(proportional-integral) feature of the control. In this case one signal, defined using [PI Reference Sel], provides a reference command and a second, defined using [PI Feedback Sel], provides a feedback signal for frequency compensation. Please refer to the

Process PI Loop on page 2-116

for details on this mode of operation.

Analog In 1 Lo

Analog In 1 Hi

Analog In 2 Lo

Analog In 2 Hi

Analog Input

1 Scale

Volts or mA

Cal Analog 1

Analog Input

2 Scale

Volts or mA

Cal Analog 2

Input/Output

Parameter

Processing

Selection/Control

Speed Ref A Sel Speed Ref B Sel Trim In Select TB Man Ref Sel PI Reference Sel PI Feedback Sel Current Lmt Sel DC Brk Levl Sel Sleep-Wake Ref

Ref A

Scale/Limit

Speed Ref A Lo

Speed Ref A Hi

Speed Ref B Lo

Speed Ref B Hi

Ref B

Scale/Limit

Trim

Scale/Limit

Trim Lo

Trim Hi

TB Manual

Scale/Limit

Trim Out Sel

Hz

+

Hz

Reference A

+

Hz

Reference B

Brake Level

Scale/Limit

Sleep Level

Compare

Hz

TB Manual

PI

Reference

Scale/Limit

%

PI Reference

PI Feedback

Scale/Limit

%

PI Feedback

Current Limit

Scale/Limit

% Rated

Current

Current Limit

% Rated

Current

DC Brake

Sleep/

Wake

Sleep/Wake

Sleep Level

Wake Level

Analog 1

Voltage

Analog 1

Current

ADC

Input/Output

Parameter

Processing

Selection/Control

Anlg In Config

0-10v

0-20mA

Unipolar

Cal 1

Current

Cal 1

Anlg In 1 Loss

Loss

Detect

Limit

0-10V

Anlg In Sqr Root

Loss

Detect

Limit

4-20mA

Square

Root

Cal Analog 1

Analog 2

Unipolar

Analog 2

Bipolar

Analog 2

Current

ADC

Anlg In Config

(voltage)

(current)

Analog In1 Value

Analog In 2 Lo

Analog In 2 Hi

0-10v

Note: If either of these parameters is < 0, input will go into bipolar mode, otherwise unipolar.

Unipolar

Cal 2

-10v - +10v

0-20mA

Bipolar

Cal 2

Current

Cal 2

Anlg In 2 Loss

Loss

Detect

Limit

0-10V

Loss

Detect

Limit

-10V to

10V

Limit

4-20mA

Anlg In Sqr Root

Square

Root

Cal Analog 2

Analog In2 Value

Analog Inputs

2-9

Scaling Blocks

[Analog In Hi]

[Analog In Lo]

A scaling operation is performed on the value read from an analog input in order to convert it to units usable for some particular purpose. The user controls the scaling by setting parameters that associate a low and high point in the input range (i.e. in volts or mA) with a low and high point in the target range (e.g. reference frequency).

Two sets of numbers may be used to specify the analog input scaling. One set (called the “input scaling points”) defines low and high points in terms of the units read by the input hardware, i.e. volts or mA.

The second set of numbers (called the “output scaling points”) used in the analog input scaling defines the same low and high points in units appropriate for the desired use of the input. For instance, if the input is to be used as a frequency reference, this second set of numbers would be entered in terms of Hz. For many features the second set of numbers is fixed. The user sets the second set for speed and reference trim.

An analog input or output signal can represent a number of different commands. Typically an analog input is used to control output frequency, but it could control frequency trim or current limit. An analog output typically is a frequency indication, but it could represent output current, voltage, or power. For this reason this document defines an analog signal level as providing a “command” value rather than a “frequency.” However when viewing a command value it is presented as a frequency based on the

[Minimum Speed] and [Maximum Freq] settings.

The 0-10 volt input scaling can be adjusted using the following parameters:

[Analog In x Lo]

[Analog In x Hi]

2-10

Analog Inputs

Configuration #1:

[Speed Ref A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Minimum Speed] = 0 Hz

[Maximum Speed] = 60 Hz

[Analog In 1 Lo] = 0%

[Analog In 1 Hi] = 100%

This is the default setting, where minimum input (0 volts) represents

[Minimum Speed] of 0 Hz and maximum input (10 volts) represents

[Maximum Speed] of 60 Hz.

8

6

4

2

12

10

Config 1

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

Output Hertz

Scaling Block

[Speed Reference A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Analog In 1 Lo]

0V

[Analog In 1 Hi]

10V

[Minimum Speed]

0 Hz

[Maximum Speed]

60 Hz

Configuration #2:

[Speed Ref A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Minimum Speed] = 0 Hz

[Maximum Speed] = 30 Hz

[Analog In 1 Lo] = 0%

[Analog In 1 Hi] = 100%

This is an application that only requires 30 Hz as a maximum output frequency, but is still configured for full 10 volt input. The result is that the resolution of the input has been doubled, providing only 3 Hz change per input volt (Configuration #1 is 6 Hz/Volt).

Analog Inputs

2-11

8

6

4

2

12

10

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

Output Hertz

Scaling Block

[Speed Reference A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Analog In 1 Lo]

0V

[Analog In 1 Hi]

10V

[Minimum Speed]

0 Hz

[Maximum Speed]

30 Hz

Config 2

Configuration #3:

[Speed Ref A Sel] = “Ana In 1”

[Minimum Speed] = 0 Hz.

[Maximum Speed] = 60 Hz.

[Analog In 1 Lo] = 20%

[Analog In 1 Hi] = 100%

This configuration is referred to as offset. In this case, a 2-10 volt input signal provides 0-60 Hz output, providing a 2 volt offset in the speed command.

12

10

8

6

4

2

Config 3

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

Output Hertz

Scaling Block

[Speed Reference A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Analog In 1 Lo]

2V

[Analog In 1 Hi]

10V

[Minimum Speed]

0 Hz

[Maximum Speed]

60Hz

2-12

Analog Inputs

Configuration #4:

[Minimum Speed] = 0 Hz.

[Maximum Speed] = 60 Hz.

[Analog In 1 Lo] = 100%

[Analog In 1 Hi] = 0%

This configuration is used to invert the operation of the input signal. Here, maximum input (100% of 10 Volts = 10 Volts) represents [Minimum Speed] of 0 Hz and minimum input (0% of 10 Volts = 0 Volts) represents

[Maximum Speed] of 60 Hz.

8

6

4

2

12

10

Config 4

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

Output Hertz

Scaling Block

[Speed Reference A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Analog In 1 Lo]

10V

[Analog In 1 Hi]

0V

[Minimum Speed]

0 Hz

[Maximum Speed]

60Hz

Configuration #5:

[Minimum Speed] = 0 Hz.

[Maximum Speed] = 60 Hz.

[Analog In 1 Lo] = 0%

[Analog In 1 Hi] = 50%

This configuration is used when the input signal is 0-5 volts. Here, minimum input (0% of 10 Volts = 0 Volts) represents [Minimum Speed] of

0 Hz and maximum input (50% of 10 Volts = 5 Volts) represents [Maximum

Speed] of 60 Hz. This allows full scale operation from a 0-5 volt source.

Analog Inputs

2-13

4

3

2

1

6

5

0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

Output Hertz

Scaling Block

[Speed Reference A Sel] = “Analog In 1”

[Analog In 1 Lo]

0V

[Analog In 1 Hi]

5V

[Minimum Speed]

0 Hz

[Maximum Speed]

60Hz

Config 5

Square Root

[Anlg In Sqr Root]

For both analog inputs, the user can enable a square root function for an analog input through the use of [Analog In Sq Root]. The function should be set to enabled if the input signal varies with the square of the quantity

(i.e. drive speed) being monitored.

If the mode of the input is bipolar voltage (-10v to 10v), then the square root function will return 0 for all negative voltages.

The square root function is scaled such that the input range is the same as the output range. For example, if the input is set up as a unipolar voltage input, then the input and output ranges of the square root function will be 0 to 10 volts, as shown in figure below.

10

8

6

4

2

0 2 4 6

Input (Volts)

8 10

2-14

Analog Inputs

Signal Loss

[Analog In 1, 2 Loss]

Signal loss detection can be enabled for each analog input. The [Analog In x Loss] parameters control whether signal loss detection is enabled for each input and defines what action the drive will take when loss of any analog input signal occurs.

5

6

3

4

1

2

Value

0

One of the selections for reaction to signal loss is a drive fault, which will stop the drive. All other choices make it possible for the input signal to return to a usable level while the drive is still running.

Hold input

Set input Lo

Set input Hi

Goto Preset 1

Hold Output Frequency

Action on Signal Loss

Disabled

Fault

Hold input (continue to use last frequency command.)

Set Input Hi - use [Minimum Speed] as frequency command.

Set Input Lo - use [Maximum Speed] as frequency command.

use [Preset 1] as frequency command.

Hold Out Freq (maintain last output frequency)

If the input is in current mode, 4 mA is the normal minimum usable input value. Any value below 3.2 mA will be interpreted by the drive as a signal loss, and a value of 3.8 mA will be required on the input in order for the signal loss condition to end.

If the input is in unipolar voltage mode, 2V is the normal minimum usable input value. Any value below 1.6 volts will be interpreted by the drive as a signal loss, and a value of 1.9 volts will be required on the input in order for the signal loss condition to end.

No signal loss detection is possible while an input is in bipolar voltage mode. The signal loss condition will never occur even if signal loss detection is enabled.

Trim

An analog input can be used to trim the active speed reference (Speed

Reference A/B). If analog is chosen as a trim input, two scale parameters are provide to scale the trim reference. The trim is a +/- value which is summed with the current speed reference. See also

Speed Reference on page 2-144

.

[Trim In Select]

[Trim Out Select]

[Trim Hi]

[Trim Lo]

Analog Inputs

2-15

Value Display

Parameters are available in the Monitoring Group to view the actual value of an analog input regardless of its use in the application. Whether it is a current limit adjustment, speed reference or trim function, the incoming value can be read via these parameters.

The value displayed includes the input value plus any factory hardware calibration value, but does not include scaling information programmed by the user (i.e. [Analog In 1 Hi/Lo]). The units displayed are determined by the associated configuration bit (Volts or mA)

016

017

[Analog In1 Value]

[Analog In2 Value]

Value of the signal at the analog inputs.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

Read Only

0.000/20.000 mA

–/+10.000V

0.001 mA or 0.001 Volt

Cable Selection

Important points to remember:

Always use copper wire.

Wire with an insulation rating of 600V or greater is recommended.

Control and signal wires should be separated from power wires by at least 0.3 meters (1 foot).

Important: I/O terminals labeled “–” or “Common” are not referenced to ground and are designed to greatly reduce common mode interference. Grounding these terminals can cause signal noise.

!

!

ATTENTION: Configuring an analog input for 0-20mA operation and driving it from a voltage source could cause component damage. Verify proper configuration prior to applying input signals.

ATTENTION: Hazard of personal injury or equipment damage exists when using bipolar input sources. Noise and drift in sensitive input circuits can cause unpredictable changes in motor speed and direction. Use speed command parameters to help reduce input source sensitivity.

Table 2.A Recommended Signal Wire

Signal

Type

Standard

Analog I/O

Encoder/

Pulse I/O

EMC

Compliance

Wire Type(s)

Belden 8760/9460(or equiv.)

Belden 8770(or equiv.)

Less than or equal to 30 m (98 ft.)

– Belden 9730 (or equiv.)

Greater than 30 m (98 ft.) –

Belden 9773(or equiv.)

Description

0.750 mm

2

(18AWG), twisted pair, 100% shield with drain

(1)

.

0.750 mm

2

(18AWG), 3 cond., shielded for remote pot only.

0.196 mm

2

(24AWG), individually shielded.

0.750 mm

2

(18AWG), twisted pair, shielded.

Refer to

EMC Instructions on page 2-37 for details.

Minimum

Insulation Rating

300V,

60 degrees C

(140 degrees F)

(1)

If the wires are short and contained within a cabinet which has no sensitive circuits, the use of shielded wire may not be necessary, but is always recommended.

2-16

Analog Inputs

Refer to

Table 2.J on page 2-46 for recommended digital I/O control wire.

Figure 2.1 PowerFlex 700 Standard I/O Terminal Designations

1

16

32

No. Signal

1

2

3

4

Anlg Volts In 1 (–)

Anlg Volts In 1 (+)

Anlg Volts In 2 (–)

Anlg Volts In 2 (+)

(1)

(1)

Description

Isolated

(2)

, bipolar, differential,

±

10V,

11 bit & sign, 100k ohm input impedance.

Isolated

(3)

, bipolar, differential,

±

10V,

11 bit & sign, 100k ohm input impedance.

For (+) and (–) 10V pot references.

Bipolar, differential,

±

10V, 11 bit & sign, 2k ohm minimum load.

5 Pot Common

6 Anlg Volts Out 1 (–)

7 Anlg Volts Out 1 (+)

8 Anlg Current Out 1 (–)

(1)

(1)

9 Anlg Current Out 1 (+)

10 Reserved for Future Use

11 Digital Out 1 – N.C.

Fault

12 Digital Out 1 Common

4-20mA, 11 bit & sign, 500 ohm maximum load.

13 Digital Out 1 – N.O.

14 Digital Out 2 – N.C.

Alarm

15 Digital Out 2 Common

16 Digital Out 2 – N.O.

(1)

17 Anlg Current In 1 (–)

18 Anlg Current In 1 (+)

(1)

19 Anlg Current In 2 (–)

20 Anlg Current In 2 (+)

Resistive Load

Rating: 8A at 250V AC/30V DC

Min. Load: 10mA

Inductive Load

Rating: 2A at 250V AC/30V DC

Min. Load: 10mA

Isolated ohm input impedance.

Isolated

(2)

, 4-20mA, 11 bit & sign, 100

(3)

, 4-20mA, 11 bit & sign, 100 ohm input impedance.

21 –10V Pot Reference –

22 +10V Pot Reference –

23 Reserved for Future Use

24 +24VDC –

2k ohm minimum, 15mA maximum load.

25 Digital In Common –

26 24V Common –

27

28

29

30

31

32

Digital In 1

Digital In 2

Digital In 3

Digital In 4

Digital In 5

Digital In 6

Drive supplied power for logic inputs.

150mA maximum Load.

Stop - CF 115V AC, 50/60 Hz

Start

Opto isolated (250V)

Jog

Low State: less than 30V AC

High State: greater than 100V AC

Speed Sel 1

24V AC/DC, 50/60 Hz

Speed Sel 2

Opto isolated (250V)

Speed Sel 3 Low State: less than 5V AC

High State: greater than 20V AC

320 -

329

338 -

346

380 -

387

320 -

329

361 -

366

(1)

(2)

(3)

These inputs/outputs are dependant on a number of parameters. See “Related Parameters.”

Differential Isolation - External source must be maintained at less than 160V with respect to PE. Input provides high common mode immunity.

Differential Isolation - External source must be less than 10V with respect to PE.

Refer to the PowerFlex 70 User Manual for terminal designations and wiring examples.

Analog Inputs

2-17

I/O Wiring Examples (PowerFlex 700 shown)

Input/Output

Potentiometer

(1)

10k Ohm Pot.

Recommended

(2k Ohm Minimum)

Joystick

(1)

±

10V Input - 100k ohm input impedance.

Connection Example

Potentiometer

Analog Input

±

10V Input - 100k ohm input impedance.

4-20 mA Input - 100 ohm input impedance

Voltage - Bipolar

(1)

3

4

(3)

5

1

2

22

Joystick

3

5

17

18

21

22

Current - Unipolar

+

Analog/Digital

Output

±

10V Output - Can drive a 10k ohm load (25 mA short circuit current limit).

Voltage

+ –

6

7

2 Wire Control

(2)

Non-Reversing

-

Requires 2-wire functions only ([Digital In1 Sel]). Using

3-wire selections will cause a type 2 alarm.

3 Wire Control

24VDC Internal Supply

(4)

24

25

26

27

Stop-Run

24VDC Internal Supply

(4)

Requires only

3-wire functions

([Digital In1 Sel]).

Including 2-wire selections will cause a type 2 alarm.

24

25

26

27

28

Stop

Start

Current

+ –

8

9

24VDC External Supply

Common

25

+24V

Logic

Power Source or

11

12

13

14

15

16

115V External Source

25

Neutral 115V

27

Stop-Run

24VDC External Supply 115V External Source

Common

25

27

28

27

Stop-Run

Stop

Start

+24V

25

Neutral

Stop

27

28

115V

Start

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

Refer to the Attention statement on

page 2-15

for important bipolar wiring information.

Important: Programming inputs for 2 wire control deactivates all HIM Start buttons.

Examples show hardware wiring only. Refer to

page 2-16 for parameters that must be adjusted.

If desired, a User Supplied 24V DC power source can be used. Refer to the “External” example.

2-18

Analog Outputs

Analog Outputs

Explanation

Each drive has one or more analog outputs that can be used to annunciate a wide variety of drive operating conditions and values.

The user selects the source for the analog output by setting [Analog Outx

Sel].

342 [Analog Out1 Sel]

Selects the source of the value that drives the analog output.

Default:

Options:

0 “Output Freq”

See Table

001

002

003

004

005

007

006

012

135

136

137

138

Configuration

The PowerFlex 70 standard I/O analog output is permanently configured as a 0 -10 volt output. The output has 10 bits of resolution yielding 1024 steps.

The analog output circuit has a maximum 1.3% gain error and a maximum

7 mV offset error. For a step from minimum to maximum value, the output will be within 0.2% of its final value after 12ms.

The PowerFlex 700 standard I/O analog output is permanently configured as a 0 -10 volt output. The output has 10 bits of resolution yielding 1024 steps. The analog output circuit has a maximum 1.3% gain error and a maximum 100 mV offset error. For a step from minimum to maximum value, the output will be within 0.2% of its final value after 12ms.

Absolute

Certain quantities used to drive the analog output are signed, i.e. the quantity can be both positive and negative. The user has the option of having the absolute value (value without sign) of these quantities taken before the scaling occurs. Absolute value is enabled separately for each analog output via the bitmapped parameter [Anlg Out Absolut].

Important: If absolute value is enabled but the quantity selected for output is not a signed quantity, then the absolute value operation will have no effect.

Scaling Blocks

The user defines the scaling for the analog output by entering analog output voltages into two parameters, [Analog Out1 Lo] and [Analog Out1 Hi].

These two output voltages correspond to the bottom and top of the possible range covered by the quantity being output, as described in

Table 2.B

, and

the output voltage will vary linearly with the quantity being output. The analog output voltage will not go outside the range defined by [Analog Out1

Lo] and [Analog Out1 Hi].

Analog Outputs

2-19

Table 2.B Analog Output Scaling Ranges

Quantity

Output Frequency

Commanded

Frequency

[Analog Outx Lo]

Corresponds to:

(Absolute Value Disabled)

-[Maximum Freq]

-[Maximum Freq]

[Analog Outx Lo]

Corresponds to:

(Absolute Value Enabled)

0 Hz

0 Hz

Output Current 0 Amps 0 Amps

Output Torque Current -200% of drive rated current 0 Amps

Output Flux Current 0 Amps

Output Power 0 kW

0 Amps

0 kW

[Analog Outx Hi]

Corresponds to:

[Maximum Freq]

[Maximum Freq]

200% of drive rated current

200% of drive rated current

200% of drive rated current

200% of drive rated power

Output Voltage

Dc Bus Voltage

PI Reference

PI Feedback

PI Error

PI Output

0 V

0 V

-100%

-100%

-100%

-100%

0 V

0 V

0%

0%

0%

0%

120% of drive rated voltage

200% of drive rated voltage

100%

100%

100%

100%

Analog Output Configuration Examples

This section gives a few examples of valid analog output configurations and describes the behavior of the output in each case.

Example 1 -- Unsigned Output Quantity

[Analog Out1 Sel] = “Output Current”

[Analog Out1 Lo] = 1 volt

[Analog Out1 Hi] = 9 volts

10V

[Analog Out1 Hi]

Analog

Output Voltage

Output Current vs.

Analog Output Voltage

Marker Lines

[Analog Out1 Lo]

0V

0% 200%

Output Current

Note that analog output value never goes outside the range defined by

[Analog Out1 Lo] and [Analog Out1 Hi], even if output current is beyond the range defined in

Table 2.B

. This is true in all cases, including all the

following examples.

Example 2 -- Unsigned Output Quantity, Negative Slope

[Analog Out1 Sel] = “Output Current”

[Analog Out1 Lo] = 9 volts

[Analog Out1 Hi] = 1 volts

This example shows that you can have [Analog Out1 Lo] greater than

[Analog Out1 Hi]. The result is a negative slope on the scaling from original quantity to analog output voltage. Negative slope could also be applied to any of the other examples in this section.

2-20

Analog Outputs

10V

[Analog Out1 Lo]

Analog

Output Voltage

Output Current vs.

Analog Output Voltage

Marker Lines

[Analog Out1 Hi]

0V

0% 200%

Output Current

Example 3 – Signed Output Quantity, Absolute Value Enabled

[Analog Out1 Sel] = “Output Torque Current”

[Analog Out1 Lo] = 1 volt

[Analog Out1 Hi] = 9 volts

[Anlg Out Absolut] set so that absolute value is enabled for output 1.

10V

[Analog Out1 Hi]

Analog

Output Voltage

Output Torque Current vs.

Analog Output Voltage

Marker Lines

[Analog Out1 Lo]

200%

0V

0%

Output Torque Current

200%

Example 4 – Signed Output Quantity, Absolute Value Disabled

[Analog Out1 Sel] = “Output Torque Current”

[Analog Out1 Lo] = 1 volt

[Analog Out1 Hi] set to 9 volts

[Anlg Out Absolut] set so that absolute value is disabled for output 1.

10V

[Analog Out1 Hi]

Analog

Output Voltage

[Analog Out1 Lo]

200%

0V

0%

Output Torque Current

200%

Output Torque Current vs.

Analog Output Voltage

Marker Lines

Filtering

Software filtering will be performed on the analog outputs for certain signal sources, as specified in

Table 2.C

. “Filter A” is one possible such filter, and

it is described later in this section. Any software filtering is in addition to any hardware filtering and sampling delays.

Analog Outputs

2-21

Table 2.C Software Filters

Quantity

Output Frequency

Filter

No extra filtering

Commanded Frequency No extra filtering

Output Current Filter A

Output Torque Current

Output Flux Current

Output Power

Output Voltage

Filter A

Filter A

Filter A

No extra filtering

DC Bus Voltage

PI Reference

PI Feedback

PI Error

PI Output

Filter A

No extra filtering

No extra filtering

No extra filtering

No extra filtering

Analog output software filters are specified in terms of the time it will take the output of the filter to move from 0% to various higher levels, given an instantaneous step in the filter input from 0% to 100%. The numbers describing filters in this document should be considered approximate; the actual values will depend on implementation.

Filter A is a single pole digital filter with a 162ms time constant. Given a

0% to 100% step input from a steady state, the output of Filter A will take

500ms to get to 95% of maximum, 810 ms to get to 99%, and 910 ms to get to 100%.

2-22

Auto / Manual

Auto / Manual

The intent of Auto/Manual is to allow the user to override the selected reference (referred to as the “auto” reference) by either toggling a button on the programming terminal (HIM), or continuously asserting a digital input that is configured for Auto/Manual.

“Alt” Function on the HIM

By toggling the “Alt” and “Auto/Man” function on the HIM, the user can switch the speed reference back and forth between the active “Auto” source (per drive programming and inputs) and the HIM requesting the manual control. “Manual” switches the Reference Source to the HIM,

“Auto” switches it back to drive programming.

The HIM manual reference can be preloaded from the auto source by enabling the [Man Ref Preload] parameter. With the preload function enabled, when the HIM requests Manual control, the current value of the auto source is loaded into the HIM reference before manual control is granted. This allows the manual control to begin at the same speed as the auto source, creating a smooth transition. If the preload function is disabled, the speed will ramp to whatever manual reference was present in the HIM at the time manual control was granted.

Digital Input

By toggling the digital input programmed as Auto/Manual, the user can switch the speed reference back and forth between the active “Auto” source (per drive programming and inputs) and the designated Terminal

Block manual reference. When this digital input is asserted, the TB will attempt to gain exclusive control (Manual) of the reference. If granted control of the reference, the specific source for the reference is determined by the parameter TB manual reference select.

The TB manual reference is selected in [TB Man Ref Sel]. The choices for this parameter are:

– Analog Input 1

– Analog Input 2

– MOP Level

– Analog Input 3 (PF700 Only)

– Pulse Input (PF700 Only)

– Encoder input (PF700 Only)

– Releasing this input sends the control back to the Auto source.

General Rules

The following rules apply to the granting and releasing of Manual control:

1. Manual control is requested through a one-time request (Auto/Man toggle, not continuously asserted). Once granted, the terminal holds

Manual control until the Auto/Man button is pressed again, which releases Manual control (i.e. back to Auto mode).

Auto / Manual

2-23

2. Manual control can only be granted to the TB or to a programming terminal (e.g. HIM) if Manual control is not already being exercised by the TB or another programming terminal at the time.

3. Manual control can only be granted to a terminal if no other device has

Local control already asserted (i.e. no other device has ownership of the

Local control function).

4. A HIM (or TB) with Manual control active can have it taken away if another DPI port requests, and is granted Local control. In this case when Local control is released the drive will not go back to Manual control, Manual control must be again requested (edge based request, see

1.

above). This is true for both the HIM and the TB (i.e. if the TB switch was in the Manual position it must be switched to Auto and back to

Manual to get Manual control again).

5. The status indicator (point LED on LED HIM & Text on LCD HIM) will indicate when that particular terminal has been granted Manual control, not the fact any terminal connected has Manual control and not the fact that the particular terminal has simply asked for Manual control.

6. When Manual control is granted, the drive will latch and save the current reference value prior to entering Manual. When Manual control is then released the drive will use that latched reference for the drive until another DPI device arbitrates ownership and changes the reference to a different value.

7. If a terminal has Manual control and clears its DPI reference mask

(disallows reference ownership), then Manual control will be released.

By extension, if the drive is configured such that the HIM can not select the reference (via reference mask setting), then the drive will not allow the terminal to acquire Manual control.

8. If a terminal has Manual control and clears its DPI logic mask (allowing disconnect of the terminal), then Manual control will be released. By extension if the drive is configured such that the HIM can be unplugged

(via logic mask setting), then the drive will not allow the terminal to acquire Manual control. The disconnect also applies to a DPI HIM that executes a soft “Logout.”

9. If a com loss fault occurs on a DPI that has Manual control, then Manual control will be released as a consequence of the fault (on that port which had Manual control).

10.There will be no way to request and hence no support of the Auto/

Manual feature on old SCANport based HIMs.

11.You can not acquire Manual control if you are already an assigned source for the DPI port requesting Manual.

12.When a restore factory defaults is performed Manual control is aborted.

2-24

Auto Restart (Reset/Run)

Auto Restart (Reset/

Run)

The Auto Restart feature provides the ability for the drive to automatically perform a fault reset followed by a start attempt without user or application intervention. This allows remote or “unattended” operation. Only certain faults are allowed to be reset. Certain faults (Type 2) that indicate possible drive component malfunction are not resettable.

Caution should be used when enabling this feature, since the drive will attempt to issue its own start command based on user selected programming.

Configuration

This feature is configured through two user parameters

174 [Auto Rstrt Tries]

Sets the maximum number of times the drive attempts to reset a fault and restart.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

0

0/9

1

!

ATTENTION: Equipment damage and/or personal injury may result if this parameter is used in an inappropriate application. Do Not use this function without considering applicable local, national and international codes, standards, regulations or industry guidelines.

175 [Auto Rstrt Delay]

Sets the time between restart attempts when [Auto Rstrt Tries] is set to a value other than zero.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

1.0 Secs

0.5/30.0 Secs

0.1 Secs

175

174

Setting [Auto Rstrt Tries] to a value greater than zero will enable the Auto

Restart feature. Setting the number of tries equal to zero will disable the feature.

The [Auto Rstrt Delay] parameter sets the time, in seconds, between each reset/run attempt.

The auto-reset/run feature provides 2 status bits in [Drive Status 2] – an active status, and a countdown status.

210 [Drive Status 2]

Present operating condition of the drive.

Read Only

Bit # x

15 x

14

0

13

D M oto r O verld req

R eg im

B us F it

C urr L

A uto ct

R st A

A uto

R st C td n

A

0

12

0

11

0

10

0

9

0

8 x

7

0

6

g g uto

Tu nin

D

C

B rakin

Sto pp in

Jo g gg in

R g un nin

A g ctive

R ead y

0

5

0

4

0

3

0

2

0

1

0

0

1 =Condition True

0 =Condition False x =Reserved

209

The typical steps performed in an Auto-Reset/Run cycle are as follows:

1. The drive is running and an auto-resettable fault occurs, tripping the drive.

2. After the number of seconds in [Auto Rstrt Delay], the drive will automatically perform an internal Fault Reset, resetting the faulted condition.

Auto Restart (Reset/Run)

2-25

3. The drive will then issue an internal Start command to start the drive.

4. If another auto-resettable fault occurs the cycle will repeat itself up to the number of attempts set in [Auto Rstrt Tries].

5. If the drive faults repeatedly for more than the number of attempts set in

[Auto Rstrt Tries] with less than five minutes between each fault, the auto-reset/run is considered unsuccessful and the drive remains in the faulted state.

6. Aborting an Auto-Reset/Run Cycle (see

Aborting an Auto-Reset/Run

Cycle

for details).

7. If the drive remains running for five minutes or more since the last reset/ run without a fault, or is otherwise stopped or reset, the auto-reset/run is considered successful. The entire process is reset to the beginning and will repeat on the next fault.

Beginning an Auto-Reset/Run Cycle

The following conditions must be met when a fault occurs for the drive to begin an auto-reset/run cycle.

The fault must be defined as an auto-resettable fault

[Auto Rstrt Tries] setting must be greater than zero.

The drive must have been running, not jogging, not autotuning, and not stopping, when the fault occurred. (Note that a DC Hold state is part of a stop sequence and therefore is considered stopping.)

Aborting an Auto-Reset/Run Cycle

During an auto-reset/run cycle the following actions/conditions will abort the reset/run attempt process.

Issuing a stop command from any source. (Note: Removal of a 2-wire run-fwd or run-rev command is considered a stop assertion).

Issuing a fault reset command from any source.

Removal of the enable input signal.

Setting [Auto Rstrt Tries] to zero.

The occurrence of a fault which is not auto-resettable.

Removing power from the drive.

Exhausting an Auto-Reset/Run Cycle

After all [Auto Rstrt Tries] have been made and the drive has not successfully restarted and remained running for five minutes or more, the auto-reset/run cycle will be considered exhausted and therefore unsuccessful. In this case the auto-reset/run cycle will terminate and an additional fault, “Auto Rstrt Tries” (Auto Restart Tries) will be issued if bit

5 of [Fault Config 1] = “1.”

2-26

Bus Regulation

Bus Regulation

[Bus Reg Gain]

[Bus Reg Mode A, B]

Some applications, such as the hide tanning shown here, create an intermittent regeneration condition. When the hides are being lifted (on the left), motoring current exists. However, when the hides reach the top and fall onto a paddle, the motor regenerates power back to the drive, creating the potential for a nuisance overvoltage trip.

When an AC motor regenerates energy from the load, the drive DC bus voltage increases unless there is another means (dynamic braking chopper/ resistor, etc.) of dissipating the energy.

Motoring Regenerating

Without bus regulation, if the bus voltage exceeds the operating limit established by the power components of the drive, the drive will fault, shutting off the output devices to protect itself from excess voltage.

Single Seq 500 S/s

OV Fault @ V bus

Max

3

Drive Output Shut Off

2

1

Ch1

Ch3

100mV

500mV

Ch2 100mV M 1.00s

Ch3 1.47 V

With bus regulation enabled, the drive can respond to the increasing voltage by advancing the output frequency until the regeneration is counteracted.

This keeps the bus voltage at a regulated level below the trip point.

Since the same integrator is used for bus regulation as for normal frequency ramp operation, a smooth transition between normal frequency ramp operation and bus regulation is accomplished.

The regulator senses a rapid rise in the bus voltage and activates prior to actually reaching the bus voltage regulation set point Vreg. This is important since it minimizes overshoot in the bus voltage when bus regulation begins thereby attempting to avoid an over-voltage fault.

Bus Regulation

2-27

The bus voltage regulation set point (Vreg) in the drive is fixed for each voltage class of drive. The bus voltage regulation set points are identical to the internal dynamic brake regulation set points VDB's.

Single Seq 2.50kS/s

DB Bus

3

Output

Motor

2

1

Ch1

Ch3

100mV

500mV

Ch2 100mV M 200ms Ch3 1.49 V

To avoid over-voltage faults, a bus voltage regulator is incorporated as part of the acceleration/deceleration control. As the bus voltage begins to approach the bus voltage regulation point (Vreg), the bus voltage regulator increases the magnitude of the output frequency and voltage to reduce the bus voltage. The bus voltage regulator function takes precedence over the other two functions. See

Figure 2.2

.

The bus voltage regulator is shown in the lower one-third of

Figure 2.2

. The

inputs to the bus voltage regulator are the bus voltage, the bus voltage regulation set point Vreg, proportional gain, integral gain, and derivative gain. The gains are intended to be internal values and not parameters. These will be test points that are not visible to the user. Bus voltage regulation is selected by the user in the Bus Reg Mode parameter.

Operation

Bus voltage regulation begins when the bus voltage exceeds the bus voltage regulation set point Vreg and the switches shown in

Figure 2.2

move to the positions shown in

Table 2.D

.

Table 2.D Switch Positions for Bus Regulator Active

SW 1

Bus Regulation Limit

SW 2

Bus Reg

SW 3

Open

SW 4

Closed

SW 5

Don’t Care

2-28

Bus Regulation

Current Limit Level

Figure 2.2 Bus Voltage Regulator, Current Limit and Frequency Ramp.

Current Limit

PI Gain Block

Derivative Gain

Block

SW 3

I Limit,

No Bus Reg

Magnitude

Calculator

U Phase Motor Current

W Phase Motor Current

0

Limit

SW 1

No Limit

Acc/Dec Rate

I Limit,

No Bus Reg

Jerk

Ramp

Jerk

Clamp

No Limit

SW 2

Bus Reg

Frequency Set Point

Maximum Frequency, Minimum Speed, Maximum Speed, Overspeed Limit

Frequency

Ramp

(Integrator)

+

+

+

Frequency Reference (to Ramp Control, Speed Ref, etc.)

Speed Control (Slip Comp, Process PI, etc)

Frequency

Reference

+

+

SW 5

Speed

Control

Mode

Frequency

Limits

Output Frequency

Bus Voltage Regulation Point, V reg

SW 4

PI Gain Block

Bus Reg On

Derivative

Gain Block

Bus Voltage (Vbus)

Bus Voltage Regulator

The derivative term senses a rapid rise in the bus voltage and activates the bus regulator prior to actually reaching the bus voltage regulation set point

Vreg. The derivative term is important since it minimizes overshoot in the bus voltage when bus regulation begins thereby attempting to avoid an over-voltage fault. The integral channel acts as the acceleration or deceleration rate and is fed to the frequency ramp integrator. The proportional term is added directly to the output of the frequency ramp integrator to form the output frequency. The output frequency is then limited to a maximum output frequency.

Bus Regulation

2-29

Bus voltage regulation is the highest priority of the three components of this controller because minimal drive current will result when limiting the bus voltage and therefore, current limit will not occur.

!

ATTENTION: The “adjust freq” portion of the bus regulator function is extremely useful for preventing nuisance overvoltage faults resulting from aggressive decelerations, overhauling loads, and eccentric loads. It forces the output frequency to be greater than commanded frequency while the drive's bus voltage is increasing towards levels that would otherwise cause a fault; however, it can also cause either of the following two conditions to occur.

1. Fast positive changes in input voltage (more than a 10% increase within 6 minutes) can cause uncommanded positive speed changes; however an “OverSpeed Limit” fault will occur if the speed reaches [Max Speed] + [Overspeed Limit]. If this condition is unacceptable, action should be taken to 1) limit supply voltages within the specification of the drive and, 2) limit fast positive input voltage changes to less than 10%. Without taking such actions, if this operation is unacceptable, the “adjust freq” portion of the bus regulator function must be disabled (see parameters 161 and 162).

2. Actual deceleration times can be longer than commanded deceleration times; however, a “Decel Inhibit” fault is generated if the drive stops decelerating altogether. If this condition is unacceptable, the “adjust freq” portion of the bus regulator must be disabled (see parameters 161 and 162). In addition, installing a properly sized dynamic brake resistor will provide equal or better performance in most cases.

Note: These faults are not instantaneous and have shown test results that take between 2 and 12 seconds to occur.

2-30

Cable, Control

Cable, Control

Cable Entry Plate

Removal

PowerFlex 70

In PowerFlex 70, the user selects the bus voltage regulator using the [Bus

Reg Mode A] and [Bus Reg Mode B] parameters. The available modes include “Disabled,” “Adjust Freq,” and “Dynamic brak.” The bus voltage regulator is never active with the internal dynamic braking function.

The bus voltage regulation set point Vreg in PowerFlex 70 is fixed for each voltage class of drive. The bus voltage regulation set points are identical to the internal dynamic brake regulation set points V

DB’s

and are shown in

Table 2.E

.

Table 2.E PowerFlex 70 Bus Voltage Regulation Set Points (Vreg)

200/240 V Class Drive 400 V Class Drive 480 V Class Drive 600 V Class

V reg

377 VDC 750 VDC 750 VDC –

The nature of this control is to increase the magnitude of the drive’s output frequency to reduce or eliminate regeneration and avoid an over-voltage fault. The increase in output frequency may increase the operating voltage.

The magnitude increase in frequency when bus regulation is active is limited to the sum of [Maximum Speed] and [Overspeed Limit]. When this frequency limit is met, the output frequency will be clamped and an over-voltage fault occurs if regeneration continues to increase the bus voltage.

PowerFlex 700

PowerFlex 700 allows the user to simultaneously enable both internal dynamic braking and the bus voltage regulator. There are two bus voltage regulation set point parameters, [Bus Reg Mode A] and [Bus Reg Mode B] in the PowerFlex 700 (See

Table 2.F

). The user can select which bus

regulation set point is active by configuring one of the digital inputs as a selector.

Table 2.F PowerFlex 700 Dynamic Braking and Bus Voltage Limit References

V db

Bus Reg 1

Bus Reg 2

200/240 V Class Drive 400 V Class Drive 480 V Class Drive 600 V Class

377 VDC 750 VDC 750 VDC –

358 – 392 VDC 715 – 785 VDC 715 – 785 VDC –

The nature of this control, like PowerFlex 70, is to increase the magnitude of the drive’s output frequency to reduce or eliminate regeneration and avoid a bus over-voltage fault. The increase in the output frequency may increase the operating voltage. PowerFlex 700 internally limits the magnitude of output frequency to the sum of Maximum Speed and

Overspeed Limit.

See

Cable Selection on page 2-15 and

Cable Selection on page 2-46

.

If additional wiring access is needed, the Cable Entry Plate on 0-3 Frame drives can be removed. Simply loosen the screws securing the plate to the chassis. The slotted mounting holes assure easy removal.

Cable, Motor Lengths

2-31

Cable, Motor Lengths

The length of cable between the drive and motor may be limited by various application parameters. The 2 primary areas of concern are Reflected Wave and Cable charging.

The Reflected Wave phenomenon, also known as transmission line effect, produces very high peak voltages on the motor due to voltage reflection.

While Allen-Bradley drives have patented software that limits the voltage peak to 2 times the DC bus voltage and reduce the number of occurrences, many motors have inadequate insulation systems to tolerate these peaks.

See

Reflected Wave on page 2-127 for more details.

Refer to

Figure 2.3

for measuring cable lengths when concerned about

Reflected Wave. Each individual motor must be considered based on the lead length for that motor only. Diagram A shows 2 motors, each 300 feet from the drive. Motor protection decisions are based on 300 feet cable length (not 600 ft). If the motors need protection at this distance, then both motors must be dealt with individually. Diagram B shows 1 motor at 50 feet and one at 550 feet. It is likely that the motor that is close to the drive (50

Ft) will not need protection, but the motor farther from the drive (550 Ft) may. Again, each motor must be considered individually based on its distance from the drive.

Cable charging occurs because of the capacitance, phase-to-phase or phase-to-ground, inherent in the length of cable. The current that is used to charge the cable capacitance detracts from the overall current capability of the drive and reduces the availability of torque producing current for the motor. This can result in poor motor performance, motor stalls under full load and nuisance drive overcurrent tripping.

Refer to

Figure 2.3

for measuring cable lengths when concerned about

cable charging. In this case, it is the total amount of cable connected to the drive that must be considered. Diagram A shows 2 motors, each 300 feet from the drive. The drive must be capable of supplying enough current to charge the total length (600 ft) plus the needed current to produce necessary torque in the motors. If the motors will not receive the desired current due to cable charging, then the drive size should be increased to supply needed current. Diagram B shows 1 motor at 50 feet and one at 550 feet. Again, the drive must be capable of supplying enough current to charge the total length

(600 ft), plus the needed current to produce necessary torque in the motors.

In fact, diagrams A, B, C and D will all require the same cable charging installation guidelines because they all have total cable lengths of 600 feet.

2-32

Cable, Motor Lengths

A

Figure 2.3 How to Measure Motor Cable Lengths Limited by Capacitance

B C D

91.4 (300)

91.4 (300)

15.2 (50)

167.6 (550) 182.9 (600)

15.2 (50)

152.4 (500)

15.2 (50)

All examples represent motor cable length of 182.9 meters (600 feet).

Cable, Power

Cable, Power

2-33

!

ATTENTION: National Codes and standards (NEC, VDE, BSI etc.) and local codes outline provisions for safely installing electrical equipment. Installation must comply with specifications regarding wire types, conductor sizes, branch circuit protection and disconnect devices. Failure to do so may result in personal injury and/or equipment damage.

A variety of cable types are acceptable for drive installations. For many installations, unshielded cable is adequate, provided it can be separated from sensitive circuits. As an approximate guide, allow a spacing of 0.3

meters (1 foot) for every 10 meters (32.8 feet) of length. In all cases, long parallel runs must be avoided. Do not use cable with an insulation thickness less than or equal to 15 mils (0.4 mm/0.015 in.).

Shielded/Armored

Shielded cable is recommended if sensitive circuits or devices are connected or mounted to the machinery driven by the motor.

Figure 2.4 Recommended Power Wire

Location

Standard

(Option 1)

Standard

(Option 2)

Class I & II;

Division I & II

Rating/Type

600V, 90

°

C (194

°

F)

XHHW2/RHW-2

Anixter

B209500-B209507,

Belden 29501-29507, or equivalent

Tray rated 600V, 90

°

C

(194

°

F) RHH/RHW-2

Anixter OLF-7xxxxx or equivalent

Tray rated 600V, 90

°

C

(194

°

F) RHH/RHW-2

Anixter 7V-7xxxx-3G or equivalent

Description

Four tinned copper conductors with XLP insulation.

Copper braid/aluminum foil combination shield and tinned copper drain wire.

PVC jacket.

Three tinned copper conductors with XLPE insulation.

5 mil single helical copper tape (25% overlap min.) with three bare copper grounds in contact with shield.

PVC jacket.

Three bare copper conductors with XLPE insulation and impervious corrugated continuously welded aluminum armor.

Black sunlight resistant PVC jacket overall.

Three copper grounds on #10 AWG and smaller.

Based on field and internal testing, Rockwell Automation/Allen-Bradley has determined conductors manufactured with Poly Vinyl Chloride (PVC) wire insulation are subject to a variety of manufacturing inconsistencies which can lead to premature insulation degradation when used with IGBT drives that produce the reflected wave phenomena. Flame-retardant heat-resistant thermoplastic insulation is the type of insulation listed in the

NEC code for the THHN wire designation. This type of insulation is commonly referred to as PVC. In addition to manufacturing inconsistencies, the physical properties of the cable can change due to environment, installation and operation, which can also lead to premature insulation degradation. The following is a summary of our findings:

2-34

Cable, Power

Manufacturing Inconsistencies and their Effects on Cable Life

Due to manufacturing inconsistencies, the following conditions can exist:

PVC insulation material may have a dielectric constant ranging between

4 and 8 depending on the manufacturer. The higher the dielectric constant, the lower the dielectric strength (and voltage withstand to transients). A single IGBT drive output may have reflected wave transient voltage stresses of up to twice (2 per unit) the DC bus voltage between its own output wires. Multiple drive output wires in a single conduit or wire tray further increase output wire voltage stress between multi-drive output wires that are touching. Drive #1 may have a (+) 2 pu stress while drive #2 may simultaneously have a (–) 2 pu stress. Wires with dielectric constants (>4) cause the voltage stress to shift to the air gap between the wires that are barely touching. This electric field may be high enough to ionize the air surrounding the wire insulation and cause a partial discharge mechanism (corona) to occur. The electric field distribution between wires increases the possibility for corona which further produces ozone. This attacks the PVC insulation and produces carbon tracking, leading to the susceptibility of insulation breakdown.

Due to inconsistencies in manufacturing processes or wire pulling, air voids can also occur in the THHN wire between the nylon jacket and

PVC insulation. Because the dielectric constant of air is much lower than the dielectric constant of the insulating material, the transient reflected wave voltage may appear across the small air void capacitance. The

Corona Inception Voltage (CIV) for the air void may be reached which further produces ozone, which attacks the PVC insulation and produces carbon tracking, leading to the susceptibility of insulation breakdown as in the above case.

Asymmetrical construction of the insulation has also been observed for some manufacturers of PVC wire. A wire with a 15 mil specification was observed to have an insulation thickness of 10 mil at some points. The smaller the insulation thickness, the less voltage the wire can withstand.

Cable, Power

2-35

Installation, Operation and Environmental Considerations

THHN jacket material has a relatively brittle nylon that lends itself to damage (i.e. nicks and cuts) when pulled through conduit on long wire runs. This issue is of even greater concern when the wire is being pulled through multiple 90 degree bends in the conduit. It is these nicks that may be a starting point for corona that leads to insulation degradation.

During operation, the conductor heats up and a “coldflow” condition may occur with PVC insulation at points where the unsupported weight of the wire may stretch the insulation. This has been observed at right angle bends where wire is dropped down to equipment from an above wireway. This “coldflow” condition produces thin spots in the insulation which lowers the cable’s voltage withstand capability.

The NEC 1996 code defines “dry, damp and wet” locations (7-31) and permits the use of heat-resistant thermoplastic wire in both dry and damp applications (Table 310-13). However, PVC insulation material is more susceptible to absorbing moisture than XLPE (Cross Linked

Polyethylene) insulation material (XHHN-2) identified for use in wet locations. Because the PVC insulating material absorbs moisture, the

Corona Inception Voltage insulation capability of the “damp” or “wet”

THHN was found to be less than 1/2 of the same wire when “dry”. For this reason, certain industries where water is prevalent in the environment have refrained from using THHN wire with IGBT drives.

Cable Recommendations for New & Existing Installations of IGBT Drives in Wet

Locations

Belden YR41709 cable is a PVC jacketed, shielded type TC with XLPE conductor insulation designed to meet NEC code designation XHHW-2

(wet locations per NEC 1996, Table 310-13). Based on Rockwell

Automation research, tests have determined the Belden YR41709 is notably superior to loose wires in dry, damp and wet applications and can significantly reduce capacitive coupling and common mode noise.

Other cable types for wet locations include those in the table above

Figure 2.5

summarizes the previous considerations and explanations.

Because applications can vary widely, the information in the flowchart is intended to be used only as a guideline in the decision-making process.

2-36

Cable, Standard I/O

Figure 2.5 Wire Selection Flowchart

Selecting Wire to Withstand Reflected Wave Voltage for New and Existing Wire Installations in Conduit or Cable Trays

PVC

Conductor

Insulation

DRY

(Per NEC 7-31)

Conductor

Environment

230V

Insulation

Thickness

15 mil

400/460V

20 mil or > (1)

RWR or

Terminator

Reflected Wave

Reducer?

No RWR or

Terminator

Cable

Length

< 50 ft.

Single Drive,

Single Conduit or Wire Tray

> 50 ft.

# of

Drives in Same

Conduit or Wire

Tray

Multiple Drives in Single Conduit or Wire Tray

15 mil PVC

Not

Recommended

USE XLPE or > 20 mil

XLPE

WET

(Per NEC code Table 7-31)

575V

Reflected Wave

Reducer?

No RWR or Terminator

15 mil PVC

Not

Recommended

USE XLPE or > 20 mil

RWR or

Terminator

OK for < 600V AC

System

No RWR or

Terminator required

XLPE (XHHW-2)

Insulation for

<600V AC

System

No RWR or

Terminator

Required

(1) The mimimum wire size for PVC cable with 20 mil or greater insulation is 10 gauge.

See NEC Guidelines

(70-196 Adjustment Factors) for

Maximum Conductor Derating &

Maximum Wires in Conduit or Tray

Cable, Standard I/O

Refer to

Cable Selection on page 2-15 and

Cable Selection on page 2-46 .

CabIe Trays and

Conduit

Important: Because of the nature of the drive PWM output and the reflected wave phenomenon, it is preferable to have each set of drive motor/power cables in an individual conduit. If this is not possible, it is important that the allowable fill rates specified in the applicable national or local codes NOT BE Exceeded.

!

ATTENTION: To avoid a possible shock hazard caused by induced voltages, unused wires in the conduit must be grounded at both ends. For the same reason, if a drive sharing a conduit is being serviced or installed, all drives using this conduit should be disabled. This will help minimize the possible shock hazard from

“cross coupled” motor leads.

Carrier (PWM)

Frequency

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

CE Conformity

CE Conformity

2-37

EMC Instructions

CE Conformity

Conformity with the Low Voltage (LV) Directive and Electromagnetic

Compatibility (EMC) Directive has been demonstrated using harmonized

European Norm (EN) standards published in the Official Journal of the

European Communities. PowerFlex Drives comply with the EN standards listed below when installed according to the User Manual.

CE Declarations of Conformity are available online at:

http://www.ab.com/certification/ce/docs .

Low Voltage Directive (73/23/EEC)

EN50178 Electronic equipment for use in power installations.

EN60204-1 Safety of machinery – Electrical equipment of machines.

EMC Directive (89/336/EEC)

EN61800-3 Adjustable speed electrical power drive systems Part 3:

EMC product standard including specific test methods.

General Notes

If the adhesive label is removed from the top of the drive, the drive must be installed in an enclosure with side openings less than 12.5 mm (0.5

in.) and top openings less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.) to maintain compliance with the LV Directive.

The motor cable should be kept as short as possible in order to avoid electromagnetic emission as well as capacitive currents.

Use of line filters in ungrounded systems is not recommended.

PowerFlex drives may cause radio frequency interference if used in a residential or domestic environment. The user is required to take measures to prevent interference, in addition to the essential requirements for CE compliance listed below, if necessary.

Conformity of the drive with CE EMC requirements does not guarantee an entire machine or installation complies with CE EMC requirements.

Many factors can influence total machine/installation compliance.

Essential Requirements for CE Compliance

Conditions 1-4 listed below must be satisfied for PowerFlex drives to meet the requirements of EN61800-3.

1. Standard PowerFlex CE compatible Drive.

2. Grounding as described on

page 2-86 .

3. Output power, control (I/O) and signal wiring must be braided, shielded cable with a coverage of 75% or better, metal conduit or equivalent attenuation.

4. Conditions in the appropriate table (

2.G

, 2.H

or 2.I

).

2-38

CE Conformity

Table 2.G PowerFlex 70 – EN61800-3 First Environment Restricted Distribution

Frame Drive Description

A Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

B

C

Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Drive Only

D

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Restrict Motor

Cable to

12 m (40 ft.)

Restrict Motor

Cable to

40 m (131 ft.)

Internal

Filter

Option

External

Filter

Comm

Cable

Ferrite

(1)

Common

Mode

Core

(2)

(1)

(2)

Two turns of the blue comm option cable through a Ferrite Core (Fair-Rite #2643102002 or equivalent).

Refer to the 1321 Reactor and Isolation Transformer Technical Data publication, 1321-TD001x for 1321-Mxxx selection information.

Table 2.H PowerFlex 70 – EN61800-3 Second Environment

Frame Drive Description

A Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

B

C

Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Drive Only

D

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Drive Only

Drive with DeviceNet

Drive with Remote I/O

Restrict Motor

Cable to

12 m (40 ft.)

Restrict Motor

Cable to

40 m (131 ft.)

Internal

Filter

Option

External

Filter

Comm

Cable

Ferrite

Common

Mode

Core

Table 2.I PowerFlex 700 EN61800-3 EMC Compatibility

1

2

Frame

0

3

Second Environment

Restrict Motor Cable to 30 m (98 ft.)

Any Drive and Option

First Environment Restricted Distribution

Restrict Motor Cable to 150 m (492 ft.)

Any Drive and Option External Filter Required

(1)

✔ ✔

(1)

Select the Roxburgh filter (or equivalent) that meets your specifications from the list below. Refer to: http://

www.deltron-emcon.com for detailed filter information.

Filter Part No.

Current

MIF306

MIF310

MIF316

MIF323

MIF330

6A

10A

16A

23A

30A

Filter Part No.

Current

MIF350 50A

MIF375

MIF3100

MIF3150

75A

100A

150A

Copy Cat

Copy Cat

2-39

Some PowerFlex drives have a feature called Copy Cat, which allows the user to upload a complete set of parameters to the LCD HIM. This information can then be used as backup or can be transferred to another drive by downloading the memory.

Generally, the transfer process manages all conflicts. If a parameter from

HIM memory does not exist in the target drive, if the value stored is out of range for the drive or the parameter cannot be downloaded because the drive is running, the download will stop and a text message will be issued. The user than has the option of completely stopping the download or continuing after noting the discrepancy for the parameter that could not be downloaded. These parameters can then be adjusted manually.

The LCD HIM will store a number of parameter sets (memory dependant) and each individual set can be named for clarity.

2-40

Current Limit

Current Limit

[Current Lmt Sel]

[Current Lmt Val]

[Current Lmt Gain]

There are 6 ways that the drive can protect itself from overcurrent or overload situations:

Instantaneous Overcurrent trip

Software Instantaneous Trip

Software Current Limit

Overload Protection IT

Heatsink temperature protection

Thermal Manager

A. Instantaneous Overcurrent - This is a feature that instantaneously trips or faults the drive if the output current exceeds this value. The value is fixed by hardware and is typically 250% of drive rated amps. The Fault code for this feature is F12 “HW Overcurrent.” This feature cannot be defeated or mitigated.

B. Software Instantaneous Trip - If it is determined that the hardware overcurrent levels are too high for certain drives (below certain output frequencies), an additional software overcurrent trip is invoked. When the drive is being operated below the given frequency (fixed and stored in drive memory) the software overcurrent trip level is set to a value less than the hardware overcurrent level. This offers additional protection to drives running at very low output frequencies, if needed. If the reduced current limit level is exceeded, an F36 “SW Overcurrent” fault is generated.

C. Software Current Limit - This is a software feature that selectively faults the drive or attempts to reduce current by folding back output voltage and frequency if the output current exceeds this value. The [Current Lmt

Val] parameter is programmable between approximately 25% and 150% of drive rating. The reaction to exceeding this value is programmable with [Shear Pin Fault]. Enabling this parameter creates an F63 “Shear

Pin Fault.” Disabling this parameter causes the drive to use Volts/Hz fold back to try and reduce load.

The frequency adjust or fold back operation consists of two modes. In the primary mode of current limit operation, motor phase current is sampled and compared to the Current Limit setting in the [Current Lmt

Val]. If a current “error” exists, error is scaled by an integral gain and fed to the integrator. The output of this integrator is summed with the proportional term and the active speed mode component to adjust the output frequency and the commanded voltage. The second mode of current limit operation is invoked when a frequency limit has been reached and current limit continues to be active. At this point, a current regulator is activated to adjust the output voltage to limit the current.

When the current limit condition ceases or the output voltage of the current regulator attempts to exceed the open loop voltage commands, control is transferred to the primary current limit mode or normal ramp operation.

Current Limit

2-41

D. Overload Protection I2T - This is a software feature that monitors the output current over time and integrates per IT. The base protection is

110% for 1 minute or the equivalent I2T value (i.e. 150% for 3 seconds, etc.). If the IT integrates to maximum, an F64 “Drive Overload” fault will occur. The approximate integrated value can be monitored via the

[Drive OL Count] parameter.

E. Heatsink Temperature Protection - The drive constantly monitors the heatsink temperature. If the temperature exceeds the drive maximum, a

“Heatsink OvrTemp” fault will occur. The value is fixed by hardware at a nominal value of 100 degrees C. This fault is generally not used for overcurrent protection due to the thermal time constant of the heatsink. It is an overload protection.

F. Thermal manager (see

Drive Overload on page 2-71 ).

2-42

Datalinks

Datalinks

Programmable

Controller

I/O Image Table

Output Image

Block Transfer

Logic Command

Analog Reference

WORD 3

WORD 4

WORD 5

WORD 6

WORD 7

Input Image

Block Transfer

Logic Status

Analog Feedback

WORD 3

WORD 4

WORD 5

WORD 6

WORD 7

A Datalink is one of the mechanisms used by PowerFlex drives to transfer data to and from a programmable controller. Datalinks allow a parameter value to be changed without using an Explicit Message or Block Transfer.

Datalinks consist of a pair of parameters that can be used independently for

16 bit transfers or in conjunction for 32 bit transfers. Because each Datalink consists of a pair of parameters, when enabled, each Datalink occupies two

16 or 32-bit words in both the input and output image tables, depending on configuration. A user enters a parameter number into the Datalink parameter. The value that is in the corresponding output data table word in the controller is then transferred to the parameter whose number has been placed in the Datalink parameter. The following example demonstrates this concept. The object of the example is to change Accel and Decel times “on the fly” under PLC control.

The user makes the following PowerFlex drive parameter settings:

Parameter 300 [Data In A1] = 140 (the parameter number of [Accel Time 1]

Parameter 301 [Data In A2] = 142 (the parameter number of [Decel Time 1]

Remote I/O

Communication

Module

Adjustable Frequency

AC Drive

Datalink A

Datalink A

Parameter/Number

Data In A1

Data In A2

300

301

Data Out A1

Data Out A2

310

311

In the PLC data Table, the user enters Word 3 as a value of 100 (10.0 Secs) and word 4 as a value of 133 (13.3 seconds). On each I/O scan, the parameters in the PowerFlex drive are updated with the value from the data table:

Accel Time P140 = 10.0 seconds (value from output image table Word 3)

Decel Time P142 = 13.3 seconds (value from output image table Word 4).

Any time these values need to be changed, the new values are entered into the data table, and the parameters are updated on the next PLC I/O scan.

Datalinks

2-43

Rules for Using Datalinks

1. 1. A Datalink consists of 4 words, 2 for Datalink x IN and 2 for Datalink x Out. They cannot be separated or turned on individually.

2. Only one communications adapter can use each set of Datalink parameters in a PowerFlex drive. If more than one communications adapter is connected to a single drive, multiple adapters must not try to use the same Datalink.

3. Parameter settings in the drive determine the data passed through the

Datalink mechanism

4. When you use a Datalink to change a value, the value is not written to the Non-Volatile Storage (EEprom memory). The value is stored in volatile memory (RAM) and lost when the drive loses power.

32-Bit Parameters using 16-Bit Datalinks

To read (and/or write) a 32-bit parameter using 16-bit Datalinks, typically both Datalinks (A,B,C,D) are set to the 32-bit parameter. For example, to read Parameter 09 - [Elapsed MWh], both Datalink A1 and A2 are set to

“9.” Datalink A1 will contain the least significant word (LSW) and Datalink

A2 the most significant word (MSW). In this example, the parameter 9 value of 5.8MWh is read as a “58” in Datalink A1

Datalink

A1

A2

Most/Least Significant Word Parameter

LSW 9

MSW 9

Data(decimal)

58

0

Regardless of the Datalink combination, x1 will always contain the LSW and x2 will always contain the MSW.

In the following examples Parameter 242 - [Power Up Marker] contains a value of 88.4541 hours.

Datalink

A1

A2

Most/Least Significant Word Parameter

LSW 242

-Not Used0

Data(decimal)

32573

0

Datalink

A1

A2

Most/Least Significant Word Parameter

-Not Used0

MSW 242

Data(decimal)

0

13

Even if non-consecutive Datalinks are used (in the next example, Datalinks

A1 and B2 would not be used), data is still returned in the same way.

Datalink

A2

B1

Most/Least Significant Word Parameter

MSW 242

LSW 242

Data(decimal)

13

32573

32-bit data is stored in binary as follows:

MSW 2

31

through 2

16

LSW 2

15

through 2

0

Example

Parameter 242 - [Power Up Marker] = 88.4541 hours

MSW = 13 decimal

= 1101 binary

= 2

16

+ 2

18

+ 2

19

= 851968

LSW = 32573

851968 + 32573 = 884541

2-44

DC Bus Voltage / Memory

DC Bus Voltage /

Memory

A measure of the instantaneous value or “nominal” bus voltage determined by heavily filtering bus voltage. Just after the pre-charge relay is closed during the initial power-up bus pre-charge, bus memory is set equal to bus voltage. Thereafter it is updated by ramping at a very slow rate toward

Vbus. The filtered value ramps at approximately 2.4V DC per minute (for a

480V AC drive). An increase in DC Bus memory is blocked during deceleration to prevent a false high value due to the bus being pumped up by regeneration. Any change to DC Bus memory is blocked during inertia ride through.

Decel Time

Decel Time

2-45

[Decel Time 1, 2]

Sets the rate at which the drive ramps down its output frequency after a Stop command or during a decrease in command frequency (speed change). The rate established is the result of the programmed Decel Time and the

Minimum and Maximum Frequency, as follows:

Maximum Frequency – Minimum Frequency

Decel Time

= Decel Rate

Two Decel times exist to allow the user to change rates “on the fly” via PLC command or Digital Input. The selection is made using the 1st/2nd Decel inputs shown below or a similar pattern of decel time select bits in the Logic

Control word used via PLC communications.

Times are adjustable in 0.1 second increments from 0.0 seconds to 3600.0

seconds.

In its factory default condition, when no Decel select inputs are closed and no time bits are “1,” the default deceleration time is [Decel Time 1] and the rate is determined as above.

2-46

Digital Inputs

Digital Inputs

Cable Selection

Important points to remember about I/O wiring:

Always use copper wire.

Wire with an insulation rating of 600V or greater is recommended.

Control and signal wires should be separated from power wires by at least 0.3 meters (1 foot).

Table 2.J Recommended Control Wire for Digital I/O

Type

Shielded

Wire Type(s)

Unshielded Per US NEC or applicable national or local code

Multi-conductor shielded cable such as Belden 8770(or equiv.)

Description

0.750 mm

2

(18AWG), 3 conductor, shielded.

Minimum

Insulation Rating

300V, 60 degrees C

(140 degrees F)

Wiring Examples

See

page 2-17 .

There are 6 digital (discrete) inputs (numbered 1 through 6) available at the terminal block.

PowerFlex 70

Each digital input has a maximum response/pass through/function execution time of 25ms. For example, no more than 25ms should elapse from the time the level changes at the Start input to the time voltage is applied to the motor.

There is both hardware and software filtering on these inputs. The hardware provides an average delay of 12ms from the time the level changes at the input to the earliest time that the software can detect the change. The actual time can vary between boards from 7 to 17ms, but any particular board should be consistent to within 1% of its average value. The amount of software filtering is not alterable by the user.

PowerFlex 700

Each digital input has a maximum response/pass through/function execution time of 25ms. This means that, for example, no more than 25ms should elapse from the time the level changes at the Start input to the time voltage is applied to the motor.

Digital Input Configuration

Inputs are configured for the required function by setting a [Digital Inx Sel] parameter (one for each input). These parameters cannot be changed while the drive is running.

Digital Inputs

2-47

361

[Digital In1 Sel]

Default: 4

362

363

364

365

366

[Digital In2 Sel]

[Digital In3 Sel]

[Digital In4 Sel]

[Digital In5 Sel]

[Digital In6 Sel]

Selects the function for the digital inputs.

(1)

When [Digital Inx Sel] is set to option 2

“Clear Faults” the Stop button cannot be used to clear a fault condition.

(2)

Typical 3-Wire Inputs.

Requires that only 3-wire functions are chosen. Including 2-wire selections will cause a type 2 alarm.

(3)

Typical 2-Wire Inputs.

Requires that only 2-wire functions are chosen. Including 3-wire selections will cause a type 2 alarm.

(4)

Speed Select Inputs.

Default:

Default:

Default:

Default:

Default:

Options:

3 2 1 Auto Reference Source

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

Reference A

Reference B

Preset Speed 2

Preset Speed 3

Preset Speed 4

Preset Speed 5

Preset Speed 6

Preset Speed 7

To access Preset Speed 1, set [Speed

Ref A Sel] or [Speed Ref B Sel] to

“Preset Speed 1”.

Type 2 Alarms

Some digital input programming may cause conflicts that will result in a Type

2 alarm. For example, [Digital In1 Sel] set to 5 “Start” in 3-wire control and

[Digital In2 Sel] set to 7 “Run” in 2-wire control.

Refer to Alarm Descriptions on page 4-8 for information on resolving this type of conflict.

(5)

Auto/Manual - Refer to Figure 1.6 on page 1-13 for details.

27

28

29

30

23

24

25

26

19

20

21

22

15

16

17

18

11

12

13

14

7

8

9

10

5

6

3

4

0

1

2

5

10

15

16

17

“Stop – CF”

(CF = Clear Fault)

“Start”

“Jog”

“Speed Sel 1”

“Speed Sel 2”

“Speed Sel 3”

“Not Used”

“Enable”

“Clear Faults”

(1)

“Aux Fault’

“Stop – CF”

(2)

“Start”

(2)

“Fwd/ Reverse”

(2)

“Run”

(3)

“Run Forward”

(3)

(3)

“Run Reverse”

“Jog”

(2)

“Jog Forward”

“Jog Reverse”

“Stop Mode B”

“Bus Reg Md B”

“Speed Sel 1”

(4)

“Speed Sel 2”

(4)

“Speed Sel 3”

(4)

“Auto/ Manual”

(5)

“Local”

“Acc2 & Dec2”

“Accel 2”

“Decel 2”

“MOP Inc”

“MOP Dec”

“Excl Link”

“PI Enable”

“PI Hold”

“PI Reset”

“Pwr Loss Lvl”

“Precharge En”

100

156

162

096

140

194

380

124

The available functions are defined in

Table 2.K

.

2-48

Digital Inputs

Table 2.K Digital Input Function List

Input Function Name

Stop - CF

Run Forward

Run Reverse

Run

Start

Forward/Reverse

Jog

Jog Forward

Jog Reverse

Speed Select 3

Speed Select 2

Speed Select 1

Auto/Manual

Purpose

Stop drive

Clear Faults (open to closed transition)

Run in forward direction (2-wire start mode)

Run in reverse direction (2-wire start mode)

Run in current direction (2-wire start mode)

Start drive (3-wire start mode)

Set drive direction (3-wire mode only)

Jog drive

Jog in forward direction

Jog in reverse direction

Select which Speed reference the drive uses.

Accel 2

Decel 2

Accel 2 & Decel 2

MOP Increment

MOP Decrement

Stop Mode B

Bus Regulation Mode B

PI Enable

PI Hold

PI Reset

Auxiliary Fault

Local Control

Allows terminal block to assume complete control of Speed

Reference.

Select acceleration rate 1 or 2.

Select deceleration rate 1 or 2.

Select acceleration rate 1 and deceleration rate 1 or acceleration rate 2 and deceleration rate 2.

Increment MOP (Motor Operated Pot Function Speed ref)

Decrement MOP (Motor Operated Pot Function Speed ref)

Select Stop Mode A (open) or B (closed)

Select which bus regulation mode to use

Enable Process PI loop.

Hold integrator for Process PI loop at current value.

Clamp integrator for Process PI loop to 0.

Open to cause “auxiliary fault” (external string).

Allows terminal block to assume complete control of drive logic.

Clear Faults

Enable

Clear faults and return drive to ready status.

Open input causes drive to coast to stop, disallows start.

Exclusive Link Exclusive Link – digital input is routed through to digital output, no other use.

Power Loss Level (PowerFlex 700 only) Selects between using fixed value for power loss level and getting the level from a parameter

Precharge Enable (PowerFlex 700 only) If common bus configuration, denotes whether drive is disconnected from DC bus or not. Controls precharge sequence on reconnection to bus.

Input Function Detailed Descriptions

Stop - Clear Faults

An open input will cause the drive to stop and become “not ready”. A closed input will allow the drive to run.

If “Start” is configured, then “Stop - Clear Faults” must also be configured. Otherwise, a digital input configuration alarm will occur.

“Stop - Clear Faults” is optional in all other circumstances.

An open to closed transition is interpreted as a Clear Faults request. The drive will clear any existing faults. The terminal block bit must be set in the [Fault Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to clear faults using this input function.

Digital Inputs

2-49

If the “Clear Faults” input function is configured at the same time as

“Stop - Clear Faults”, then it will not be possible to reset faults with the

“Stop - Clear Faults” input.

Run Forward, Run Reverse

An open to closed transition on one input or both inputs while drive is stopped will cause the drive to run unless the “Stop - Clear Faults” input function is configured and open.

The table below describes the basic action taken by the drive in response to particular states of these input functions.

Run Forward Run Reverse Action

Open Open Drive stops, terminal block relinquishes direction ownership.

Open Closed

Closed Open

Drive runs in reverse direction, terminal block takes direction ownership.

Drive runs in forward direction, terminal block takes direction ownership.

Closed Closed Drive continues to run in current direction, but terminal block maintains direction ownership.

If one of these input functions is configured and the other one isn’t, the above description still applies, but the unconfigured input function should be considered permanently open.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Start Mask], [Direction Mask], and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to start or change the direction of the drive using these inputs.

Important: Direction control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function (see

Owners). This means that only one control device (terminal block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed to control direction at a time. The terminal block must become direction “owner” before it can be used to control direction.

If another device is currently the direction owner (as indicated by [Direction Owner]), it will not be possible to

start the drive or change direction by using the terminal block digital inputs programmed for both Run and

Direction control (i.e. Run/Fwd).

If one or both of these input functions is configured, it will not be possible to start or jog the drive from any other control device. This is true irrespective of the state of the [Start Mask], [Direction Mask], and

[Logic Mask] parameters.

Run

An open to closed transition on this input while drive is stopped will cause the drive to run in the currently selected direction unless the “Stop

- Clear Faults” input function is configured and open.

If this input is open, then the drive will stop.

2-50

Digital Inputs

The purpose of this input function is to allow a 2-wire start while the direction is being controlled by some other means.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Start Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to start the drive using this input.

If the “Run” input function is configured, it will not be possible to start or jog the drive from any other control device. This is true irrespective of the state of the [Start Mask], [Direction Mask], and [Logic Mask] parameters.

The Effects of 2-Wire Start Modes on Other DPI Devices

The “Run/Stop” and “Run Fwd/Rev” start modes are also called

“2-wire” start modes, because they allow the drive to be started and stopped with only a single input and two wires. When a “2-wire” terminal block start mode is put into effect by the user, the drive can no longer be started or jogged from any other control device (i.e. HIM, network card, etc.). This restriction persists as long as one or more of

“Run”, “Run Forward”, and “Run Reverse” are configured. This is true even if the configuration is otherwise illegal and causes a configuration alarm.

Start

An open to closed transition while the drive is stopped will cause the drive to run in the current direction, unless the “Stop – Clear Faults” input function is open.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Start Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to start or change the direction of the drive using these inputs.

If “Start” is configured, then “Stop - Clear Faults” must also be configured.

Forward/Reverse

This function is one of the ways to provide direction control when the

Start / Stop / Run functions of the drive are configured as 3 – wire control.

An open input sets direction to forward. A closed input sets direction to reverse. If state of input changes and drive is running or jogging, drive will change direction.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Direction Mask] and [Logic

Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to select the direction of the drive using this input function.

Important: Direction control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function (see

Owners). This means that only one control device (terminal block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed to control direction at a time. The terminal block must become

Digital Inputs

2-51

direction “owner” before it can be used to control direction.

If another device is currently the direction owner (as indicated by [Direction Owner]), it will not be possible to

start the drive or change direction by using the terminal block digital inputs programmed for both Run and

Direction control (i.e. Run/Fwd).

Important:

Because an open condition (or unwired condition) commands Forward, the terminal block seeks direction ownership as soon as this input function is configured, which may happen at power-up. In order for the terminal block to actually gain ownership, the masks must be set up correctly (see above) and no other device can currently have direction ownership. Once the terminal block gains direction ownership, it will retain it until shutdown, until the [Direction Mask] or [Logic Mask] bits for the terminal block are cleared, or until this input function is no longer configured

Jog

Jog is essentially a non-latched “run/start” command. An open to closed transition while drive is stopped causes drive to start (jog) in the current direction. When the input opens while drive is running (jogging), the drive will stop.

The drive will not jog while running or while the “Stop - Clear Faults” input is open. Start has precedence.

!

ATTENTION: If a normal drive start command is received while the drive is jogging, the drive will switch from jog mode to run mode. The drive will not stop, but may change speed and/or change direction.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Jog Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to cause the drive to jog using this input function.

Jog Forward, Jog Reverse

An open to closed transition on one input or both inputs while drive is stopped will cause the drive to jog unless the “Stop - Clear Faults” input function is configured and open. The table below describes the actions taken by the drive in response to various states of these input functions.

Jog Forward Jog Reverse Action

Open Open Drive will stop if already jogging, but can be started by other means. Terminal block relinquishes direction ownership.

Open Closed

Closed Open

Drive jogs in reverse direction. Terminal block takes direction ownership.

Drive jogs in forward direction. Terminal block takes direction ownership.

Closed Closed Drive continues to jog in current direction, but terminal block maintains direction ownership.

2-52

Digital Inputs

If one of these input functions is configured and the other one isn’t, the above description still applies, but the unconfigured input function should be considered permanently open.

The drive will not jog while drive is running or while “Stop - Clear

Faults” input is open. Start has precedence

.

!

ATTENTION: If a normal drive start command is received while the drive is jogging, the drive will switch from jog mode to run mode. The drive will not stop, but may change speed and/or change direction.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Jog Mask], [Direction Mask], and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the terminal block to cause the drive to jog using these input functions.

Important: Direction control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function (see

Owners). This means that only one control device (terminal block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed to control direction at a time. The terminal block must become direction “owner” before it can be used to control direction.

If another device is currently the direction owner (as indicated by [Direction Owner]), it will not be possible to

jog the drive or change direction by using the terminal block digital inputs programmed for both Run and

Direction control (i.e. Run/Fwd).

If another device is not currently the direction owner (as indicated by

[Direction Owner]) and the terminal block bit is set in the [Direction

Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters, the terminal block becomes direction owner as soon as one (or both) of the “Jog Forward” or “Jog

Reverse” input functions is closed.

Speed select 1, 2, and 3

One, two, or three digital input functions can be used to select the speed reference used by the drive, and they are called the Speed Select input functions. The current open/closed state of all Speed Select input functions combine to select which source is the current speed reference.

There are 8 possible combinations of open/closed states for the three input functions, and thus 8 possible parameters can be selected. The 8 parameters are: [Speed Ref A Sel], [Speed Ref B Sel], and [Preset Speed

2] through [Preset Speed 7].

If the Speed Select input functions select [Speed Ref A Sel] or [Speed

Ref B Sel], then the value of that parameter further selects a reference source. There are a large number of possible selections, including all 7 presets.

If the input functions directly select one of the preset speed parameters, then the parameter contains a frequency that is to be used as the reference.

Digital Inputs

2-53

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Reference Mask] and [Logic

Mask] parameters in order for the reference selection to be controlled from the terminal block using the Speed Select inputs functions.

Important: Reference Control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function

(see

Owners on page 2-104 ). This means that only one

control device (terminal block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed to select the reference source. The terminal block must become direction “owner” before it can be used to control direction. If another device is currently the reference owner (as indicated by [Reference Owner]), it will not be possible to select the reference by using the terminal block digital inputs, and the Speed Select Inputs will have no effect on which reference the drive is currently using.

Because any combination of open/closed conditions (or unwired condition) commands a reference source, terminal block seeks ownership of reference selection as soon as any of these input functions are configured, which may happen at power-up. In order for the terminal block to actually gain ownership, the masks must be set up correctly (see above) and no other device can currently have reference ownership.

Once the terminal block gains reference ownership, it will retain it until shutdown, until the [Reference Mask] or [Logic Mask] bits for the terminal block are cleared, or until none of the digital inputs are configured as Speed Select input functions.

The Speed Select input function configuration process involves assigning the functionality of the three possible Speed Select input functions to physical digital inputs. The three Speed Select inputs functions are called “Speed Select 1”, “Speed Select 2”, and “Speed

Select 3”, and they are assigned to physical inputs using the [Digital Inx

Sel] parameters.

The table below describes the various reference sources that can be selected using all three of the Speed Select input functions.

Speed Select 3 Speed Select 2 Speed Select 1 Parameter that determines Reference

Open Open Open [Speed Ref A Sel]

Open

Open

Open

Closed

Closed

Open

[Speed Ref B Sel]

[Preset Speed 2]

Open

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Open

Open

Closed

Closed

Closed

Open

Closed

Open

Closed

[Preset Speed 3]

[Preset Speed 4]

[Preset Speed 5]

[Preset Speed 6]

[Preset Speed 7]

If any of the three Reference Select input functions are not configured, then the software will still follow the table, but will treat the unconfigured inputs as if they are permanently open.

As an example, the table below describes what reference selections can be made if “Speed Select 1” is the only configured input function. This

2-54

Digital Inputs configuration allows a single input to choose between [Speed Ref A Sel] and [Speed Ref B Sel].

Speed Select 1

Open

Closed

Selected Parameter that determines Reference

[Speed Ref A Sel]

[Speed Ref B Sel]

As another example, describes what reference selections can be made if the “Speed Select 3” and “Speed Select 2” input functions are configured, but “Speed Select 1” is not.

Speed Select 3 Speed Select 2 Selected Parameter that determines reference

Open Open [Speed Ref A Sel]

Open

Closed

Closed

Closed

Open

Closed

[Preset Speed 2]

[Preset Speed 4]

[Preset Speed 6]

Auto/Manual

The Auto/Manual facility is essentially a higher priority reference select.

It allows a single control device to assume exclusive control of reference select, irrespective of the reference select digital inputs, reference select

DPI commands, the reference mask, and the reference owner.

If the “Auto/Manual” input function is closed, then the drive will use one of the analog inputs (defined by [TB Man Ref Sel]) as the reference, ignoring the normal reference selection mechanisms. This mode of reference selection is called “Terminal Block Manual Reference

Selection Mode”.

If this input function is open, then the terminal block does not request manual control of the reference. If no control device (including the terminal block) is currently requesting manual control of the reference, then the drive will use the normal reference selection mechanisms. This is called “Automatic Reference Selection” mode.

The drive arbitrates among manual reference requests from different control devices, including the terminal block.

Accel 2 / Decel 2

The Acceleration/Deceleration Rate Control input functions (Acc/Dec input functions for short) allow the rate of acceleration and deceleration for the drive to be selected from the terminal block. The rates themselves are contained in [Accel Time 1], [Decel Time 1], [Accel Time 2], and

[Decel Time 2]. The Acc/Dec input functions are used to determine which of these acceleration and deceleration rates are in effect at a particular time.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Accel Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the acceleration rate selection to be controlled from the terminal block. The terminal block bit must be set in the [Decel

Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the deceleration rate selection to be controlled from the terminal block.

Digital Inputs

2-55

There are two different schemes for using the Acc/Dec input functions.

Each one will be described in its own section.

Accel 2, Decel 2

In the first scheme, one input function (called “Accel 2”) selects between

[Accel Time 1] and [Accel Time 2], and another input function (called

“Decel 2”) selects between [Decel Time 1] and [Decel Time 2]. The open state of the function selects [Accel Time 1] or [Decel Time 1], and the closed state selects [Accel Time 2] or [Decel Time 2].

Important: Acc/Dec Control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function (see

Owners). This means that only one control device (terminal block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed to select the Acc/Dec rates. The terminal block must become Acc/

Dec “owner” before it can be used to control ramp rates. If another device is currently the reference owner (as indicated by [Reference Owner]), it will not be possible to select the reference by using the terminal block digital inputs, and the

Speed Select Inputs will have no effect on which reference the drive is currently using.

Because any combination of open / closed conditions (or unwired condition) commands a reference source, the terminal block seeks accel ownership as soon as the “Accel 2” input function is configured, which may happen at power-up. In order for the terminal block to actually gain ownership, the masks must be set up correctly (see above) and no other device can currently have accel ownership. Once the terminal block gains accel ownership, it will retain it until shutdown, until the [Accel

Mask] or [Logic Mask] bits for the terminal block are cleared, or until

“Accel 2” is unconfigured.

For the “Decel 2” input function, deceleration rate selection ownership is handled in a similar fashion to acceleration rate selection ownership.

Acc2 & Dec2

In the second scheme, the “1” rates are combined (Acc and Dec) and the

“2” rates are combined. A single input function is used to select between

[Accel Time 1]/[Decel Time 1] and [Accel Time 2]/[Decel Time 2]. This input function is called “Acc 2 & Dec 2”.

If function is open, then drive will use [Accel Time 1] as the acceleration rate and [Decel Time 1] as the deceleration rate. If function is closed, then drive will use [Accel Time 2] as the acceleration rate and [Decel

Time 2] as the deceleration rate.

The same ownership rules as above apply.

MOP Increment, MOP Decrement

These inputs are used to increment and decrement the Motor Operated

Potentiometer (MOP) value inside the drive. The MOP is a reference setpoint (called the “MOP Value”) that can be incremented and

2-56

Digital Inputs decremented by external devices. The MOP value will be retained through a power cycle.

While the “MOP Increment” input is closed, MOP value will increase at rate contained in [MOP Rate]. Units for rate are Hz per second.

While the “MOP Decrement” input is closed, MOP value will decrease at rate contained in [MOP Rate]. Units for rate are Hz per second.

If both the “MOP Increment” and “MOP Decrement” inputs are closed,

MOP value will stay the same.

The terminal block bit must be set in the [MOP Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for the MOP to be controlled from the terminal block.

In order for the drive to use the MOP value as the current speed reference, either [Speed Ref A Sel] or [Speed Ref B Sel] must be set to

“MOP.”

Stop Mode B

This digital input function selects between two different drive stop modes. See also

Stop Modes on page 2-158

.

If the input is open, then [Stop Mode A] selects which stop mode to use.

If the input is closed, then [Stop Mode B] selects which stop mode to use. If this input function is not configured, then [Stop Mode A] always selects which stop mode to use.

Bus Regulation Mode B

This digital input function selects how the drive will regulate excess voltage on the DC bus. See also

Bus Regulation .

If the input is open, then [Bus Reg Mode A] selects which bus regulation mode to use. If the input is closed, then [Bus Reg Mode B] selects which bus regulation mode to use. If this input function is not configured, then

[Bus Reg Mode A] always selects which bus regulation mode to use.

PI Enable

If this input function is closed, the operation of the Process PI loop will be enabled.

If this input function is open, the operation of the Process PI loop will be disabled. See

Process PI Loop on page 2-116 .

PI Hold

If this input function is closed, the integrator for the Process PI loop will be held at the current value, which is to say that it will not increase.

Digital Inputs

2-57

If this input function is open, the integrator for the Process PI loop will be allowed to increase. See

Process PI Loop on page 2-116

.

PI Reset

If this input function is closed, the integrator for the Process PI loop will be reset to 0.

If this input function is open, the integrator for the Process PI loop will integrate normally. See

Process PI Loop on page 2-116

.

Auxiliary Fault

The “Auxiliary Fault” input function allows external equipment to fault the drive. Typically, one or more machine inputs (limit switches, pushbuttons, etc.) will be connected in series and then connected to this input. If the input function is open, the software detects the change of state then the drive will fault with the “Auxiliary Fault” fault code.

If the “Auxiliary Fault” input function is assigned to a physical digital input, that input will be active irrespective of any drive control masks.

Also, the input will be active even if a device other than the terminal block gains complete local control of drive logic. See

Local Control .

If this input function is not configured, then the fault will not occur.

Local Control

The “Local Control” input function allows exclusive control of all drive logic functions from the terminal block. If this input function is closed, the terminal block has exclusive control (disabling all the DPI devices) of drive logic, including start, reference selection, acceleration rate selection, etc. The exception is the stop condition, which can always be asserted from any connected control device.

The drive must be stopped in order for the terminal block to gain complete local control.

Important: Local Control is an “Exclusive Ownership” function (see

Owners ). This means that only one control device (terminal

block, DPI device, HIM, etc.) at a time is allowed take local control. If another device is not currently the local owner (as indicated by [Local Owner]) and the terminal block bit is set in the [Local Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters, the terminal block becomes local owner as soon as the “Local

Control” input function is closed.

Clear Faults

The “Clear Faults” digital input function allows an external device to reset drive faults through the terminal block. An open to closed transition on this input will cause the current fault (if any) to be reset.

If this input is configured at the same time as “Stop - Clear Faults”, then only the “Clear Faults” input can actually cause faults to be reset.

2-58

Digital Inputs

The terminal block bit must be set in the [Fault Mask] and [Logic Mask] parameters in order for faults to be reset from the terminal block.

Enable

If this input is closed, then the drive can run (start permissive). If open, the drive will not start.

If the drive is already running when this input is opened, the drive will coast and indicate “not enabled” on the HIM (if present). This is not considered a fault condition, and no fault will be generated.

This input is not used for a fast output power removal. The drive will not stop running until the software detects the open state of this input function.

If multiple “Enable” inputs are configured, then the drive will not run if any of the inputs are open.

Exclusive Link

This input function is used to activate the state of the input to control one of the drive’s digital outputs. See

Digital Outputs

.

If an Input is so configured, no function exists for the input until complementary Digital Output programming is done. If no outputs are programmed (linked), the input has no function.

This choice is made when the user wishes to link the input to the output, but desires that no other functionality be assigned to the input.

The state of any digital input can be “passed through” to a digital output by setting the value of a digital output configuration parameter ([Digital

Outx Sel]) to “Input n Link”. The output will then be controlled by the state of the input, even if the input is being used for a second function. If the input is configured as “Not used” input function, the link to the input is considered non-functional.

Power Loss Level (PowerFlex 700 only)

When the DC bus level in the drive falls below a certain level, a “power loss” condition is created in the drive logic. This input allows the user to select between two different “power loss” detection levels dynamically.

If the physical input is closed, then the drive will take its power loss level from a parameter. If the physical input is open (de-energized), then the drive will use a power loss level designated by internal drive memory, typically 82% of nominal.

If the input function is not configured, then the drive always uses the internal power loss level. This input function is used in PowerFlex 700 drives only. In PowerFlex 70 drives, the power loss level is always internal and not selectable.

Digital Inputs

2-59

Precharge Enable (PowerFlex 700 only)

This input function is used to manage disconnection from a common DC bus.

If the physical input is closed, this indicates that the drive is connected to common DC bus and normal precharge handling can occur, and that the drive can run (start permissive). If the physical input is open, this indicates that the drive is disconnected from the common DC bus, and thus the drive should enter the precharge state (precharge relay open) and initiate a coast stop immediately in order to prepare for reconnection to the bus.

If this input function is not configured, then the drive assumes that it is always connected to the DC bus, and no special precharge handling will be done. This input function is used in PowerFlex 700 drive only. In

PowerFlex 70 drives, the drive assumes it is always connected to the DC bus.

Digital Input Conflict Alarms

If the user configures the digital inputs so that one or more selections conflict with each other, one of the digital input configuration alarms will be asserted. As long as the Digital Input Conflict exists, the drive will not

start. These alarms will be automatically cleared by the drive as soon as the user changes the parameters so that there is an internally consistent digital input configuration.

Examples of configurations that cause an alarm are:

User tries to configure both the “Start” input function and the “Run

Forward” input function at the same time. “Start” is only used in

“3-wire” start mode, and “Run Forward” is only used in “2-wire” run mode, so they should never be configured at the same time

User tries to assign a toggle input function (for instance “Forward/

Reverse”) to more than one physical digital input simultaneously.

These alarms, called Type 2 Alarms, are different from other alarms in that it will not be possible to start the drive while the alarm is active. It should not be possible for any of these alarms to occur while drive is running, because all configuration parameters are only changeable while drive is stopped. Whenever one or more of these alarms is asserted, the drive ready status will become “not ready” and the HIM will reflect a message signaling the conflict. In addition, the drive status light will be flashing yellow.

There are three different digital input configuration alarms. They appear to the user (in [Drive Alarm 2]) as “DigIn CflctA”, “DigIn CflctB”, and “DigIn

CflctC”.

“DigIn CflctA” indicates a conflict between different input functions that are not specifically associated with particular start modes.

2-60

Digital Inputs

The table below defines which pairs of input functions are in conflict.

Combinations marked with a “ ” will cause an alarm.

Important: There are combinations of input functions in

Table 2.L

that will produce other digital input configuration alarms. “DigIn

CflctA” alarm will also be produced if “Start” is configured and

“Stop – Clear Faults” is not.

Table 2.L Input function combinations that produce “DigIn CflctA” alarm

Acc2/Dec2 Accel 2 Decel 2 Jog Jog Fwd Jog Rev Fwd/Rev

Acc2 / Dec2

Accel 2

Decel 2

Jog

Jog Fwd

Jog Rev

Fwd / Rev

“DigIn CflctB” indicates a digital Start input has been configured without a

Stop input or other functions are in conflict. Combinations that conflict are marked with a “ ” and will cause an alarm.

Table 2.M Input function combinations that produce “DigIn CflctB” alarm

Start Stop–CF Run Run Fwd Run Rev Jog Jog Fwd Jog Rev

Fwd/

Rev

Start

Stop–CF

Run

Run Fwd

Run Rev

Jog

Jog Fwd

Jog Rev

Fwd / Rev

“Digin CflctC” indicates that more than one physical input has been configured to the same input function, and this kind of multiple configuration isn’t allowed for that function. Multiple configuration is allowed for some input functions and not allowed for others.

There is one additional alarm that is related to digital inputs: the “Bipolar

Cflct” alarm occurs when there is a conflict between determining motor direction using digital inputs on the terminal block and determining it by the polarity of an analog speed reference signal.

Note that the drive will assert an alarm when the user sets up a illegal configuration rather than refusing the first parameter value that results in such a configuration. This is necessary because the user may have to change several parameters one at a time in order to get to a new desired configuration, and some of the intermediate configurations may actually be illegal. Using this scheme, the user or a network device can send parameter updates in any order when setting up the digital input configuration.

Digital Inputs

2-61

“Digin CflctC” indicates that more than one physical input has been configured to the same input function, and this kind of multiple configuration isn’t allowed for that function. Multiple configuration is allowed for some input functions and not allowed for others. The input functions for which multiple configuration is not allowed are:

Forward/Reverse

Speed Select 1

Speed Select 2

Speed Select 3

Run Forward

Run Reverse

Jog Forward

Jog Reverse

Run

Stop Mode B

Bus Regulation Mode B

Accel2 & Decel2

Accel 2

Decel 2

The “Bipolar Cflct” alarm occurs when there is a conflict between determining motor direction using digital inputs on the terminal block and determining it by some other means.

When [Direction Mode] is “Bipolar”, the drive uses the sign of the reference to determine drive direction; when [Direction Mode] is “Reverse

Dis”, then the drive never permits the motor to run in the reverse direction.

In both of these cases, the terminal block inputs cannot be used to set direction, so this alarm is asserted if any digital input function that can set motor direction is configured.

The “Bipolar Cflct” alarm will be asserted if both of the following are true:

One or more of the following digital input functions are configured:

“Forward/Reverse”, “Run Forward”, “Run Reverse”, “Jog Forward”,

“Jog Reverse”.

[Direction Mode] is set to “Bipolar” or “Reverse Dis”.

Digital In Status

This parameter represents the current state of the digital inputs. It contains one bit for each input. The bits are “1” when the input is closed and “0” when the input is open.

Examples

PowerFlex 70

Below is a typical digital input configuration that includes “3-wire” start.

The digital input configuration parameters should be set up as follows:

[Digital In1 Sel] set to “Start”

[Digital In2 Sel] set to “Stop - Clear Faults”

[Digital In3 Sel] set to “Forward/Reverse”

[Digital In4 Sel] set to “Jog”

[Digital In5 Sel] set to “Speed Select 1”

[Digital In6 Sel] set to “Enable”

2-62

Digital Inputs

Figure 2.6 Typical digital input configuration with “3-wire” start

Digital In1

Digital In2

Digital In3

Digital In4

Digital In5

Digital In6

Common

Start

Stop - CF

Forward/Reverse

Jog

Speed Select 2

Enable

Figure 2.7

represents a typical digital input configuration that includes “Run

Fwd/Rev” start. The digital input configuration parameters should be set up as follows:

[Digital In1 Sel] = “Run Forward”.

[Digital In2 Sel] = “Run Reverse”.

[Digital In3 Sel] = “Jog Forward”.

[Digital In4 Sel] = “Jog Reverse”

[Digital In5 Sel] = “Accel 2 & Decel 2”.

[Digital In6 Sel] = “Speed Select 1”.

Figure 2.7 Typical digital input configuration with “Run Fwd/Rev” start

Digital In1

Digital In2

Digital In3

Digital In4

Digital In5

Digital In6

Common

Run Forward

Run Reverse

Jog Forward

Jog Reverse

Accel 2/Decel 2

Speed Select 1

Digital Outputs

Digital Outputs

2-63

Each drive provides digital (relay) outputs for external annunciation of a variety of drive conditions. Each relay is a Form C (1 N.O. – 1 N.C. with shared common) device whose contacts and associated terminals are rated for a maximum of 250 VAC or 220 VDC. The table below shows specifications and limits for each relay / contact.

PowerFlex 700

Rated Voltage

Maximum Current

Maximum Power

Minimum DC Current

Minimum DC Voltage

Switching Time

Initial State

Number of relays

(Standard I/O)

PowerFlex 70

Resistive Load Inductive Load

250 VAC

220 VDC

250 VAC

220 VDC

3 A

AC - 50 VA

DC - 60 W

10

µ

A

10 mV

1.5 A

AC - 25 VA

DC - 30 W

8ms

De-energized

2

250 VAC

220 VDC

8 A

8ms

De-energized

2

250 VAC

220 VDC

4 A

Configuration

The outputs may be independently configured via the following parameters to switch for various states of the drive.

380

384

[Digital Out1 Sel]

[Digital Out2 Sel]

Selects the drive status that will energize a (CRx) output relay.

Default:

Options:

(1)

Contacts shown on page 1-12 are in drive powered state with condition not present. For functions such as “Fault” and “Alarm” the normal relay state is energized and N.O. / N.C. contact wiring may have to be reversed.

1

4

13

14

15

16

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

21

22

23

24

17

18

19

20

25

26

“Fault”

“Run”

“Fault”

(1)

“Alarm”

(1)

“Ready”

“Run”

“Forward Run”

“Reverse Run”

“Auto Restart”

“Powerup Run”

“At Speed”

“At Freq”

“At Current”

“At Torque”

“At Temp”

“At Bus Volts”

“At PI Error”

“DC Braking”

“Curr Limit”

“Economize”

“Motor Overld”

“Power Loss”

“Input 1 Link”

“Input 2 Link”

“Input 3 Link”

“Input 4 Link”

“Input 5 Link”

“Input 6 Link”

002

001

003

004

218

012

137

157

147

053

048

184

381

385

382

386

383

The selections can be divided into three types of annunciation.

1. The relay changes state due to a particular status condition in the drive.

2-64

Digital Outputs

The following drive conditions or status can be selected to cause the relay activation:

Condition

Fault

Alarm

Ready

Run

Forward Run

Reverse Run

Reset/Run

Powerup Run

DC Braking

Current Limit

Economize

Mtr Overload

Power Loss

Description

A drive Fault has occurred and stopped the drive

A Drive Type 1 or Type 2 Alarm condition exists

The drive is powered, Enabled and no Start Inhibits exist. It is “ready” to run

The drive is outputting Voltage and frequency to the motor (indicates 3– wire control, either direction)

The drive is outputting Voltage and frequency to the motor (indicates 2– wire control in Forward)

The drive is outputting Voltage and frequency to the motor (indicates 2– wire control in Reverse)

The drive is currently attempting the routine to clear a fault and restart the drive

The drive is currently executing the Auto Restart or “Run at Power Up” function

The drive is currently executing either a “DC Brake” or a “Ramp to Hold”

Stop command and the DC braking voltage is still being applied to the motor.

The drive is currently limiting output current

The drive is currently reducing the output voltage to the motor to attempt to reduce energy costs during a lightly loaded situation.

The drive output current has exceeded the programmed [Motor NP FLA] and the electronic motor overload function is accumulating towards an eventual trip.

The drive has monitored DC bus voltage and sensed a loss of input AC power that caused the DC bus voltage to fall below the fixed monitoring value (82% of [DC bus Memory]

2. The relay changes state because a particular value in the drive has exceeded a preset limit.

The following drive values can be selected to cause the relay activation:

Condition

At Speed

Description

The drive Output Frequency has equalled the commanded frequency

The balance of these functions require that the user set a limit for the specified value. The limit is set into one of two parameters: [Dig Out1

Level] and [Dig Out2 Level] depending on the output being used. If the value for the specified function (frequency, current, etc.) exceeds the user programmed limit, the relay will activate. If the value falls back below the limit, the relay will deactivate.

380 381

385

[Dig Out1 Level]

[Dig Out2 Level]

Sets the relay activation level for options

10 – 15 in [Digital Outx Sel]. Units are assumed to match the above selection

(i.e. “At Freq” = Hz, “At Torque” = Amps).

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

0.0

0.0

0.0/819.2

0.1

Notice that the [Dig Outx Level] parameters do not have units. The drive assumes the units from the selection for the annunciated value. For example, if the chosen “driver” is current, the drive assumes that the entered value for the limit [Dig Outx Level] is% rated Amps. If the

Digital Outputs

2-65

chosen “driver” is Temperature, the drive assumes that the entered value for the limit [Dig Outx Level] is degrees C. No units will be reported to

LCD HIM users, offline tools, devices communicating over a network,

PLC’s, etc.

The online and offline limits for the digital output threshold parameters will be the minimum and maximum threshold value required for any output condition.

If the user changes the currently selected output condition for a digital output, then the implied units of the corresponding threshold parameter will change with it, although the value of the parameter itself will not.

For example, if the output is set for “At Current” and the threshold for

100, drive current over 100% will activate the relay. If the user changes the output to “At Temp”, the relay will deactivate (even if current >

100%) because the drive is cooler than 100 degrees C.

The following values can be annunciated

Value

At Freq

At Current

At Torque

At Temp

At Bus Volts

At PI Error

Description

The drive output frequency equals or exceeds the programmed Limit

The drive total output current exceeds the programmed Limit

The drive output torque current component exceeds the programmed Limit

The drive operating temperature exceeds the programmed Limit

The drive bus voltage exceeds the programmed Limit

The drive Process PI Loop error exceeds the programmed Limit

3. The relay changes state because a Digital Input link has been established and the Input is closed.

An Output can be “linked” directly to an Digital Input so that the output

“tracks” the input. When the input is closed, the Output will be energized, and when the input is open, the output will be de-energized.

This “tracking will occur if two conditions exist:

– The Input is configured for any choice other than “Unused”

– The Output is configured for the appropriate “Input x Link”

Note that the output will continue to track or be controlled by the state of the input, even if the input has been assigned a function (i.e. Start, Jog)

Output Time Delay

Each digital output has two user-controlled timers associated with it.

One timer (the ON timer) defines the delay time between a FALSE to TRUE transition (condition appears) on the output condition and the corresponding change in state of the digital output.

The second timer (the OFF timer) defines the delay time between a TRUE to FALSE transition (condition disappears) on the output condition and the corresponding change in the state of the digital output.

2-66

Digital Outputs

The user can disable either timer by setting the corresponding delay time to

0.

Important: Note that whether a particular type of transition (FALSE to

TRUE or TRUE TO FALSE) on an output condition results in an energized or de-energized output depends on the output condition.

If a transition on an output condition occurs and starts a timer, and the output condition goes back to its original state before the timer runs out, then the timer will be aborted and the corresponding digital output will not change state.

382

386

[Dig Out1 OnTime]

[Dig Out2 OnTime]

Sets the “ON Delay” time for the digital outputs. This is the time between the occurrence of a condition and activation of the relay.

383

387

[Dig Out1 OffTime]

[Dig Out2 OffTime]

Sets the “OFF Delay” time for the digital outputs. This is the time between the disappearance of a condition and de-activation of the relay.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

0.0 Secs

0.0 Secs

0.0/600.0 Secs

0.1 Secs

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

0.0 Secs

0.0 Secs

0.0/600.0 Secs

0.1 Secs

380

380

0

0

CR1 On Delay = 2 Seconds

Relay Activates

5

Current Limit Occurs

10

Relay Does Not Activate

CR1 On Delay = 2 Seconds

Cyclic Current Limit

(every other second)

5 10

Direction Control

Direction Control

2-67

Direction control of the drive is an exclusive ownership function. This means that only one device can be commanding / controlling direction at a time and that device can only command one direction or the other, not both.

Direction is defined as the forward or reverse, of the drive output, not he motor. Motor wiring and phasing determines its CW or CCW rotation The direction of the drive, is controlled in one of three ways:

1. 2-Wire digital input selection such as Run Forward or Run Reverse

2. 3-Wire digital input selection such as Forward/Reverse, Forward or

Reverse

3. Control Word bit manipulation from a DPI device such as a communications interface.

4. The sign (+ / -) of a bipolar analog input

Refer to

Digital Inputs on page 2-46

and

Analog Inputs on page 2-6 for

more detail on the configuration and operating rules for direction control.

2-68

DPI

DPI

DPI is an enhancement to SCANport that provides more functions and better performance. SCANport was a CAN based, Master-Slave protocol, created to provide a standard way of connecting motor control products and optional peripheral devices together. It allows multiple (up to 6) devices to communicate with a motor control product without requiring configuration of the peripheral. SCANport and DPI both provide two basic message types called Client/Server (C/S) and Producer/Consumer (P/C). Client/Server messages are used to transfer parameter and configuration information in the background (relative to other message types). Producer/Consumer messages are used for control and status information. DPI adds a higher baud rate, brand specific enabling, Peer-to-Peer (P/P) communication, and

Flash Memory programming support. PowerFlex drives support the existing

SCANport and Drive Peripheral Interface (DPI) communication protocols.

Multiple devices of each type (SCANport or DPI) can be attached to and communicate with the drive at the same time. This communication interface is the primary way to interact with, and control the drive.

Client/Server

Client/Server messages operate in the background (relative to other message types) and are used for non-control purposes. The Client/Server messages are based on a 10ms “ping” event that allows peripherals to perform a single transaction (i.e. one C/S transaction per peripheral per time period). Message fragmentation (because the message transaction is larger than the standard CAN message of eight data bytes) is automatically handled by Client/Server operation. The following types of messaging are covered:

Logging in peripheral devices

Read/Write of parameter values

Access to all parameter information (limits, scaling, default, etc.)

User set access

Fault/Alarm queue access

Event notification (fault, alarm, etc.)

Access to all drive classes/objects (e.g. Device, Peripheral, Parameter, etc.)

Producer/Consumer operation overview

Producer/Consumer messages operate at a higher priority than Client/

Server messages and are used to control/report the operation of the drive

(e.g. start, stop, etc.). A P/C status message is transmitted every 5ms (by the drive) and a command message is received from every change of state in any attached DPI peripheral. Change of state is a button being pressed or error detected by a DPI peripheral. SCANport devices are slightly different in that those peripherals transmit command messages upon reception of a drive status message rather than on detection of a change of state. Producer/

DPI

2-69

Consumer messages are of fixed size, so support of message fragmentation is not required. The following types of messaging are covered:

Drive status (running, faulted, etc.)

Drive commands (start, stop, etc.)

Control logic parsing operations (e.g., mask and owner parameters)

Entering Flash programming mode

“Soft” login and logout of peripheral devices (enabling/disabling of peripheral control)

Peer-to-Peer operation

Peer-to-Peer messaging allows two devices to communicate directly rather than through the master or host (i.e. drive). They are the same priority as C/

S messages and will occur in the background. In the PowerFlex 70 drive, the only Peer-to-Peer functionality supports proxy operations for the LED

HIM. Since the PowerFlex 700 drive does not support an LED HIM, it will not support Peer-to-Peer proxy operations. The Peer-to-Peer proxy operation is only used so that the LED HIM can access parameters that are not directly part of the regulator board (e.g. DeviceNet baud rate, etc.). The

LED HIM is not attached to a drive through a CAN connection (as normal

DPI or SCANport devices are), so a proxy function is needed to create a

DPI message to access information in an off-board peripheral. If an LCD

HIM is attached to the PowerFlex 70 or 700 drive, it will be able to directly request off-board parameters using Peer-to-Peer messages (i.e. no proxy support needed in the drive). Because the PowerFlex 70 supports the LED

HIM, only 4 communication ports can be used. PowerFlex 700 drives can use all 6 communication ports because Peer-to-Peer proxy operations are not needed. All Peer-to-Peer operations occur without any intervention from the user (regardless whether proxy or normal P/P operation), no setup is required. No Peer-to-Peer proxy operations are required while the drive is in Flash mode.

All the timing requirements specified in the DPI and SCANport System,

Control, and Messaging specifications are supported. Peripheral devices will be scanned (“pinged”) at a 10ms rate. Drive status messages will be produced at a 5ms rate, while peripheral command messages will be accepted (by the drive) as they occur (i.e. change of state). Based on these timings, the following worst case conditions can occur (independent of the baud rate and protocol):

Change of peripheral state (e.g. Start, Stop, etc.) to change in the drive –

10ms

Change in reference value to change in drive operation – 10ms

Change in Datalink data value to change in the drive – 10ms

Change of parameter value into drive – 20ms times the number of attached peripherals

The maximum time to detect the loss of communication from a peripheral device is 500ms.

2-70

DPI

Table 2.N Timing specifications contained in DPI and SCANport

DPI

SCANport Host status messages only go out to peripherals once they log in. Peripherals time out if >500ms. If Peripheral receives incorrect status message type, Peripheral generates an error. Actual time dependent on number of peripherals attached. SCANport allows minimum rate of 5ms.

DPI

Host status messages only go out to peripherals once they log in and at least every

125ms (to all attached peripherals). Peripherals time out if >250ms. Actual time dependent on number of peripherals attached. Minimum time goal of 5ms (may have to be dependent on Port Baud Rate). DPI allows minimum 5ms status at 125k and

1ms status at 500k.

Host determines MUT based on number of attached peripherals. Range of values from 2 to 125ms. Minimum goal time of 5ms. DPI allows 2ms min at 500k and 5ms min at 125k.

SCANport No MUT.

DPI Peripheral command messages (including Datalinks) generated on change-of-state, but not faster than Host MUT and at least every 250ms. Host will time out if >500ms.

SCANport Command messages produced as a result of Host status message. If no command response to Host status within 3 status scan times, Host will time out on that peripheral.

DPI Peer messages requests cannot be sent any faster than 2x of MUT.

SCANport No Peer message support

DPI

SCANport Host waits at least 10ms for response to ping. Host cannot send more than 2 event messages (including ping) to a peripheral within 5ms. Peripherals typical response time is 1ms.

DPI

Host must ping every port at least every 2 sec. Peripherals time out if >3 sec. Host will wait maximum of 10ms (125k) or 5ms (500k) for peripheral response to ping.

Peripherals typical response time is 1ms. Peripherals only allow one pending explicit message (i.e. ping response or peer request) at a time.

Response to an explicit request or fragment must occur within 1 sec or device will time out (applies to Host or Peripheral). Time-out implies retry from beginning. Maximum number of fragments per transaction is 16. Flash memory is exception with 22 fragments allowed.

SCANport Assume same 1 sec time-out. Maximum number of fragments is 16

DPI During Flash mode, host stops ping, but still supports status/command messages at a

1 – 5 sec rate. Drive will use 1 sec rate. Data transfer occurs via explicit message as fast as possible (i.e. peripheral request, host response, peripheral request, etc.) but only between two devices.

SCANport No Flash mode support

The Minimum Update Time (MUT), is based on the message type only. A standard command and Datalink command could be transmitted from the same peripheral faster than the MUT and still be O.K. Two successive

Datalink commands or standard commands will still have to be separated by the MUT, however.

Drive Overload

Drive Overload

2-71

The drive thermal overload has two primary functions. The first requirement is to make sure the drive is not damaged by abuse. The second is to perform the first in a manor that does not degrade the performance, as long the drive temperature and current ratings are not exceeded.

The purpose of is to protect the power structure from abuse. Any protection for the motor and associated wiring is provided by a Motor Thermal

Overload feature.

The drive will monitor the temperature of the power module based on a measured temperature and a thermal model of the IGBT. As the temperature rises the drive may lower the PWM frequency to decrease the switching losses in the IGBT. If the temperature continues to rise, the drive may reduce current limit to try to decrease the load on the drive. If the drive temperature becomes critical the drive will generate a fault.

If the drive is operated in a low ambient condition the drive may exceed rated levels of current before the monitored temperature becomes critical.

To guard against this situation the drive thermal overload also includes an inverse time algorithm. When this scheme detects operation beyond rated levels, current limit may be reduced or a fault may be generated.

Operation

The drive thermal overload has two separate protection schemes, an overall

RMS protection based on current over time, and an IGBT junction thermal manager based on measured power module temperature and operating conditions. The drive may fold back current limit when either of these methods detects a problem.

Overall RMS Protection

The overall RMS protection makes sure the current ratings of the drive are not exceeded. The lower curve in

Figure 2.8

shows the boundary of

normal-duty operation. In normal duty, the drive is rated to produce 110% of rated current for 60 seconds, 150% of rated current for three seconds, and

165% of rated current for 100 milliseconds. The maximum value for current limit is 150% so the limit of 165% for 100 milliseconds should never be crossed. If the load on the drive exceeds the level of current as shown on the upper curve, current limit may fold back to 100% of the drive rating until the 10/90 or 5/95 duty cycle has been achieved. For example, 60 seconds at

110% will be followed by 9 minutes at 100%, and 3 seconds at 150% will be followed by 57 seconds at 100%. With the threshold for where to take action slightly above the rated level the drive will only fold back when drive ratings are exceeded.

If fold back of current limit is not enabled in [Drive OL Mode], the drive will generate a fault when operation exceeds the rated levels. This fault can not be disabled. If current limit fold back is enabled then a fault is generated when current limit is reduced.

2-72

Drive Overload

Figure 2.8 Normal Duty Boundary of Operation

1.80

1.70

1.60

1.50

1.40

1.30

1.20

1.10

1.00

0.90

0.80

0.70

0.60

0.50

0.40

0.30

0.20

0.10

0.00

1.00

10.00

Time (Seconds)

100.00

1,000.00

2.00

1.75

1.50

1.25

1.00

0.75

0.50

0.25

0.00

1.00

The lower curve in

Figure 2.9

shows the boundary of heavy duty operation.

In heavy duty, the drive is rated to produce 150% of rated current for 60 seconds, 200% of rated current for three seconds, and 220% of rated current for 100 milliseconds. The maximum value for current limit is 200% so the limit of 220% for 100 milliseconds should never be crossed. If the load on the drive exceeds the level of current as shown on the upper curve, current limit may fold back to 100% of the drive rating until the 10/90 or 5/95 duty cycle has been achieved. For example, 60 seconds at 150% will be followed by 9 minutes at 100%, and 3 seconds at 200% will be followed by 57 seconds at 100%. With the threshold for where to take action slightly above the rated level the drive will only fold back when drive ratings are exceeded.

Again, if fold back of current limit is not enabled in the [Drive OL Mode], the drive will generate a fault when operation exceeds the rated levels. This fault can not be disabled. If current limit fold back is enabled then a fault is generated when current limit is reduced.

Figure 2.9 Heavy Duty Boundary of Operation

2.50

2.25

10.00

100.00

Time (Seconds)

1000.00

10000.00

Drive Overload

2-73

Thermal Manager Protection

The thermal manager protection assures that the thermal ratings of the power module are not exceeded. The operation of the thermal manager can be thought of as a function block with the inputs and outputs as shown below.

Figure 2.10 Thermal Manager Inputs/Outputs

DTO Select

(Off,PWM,ILmt,Both)

PWM Frequency

(2 - 12 kHz)

Current Limit

(0 - 200%)

Temperature Analog Input

(Volts)

I_total

(Amps)

V_dc

(Volts)

Output Frequency

(0-400 Hz)

Drive

Thermal

Overload

DTO Fault

(On,Off)

Active PWM Frequency

(2 - 12 kHz)

Active Current Limit

(0 - 200%)

Drive Temperature

(x deg C)

IGBT Temperature

(x deg C)

KHz Alarm

(On, Off)

ILmt Alarm

(On, Off)

EE Power Board Data

The following is a generalization of the calculations done by the thermal manager. The IGBT junction temperature T

J

is calculated based on the measured drive temperature T

Drive

, and a temperature rise that is a function of operating conditions. When the temperature device is inside the power module T

Drive

is the same as T

Case

. On larger size drives the temperature device will be mounted on the heat sink rather than inside the power module, and the thermal model becomes more complex.

P

J

as defined in the second equation is the power dissipated in one generalized IGBT.

R

J-Case

is the worst case thermal resistance from the junction to the case.

Boost[freq] is a term that increases the modeled temperature at low output frequencies.

kHz * SwitchLosses is a term that increases losses at higher PWM carrier frequencies.

T

J

= T

Case

+ P

J

R

J-Case

Boost{Freq]

P

J

= I

Peak

2

R

0

+ I

Peak

V

0

+ I

Peak

V

DC kHz * SwitchLosses

Without a temperature device on each IGBT the calculation of T

J must take into account the worst case conditions for heat transfer. A model that adds the heat dissipated in the rectifier is also under consideration. More detail will be included in the design specification.

2-74

Drive Overload

When the calculated junction temperature reaches a maximum limit the drive will generate a fault. This fault can not be disabled. This maximum junction temperature is stored in EE on the power board along with other information to define the operation of the drive thermal overload function.

These values are not user adjustable. In addition to the maximum junction temperature there are thresholds that select the point at which the PWM frequency begins to fold back, and the point at which current limit begins to fold back. As T

J

increases the thermal manager may reduce the PWM frequency. If T

J

continues to rise current limit may be reduced, and if T

J continues to rise the drive generates a fault. The calculation of the reduced

PWM frequency and current limit is implemented with an integral control.

PWM Frequency

PWM Frequency as selected by the user can be reduced by the thermal manager. The resulting Active PWM Frequency may be displayed in a test point parameter.

The active PWM frequency will change in steps of 2 kHz. It will always be less than or equal to the value selected by the user, and will not be less than the drives minimum PWM frequency. When drive temperature reaches the level where PWM frequency would be limited, the kHz Alarm is turned on.

This alarm will be annunciated even if the reduced PWM frequency is not enabled.

Current Limit

Current Limit as selected by the user can be reduced by the thermal manager. The resulting active current limit may be displayed as a test point parameter.

The active current limit will always be less than or equal to the value selected by the user, and will not be less than flux current. When drive temperature reaches the level where current limit would be clamped, the

ILmt Alarm is turned on. This alarm will be annunciated even if reduced current limit is not enabled.

The active current limit is used during normal operation and during DC injection braking. Any level of current requested for DC injection braking is limited by the Active Current Limit.

Configuration

The [Drive OL Mode] allows the user to select the action(s) to perform with increased current or drive temperature. When this parameter is “Disabled,” the drive will not modify the PWM frequency or current limit. When set to

“Reduce PWM” the drive will only modify the PWM frequency. “Reduce

CLim” will only modify the current limit. Setting this parameter to

“Both-PWM 1st” the drive will modify the PWM frequency and the current limit.

Drive Ratings (kW, Amps, Volts)

2-75

DTO Fault

For all possible settings of [Drive OL Mode], the drive will always monitor the T j

and T

Drive

and generate a fault when either temperature becomes critical. If T

Drive

is less than –20

°

C, a fault is generated. With these provisions, a DTO fault is generated if the NTC ever malfunctions.

Temperature Display

The measured Drive temperature is displayed as a standard parameter. The calculated IGBT temperature may be displayed as a test point parameter.

Analysis of the possible source or error shows that the drive temperature should be within +/– 3

°

C of the actual temperature, over the full range of operation.

Low Speed Operation

When operation is below 4 Hz, the rating of the drive is reduced. At low output frequencies the duty cycle is such that a given IGBT will carry more of the load for a while and more heat will build up in that device. The thermal manager will increase the calculated IGBT temperature at low output frequencies and will cause corrective action to take place sooner.

When the drive is in current limit the output frequency is reduced to try to reduce the load. This works fine for a variable torque load, but for a constant torque load reducing the output frequency does not lower the current (load).

Lowering current limit on a CT load will push the drive down to a region where the thermal issue becomes worse. In this situation the thermal manager will increase the calculated losses in the power module to track the worst case IGBT. For example, if the thermal manager normally provides

150% for 3 seconds at high speeds, it may only provide 150% for one second before generating a fault at low speeds.

If operating at 60Hz 120%, lowering the current limit may cause a fault sooner than allowing the drive to continue to operate. In this case the user may want to disable current limit fold back.

Drive Ratings (kW,

Amps, Volts)

Refer to

Fuses and Circuit Breakers on page 2-83

.

2-76

Economizer

Economizer

Efficiency

Auto-Economizer (also see

Torque Performance Modes on page 2-162 )

Economize mode consists of the sensorless vector control voltage with an energy saving function (E-SVC).

The output voltage is automatically adjusted, in steady state frequency operation only, as the load is increased or decreased such that minimum current is supplied to the motor and its efficiency is optimized. Adjusting the flux producing current facilitates reduction of the output voltage. The flux current is reduced as long as the total drive output current does not exceed 75% of motor rated current. The flux current is not allowed to be less than 50% of the selected flux current parameter value.

Maximum Voltage

Motor Nameplate Voltage

Rated Flux Current

Increasing

Load

V total

Ir Voltage

0

0

Frequency

Reduced Flux Current, minimum of 50% of Rated Flux Current

Motor Nameplate

Frequency

Maximum

Frequency

0.6

0.5

0.8

0.7

The following chart is typical of the efficiency calculations for variable frequency drives. Efficiency generally decreases with increasing load on decreasing speed.

1

1 HP

0.5 HP

0.9

25 50 75 100

Fan Curve

Fan

Fan Curve

2-77

When torque performance is set to Fan Curve the relation ship between frequency and voltage is as shown in the following figure. The fan curve provides the option to generate voltage that is a function of the stator frequency squared up to the motor nameplate frequency. Above base frequency voltage is a linear function of frequency. At low speed the fan curve is offset by the run boost parameter to provide necessary starting torque. No extra parameters are needed for fan curve.

Maximum Voltage

Base Voltage

(Nameplate)

Run Boost

See

Fan Curve

above.

Base Frequency

(Nameplate)

Maximum

Frequency

2-78

Faults

Faults

Faults are events or conditions within the drive which constitute user notification and may warrant various responses. Some conditions are user configurable as to whether the drive will consider them a fault. Faults are indicated to the user via HIM fault codes and/or popup dialogs or status indications as well as a group of output parameters. Faults are latched, requiring the user or application to perform a fault reset action to clear the latched condition. If the fault condition still exists it will be latched again.

When a Fault Occurs

1. The faulted status is set causing a coast stop sequence to occur turning off output power to the motor.

2. If this is the first fault latched:

– An entry is made in the fault queue.

– The following fault context data will be recorded/updated. Note there is only a single copy of this information which is always related to the most recent fault queue entry (#1).

– Status 1 @ Fault and Status 2 @ Fault

State of Drive Status 1 and Drive Status 2.

– Alarm 1 @Fault and Alarm 2 @Fault

State of Alarm Status 1 and Alarm Status 2

– Fault Frequency: drive speed at time of fault (output frequency if in v/ hz or SVC operation).

– Fault Motor Amps: motor amps at time of fault.

– Fault Bus Volts: unfiltered DC Bus volts at time of fault.

A faulted status indicates whether one or more fault conditions have occurred. The state of the fault queue (empty or full) has no affect on the faulted status.

Fault Queue

Faults are also logged Into a fault queue such that a history of the most recent fault events Is retained.

A fault queue will record the occurrence of the first fault event - i.e. the 1st fault which occurs while no other fault is latched. A new fault event will not be logged to the fault queue if a previous fault is already latched (has occurred but not yet reset/cleared). This results in fault queue entry #1 always indicating the fault which last tripped the drive.

Each fault queue entry will include a fault code and a time stamp value. The fault queue will be a first-in first-out (FIFO) queue. This results in the most recent 'n' faults being retained in the fault queue. Entry 1 will always be the most-recent entry (newest). Entry 'n' will always be the oldest entry, where

'n' is the maximum number of queue entries supported by the drive. As a

Faults

2-79

new fault is logged into the queue each existing entry will be shifted up by one (i.e. previous entry #1 will move to entry #2, previous entry #2 will move to entry #3, etc.). If the queue is full when a fault occurs the oldest entry will be discarded.

The fault queue will be saved in nonvolatile storage at power loss, thus retaining its contents through a power off - on cycle

The fault code for each entry can be read via a corresponding output

(read-only) parameter. Viewed in this manner (i.e. as a parameter) a numeric fault code is presented - i.e. no text string. This was decided to provide consistent fault indication between the LED and LCD HIM peripherals.

A text string of up to 16 characters is presented when accessing the fault queue via a DPI peripheral, which can present the fault queue to the user rather than through parameters.

Time

[Fault 1-8 Time]

Time Stamp Value

The time stamp value recorded in the fault queue is the value of an internal drive-under-power-timer at the time of the fault. At drive power-up, this internal value is copied to [PowerUp Marker]. The fault queue time stamp can then be compared to determine when the fault occurred relative to the last drive power-up. The user has no control over the value of the internal drive under power timer, which will increment in value over the life of the power structure (saved in nonvolatile storage on the power structure, not the

Control Board).

The time stamp for each fault queue entry can be read via a corresponding parameter. The time stamp value will be presented in xxx.yyyy hours (4 decimal places). Each increment of 1 will represent approximately 0.36

seconds. Internally it will be accumulated in a 32-bit unsigned integer with a resolution of 0.35 seconds, resulting in a rollover to zero every 47.66

years. Time comparisons of one fault to the next and/or with [PowerUp

Marker] are only meaningful if they occur less than or equal to the rollover range.

Resetting or Clearing a Fault

A latched fault condition can be cleared by the following:

2-80

Faults

1. An off to on transition on a digital input configured for fault reset or stop/reset.

2. Setting [Fault Clear] to “1”

3. A DPI peripheral (several ways).

4. Performing a reset to factory defaults via parameter write.

5. Cycling power to the drive such that the control board goes through a power-up sequence.

Resetting faults will clear the faulted status indication. If any fault condition still exists, the fault will be latched and another entry made in the fault queue.

Note: Performing a fault reset does not inherently clear the fault queue.

Clearing the fault queue is a separate action.

Configuration

[Fault Config 1]

Bit-mapped 16 bit word enabling certain fault conditions. Disabling a fault removes the affect of the fault condition and makes the event unknown to the user. If the bit is on, the fault is enabled. If the bit is off, the fault is not enabled.

Flying Start

Flying Start

2-81

The Flying Start feature is used to start into a rotating motor, as quick as possible, and resume normal operation with a minimal impact on load or speed.

When a drive is started in its normal mode it initially applies a frequency of

0 Hz and ramps to the desired frequency. If the drive is started in this mode with the motor already spinning, large currents will be generated. An overcurrent trip may result if the current limiter cannot react quickly enough. The likelihood of an overcurrent trip is further increased if there is a residual flux (back emf) on the spinning motor when the drive starts. Even if the current limiter is fast enough to prevent an overcurrent trip, it will take an unacceptable amount of time for synchronization to occur and for the motor to reach its desired frequency. In addition, larger mechanical stress is placed on the application, increasing downtime and repair costs while decreasing productivity.

In Flying Start mode, the drive’s response to a start command will be to identify the motor’s speed and apply a voltage that is synchronized in frequency, amplitude and phase to the back emf of the spinning motor. The motor will then accelerate to the desired frequency. This process will prevent an overcurrent trip and significantly reduce the time for the motor to reach its desired frequency. Since the motor is “picked up “smoothly at its rotating speed and ramped to the proper speed, little or no mechanical stress is present.

Configuration

Flying Start is activated by setting the [Flying Start En] parameter to

“Enable”

169 [Flying Start En]

Enables/disables the function which reconnects to a spinning motor at actual

RPM when a start command is issued.

Default:

Options:

0

0

1

“Disabled”

“Disabled”

“Enabled”

170

The gain can be adjusted to increase responsiveness. Increasing the value in

[Flying StartGain] increases the responsiveness of the Flaying Start Feature

169 170 [Flying StartGain]

Sets the response of the flying start function.

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

4000

20/32767

1

Application Example

In some applications, such as large fans, wind or drafts may rotate the fan in the reverse direction when the drive is stopped. If the drive were started in the normal manner, its output would begin at zero Hz, acting as a brake to bring the reverse rotating fan to a stop and then accelerating it in the correct direction.

This operation can be very hard on the mechanics of the system including fans, belts and other coupling devices.

2-82

Flying Start

Cooling Tower Fans

Draft/wind blows idle fans in reverse direction. Restart at zero damages fans, breaks belts. Flying start alleviates the problem

Fuses and Circuit

Breakers

Fuses and Circuit Breakers

2-83

Tables

2.O

through

2.S

provide drive ratings (including continuous, 1 minute and 3 second) and recommended AC line input fuse and circuit breaker information. Both types of short circuit protection are acceptable for UL and IEC requirements. Sizes listed are the recommended sizes based on 40 degree C and the U.S. N.E.C. Other country, state or local codes may require different ratings.

Fusing

If fuses are chosen as the desired protection method, refer to the recommended types listed below. If available amp ratings do not match the tables provided, the closest fuse rating that exceeds the drive rating should be chosen.

IEC

– BS88 (British Standard) Parts 1 & 2

(1)

, EN60269-1, Parts 1 & 2, type gG or equivalent should be used.

UL – UL Class CC, T, RK1 or J must be used.

Circuit Breakers

The "non-fuse" listings in the following tables include both circuit breakers

(inverse time or instantaneous trip) and 140M Self-Protecting Motor

Starters. If one of these is chosen as the desired protection method, the following requirements apply.

IEC and UL

– Both types of devices are acceptable for IEC and UL installations.

(1) Typical designations include, but may not be limited to the following; Parts 1 & 2: AC, AD, BC, BD, CD, DD, ED,

EFS, EF, FF, FG, GF, GG, GH.

2-84

Fuses and Circuit Breakers

Table 2.O PF70 208/240 Volt AC Input Recommended Protection Devices

Drive

Catalog

Number

HP

Rating

Input

Ratings Output Amps

Dual

Element Time

Delay Fuse

ND HD Amps kVA Cont. 1 Min. 3 Sec. Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

208 Volt AC Input

20AB2P2 A 0.5

0.33 2.9

20AB4P2 A 1 0.75 5.6

20AB6P8 B 2

20AB9P6 B 3

1.5

2

10.0

14.0

1.1

2

3.6

5.1

2.5

4.8

7.8

11.0

2.7

5.5

10.3

12.1

3.7

7.4

13.8

16.5

20AB015 C 5 3

20AB022 D 7.5

5

16.0

23.3

5.8

8.3

17.5

25.3

19.2

27.8

26.6

37.9

20AB028 D 10 7.5

29.8

10.7 32.2

37.9

50.6

240 Volt AC Input

20

25

35

6

10

15

20

35

50

70

6

10

15

25

20AB2P2 A 0.5

0.33 2.5

20AB4P2 A 1 0.75 4.8

1.1

2.2

2 4.2

2.4

4.8

3.3

6.4

20AB6P8 B 2

20AB9P6 C 3

20AB015 C 5 3

20AB022 D 7.5

5

1.5

8.7

2 12.2

3.6

5.1

6.8

9.6

13.9

19.9

5.8

8.3

15.3

22

9

10.6

17.4

24.2

12

14.4

23.2

33

20AB028 D 10 7.5

25.7

10.7 28 33 44

6

10

15

20

20

25

35

4.5

9

15

20

30

45

60

20

25

35

6

10

15

20

6

10

15

20

20

25

35

Non-Time

Delay Fuse

Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

10

17.5

30

40

70

100

125

8

15

25

35

60

80

110

15

15

30

40

70

100

125

15

15

25

35

60

80

110

Circuit

Breaker

(3)

Motor

Circuit

Protector

(4)

Amps Amps

140M Motor Starter with Adjustable Current Range

(5)(6)

Available Catalog Numbers

(7)

3

7

15

15

30

30

50

30

30

50

7

7

15

30

140M-C2E-B40 140M-D8E-B40 –

140M-C2E-B63 140M-D8E-B63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C20 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C20 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C25 140M-F8E-C25 140M-CMN-2500

– – 140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B63 140M-D8E-B63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C20 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C20 –

– –

140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

Table 2.P PF70 400/480 Volt AC Input Recommended Protection Devices

Drive

Catalog

Number

HP

Rating

Input

Ratings Output Amps

Dual

Element Time

Delay Fuse

ND HD Amps kVA Cont. 1 Min. 3 Sec. Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

400 Volt AC Input

20AC1P3 A 0.37 0.25 1.6

20AC2P1 A 0.75 0.55 2.5

1.1

1.3

1.8

2.1

1.4

2.4

20AC3P5 A 1.5

1.1

4.3

20AC5P0 B 2.2

1.5

6.5

20AC8P7 B 4 3

20AC011 C 5.5

4

11.3

11

3

4.5

7.8

7.6

3.5

5

8.7

11.5

4.5

5.5

9.9

13

20AC015 C 7.5

5.5

15.1

10.4 15.4

17.2

20AC022 D 11 7.5

21.9

15.2 22 24.2

20AC030 D 15 11 30.3

21 30 33

480 Volt AC Input

1.9

3.2

6

7.5

13.2

17.4

23.1

33

45

3

6

10

10

15

15

20

25

35

30

45

60

3

4

6

10

17.5

25

20AD1P1 A 0.5

0.33 1.3

20AD2P1 A 1 0.75 2.4

20AD3P4 A 2

20AC5P0 B 3

20AD8P0 B 5 3

20AD011 C 7.5

5

1.5

3.8

2 5.6

9.8

9.5

1.1

2

1.1

2.1

3.2

3.4

4.7

5

8.4

8

7.9

11

20AD015 C 10 7.5

12.5

10.4 14

20AD022 D 15 10 19.9

16.6 22

20AD027 D 20 15 24.8

20.6 27

1.2

2.4

4.5

5.5

8.8

12.1

16.5

24.2

33

22

33

44

1.6

3.2

6

7.5

12

16.5

3

6

10

10

15

15

20

25

35

3

6

10

10

15

20

30

45

60

3

6

10

10

15

15

20

25

35

3

6

10

10

15

15

20

25

35

Non-Time

Delay Fuse

Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

Circuit

Breaker

(3)

Motor

Circuit

Protector

(4)

Amps Amps

4

8

12

20

30

40

50

80

100

5

8

12

20

30

45

60

80

120

15

15

15

20

30

40

50

80

100

15

15

15

20

30

40

60

80

120

3

3

7

15

15

15

20

30

50

3

7

7

15

15

15

20

30

50

140M Motor Starter with Adjustable Current Range

(5)(6)

Available Catalog Numbers

(7)

140M-C2E-B16 – –

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B40 140M-D8E-B40 – –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C25 140M-F8E-C25 140-CMN-2500

– – 140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

140M-C2E-B16 – –

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B40 140M-D8E-B40 –

140M-C2E-C63 140M-D8E-C63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C20 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C20 –

– – 140M-F8E-C25 140M-CMN-2500

Table 2.Q PF70 600 Volt AC Input Recommended Protection Devices

Drive

Catalog

Number

HP

Rating

Input

Ratings Output Amps

Dual

Element Time

Delay Fuse

ND HD Amps kVA Cont. 1 Min. 3 Sec. Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

600 Volt AC Input

20AE0P3 A 0.5

0.33 1.3

20AE1P7 A 1 0.75 1.9

20AE2P7 A 2

20AE3P9 B 3

1.5

2

3.0

4.4

1.3

0.9

2.0

1.7

3.1

2.7

4.5

3.9

1.1

2.0

3.6

4.3

1.4

2.6

4.8

5.9

20AE6P1 B 5 3

20AE9P0 C 7.5

5

7.5

7.7

7.8

6.1

8.0

9.0

6.7

9.9

9.2

13.5

20AE011 C 10 7.5

9.8

10.1 11.0

13.5

18.0

20AE017 D 15 10 15.3

15.9 17.0

18.7

25.5

20AE022 D 20 15 20.0

20.8 22.0

25.5

34.0

10

10

15

20

4

6

3

3

25

12

20

20

35

6

8

3

3.5

45

10

10

15

20

4

6

3

3

25

Non-Time

Delay Fuse

Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

20

35

40

60

3.5

6

10

15

80

Circuit

Breaker

(3)

Motor

Circuit

Protector

(4)

Amps Amps

20

35

40

60

15

15

15

15

80

15

15

15

30

7

7

3

3

30

140M Motor Starter with Adjustable Current Range

(5)(6)

Available Catalog Numbers

(7)

Not Applicable

See

page 2-85

for Notes.

Fuses and Circuit Breakers

2-85

Table 2.R PF700 208/240 Volt AC Input Recommended Protection Devices

Drive

Catalog

Number

HP

Rating

Input

Ratings Output Amps

Dual

Element Time

Delay Fuse

ND HD Amps kVA Cont. 1 Min. 3 Sec. Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

208 Volt AC Input

20BB2P2 0 0.5

0.33 1.9

20BB4P2 0 1 0.75 3.7

20BB6P8 0 2

20BB9P6 0 3

1.5

2

6.8

9.5

0.7

2.5

1.3

4.8

2.4

7.8

3.4

11

2.7

5.5

3.7

7.4

10.3

13.8

12.1

16.5

20BB015 1 5 3

20BB022 1 7.5

5

15.7

5.7

17.5

19.2

26.2

23.0

8.3

25.3

27.8

37.9

20BB028 2 10 7.5

29.6

10.7 32.2

37.9

50.6

20BB042 3 15 10 44.5

16.0 48.3

53 72.5

20BB054 3 20 15 57.2

20.6 62.1

72.5

97

240 Volt AC Input

20

30

40

60

3

6

10

12

80

35

50

70

100

6

10

15

20

125

20BB2P2 0 0.5

0.33 1.7

20BB4P2 0 1 0.75 3.3

20AB6P8 0 2

20BB9P6 0 3

1.5

2

5.9

8.3

0.7

2.2

1.4

4.2

2.4

6.8

3.4

9.6

2.4

4.8

9

10.6

3.3

6.4

12

14.4

20BB015 1 5 3

20BB022 1 7.5

5

13.7

5.7

15.3

17.4

23.2

19.9

8.3

22 24.2

33

20BB028 2 10 7.5

25.7

10.7 28

20BB042 3 15 10 38.5

16.0 42

33

46.2

44

63

20BB054 3 20 15 49.5

20.6 54 63 84

20

25

35

50

3

5

10

12

70

30

50

60

90

6

8

15

20

100

20

30

40

60

3

6

10

12

80

20

25

35

50

3

5

10

12

70

Non-Time

Delay Fuse

Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

70

100

125

175

10

17.5

30

40

225

60

80

100

150

10

15

25

35

200

70

100

125

175

15

15

30

40

225

60

80

100

150

15

15

25

35

200

Circuit

Breaker

(3)

Amps

Motor

Circuit

Protector

(4)

Amps

140M Motor Starter with Adjustable Current Range

(5)(6)

Available Catalog Numbers

(7)

60

80

100

150

15

15

25

35

200

30

30

50

70

3

7

15

15

100

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B63 140M-D8E-B63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C20 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C20 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C25 140M-F8E-C25 140M-CMN-2500

140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

140M-F8E-C45 140M-CMN-6300

– – – 140M-CMN-6300

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B63 140M-D8E-B63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C25 140M-F8E-C25 140M-CMN-2500

140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

140M-F8E-C45 140M-CMN-6300

– – – 140M-CMN-6300

Table 2.S PF700 400/480 Volt AC Input Recommended Protection Devices

Drive

Catalog

Number kW/HP

Rating

Input

Ratings Output Amps

Dual

Element Time

Delay Fuse

ND HD Amps kVA Cont. 1 Min. 3 Sec. Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

400 Volt AC Input

20BC1P1 0 0.37 0.25 1.08

0.75 1.3

20BC2P1 0 0.75 0.55 1.7

1.2

2.1

1.4

2.4

20BC3P5 0 1.5

0.75 3.1

20BC5P0 0 2.2

1.5

4.5

2.1

3.5

3.2

5.0

4.5

5.5

20BC8P7 0 4 2.2

8.2

20BC011 0 5.5

4 11.0

5.7

7.6

8.7

11.5

9.9

13

20BC015 1 7.5

5.5

15.1

10.4 15.4

17.2

20BC022 1 11 7.5

21.9

15.2 22 24.2

20BC030 2 15 11 30.3

21.0 30

20BC037 2 18.5 15 37.7

26.1 37

33

45

20BC043 3 22 18.5 44.1

30.6 43

20BC056 3 30 22 57.9

40.1 56

480 Volt AC Input

56

64

20

30

40

50

60

75

3

3

6

6

15

15

23.1

33

45

60

74

86

1.9

3.2

6.0

7.5

13.2

17.4

30

45

60

80

90

120

3

6

8

10

17.5

25

20BD1P1 0 0.5

0.33 0.9

20BD2P1 0 1 0.75 1.6

20BD3P4 0 2 1.5

2.6

0.7

1.1

1.4

2.1

2.2

3.4

20BD5P0 0 3

20BD8P0 0 5

2

3

3.9

6.9

3.2

5.0

5.7

8.0

20BD011 0 7.5

5 9.5

7.9

11

20BD014 1 10 7.5

12.5

10.4 14

20BD022 1 15 10 19.9

16.6 22

20BD027 2 20 15 24.8

20.6 27

20BD034 2 25 20 31.2

25.9 34

20BD040 3 30 25 36.7

30.5 40

20BD052 3 40 30 47.7

39.7 52

24.2

33

40.5

51

60

1.2

2.4

4.5

5.5

8.8

12.1

16.5

33

44

54

68

80

1.6

3.2

6.0

7.5

12

16.5

22

25

35

40

50

60

3

3

4

6

10

15

17.5

50

60

70

90

110

10

15

20

30

3

6

8

20

30

40

50

60

75

3

3

6

6

15

15

25

35

40

50

60

3

3

4

6

10

15

17.5

Non-Time

Delay Fuse

Min.

(1)

Max.

(2)

Circuit

Breaker

(3)

Amps

Motor

Circuit

Protector

(4)

Amps

140M Motor Starter with Adjustable Current Range

(5)(6)

Available Catalog Numbers

(7)

80

100

125

150

200

20

30

40

50

4

8

12

60

80

120

125

150

200

5

8

12

20

30

45

30

50

50

50

70

7

15

15

20

3

3

7

80

100

125

150

200

20

30

40

50

15

15

15

20

30

50

50

80

80

3

3

7

7

15

15

60

80

120

125

150

200

15

15

15

20

30

45

140M-C2E-B16 – –

140M-C2E-B25 140M-D8E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B40 140M-D8E-B40 –

140M-C2E-B63 140M-D8E-B63 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C20 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C20 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C25 140M-F8E-C25 –

140M-F8E-C32 –

140M-F8E-C45 –

140M-C2E-B16 –

140M-C2E-B25 –

140M-C2E-B40 140M-D8E-B40 –

140M-C2E-C63 140M-D8E-C63 – –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C10 140M-D8E-C10 140M-F8E-C10 –

140M-C2E-C16 140M-D8E-C16 140M-F8E-C16 –

140M-C2E-C25 140M-D8E-C20 140M-F8E-C25 140M-CMN-2500

– – 140M-F8E-C32 140M-CMN-4000

140M-F8E-C45 140M-CMN-4000

140M-F8E-C45 140M-CMN-4000

– – – 140M-CMN-6300

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

Minimum protection device size is the lowest rated device that supplies maximum protection without nuisance tripping.

Maximum protection device size is the highest rated device that supplies drive protection.

Circuit Breaker - inverse time breaker.

Motor Circuit Protector - instantaneous trip circuit breaker.

Bulletin 140M with adjustable current range should have the current trip set to the minimum range that the device will not trip.

Manual Self-Protected (Type E) Combination Motor Controller, UL listed for 208 Wye or Delta, 240 Wye or Delta, 480Y/277 or 600Y/ 347. Not UL listed for use on

480V or 600V Delta/Delta systems.

The AIC ratings of the Bulletin 140M Motor Protector may vary. See publication 140M-SG001B-EN-P.

2-86

Grounding, General

Grounding, General

The drive Safety Ground - PE must be connected to system ground. Ground impedance must conform to the requirements of national and local industrial safety regulations and/or electrical codes. The integrity of all ground connections should be periodically checked.

Figure 2.11 Typical Grounding

R (L1)

S (L2)

T (L3)

U (T1)

V (T2)

W (T3)

PE

SHLD

For installations within a cabinet, a single safety ground point or ground bus bar connected directly to building steel should be used. All circuits including the AC input ground conductor should be grounded independently and directly to this point/bar.

Figure 2.12 Single-Point Grounding/Panel Layout

R (L1)

T (L3)

S (L2)

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

TE PE

Refer to

page 2-87 for an

explanation of numbered items.

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

TE PE

U (T1)

V (T2)

W (T3)

U (T1)

V (T2)

W (T3)

Grounding, General

2-87

No.

1

Description

Programmable Controller

4

5

2

3

PE

PE (Safety) - ground bus

Nearest building structure steel

Shield

8

9

6

7

Additional shield (if required)

Attach to motor frame

Analog signal

Motor Terminator

10 Common mode core

Install as

Needed Notes

Refer to publication 1770-4.1 for Programmable

Controller Grounding Recommendations

Motor ground

PE to bus to building steel

Ground per local or national codes

Safety Ground - PE

This is the safety ground for the drive that is required by code. This point must be connected to adjacent building steel (girder, joist), a floor ground rod or bus bar (see above). Grounding points must comply with national and local industrial safety regulations and/or electrical codes. A second terminal is provided for the motor ground connection.

Shield Termination - SHLD

The SHLD terminal (located on the Cable Entry Plate) provides a grounding point for the motor cable shield. It must be connected to an earth ground by a separate continuous lead. The motor cable shield should be grounded to both the drive Cable Entry Plate (drive end) and the motor frame (motor end).

When shielded cable is used for remote control and signal wiring, the shield should be grounded at the source end only, not at the drive.

RFI Filter Grounding

Using an optional RFI filter may result in relatively high ground leakage currents. Therefore, the filter must only be used in installations with grounded AC supply systems and be permanently installed and solidly grounded (bonded) to the building power distribution ground.

Ensure that the incoming supply neutral is solidly connected (bonded) to the same building power distribution ground. Grounding must not rely on flexible cables and should not include any form of plug or socket that would permit inadvertent disconnection. Some local codes may require redundant ground connections. The integrity of all connections should be periodically checked. Refer to the instructions supplied with the filter

2-88

HIM Memory

HIM Memory

HIM Operations

See

Copy Cat on page 2-39 .

Selecting a Language

See also

Language on page 2-91 . PowerFlex 700 drives support multiple

languages. When you first apply drive power, a language screen appears on the HIM. Use the Up or Down Arrow to scroll through the available languages. Press Enter to select the desired language. To switch to an alternate language, follow the steps below.

Step

1. Press ALT and then the Up Arrow (Lang).

The Language screen will appear.

2. Press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to scroll through the languages.

3. Press Enter to select a language.

Key(s)

ALT

+

Example Displays

Speak English?

Parlez Francais?

Spechen Duetsch?

Plare Italiano?

Using Passwords

By default the password is set to 00000 (password protection disabled).

Logging in to the Drive

Step

1. Press the Up or Down Arrow to enter your password. Press Sel to move from digit to digit.

2. Press Enter to log in.

Key(s) Example Displays

Login: Enter

Password 9999

Logging Out

Step

You are automatically logged out when the User

Display appears. If you want to log out before that, select “log out” from the Main Menu.

Key(s)

To change a password

Step

1. Use the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to scroll to

Operator Intrfc. Press Enter.

Key(s)

2. Select “Change Password” and press Enter.

3. Enter the old password. If a password has not been set, type “0.” Press Enter.

4. Enter a new password (1- 65535). Press

Enter and verify the new password. Press

Enter to save the new password.

Example Displays

Example Displays

Operator Intrfc:

Change Password

User Display

Parameters

Password:

Old Code: 0

New Code: 9999

Verify: 9999

The User Display

The User Display is shown when module keys have been inactive for a predetermined amount of time. The display can be programmed to show pertinent information.

Input Devices

Input Devices

2-89

Setting the User Display

Step

1. Press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to scroll to Operator Intrfc. Press Enter.

Key(s)

2. Press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to scroll to User Display. Press Enter.

3. Select the desired user display. Press Enter.

Scroll to the parameter that the user display will be based on.

4. Press Enter. Set a scale factor.

Sel

5. Press Enter to save the scale factor and move to the last line.

6. Press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to change the text.

7. Press Enter to save the new user display.

Example Displays

Operator Intrfc:

Change Password

User Display

Parameters

Setting the Properties of the User Display

The following HIM parameters can be set as desired:

User Display - Enables or disables the user display.

User Display 1 - Selects which user display parameter appears on the top line of the user display.

User Display 2 - Selects which user display parameter appears on the bottom line of the user display.

User Display Time - Sets how many seconds will elapse after the last programming key is touched before the HIM displays the user display.

Contactors

See

Motor Start/Stop Precautions on page 2-100

Circuit Breakers / Fuses

See

Fuses and Circuit Breakers on page 2-83

Filters

Internal EMC

Refer to

CE Conformity on page 2-37 .

External EMC

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

2-90

Input Modes

Input Modes

The PowerFlex family of drives does not use a direct choice of 2-wire or

3-wire input modes, but allows full configuration of the digital I/O. As a means of defining the modes used, consider the following:

2-Wire Control

This input mode is so named because it only utilizes one device and 2 wires to control both the Start (normally referred to as

“RUN” in 2-wire) and Stop functions in an application.

A maintained contact device, such as a thermostat, for example, closes its contact to

Run the drive and opens to

Stop the drive

Run/Stop

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

In other applications, the maintained device (such as a limit switch), can directly control both Run/Stop and direction control . . .

Run Forward

Run Reverse

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

Or, a combination of the two may be desirable.

Run

Forward/Reverse

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

3-Wire Control

This input mode utilizes 2 devices requiring 3 wires to control the

Start (proper term for 3-wire) and

Stop functions in an application.

In this case, momentary contact devices, such as pushbuttons are used.

A Start is issued when the

Start button is closed, but unlike 2-wire circuits, the drive does not Stop when the

Start button is released.

Instead, 3-wire control requires a Stop input to Stop the drive

Direction control is accomplished either with momentary inputs . . .

Start

Stop

Start

Stop

Forward

Reverse

Or, with a maintained input.

Start

Stop

Forward/Reverse

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PORT

MOD

NET A

NET B

PWR

STS

PWR

STS

PWR

STS

Input Power

Conditioning

Jog

Language

Input Power Conditioning

2-91

In general, the drive is suitable for direct connection to an AC line of the correct voltage. Certain conditions can exist, however, that prompt consideration of a line reactor or isolation transformer ahead of the drive.

The basic rules to aid in determining whether a line reactor or isolation transformer should be considered are as follows:

1. If the source is greater than 6 times the drive kVA then use a reactor or transformer.

2. If the AC source for the drive does not have a ground reference (neutral or phase ground), an isolation transformer with the neutral of the secondary grounded is highly recommended. These products contain PE referenced capacitors for EMC compliance and PE referenced MOV devices for input transient voltage limiting. If the drive must be operated on an ungrounded voltage source, these devices should be disconnected from PE by removing the appropriate jumpers (Refer to Disconnecting

MOVs and Common Mode Capacitors in the User Manual). Transients occurring on a non-ground referenced voltage source may generate excessive line to ground voltages which could exceed the limits of the insulation system of the drive. Under these conditions, it is highly recommended that a system level transient voltage suppression device be employed in order to limit the potential line to ground voltage.

Figure 2.13 Phase to Ground MOV Removal (PF70)

Three-Phase

AC Input

R

S

T

JP2 JP3 1 2 3 4

3. Power factor capacitor switching will cause line voltage transients.

Characteristics of how the capacitors are switched and the impedance of the distribution system will determine the nature of the voltage transients. If the transients are severe enough and the source impedance as seen by the drive is low enough, nuisance fuse blowing, overvoltage faults or drive power structure damage may occur. Historically if there have been voltage transient issues at the facility where the drive is being applied, the use of a 5% 3 phase reactor or appropriately sized isolation transformer for the drive 3 phase power is recommended.

Refer to

Jog on page 2-51 .

PowerFlex drives are capable of communicating in 7 languages; English,

Spanish, German, Italian, French, Portuguese and Dutch. All drive functions and information displayed on an LCD HIM are shown in the

2-92

Masks

Masks

selected language. The desired language can be selected several different ways:

On initial drive power-up, a language choice screen appears.

The language choice screen can also be recalled at any time to change to a new language. This is accomplished by pressing the “Alt” key followed by the “Lang” key.

The language can also be changed by selecting the [Language] parameter (201). Note that this parameter is not functional when using an LED HIM.

A mask is a parameter that contains one bit for each of the possible

Adapters. Each bit acts like a valve for issued commands. Closing the valve

(setting a bit's value to 0) stops the command from reaching the drive logic.

Opening the valve (setting a bit's value to 1) allows the command to pass through the mask into the drive logic.

276 [Logic Mask]

Determines which adapters can control the drive. If the bit for an adapter is set to

“0,” the adapter will have no control functions except for stop.

288 thru

297 x

15 x

14 x

13 x

12 x

11 x

10 x

9 x

8 x

7 x

6

Bit #

Factory Default Bit Values

277 [Start Mask]

Controls which adapters can issue start commands.

278 [Jog Mask]

Controls which adapters can issue jog commands.

279 [Direction Mask]

1

5

D

PI P ort

5

D

PI P ort

4

D

PI P

D ort

3

PI P ort

2

D

PI P ort

1

D ig ital In

1

4

1

3

1

2

1

1

1

0

1 =Control Permitted

0 =Control Masked x =Reserved

See

See

See

[Logic Mask]

[Logic Mask]

[Logic Mask] .

.

.

Controls which adapters can issue forward/reverse direction commands.

280 [Reference Mask]

Controls which adapters can select an alternate reference; [Speed Ref A, B Sel] or [Preset Speed 1-7].

281 [Accel Mask]

Controls which adapters can select

[Accel Time 1, 2].

282 [Decel Mask]

Controls which adapters can select

[Decel Time 1, 2].

283 [Fault Clr Mask]

Controls which adapters can clear a fault.

See

See

See

See

[Logic Mask]

[Logic Mask]

[Logic Mask]

[Logic Mask] .

.

.

.

284 [MOP Mask]

Controls which adapters can issue MOP commands to the drive.

285 [Local Mask]

Controls which adapters are allowed to take exclusive control of drive logic commands (except stop). Exclusive

“local” control can only be taken while the drive is stopped.

See

[Logic Mask] .

See

[Logic Mask] .

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

288 thru

297

Masks

2-93

Example: A customer's process is normally controlled by a remote PLC, but the drive is mounted on the machine. The customer does not want anyone to walk up to the drive and reverse the motor because it would damage the process. The local HIM (drive mounted Adapter 1) is configured with an operator's panel that includes a “REV” Button. To assure that only the PLC (connected to Adapter 2) has direction control, the

[Direction Mask] can be set as follows:

Direction Mask

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

Adapter # X 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

This “masks out” the reverse function from all adapters except Adapter 2, making the local HIM (Adapter 1) REV button inoperable. Also see

Owners on page 2-104 .

2-94

MOP

MOP

The Motor Operated Pot (MOP) function is one of the sources for the frequency reference. The MOP function uses digital inputs to increment or decrement the Speed reference at a programmed rate.

The MOP has three components:

[MOP Rate] parameter

[Save MOP Ref] parameter

[MOP Frequency] parameter

MOP increment input

MOP decrement input

The MOP reference rate is defined in [MOP rate]. The MOP function is defined graphically below

MOP dec

MOP inc

MOP reference

MOP rate is defined in Hz/sec. The MOP reference will increase/decrease linearly at that rate as long as the MOP inc or dec is asserted via TB or DPI port (the MOP inputs are treated as level sensitive).

Both the MOP inc and dec will use the same rate (i.e. they can not be separately configured). The MOP rate is the rate of change of the MOP reference. The selected active MOP reference still feeds the ramp function to arrive at the present commanded speed/frequency (eg. is still based on the accel/decel rates). Asserting both MOP inc and dec inputs simultaneously will result in no change to the MOP reference.

[Save MOP Ref] is a packed boolean parameter with two bits used as follows:

Bit 0

0 = Don’t save MOP reference on power-down (default)

1 = Save MOP reference on power-down

If the value is “SAVE MOP Ref” when the drive power returns, the MOP reference is reloaded with the value from the non-volatile memory.

When the bit is set to 0, the MOP reference defaults to zero when power is restored. The MOP save reference parameter and the MOP rate parameter can be changed while the drive is running.

Bit 1

0 = Reset MOP reference when STOP edge is asserted

1 = Don’t reset MOP reference when STOP is asserted (default)

MOP

2-95

Important: The MOP reset only occurs on the stop edge and is not continuously cleared because the stop is asserted (this is always processed when a stop edge is seen, even if the drive is stopped). The reset only applies to the stop edge and not when a fault is detected.

In order to change the MOP reference (increment or decrement) a given DPI port must have the MOP mask asserted (and the logic mask asserted). In the case of the terminal block, if the MOP increment or MOP decrement function is assigned to a digital input, then the act of asserting either of those inputs will cause the TB to try and gain ownership of the MOP inc/ dec reference change.

Ownership of the MOP function can be obtained even if the MOP reference is not being used to control the drive. If ownership is granted, the owner has the right to inc/dec the MOP reference. Whether this reference is the active speed reference for the drive is separately selected via TB reference select, or Ref A/B select through DPI.

The MOP Frequency parameter is an output which shows the active value of the MOP reference in Hz x 10.

MOP handling with Direction Mode

If the Direction Mode is configured for “Unipolar,” then the MOP decrement will clamp at zero not allowing the user to generate a negative

MOP reference that is clamped off by the reference generation. When

Direction Mode = “Bipolar” the MOP reference will permit the decrement function to produce negative values. If the drive is configured for Direction

Mode = “Bipolar” and then is changed to “Unipolar”, the MOP reference will also be clamped at zero if it was less than zero.

2-96

Motor Nameplate

Motor Nameplate

[Motor NP Volts]

The motor nameplate base voltage defines the output voltage, when operating at rated current, rated speed, and rated temperature.

[Motor NP FLA]

The motor nameplate defines the output amps, when operating at rated voltage, rated speed, and rated temperature. It is used in the motor thermal overload, and in the calculation of slip.

[Motor NP Hz]

The motor nameplate base frequency defines the output frequency, when operating at rated voltage, rated current, rated speed, and rated temperature.

[Motor NP RPM]

The motor nameplate RPM defines the rated speed, when operating at motor nameplate base frequency, rated current, base voltage, and rated temperature. This is used to calculate slip.

[Motor NP Power]

The motor nameplate power is used together with the other nameplate values to calculate default values for motor parameters to and facilitate the commissioning process. This may be entered in horsepower or in kilowatts as selected in the previous parameter or kW for certain catalog numbers and

HP for others.

[Motor NP Pwr Units]

The rated power of the motor may be entered in horsepower or in kilowatts.

This parameter determines the units on the following parameter.

Motor Overload

Motor Overload

2-97

The motor thermal overload uses an IT algorithm to model the temperature of the motor. The curve is modeled after a Class 10 protection thermal overload relay that produces a theoretical trip at 600% motor current in ten

(10) seconds and continuously operates at full motor current. Motor nameplate FLA programming is used to set the overload feature. This parameter, set in the start up procedure, is adjustable from 0 - 200% of drive rating and should be set for the actual motor FLA rating.

Setting the correct bit in the Fault Config parameter to zero disables the motor thermal overload. Since the MTO cannot distinguish individual currents in a multimotor application, it is suggested that the MTO be disabled.

The operation of the overload is actually based on three parameters, Motor

Nameplate Full Load Amps, Motor Overload Factor, and Motor Overload

Hz. Motor nameplate full load amps is multiplied by the motor overload factor to allow the user to move the motor overload protection into the drive overload area (simulating a higher motor service factor) by defining the continuous level of current allowed by the MTO.

Motor Overload Hz is used to allow the user to adjust the response of the

MTO to lower motor speeds (lower output frequencies) where a higher degree of protection may be required due to decreased motor cooling.

Motor Overload Curve

100000

10000

1000

100

10

100 125 150 175 200

Full Load Amps (%)

225

250

Cold

Hot

[Motor OL Hz]

[Motor OL Hertz] is used to further protect motors with limited speed ranges. Since some motors may not have sufficient cooling ability at lower speeds, the Overload feature can be programmed to increase protection in the lower speed areas. This parameter defines the frequency where derating the motor overload capacity should begin. As shown here, the motor overload capacity is reduced when operating below the motor overload Hz.

For all settings of overload Hz other than zero, the overload capacity is reduced to 70% when output frequency is zero.

2-98

Motor Overload

During DC injection the motor current may exceed 70% of FLA, but this will cause the Motor Thermal Overload to trip sooner than when operating at base speed. At low frequencies, the limiting factor may be the Drive

Thermal Overload.

Changing Overload Hz

120

100

80

60

40

20

OL Hz = 10

OL Hz = 25

OL Hz = 50

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

% of Base Speed

1 Minute

150%

100%

1 Minute

20 Minutes

{Motor OL Factor]

[Motor OL Factor] is used to adjust for the service factor of the motor.

Within the drive, motor nameplate FLA is multiplied by motor overload factor to select the rated current for the motor thermal overload. This can be used to raise or lower the level of current that will cause the motor thermal overload to trip without the need to adjust the motor FLA. For example, if motor nameplate FLA is 10 Amps and motor overload factor is 1.2, then motor thermal overload will use 12 Amps as 100%.

The effective overload factor is a combination of overload Hz and overload factor.

Motor Overload

2-99

Changing Overload Factor

140

120

100

80

60

40

20

OL % = 1.20

OL % = 1.00

OL % = 0.80

120

125

130

135

FLA%

105

110

115

140

145

150

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

% of Base Speed

Duty Cycle for the Motor Thermal Overload

When the motor is cold motor thermal overload will allow 3 minutes at

150%. When the motor is hot motor thermal overload will allow 1 minute at

150%. A continuous load of 102% will not trip. The duty cycle of the motor thermal overload is defined as follows. If operating continuous at 100%

FLA, and the load increases to 150% FLA for 59 seconds and then returns to 100%FLA, the load must remain at 100% FLA for 20 minutes to reach steady state.

The ratio of 1:20 is the same for all durations of 150%. When operating continuous at 100%, if the load increases to 150% for 1 second the load must then return to 100% for 20 seconds before another step to 150%

291

244

209

180

934

619

456

357

Cold Trip

Time

6320

1794

122

94

74

60

667

375

240

167

Hot Trip

Time

5995

1500

170

175

180

185

FLA%

155

160

165

190

195

200

88

82

76

70

128

115

105

96

Cold Trip

Time

160

142

21

19

17

15

36

31

27

23

Hot Trip

Time

50

42

220

225

230

235

FLA%

205

210

215

240

245

250

46

44

41

39

58

54

51

48

Cold Trip

Time

66

62

7

7

8

8

11

10

10

9

Hot Trip

Time

14

12

2-100

Motor Start/Stop Precautions

Motor Start/Stop

Precautions

Mounting

!

!

ATTENTION: A contactor or other device that routinely disconnects and reapplies the AC line to the drive to start and stop the motor can cause drive hardware damage. The drive is designed to use control input signals that will start and stop the motor. If an input device is used occasionally, an auxiliary contact on that device should also be wired to a digital input programmed as a

“Stop” function.

ATTENTION: The drive start/stop control circuitry includes solidstate components. If hazards due to accidental contact with moving machinery or unintentional flow of liquid, gas or solids exist, an additional hardwired stop circuit may be required to remove the AC line to the drive. When the AC line is removed, there will be a loss of any inherent regenerative braking effect that might be present - the motor will coast to a stop. An auxiliary braking method may be required.

Refer to the User Manual for Mounting Clearances. Drive mounting dimensions are presented in

Chapter 1 .

Output Current

Output Devices

Output Current

2-101

[Output Current]

This parameter displays the total output current of the drive. The current value displayed here is the vector sum of both torque producing and flux producing current components.

Drive Output Disconnection

!

ATTENTION: Any disconnecting means wired to the drive output terminals U, V and W must be capable of disabling the drive if opened during drive operation. If opened during drive operation, the drive will continue to produce output voltage between U, V, W. An auxiliary contact must be used to simultaneously disable the drive.

Allen-Bradley Drives can be used with an output contactor between the drive and motor. This contactor can be opened under load without damage to the drive. It is recommended, however, that the drive have a programmed

“Enable” input and that this input be opened at the same time as the output contactor.

Cable Termination

Voltage doubling at motor terminals, known as reflected wave phenomenon, standing wave or transmission line effect, can occur when using drives with long motor cables.

Inverter duty motors with phase-to-phase insulation ratings of 1200 volts or higher should be used to minimize effects of reflected wave on motor insulation life.

Applications with non-inverter duty motors or any motor with exceptionally long leads may require an output filter or cable terminator. A filter or terminator will help limit reflection to the motor, to levels which are less than the motor insulation rating.

Cable length restrictions for unterminated cables are discussed on

page 2-31 . Remember that the voltage doubling phenomenon occurs at dif-

ferent lengths for different drive ratings. If your installation requires longer motor cable lengths, a reactor or cable terminator is recommended.

Optional Output Reactor

Bulletin 1321 Reactors can be used for drive input and output. These reactors are specifically constructed to accommodate IGBT inverter applications with switching frequencies up to 20 kHz. They have a UL approved dielectric strength of 4000 volts, opposed to a normal rating of 2500 volts.

The first two and last two turns of each coil are triple insulated to guard against insulation breakdown resulting from high dv/dt. When using motor line reactors, it is recommended that the drive PWM frequency be set to its lowest value to minimize losses in the reactors.

2-102

Output Frequency

Output Frequency

Output Power

Output Voltage

By using an output reactor the effective motor voltage will be lower because of the voltage drop across the reactor - this may also mean a reduction of motor torque.

[Output Frequency]

This parameter displays the actual output frequency of the drive. The output frequency is created by a summation of commanded frequency and any active speed regulator such as slip compensation, PI Loop, bus regulator.

The actual output may be different than the commanded frequency.

This parameter displays the output kW of the drive. The ouput power is a calculated value and tends to be inaccurate at lower speeds. It is not recommended for use as a process variable to control a process.

[Output Voltage]

This parameter displays the actual output voltage at the drive output terminals. The actual output voltage may be different than that determined by the sensorless vector or V/Hz algorithms because it may be modified by features such as the Auto-Economizer.

Overspeed Limit

Overspeed Limit

2-103

The Overspeed Limit is a user programmable value that allows operation at maximum speed but also provides an “overspeed band” that will allow a speed regulator such as encoder feedback or slip compensation to increase the output frequency above maximum Speed in order to maintain maximum

Motor Speed.

Figure 2.14

illustrates a typical Custom V/Hz profile. Minimum Speed is

entered in Hertz and determines the lower speed reference limit during normal operation. Maximum Speed is entered in Hertz and determines the upper speed reference limit. The two “Speed” parameters only limit the speed reference and not the output frequency.

The actual output frequency at maximum speed reference is the sum of the speed reference plus “speed adder” components from functions such as slip compensation.

The Overspeed Limit is entered in Hertz and added to Maximum Speed and the sum of the two (Speed Limit) limit the output frequency. This sum

(Speed Limit) must is compared to Maximum Frequency and an alarm is initiated which prevents operation if the Speed Limit exceeds Maximum

Frequency.

Figure 2.14 Typical V/Hz Curve for Full Custom (with Speed/Frequency Limits

Allowable Output Frequency Range -

Bus Regulation or Current Limit

Allowable Output Frequency Range - Normal Operation

1

Allowable Speed Reference Range

Maximum

Voltage

Motor NP

Voltage

Frequency Trim due to Speed

Control Mode

Overspeed

Limit

Break

Voltage

Start

Boost

Run

Boost

0 Minimum

Speed

Break

Frequency

Motor NP Hz Maximum

Speed

Output

Frequency

Limit

Maximum

Frequency

Frequency

Note 1: The lower limit on this range can be 0 depending on the value of Speed Adder

2-104

Owners

Owners

An owner is a parameter that contains one bit for each of the possible adapters. The bits are set high (value of 1) when its adapter is currently issuing that command, and set low when its adapter is not issuing that command. Ownership falls into two categories;

Exclusive: Only one adapter at a time can issue the command and only one bit in the parameter will be high.

Non Exclusive: Multiple adapters can simultaneously issue the same command and multiple bits may be high.

288 [Stop Owner]

Adapters that are presently issuing a valid stop command.

Read Only 276 thru

285 x

15 x

14 x

13 x

12 x

11 x

10 x

9 x

8 x

7 x

6

ort

5 ort

4 ort

3 ort

2 ort

1

0

5

D

PI P

D

PI P

D

PI P

D

PI P

0

4

0

3

0

2

0

1

D

PI P

1

0

D igital In

1 =Issuing Command

0 =No Command x =Reserved

Bit #

289 [Start Owner]

Adapters that are presently issuing a valid start command.

290 [Jog Owner]

See [Stop Owner]

See [Stop Owner]

Adapters that are presently issuing a valid jog command.

291 [Direction Owner]

Adapter that currently has exclusive control of direction changes.

292 [Reference Owner]

Adapter that has the exclusive control of the command frequency source selection.

293 [Accel Owner]

Adapter that has exclusive control of selecting [Accel Time 1, 2].

See [Stop Owner]

See [Stop Owner]

See [Stop Owner]

See [Stop Owner] 294 [Decel Owner]

Adapter that has exclusive control of selecting [Decel Time 1, 2].

295 [Fault Clr Owner]

Adapter that is presently clearing a fault.

See [Stop Owner]

296 [MOP Owner]

Adapters that are currently issuing increases or decreases in MOP command frequency.

297 [Local Owner]

Adapter that has requested exclusive control of all drive logic functions. If an adapter is in local lockout, all other functions (except stop) on all other adapters are locked out and non-functional. Local control can only be obtained when the drive is not running.

See [Stop Owner]

See [Stop Owner]

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

Some ownership must be exclusive; that is, only one Adapter at a time can issue certain commands and claim ownership of that function. For example, it is not allowable to have one Adapter command the drive to run in the

forward direction while another Adapter is issuing a command to make the drive run in reverse. Direction Control, therefore, is exclusive ownership.

140

276 thru

285

142

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

276 thru

285

Owners

2-105

Conversely, any number of adapters can simultaneously issue Stop

Commands. Therefore, Stop Ownership is not exclusive.

Example:

The operator presses the Stop button on the Local HIM to stop the drive.

When the operator attempts to restart the drive by pressing the HIM Start button, the drive does not restart. The operator needs to determine why the drive will not restart.

The operator first views the Start owner to be certain that the Start button on the HIM is issuing a command.

Start Owner

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Adapter # X 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

When the local Start button is pressed, the display indicates that the command is coming from the HIM.

Start Owner

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Adapter # X 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

The [Start Owner] indicates that there is not any maintained Start commands causing the drive to run.

Stop Owner

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Adapter # X 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

The operator then checks the Stop Owner. Notice that bit 0 is a value of “1,” indicating that the Stop device wired to the Digital Input terminal block is open, issuing a Stop command to the drive.

Until this device is reclosed, a permanent Start Inhibit condition exists and the drive will not restart.

Also refer to

Start Inhibits

and

Start Permissives .

2-106

Parameter Access Level

Parameter Access

Level

PET

The PowerFlex 70 allows the user to restrict the number of parameters that are viewable on the LCD or LED HIM. By limiting the parameter view to the most commonly adjusted set, additional features that may make the drive seem more complicated are hidden.

If you are trying to gain access to a particular parameter and the HIM skips over it, you must change the parameter view from “Basic” to “Advanced.”

This can be accomplished in two different ways:

Press “Alt” and then “View” from the HIM and change the view.

or

Reprogram Parameter 196 [Param Access Lvl] to “Advanced”.

Pulse Elimination Technique – See

Reflected Wave on page 2-127 .

Power Loss

Power Loss

2-107

Some processes or applications cannot tolerate drive output interruptions caused by momentary power outages. When AC input line power is interrupted to the drive, user programming can determine the drive’s reaction.

Terms

The following is a definition of terms. Some of these values are drive parameters and some are not. The description of how these operate is explained below

Term

Vbus

Vmem

Definition

The instantaneous DC bus voltage.

The average DC bus voltage. A measure of the “nominal” bus voltage determined by heavily filtering bus voltage. Just after the pre-charge relay is closed during the initial power-up bus pre-charge, bus memory is set equal to bus voltage. Thereafter it is updated by ramping at a very slow rate toward Vbus. The filtered value ramps at 2.4VDC

per minute (for a 480VAC drive). An increase in Vmem is blocked during deceleration to prevent a false high value due to the bus being pumped up by regeneration. Any change to Vmem is blocked during inertia ride through.

Vslew The rate of change of Vmem in volts per minute.

Vrecover The threshold for recovery from power loss.

Vtrigger The threshold to detect power loss.

PowerFlex 700

The level is adjustable. The default is the value in the PF700 Bus Level table. If “Pwr Loss

Lvl” is selected as an input function AND energized, Vtrigger is set to Vmem minus

[Power Loss Level].

Vopen is normally 60VDC below Vtrigger (in a 480VAC drive). Both Vopen and Vtrigger are limited to a minimum of Vmin. This is only a factor if [Power Loss Level] is set to a large value.

PowerFlex 70 This is a fixed value.

WARNING:

When using a value of Parameter #186 [Power Loss Level] larger than default, the customer must provide a minimum line impedance to limit inrush current when the power line recovers. The input impedance should be equal or greater than the equivalent of a

5% transformer with a VA rating 5 times the drive’s input VA rating.

Vinertia The software regulation reference for Vbus during inertia ride through.

Vclose The threshold to close the pre-charge contactor.

Vopen

Vmin

Voff

The threshold to open the pre-charge contactor.

The minimum value of Vopen.

The bus voltage below which the switching power supply falls out of regulation.

Table 2.T PF70 Bus Levels

Class

Vslew

Vrecover

Vclose

Vtrigger1

Vtrigger2

Vopen

Vmin

Voff 3

200/240 VAC

1.2 VDC

Vmem – 30V

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 90V

Vmem – 90V

204 VDC

?

400/480 VAC

2.4 VDC

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 120V

Vmem – 120V

Vmem – 180V

Vmem – 180V

407 VDC

300 VDC

600/690 VAC

3.0 VDC

Vmem – 75V

Vmem – 150V

Vmem – 150V

Vmem – 225V

Vmem – 225V

509 VDC

?

2-108

Power Loss

550

500

450

400

350

300

700

650

600

700

650

600

550

500

450

Line Loss Mode = Decel

Recover

Close

Trigger

Open

400

350 400

AC Input Volts

Table 2.U PF700 Bus Levels

Class

Vslew

Vrecover

Vclose

Vtrigger1,2

Vtrigger1,3

Vopen

Vopen4

Vmin

Voff 5

200/240 VAC

1.2 VDC

Vmem – 30V

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 90V

Vmem – 90V

153 VDC

153 VDC

450

Note 1:Vtrigger is adjustable, these are the standard values.

Line Loss Mode = Coast

550

500

450

400

350

300

700

650

600

Recover

Close

Trigger

Open

350 400

AC Input Volts

450

550

500

450

400

350

300

700

650

600

400/480 VAC

2.4 VDC

Vmem – 60V

Vmem – 120V

Vmem – 120V

Vmem – 180V

Vmem – 180V

305 VDC

305 VDC

200 VDC

700

650

600

550

500

450

400

350

350

Line Loss Mode = Coast

Recover

Close

Trigger

Open

400

AC Input Volts

600/690 VAC

3.0 VDC

Vmem – 75V

Vmem – 150V

Vmem – 150V

Vmem – 225V

Vmem – 225V

382 VDC

382 VDC

Line Loss Mode = Decel

Recover

Close

Trigger

Open

400

AC Input Volts

450

450

Line Loss Mode = Half Voltage

Recover

Close

Trigger

Open

350 400

AC Input Volts

450

Power Loss

2-109

Restart after Power Restoration

If a power loss causes the drive to coast and power recovers the drive will return to powering the motor if it is in a “run permit” state. The drive is in a

“run permit” state if:

3 wire mode – it is not faulted and if all Enable and Not Stop inputs are energized.

2 wire mode – it is not faulted and if all Enable, Not Stop, and Run inputs are energized.

Power Loss Actions

The drive is designed to operate at a nominal bus voltage. When Vbus falls below this nominal value by a significant amount, action can be taken to preserve the bus energy and keep the drive logic alive as long as possible.

The drive will have three methods of dealing with low bus voltages:

“Coast” – Disable the transistors and allow the motor to coast.

“Inertia” – Decelerate the motor at just the correct rate so that the energy absorbed from the mechanical load balances the losses.

“Half Voltage” – Allow the drive to power the motor down to half bus voltage.If Parameter #184 [Power Loss Mode] = “Coast”

013

185

184 [Power Loss Mode]

Sets the reaction to a loss of input power.

Power loss is recognized when:

DC bus voltage is

73% of [DC Bus

Memory] and [Power Loss Mode] is set to “Coast”.

DC bus voltage is

82% of [DC Bus

Memory] and [Power Loss Mode] is set to “Decel”.

Default:

Options:

0

0

1

2

3

4

“Coast”

“Coast”

“Decel”

“Continue”

“Coast Input”

“Decel Input”

Coast

This is the default mode of operation.

The drive determines a power loss has occurred if the bus voltage drops below Vtrigger. If the drive is running the inverter output is disabled and the motor coasts.

The power loss alarm in [Drive Alarm 1] is set and the power loss timer starts.

The Alarm bit in [Drive Status 1] is set if the Power Loss bit in [Alarm

Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F003 – Power Loss Fault if the power loss timer exceeds [Power Loss Time] and the Power Loss bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F004 – UnderVoltage fault if the bus voltage falls below Vmin and the UnderVoltage bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The pre-charge relay opens if the bus voltage drops below Vopen and closes if the bus voltage rises above Vclose

2-110

Power Loss

If the bus voltage rises above Vrecover for 20mS, the drive determines the power loss is over. The power loss alarm is cleared.

If the drive is in a “run permit” state, the reconnect algorithm is run to match the speed of the motor. The drive then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed.

Bus Voltage

680V

620V

560V

500V

407V

305V

Motor Speed

Power Loss

Output Enable

Pre-Charge

Drive Fault

Decel

This mode of operation is useful if the mechanical load is high inertia and low friction. By recapturing the mechanical energy, converting it to electrical energy and returning it to the drive, the bus voltage is maintained.

As long as there is mechanical energy, the ride through time is extended and the motor remains fully fluxed up. If AC input power is restored, the drive can ramp the motor to the correct speed without the need for reconnecting.

The drive determines a power loss has occurred if the bus voltage drops below Vtrigger.

If the drive is running, the inertia ride through function is activated.

The load is decelerated at just the correct rate so that the energy absorbed from the mechanical load balances the losses and bus voltage is regulated to the value Vinertia.

The Power Loss alarm in [Drive Alarm 1] is set and the power loss timer starts.

The Alarm bit in [Drive Status 1] is set if the Power Loss bit in [Alarm

Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F003 – Power Loss fault if the power loss timer exceeds [Power Loss Time] and the Power Loss bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F004 – UnderVoltage fault if the bus voltage falls below Vmin and the UnderVoltage bit in [E238 Fault Config 1] is set.

Power Loss

2-111

The inverter output is disabled and the motor coasts if the output frequency drops to zero or if the bus voltage drops below Vopen or if any of the “run permit” inputs are de-energized.

The pre-charge relay opens if the bus voltage drops below Vopen.

The pre-charge relay closes if the bus voltage rises above Vclose

If the bus voltage rises above Vrecover for 20mS, the drive determines the power loss is over. The power loss alarm is cleared.

If the drive is still in inertia ride through operation, the drive immediately accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed. If the drive is coasting and it is in a “run permit” state, the reconnect algorithm is run to match the speed of the motor. The drive then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed.

Bus Voltage

680V

620V

560V

500V

407V

305V

Motor Speed

Power Loss

Output Enable

Pre-Charge

Drive Fault

Half Voltage

This mode provides the maximum power ride through. In a typical application 230VAC motors are used with a 480VAC drive, the input voltage can then drop to half and the drive is still able to supply full power to the motor.

!

ATTENTION: To guard against drive damage, a minimum line impedance must be provided to limit inrush current when the power line recovers. The input impedance should be equal or greater than the equivalent of a 5% transformer with a VA rating

6 times the drive’s input VA rating.

The drive determines a power loss has occurred if the bus voltage drops below Vtrigger.

If the drive is running the inverter output is disabled and the motor coasts.

If the bus voltage drops below Vopen/Vmin (In this mode of operation

Vopen and Vmin are the same value) or if the Enable input is de-energized,

2-112

Power Loss the inverter output is disabled and the motor coasts. If the Not Stop or Run inputs are de-energized, the drive stops in the programmed manner.

The pre-charge relay opens if the bus voltage drops below Vopen/Vmin and closes if the bus voltage rises above Vclose.

The power loss alarm in [Drive Alarm 1] is set and the power loss timer starts. The Alarm bit in [Drive Status 1] is set if the Power Loss bit in

[Alarm Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F003 – Power Loss fault if the power loss timer exceeds [Power Loss Time] and the Power Loss bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F004 – UnderVoltage fault if the bus voltage falls below Vmin and the UnderVoltage bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

If the bus voltage rises above Vrecover for 20mS, the drive determines the power loss is over. The power loss alarm is cleared.

If the drive is coasting and if it is in a “run permit” state, the reconnect algorithm is run to match the speed of the motor. The drive then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed.

Bus Voltage

680V

620V

560V

365V

305V

Motor Speed

Power Loss

Output Enable

Pre-Charge

Drive Fault

Coast Input (PowerFlex700 Only)

This mode can provide additional ride through time by sensing the power loss via an external device that monitors the power line and provides a hardware power loss signal. This signal is then connected to the drive through the “pulse” input (because of its high-speed capability). Normally this hardware power loss input will provide a power loss signal before the bus drops to less than Vopen.

The drive determines a power loss has occurred if the “pulse” input is de-energized OR the bus voltage drops below Vopen. If the drive is running, the inverter output is disabled.

The Power Loss alarm in [Drive Alarm 1] is set and the power loss timer starts.

Power Loss

2-113

The Alarm bit in [Drive Status 1] is set if the Power Loss bit in [Alarm

Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F003 – Power Loss fault if the power loss timer exceeds [Power Loss Time] and the Power Loss bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F004 – UnderVoltage fault if the bus voltage falls below Vmin and the UnderVoltage bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The pre-charge relay opens if the bus voltage drops below Vopen and closes if the bus voltage rises above Vclose.

If the “pulse” input is re energized and the pre-charge relay is closed, the drive determines the power loss is over. The power loss alarm is cleared.

If the drive is in a “run permit” state, the reconnect algorithm is run to match the speed of the motor. The drive then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed.

Decel Input (PF700 only)

This mode can provide additional ride through time by sensing the power loss via an external device that monitors the power line and provides a hardware power loss signal. This signal is then connected to the drive through the “pulse” input (because of its high-speed capability). Normally this hardware power loss input will provide a power loss signal before the bus drops to less than Vopen.

The drive determine a power loss has occurred if the “pulse” input is de-energized or the bus voltage drops below Vopen.

If the drive is running, the inertia ride through function is activated. The load is decelerated at just the correct rate so that the energy absorbed from the mechanical load balances the losses and bus voltage is regulated to the value Vmem.

If the output frequency drops to zero or if the bus voltage drops below

Vopen or if any of the “run permit” inputs are de-energized, the inverter output is disabled and the motor coasts.

The power loss alarm in [Drive Alarm 1] is set and the power loss timer starts. The Alarm bit in [Drive Status 1] is set if the Power Loss bit in

[Alarm Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F003 – Power Loss fault if the power loss timer exceeds [Power Loss Time] and the Power Loss bit in [E238 Fault Config 1] is set.

The drive faults with a F004 – UnderVoltage fault if the bus voltage falls below Vmin and the UnderVoltage bit in [Fault Config 1] is set.

The pre-charge relay opens if the bus voltage drops below Vopen and closes if the bus voltage rises above Vclose.

2-114

Power Loss

If power recovers while the drive is still in inertia ride through the power loss alarm is cleared and it then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed. Otherwise, if power recovers before power supply shutdown, the power loss alarm is cleared.

If the drive is in a “run permit” state, the reconnect algorithm is run to match the speed of the motor. The drive then accelerates at the programmed rate to the set speed.

Preset Frequency

Preset Frequency

2-115

There are 7 Preset Frequency parameters that are used to store a discrete frequency value. This value can be used for a speed reference or PI

Reference. When used as a speed reference, they are accessed via manipulation of the digital inputs or the DPI reference command. Preset frequencies have a range of plus/minus [Maximum Speed].

2-116

Process PI Loop

Process PI Loop

[PI Config]

[PI Control]

[PI Reference Sel]

[PI Setpoint]

[PI Feedback Sel]

[PI Integral Time]

[PI Prop Gain]

[PI Upper/Lower Limit]

[PI Preload]

[PI Status]

[PI Ref Meter]

[PI Feedback Meter]

[PI Error Meter]

[PI Output Meter]

The internal PI function provides closed loop process control with proportional and integral control action. The function is designed to be used in applications that require simple control of a process without external control devices. The PI function allows the microprocessor to follow a single process control loop.

The PI function reads a process variable input to the drive and compares it to a desired setpoint stored in the drive. The algorithm will then adjust the output of the PI regulator, changing drive output frequency to try and make the process variable equal the setpoint.

Proportional control (P) adjusts output based on size of the error (larger error = proportionally larger correction). If the error is doubled, then the output of the proportional control is doubled and, conversely, if the error is cut in half then the output of the proportional output will be cut in half. With proportional control there is always an error, so the feedback and the reference are never equal.

Integral control (I) adjusts the output based on the duration of the error.

(The longer the error is present, the harder it tries to correct). The integral control by itself is a ramp output correction. This type of control gives a smoothing effect to the output and will continue to integrate until zero error is achieved. By itself, integral control is slower than many applications require and therefore is combined with proportional control (PI).

Derivative Control (D) adjusts the output based on the rate of change of the error and, by itself, tends to be unstable. The faster that the error is changing, the larger change to the output. Derivative control is generally not required and, when it is used, is almost always combined with proportional and integral control (PID).

The PI function can perform a combination of proportional and integral control. It does not perform derivative control, however, the accel / decel control of the drive can be considered as providing derivative control.

Process PI Loop

2-117

There are two ways the PI Controller can be configured to operate.

Process Trim - The PI Output can be added to the master speed reference

Process Control - PI can have exclusive control of the commanded speed.

The selection between these two modes of operation is done in the [PI

Configuration] parameter.

Process Trim

Process Trim takes the output of PI regulator and sums it with a master speed reference to control the process. In the following example, the master speed reference sets the wind/unwind speed and the dancer pot signal is used as a PI Feedback to control the tension in the system. An equilibrium point is programmed as PI Reference, and as the tension increases or decreases during winding, the master speed is trimmed to compensate and maintain tension near the equilibrium point.

0 Volts

Equilibrium Point

[PI Reference Sel]

Dancer Pot

[PI Feedback Sel]

10 Volts

Master Speed Reference

When the PI is disabled the commanded speed is the ramped speed reference.

Slip Adder

Spd Ref

PI Ref

PI Fbk

Process PI

Controller

PI Disabled

Linear Ramp

& S-Curve

+

+

+

+

Slip

Comp

Open

Loop

Process

PI

Speed Control

Spd Cmd

2-118

Process PI Loop

When the PI is enabled, the output of the PI Controller is added to the ramped speed reference.

Slip Adder

Spd Ref

Linear RAmp

& S-Curve

+

+

+

+

Slip

Comp

Open

Loop

Process

PI

Spd Cmd

PI Ref

PI Fbk

Process PI

Controller

PI Enabled Speed Control

Exclusive Control

Process Control takes the output of PI regulator as the speed command. No master speed reference exists and the PI Output directly controls the drive output.

In the pumping application example below, the reference or setpoint is the required pressure in the system. The input from the transducer is the PI feedback and changes as the pressure changes. The drive output frequency is then increased or decreased as needed to maintain system pressure regardless of flow changes. With the drive turning the pump at the required speed, the pressure is maintained in the system.

Pump

Pressure

Transducer

Motor

PI Feedback

Desired Pressure

[PI Reference Sel]

However, when additional valves in the system are opened and the pressure in the system drops, the PI error will alter its output frequency to bring the process back into control.

When the PI is disabled the commanded speed is the ramped speed reference.

Process PI Loop

2-119

Slip Adder

Spd Ref

PI Ref

PI Fbk

Process PI

Controller

PI Disabled

Linear RAmp

& S-Curve

+

+

Slip

Comp

Open

Loop

Process

PI

Speed Control

Spd Cmd

When the PI is enabled, the speed reference is disconnected and PI Output has exclusive control of the commanded speed, passing through the linear ramp and s-curve.

Slip Adder

Spd Ref

Linear RAmp

& S-Curve

+

+

Slip

Comp

Open

Loop

Process

PI

Spd Cmd

PI Ref

Process PI

Controller

PI Fbk PI Enabled

Speed Control

Configuration

To operate the drive in PI regulator Mode, the speed regulation mode must be changed by selecting “Process PI” through the [Speed Control] parameter.

Three parameters are used to configure, control, and indicate the status of the logic associated with the Process PI controller; [PI Configuration], [PI

Control], and [PI Status]. Together these three parameters define the operation of the PI logic.

1. [PI Configuration] is a set of bits that select various modes of operation.

The value of this parameter can only be changed while the drive is stopped.

Exclusive Mode - see

page 2-118 .

Invert Error - This feature changes the “sign” of the error, creating a decrease in output for increasing error and an increase in output for decreasing error. An example of this might be an HVAC system with thermostat control. In Summer, a rising thermostat reading commands an increase in drive output because cold air is being blown. In Winter, a falling thermostat commands an increase in drive output because warm air is being blown.

The PI has the option to change the sign of PI Error. This is used when an increase in feedback should cause an increase in output.

2-120

Process PI Loop

PI Enabled

PI Output

Spd Cmd

The option to invert the sign of PI Error is selected in the PI

Configuration parameter.

PI_Config

.Invert

+

PI Ref Sel

PI_Config

.Sqrt

-

PI Fdbk Sel

PI Fbk

PI Error

Preload Integrator - This feature allows the PI Output to be stepped to a preload value for better dynamic response when the PI Output is enabled. Refer to diagram 2 below.

If PI is not enabled the PI Integrator may be initialized to the PI

Pre-load Value or the current value of the commanded speed. The operation of Preload is selected in the PI Configuration parameter.

PI_Config

.PreloadCmd

PI_Status

.Enabled

Preload Value PI Integrator

Spd Cmd

By default, Pre-load Command is off and the PI Load Value is zero, causing a zero to be loaded into the integrator when the PI is disabled.

As below shown on the left, when the PI is enabled the PI output will start from zero and regulate to the required level. When PI is enabled with PI Load Value is set to a non-zero value the output begins with a step as shown below on the right. This may result in the PI reaching steady state sooner, however if the step is too large the drive may go into current limit which will extend the acceleration.

PI Pre-load Value = 0

PI Pre-load Value

PI Pre-load Value > 0

Process PI Loop

2-121

Pre-load command may be used when the PI has exclusive control of the commanded speed. With the integrator preset to the commanded speed there is no disturbance in commanded speed when PI is enabled. After PI is enabled the PI output is regulated to the required level.

PI Enabled

Start at Spd Cmd

PI Output

Spd Cmd

Pre-load to Command Speed

When the PI is configured to have exclusive control of the commanded speed and the drive is in current limit or voltage limit the integrator is preset to the commanded speed so that it knows where to resume when no longer in limit.

Ramp Ref - The PI Ramp Reference feature is used to provide a smooth transition when the PI is enabled and the PI output is used as a speed trim (not exclusive control),.

When PI Ramp Reference is selected in the PI Configuration parameter, and PI is disabled, the value used for the PI reference will be the PI feedback. This will cause PI error to be zero. Then when the

PI is enabled the value used for the PI reference will ramp to the selected value for PI reference at the selected acceleration or deceleration rate. After the PI reference reaches the selected value the ramp is bypassed until the PI is disabled and enabled again. S-curve is not available as part of the PI linear ramp.

Zero Clamp - This feature limits the possible drive action to one direction only. Output from the drive will be from zero to maximum frequency forward or zero to maximum frequency reverse. This removes the chance of doing a “plugging” type operation as an attempt to bring the error to zero.

The PI has the option to limit operation so that the output frequency will always have the same sign as the master speed reference. The zero clamp option is selected in the PI Configuration parameter. Zero clamp is disabled when PI has exclusive control of speed command.

For example, if master speed reference is +10 Hz and the output of the PI results in a speed adder of –15 Hz, zero clamp would limit the output frequency to not become less than zero. Likewise, if master speed reference is –10 Hz and the output of the PI results in a speed adder of +15 Hz, zero clamp would limit the output frequency to not become greater than zero.

2-122

Process PI Loop

Spd Ref

PI Ref

PI Fbk

Linear

Ramp

& S-Curve

Process PI

Controller

Spd Ramp

+

+

PI Output

0

PI_Config

.ZeroClamp

+32K

0

0

-32K

+32K

-32K

Spd Cmd

Feedback Square Root - This feature uses the square root of the feedback signal as the PI feedback. This is useful in processes that control pressure, since centrifugal fans and pumps vary pressure with the square of speed.

The PI has the option to take the square root of the selected feedback signal. This is used to linearize the feedback when the transducer produces the process variable squared. The result of the square root is normalized back to full scale to provide a consistent range of operation.

The option to take the square root is selected in the PI Configuration parameter.

100.0

75.0

50.0

25.0

0.0

-25.0

-50.0

-75.0

-100.0

-100.0

-75.0

-50.0

-25.0

0.0

25.0

Normalized Feedback

50.0

75.0

100.0

Stop Mode (PF700 Only). When Stop Mode is set to “1” and a Stop command is issued to the drive, the PI loop will continue to operate during the decel ramp. When set to “0” the drive will perform a normal stop.

Anti-Wind Up (PF700 Only). When Anti-Windup is set to “1” the

PI loop will automatically prevent the integrator from creating an excessive error that could cause loop instability. The integrator will be automatically controlled without the need for PI Reset or PI Hold inputs.

Process PI Loop

2-123

2. [PI Control] is a set of bits to dynamically enable and disable the operation of the process PI controller. When this parameter is interactively written to from a network it must be done through a data link so the values are not written to EEprom.

PI Enable - The PI regulator output can be turned on/off. PI Enabled determines when PI Output is part, or all of the commanded speed.

The logic evaluated for PI Enabled is shown in the following ladder diagram.

The drive must be in run before PI Enabled can turn on. PI Enabled will stay off when the drive is jogged. The PI is disabled when the drive begins a ramp to stop.

If a digital input is configured to provide PI Enable and that digital input is turned on then PI Enabled may turn on. Note that when a digital input is configured to provide PI Enable that input takes precedence over the PI Control parameter.

If a digital input is not configured to provide PI Enable and the PI

Enable bit in the PI Control parameter is turned on then PI Enabled may turn on. If PI_Control.PI_Enable is left on all the time then the

PI may become enabled as soon as the drive goes into run. If analog input signal loss is detected PI Enabled is turned off.

Running Stopping

DigInCfg

.PI_Enable

DigIn

.PI_Enable

Signal Loss

PI_Status

.Enabled

DigInCfg

.PI_Enable

PI_Control

.PI_Enable

PI Hold - The Process PI Controller has the option to hold the integrator at the current value so if some part of the process is in limit the integrator will maintain the present value to avoid windup in the integrator.

The logic to hold the integrator at the current value is shown in the following ladder diagram. There are three conditions under which hold will turn on.

– If a digital input is configured to provide PI Hold and that digital input is turned on then the PI integrator will stop changing. Note that when a digital input is configured to provide PI Hold that takes precedence over the PI Control parameter.

– If a digital input is not configured to provide PI Hold and the PI Hold bit in the PI Control parameter is turned on then the PI integrator will stop changing.

2-124

Process PI Loop

– If the current limit or voltage limit is active then the PI is put into hold.

DigInCfg

.PI_Hold

DigIn

.PI_Hold

PI_Status

.Hold

DigInCfg

.PI_Hold

Current Lmt or Volt Lmt

PI_Control

.PI_Hold

PI Reset – This feature holds the output of the integral function at zero. The term “anti windup” is often applied to similar features. It may be used for integrator preloading during transfer and can be used to hold the integrator at zero during “manual mode”. Take the example of a process whose feedback signal is below the reference point, creating error. The drive will increase its output frequency in an attempt to bring the process into control. If, however, the increase in drive output does not zero the error, additional increases in output will be commanded. When the drive reaches programmed Maximum

Frequency, it is possible that a significant amount of integral value has been “built up” (windup). This may cause undesirable and sudden operation if the system were switched to manual operation and back.

Resetting the integrator eliminates this windup.

NOTE: In the PowerFlex 70, once the drive has reached the programmable positive and negative PI limits, the integrator stops integrating and no further “windup” is possible.

3. [PI Status] parameter is a set of bits that indicate the status of the process PI controller

Enabled – The loop is active and controlling the drive output.

Hold – A signal has been issued and the integrator is being held at its current value.

Reset – A signal has been issued and the integrator is being held at zero.

In Limit – The loop output is being clamped at the value set in [PI

Upper/Lower Limit].

PI Reference and Feedback

The selection of the source for the reference signal is entered in the PI

Reference Select parameter. The selection of the source for the feedback signal is selected in the PI Feedback Select parameter. The reference and feedback have the same limit of possible options.

Process PI Loop

2-125

PF70 options include DPI adapter ports, MOP, preset speeds, analog inputs and PI setpoint parameter. In the PF700, options are expanded to also include additional analog inputs, pulse input, and encoder input.

The value used for reference is displayed in PI Reference as a read only parameter. The value used for feedback is displayed in PI Feedback as a read only parameter. These displays are active independent of PI Enabled.

Full scale is displayed as 100.00.

Refer to

Analog Input Configuration on page 2-6

.

PI Setpoint

This parameter can be used as an internal value for the setpoint or reference for the process. If [PI Reference Sel] points to this Parameter, the value entered here will become the equilibrium point for the process.

PI Output

The PI Error is then sent to the Proportional and Integral functions, which are summed together.

PI Gains

The PI Proportional Gain and the PI Integral Gain parameters determine the response of the PI.

The PI Proportional Gain is unitless and defaults to 1.00 for unit gain. With

PI Proportional Gain set to 1.00 and PI Error at 1.00% the PI output will be

1.00% of maximum frequency.

The PI Integral Gain is entered in seconds. If the PI Integral Gain is set to

2.0 seconds and PI Error is 100.00% the PI output will integrate from 0 to

100.00% in 2.0 seconds.

Positive and Negative Limits

The PI has parameters to define the positive and negative limits of the output PI Positive Limit, and PI Negative Limit. The limits are used in two places; on the integrator and on the sum of the Kp + Ki terms.

Providing an external source doesn't turn on Hold, the integrator is allowed to integrate all the way to Positive or Negative limit. If the integrator reaches the limit the value is clamped and the InLimit bit is set in the PI

Status parameter to indicate this condition.

The limits are entered in the range of 100.00.

PI Positive Limit must always be greater than PI Negative Limit.

2-126

Process PI Loop

If the application is Process Control, typically these limits would be set to the maximum allowable frequency setting. This allows the PI regulator to control over the entire required speed range.

If the application is Process Trim, large trim corrections may not be desirable and the limits would be programmed for smaller values.

PI PosLmt

PI NegLmt

PI Kp

PI Error

*

+

+

PI Output

*

PI_Status

.Hold

+

+

In Limit

PI Ki

Z

-1

Output Scaling

The output value produced by the PI is displayed as

±

100.00. Internally this is represented by

±

32767 which corresponds to maximum frequency.

PI_Config

.ZeroClamp

PI_Config

.Exclusive

PI_Status

.Enabled

Spd Ref

PI Pos Limit

PI Neg Limit

PI Kp

PI ExcessErr

*(PI Ref Sel)

PI_Status

.Enabled

PI_Config

.RampCmd

0

*(PI Fbk Sel)

PI_Config

.Sqrt

PI_Config

.Invert

PI Ki

PI_Status

.Hold

Preload Value

Spd Cmd

PI_Config

.PreloadCmd

PI_Status

.Enabled

PI Ref

Linear

Ramp

PI Cmd

+

-

-

Spd Cmd

PI_Config

.Exclusive

Current Limit or Volt Limit

PI Fbk

Figure 2.15 Process PI Block Diagram

abs

PI Error

PI XS Error

*

*

+

+

+

+ z

-1

PI Output

Linear Ramp

& S-Curve

Spd Ramp

+

+

0

+32K

-32K

+32K

0

0

-32K

Spd Cmd

Zclamped

In Limit

Reflected Wave

Reflected Wave

2-127

[Compensation]

The pulses from a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) inverter using IGBTs are very short in duration (50 nanoseconds to 1 millisecond). These short pulse times combined with the fast rise times (50 to 400 nanoseconds) of the IGBT, will result in excessive over-voltage transients at the motor.

Voltages in excess of twice the DC bus voltage,(650V DC nominal @ 480 V input) result at the motor and can cause motor winding failure.

The patented reflected wave correction software in the PowerFlex 70 will reduce these over-voltage transients from a VFD to the motor. The correction software modifies the PWM modulator to prevent PWM pulses less than a minimum time from being applied to the motor. The minimum time between PWM pulses is 10 microseconds. The modifications to the

PWM modulator limit the over-voltage transient to 2.25 per unit volts line-to-line peak at 600 feet of cable.

400 V Line + 10% High Line = 540V DC bus X 2.25 = 1200 V

480 V Line + 10% High Line = 715V DC bus X 2.25 = 1600 V

600 V Line + 10% High Line = 891V DC bus X 2.25 = 2000 V

(inverter duty grade motor insulation)

The software is standard and requires no special parameters or settings.

Inverter 500

V/div

0

<T

α

1670 Vpk

Motor

500

V/div

0

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

Time ( sec)

35 40 45 50

The above figure shows the inverter line-to-line output voltage (top trace) and the motor line-to-line voltage (bottom trace) for a 10 HP, 460V AC inverter, and an unloaded 10 HP AC induction motor at 60 Hz operation.

500 ft. of #12 AWG PVC cable connects the drive to the motor.

Initially, the cable is in a fully charged condition. A transient disturbance occurs by discharging the cable for approximately 4ms. The propagation delay between the inverter terminals and motor terminals is approximately

1ms. The small time between pulses of 4ms does not provide sufficient time to allow the decay of the cable transient. Thus, the second pulse arrives at a point in the motor terminal voltage's natural response and excites a motor

2-128

Reflected Wave over-voltage transient greater than 2 pu. The amplitude of the double pulsed motor over-voltage is determined by a number of variables. These include the damping characteristics of the cable, bus voltage, and the time between pulses, the carrier frequency, modulation technique, and duty cycle.

The plot below shows the per unit motor over-voltage as a function of cable length. This is for no correction versus the modulation correction code for varied lengths of #12 AWG PVC cable to 600 feet for a 4 kHz and 8 kHz carrier frequencies. The output line-to-line voltage was measured at the motor terminals in 100 feet increments.

No Correction vs Correction Method at 4 kHz and 8 kHz Carrier

Frequencies - Vbus = 650, fe = 60 Hz

2.6

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.1

2

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.6

0

No Correction 4 kHz Carrier

Corrected 4 kHz Carrier

No Correction 8 kHz Carrier

Corrected 8 kHz Carrier

100 200 300 400

Cable Length (Feet)

500 600

Without the correction, the over-voltage increases to unsafe levels with increasing cable length for both carrier frequencies.

The patented modulation correction code reduces the over-voltage for both carrier frequencies and maintains a relatively flat over-voltage level for increasing cable lengths beyond 300 feet.

Reset Meters

2-129

Reset Meters

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

Reset Run

Refer to

Auto Restart (Reset/Run) on page 2-24

.

RFI Filter Grounding

See

RFI Filter Grounding on page 2-87

2-130

S Curve

S Curve

The S Curve function of the PowerFlex family of drives allows control of the “jerk” component of acceleration and deceleration through user adjustment of the S Curve parameter. Jerk is the rate of change of acceleration and controls the transition from steady state speed to acceleration or deceleration and vice versa. By adjusting the percentage of S

Curve applied to the normal accel / decel ramps, the ramp takes the shape of an “S”. This allows a smoother transition that produces less mechanical stress and smoother control for light loads.

Linear Accel & Decel

Acceleration is defined as moving away from zero; deceleration is defined as moving toward zero. The linear acc / dec ramp is active when the S curve% is set to zero. The accel time and maximum frequency determine the ramp rate for speed increases while decel time and maximum frequency determine the ramp rate for speed decreases. Separate times can be set for accel and decel. In addition, a second set of accel and decel times is available. In this example Ta = 1.0 sec, Td = 2.0 sec and Maximum

Frequency is set to 60.0 Hz.

80.0

60.0

40.0

20.0

0.0

-20.0

-40.0

-60.0

-80.0

0.0

1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

Seconds

5.0

6.0

7.0

8.0

S-Curve Selection

S-curve is enabled by defining the time to extend the acceleration and deceleration. The time is entered as a percentage of acceleration and deceleration time. In this case acceleration time is 2.0 seconds. The line on the left has s-curve set to 0%. The other lines show 25%, 50%, and 100%

S-curve. At 25% S-curve acceleration time is extended by 0.5 seconds (2.0

* 25%). Note that the linear portion of this line has the same slope as when s-curve is set to zero.

70.0

60.0

50.0

40.0

30.0

20.0

10.0

0.0

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

Seconds

2.5

3.0

3.5

4.0

S Curve

2-131

The acceleration and deceleration times are independent but the same

S-curve percentage is applied to both of them. With S-curve set to 50%, acceleration time is extended by 0.5 seconds (1.0 * 50%), and deceleration time is extended by 1.0 seconds (2.0 * 50%).

70.0

60.0

50.0

40.0

30.0

20.0

10.0

0.0

0.0

1.0

2.0

3.0

Seconds

4.0

5.0

6.0

Time to Max Speed

Note that S-curve time is defined for accelerating from 0 to maximum speed. With maximum speed = 60 Hz, Ta = 2.0 sec, and S-curve = 25%, acceleration time is extended by 0.5 seconds (2.0 * 25%). When accelerating to only 30 Hz the acceleration time is still extended by the same amount of time.

70.0

60.0

50.0

40.0

30.0

20.0

10.0

0.0

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

Seconds

2.0

2.5

3.0

Crossing Zero Speed

When the commanded frequency passes through zero the frequency will

S-curve to zero and then S-curve to the commanded frequency.

80.0

60.0

40.0

20.0

0.0

-20.0

-40.0

-60.0

-80.0

0.0

1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

Seconds

2-132

S Curve

The following graph shows an acceleration time of 1.0 second. After 0.75

seconds, the acceleration time is changed to 6.0 seconds. When the acceleration rate is changed, the commanded rate is reduced to match the requested rate based on the initial S-curve calculation. After reaching the new acceleration rate, the S-curve is then changed to be a function of the new acceleration rate.

70.0

60.0

50.0

40.0

30.0

20.0

10.0

0.0

0.0

1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

Seconds

Scaling Blocks

Scaling Blocks

2-133

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

2-134

Shear Pin Fault

Shear Pin Fault

This feature allows the user to select programming that will fault the drive if the drive output current exceeds the programmed current limit. As a default, exceeding the set current limit is not a fault condition. However, if the user wants to stop the process in the event of excess current, the Shear Pin feature can be activated. By programming the drive current limit value and enabling the electronic shear pin, current to the motor is limited, and if excess current is demanded by the motor, the drive will fault.

Configuration

The Shear Pin Fault is activated by setting Bit 4 of [Fault Config 1] to “1.”

238 [Fault Config 1]

Enables/disables annunciation of the listed faults.

x

15 x

14 x

13 x

12 x

11 x

10 x

9

Bit #

Factory Default Bit Values x

8 x

7

1

6

D

0

5

ib t utR ries in st T

Sh ear P

M oto r O verL d

U nd erV ge olta er L oss

Po w

0 1

x

1 0

1 =Enabled

4 3 2 1 0

0 =Disabled x =Reserved

The programmable current limit [Current Lmt Sel] should also set to identify the source of the current limit value. If “Cur Lim Val” is selected, then [Current Lmt Val] should be set to the required limit value.

147 [Current Lmt Sel]

Selects the source for the adjustment of current limit (i.e. parameter, analog input, etc.).

Default:

Options:

0

0

1

2

“Cur Lim Val”

“Cur Lim Val”

“Analog In 1”

“Analog In 2”

146

149

A separate fault (Shear Pin Fault, F63) dedicated to the Shear Pin feature, will be generated if the function is activated.

Application Example

In some applications, mechanical hardware can be damaged if the motor is allowed to develop excess torque. If a mechanical jam should occur, shutting down the system may be the only way to prevent damage. For example, a chain conveyor may be able to “hook” itself, causing a jam on the conveyor. Excess torque from the motor could cause chain or other mechanical damage.

By programming the Shear Pin feature, the user can cause the drive to fault, stopping the excess torque before mechanical damage occurs.

Skip Bands

Skip Bands

2-135

[Skip Freq 1-3]

The skip band function provides three skip bands that the drive will ramp through but will not continuously run within. The user will be able to set the skip frequency (center frequency) for each band and the skip band centered on the skip frequency. The skip band applies to all three skip frequencies.

The skip band function operates as follows.

1. Greater than or equal to the center frequency and less than or equal to the high value of the band sets the output to the high value of the band. See grayed area of 'Upper Band' below.

2. Less than the center frequency and greater than or equal to the low value of the band, sets the output to the low value of the band. See grayed area of 'Lower Band' below.

3. The skip frequency will have hysteresis so the output does not toggle between high and low values.

Hyst.

Upper Band Lower Band

Conditions

If none of the skip bands touch or overlap, each band has its own high/low limit. See example #1 below.

If skip bands overlap or touch, the center frequency is recalculated based on the highest and lowest band values. See example #2 below.

Set Values

60 Hz

54 Hz

Example #1

45 Hz

Adjusted Values

60 Hz

54 Hz

45 Hz

33 Hz

Example #2

27 Hz

30 Hz

13.5 Hz

Example #2

9 Hz

0 Hz

Time

Command Frequency

Skip Band Output

11.25 Hz

0 Hz

2-136

Skip Bands

If a skip band(s) extend beyond the max or min limits, the highest or lowest band values, respectively, will be clamped at the limit. The center frequency is recalculated based on the highest and lowest band values. If the band is outside the limits, the skip band is inactive.

400 Hz

Skip Frequency #3

Max Frequency

Skip Frequency #2

}

Skip Frequency #3 (Inactive)

}

Skip Frequency #2 (Adjusted)

Skip Frequency #1

Min Frequency

}

Skip Frequency #1 (Adjusted)

0 Hz

Disabling

If a skip band is not required, its skip frequency value is set to zero.

Range

The skip bands apply to both forward and reverse directions.

Sleep Mode

Sleep Mode

2-137

The basic operation of this function is to start (wake) the drive when an analog signal is greater than or equal to the user specified [Wake Level], and stop the drive when an analog signal is less than or equal to the user specified [Sleep Level].

Enabling the sleep wake function is accomplished by setting the

[Sleep-Wake Mode] parameter to “Direct”.

All previously defined permissives (stop, enable, faults, type 2 alarms, etc.) are honored. In addition to the sleep function, at least one of the following assignments must be made to a digital input, and the input must be closed:

(Enable, Stop-CF, Run, Run Fwd, Run Rev).

Restarting following a fault condition will be possible by either a rising edge of the timed wake signal or a separate start signal. A wake signal condition will not interfere with the resetting of a fault or restarting of the drive with another signal.

Timers will determine the length of time required for Sleep/Wake levels to produce true functions. These timers will start counting when the Sleep/

Wake levels are satisfied and will count in the opposite direction whenever the respective level is dissatisfied. If the timer counts all the way to the user specified time, it creates an edge to toggle the Sleep/Wake function to the respective condition (sleep or wake). Upon power up, timers should be initialized to the state that does not permit a start condition, and then start counting if the analog signal satisfies the level requirement.

Separate start commands are also honored (including a digital input “start”), but only when the sleep timer is not satisfied, essentially acting as a continuous stop. There are two exceptions to this, which will ignore the

Sleep/Wake function:

1. When a device is commanding “local” control, and

2. when a jog command is being issued.

When a device is commanding “local” control, the port that is commanding it has exclusive start control (in addition to ref select), essentially overriding the Sleep/Wake function, and allowing the drive to run in the presence of a sleep situation. This holds true even for the case of Port 0, where a digital input start or run will be able to override a sleep situation.

Normal operation will require that [Wake Level] be set greater than or equal to [Sleep Level]. However, there are no limits that prevent the parameter settings from crossing, but the drive will not start until such settings are corrected. These levels are programmable while the drive is running. If

[Sleep Level] is made greater than [Wake Level] while the drive is running, the drive will continue to run as long as the analog input remains at a level that doesn’t trigger the sleep condition. Once the drive goes to sleep in this situation, it will not be allowed to restart until the level settings are corrected (increase wake, or decrease sleep). If however, the levels are corrected prior to the drive going to sleep, normal Sleep/Wake operation will continue. All defined analog inputs for a product shall be considered as valid Sleep/Wake sources. The Sleep/Wake function is completely

2-138

Sleep Mode

Sleep Timer

Satisfied

Sleep Level

Satisfied

Wake Timer

Satisfied

Wake Level

Satisfied

Wake Level

Sleep Level

Analog Signal

Drive

Run

Sleep-Wake

Function

Start

Stop independent of any other functions that are also using the assigned analog input. Thus, using the same analog input for both speed reference and wake control is permitted. Also, [Analog In x Hi] and [Analog In x Lo] parameters have no affect on the function. However, the factory calibrated result will be used. In addition, the absolute value of the calibrated result will be used, thus making the function useful for bipolar direction applications. The analog in loss function is unaffected and therefore operational with the Sleep /Wake function, but not tied to the sleep or wake levels.

Wake Up

Go to Sleep

Wake

Time

Example Conditions

Wake Time = 3 Seconds

Sleep Time = 3 Seconds

Sleep

Time

Wake

Time

Sleep

Time

Speed Control

Speed Mode

Speed Regulation

Speed Control Speed Mode Speed Regulation

2-139

The purpose of speed regulation is to allow the drive to adjust certain operating conditions, such as output frequency, to compensate for actual motor speed losses in an attempt to maintain motor shaft speed within the specified regulation percentage.

The [Speed Mode] parameter selects the speed regulation method for the drive, and can be set to one of 3 choices on the PowerFlex 70. Additional choices are available on the PowerFlex 700 (see

page 2-142 ):

Open Loop - No speed control is offered

Slip Comp - Slip Compensation is active – approximately 5% regulation

Process PI – The PI Loop sets the actual speed based on process variables

080 [Speed Mode]

Sets the method of speed regulation.

Default:

Options:

0

0

1

2

“Open Loop”

“Open Loop”

“Slip Comp”

“Process PI”

121 thru

138

Open Loop

As the load on an induction motor increases, the rotor speed or shaft speed of the motor decreases, creating additional slip (and therefore torque) to drive the larger load. This decrease in motor speed may have adverse effects on the process. If the [Speed Mode] parameter is set to “Open Loop,” no speed control will be exercised. Motor speed will be dependent on load changes and the drive will make no attempt to correct for increasing or decreasing output frequency due to load.

Slip Compensation

As the load on an induction motor increases, the rotor speed or shaft speed of the motor decreases, creating additional slip (and therefore torque) to drive the larger load. This decrease in motor speed may have adverse effects on the process. If speed control is required to maintain proper process control, the slip compensation feature of the PowerFlex drives can be enabled by the user to more accurately regulate the speed of the motor without additional speed transducers.

When the slip compensation mode is selected, the drive calculates an amount to increase the output frequency to maintain a consistent motor speed independent of load. The amount of slip compensation to provide is selected in [Slip RPM @ FLA]. During drive commissioning this parameter is set to the RPM that the motor will slip when operating with Full Load

Amps. The user may adjust this parameter to provide more or less slip.

As mentioned above, induction motors exhibit slip which is the difference between the stator electrical frequency, or output frequency of the drive, and the induced rotor frequency.

The slip frequency translates into a slip speed resulting in a reduction in rotor speed as the load increases on the motor. This can be easily seen by examining

Figure 2.16

.

2-140

Speed Control Speed Mode Speed Regulation

Figure 2.16 Rotor Speed with/without Slip Compensation

0

0

Slip Compensation

Inactive

Load

Applied

No Load

0.5 p.u. Load

1.0 p.u. Load

1.5 p.u. Load

Slip Compensation

Active

Load

Applied

1.5 p.u. Load

1.0 p.u. Load

0.5 p.u. Load

Slip Compensation

Active

Load

Removed

Slip @

F.L.A.

Time

Without slip compensation active, as the load increases from no load to

150% of the motor rating, the rotor speed decreases approximately proportional to the load.

With slip compensation, the correct amount of slip compensation is added to the drive output frequency based on motor load. Thus, the rotor speed returns to the original speed. Conversely, when the load is removed, the rotor speed increases momentarily until the slip compensation decays to zero.

Motor nameplate data must be entered by the user in order for the drive to correctly calculate the proper amount of slip compensation. The motor nameplate reflects slip in the rated speed value at rated load. The user can enter the Motor Nameplate RPM, Motor Nameplate Frequency, the Motor

Nameplate Current, Motor Nameplate Voltage, and Motor Nameplate HP/ kW and during commissioning the drive calculates the motor rated slip frequency and displays it in [Slip RPM @ FLA]. The user can adjust the slip compensation for more accurate speed regulation, by increasing or decreasing [Slip RPM @ FLA] value.

Internally, the drive converts the rated slip in RPM to rated slip in frequency. To more accurately determine the rated slip frequency in hertz, an estimate of flux current is necessary. This parameter is either a default value based on motor nameplate data or the auto tune value. The drive scales the amount of slip compensation to the motor rated current. The amount of slip frequency added to the frequency command is then scaled by the sensed torque current (indirect measurement of the load) and displayed.

Slip compensation also affects the dynamic speed accuracy (ability to maintain speed during “shock” loading). The effect of slip compensation during transient operation is illustrated in

Figure 2.17

. Initially, the motor is

operating at some speed and no load. At some time later, an impact load is applied to the motor and the rotor speed decreases as a function of load and inertia. And finally, the impact load is removed and the rotor speed increases momentarily until the slip compensation is reduced based on the applied load.

Speed Control Speed Mode Speed Regulation

2-141

When slip compensation is enabled the dynamic speed accuracy is dependent on the filtering applied to the torque current. The filtering delays the speed response of the motor/drive to the impact load and reduces the dynamic speed accuracy. Reducing the amount of filtering applied to the torque current can increase the dynamic speed accuracy of the system.

However, minimizing the amount of filtering can result in an unstable motor/drive. The user can adjust the Slip Comp Gain parameter to decrease or increase the filtering applied to the torque current and improve the system performance.

Figure 2.17 Rotor Speed Response Due to Impact Load and Slip Com Gain

Impact Load

Removed

Impact Load

Applied

Increasing Slip

Comp Gain

Increasing Slip

Comp Gain

Rotor Speed

Reference

0

0

Time

Application Example - Baking Line

The diagram below shows a typical application for the Slip Compensation feature. The PLC controls the frequency reference for all four of the drives.

Drive #1 and Drive #3 control the speed of the belt conveyor. Slip compensation will be used to maintain the RPM independent of load changes caused by the cutter or dough feed. By maintaining the required

RPM, the baking time remains constant and therefore the end product is consistent.

With the Slip Compensation feature, the process will only require a new speed reference when the product is changed. The user will not have to tune the drive due to a different load characteristic.

PowerFlex

Drive

#1

PowerFlex

Drive

#2

Dough Stress

Relief

CUTTERS

Cookie Line

5/40

PowerFlex

Drive

#3

PowerFlex

Drive

#4

OVEN

2-142

Speed Control Speed Mode Speed Regulation

Process PI –

See

Process PI Loop on page 2-116

Encoder Feedback (PowerFlex 700 Only)

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

Droop (PowerFlex 700 Only)

As the load on an induction motor increases, the rotor speed or shaft speed of the motor decreases, creating additional slip (and therefore torque) to drive the larger load. This increase in motor torque could cause undesirable operation in some process. Typically, if two or more motors are mechanically linked to the same load, this increased torque will cause one motor to assume more of the load and it may set up an unstable “struggle” between motors. In this case, the droop function will decrease the output frequency to maintain a consistent torque level, allowing multiple motors to

“share” the work.

Without droop active, as the load increases, the rotor speed decreases creating uneven loading on the motors.

With droop, the correct amount of compensation is deducted from the drive output frequency based on motor load. Thus, the torque level decreases and other motors can share the load. Conversely, when the load is reduced, the rotor speed decreases momentarily until the droop decays to zero.

Application Considerations

The Droop function is enabled by selecting “Droop” as the speed control method in [Speed Control]. The amount of Droop that will be subtracted from the output frequency at full load is determined by the setting of the

[Slip @ F.L.A.]. The response of the droop circuit can be adjusted by setting

[Slip Comp Gain], 1 being the slowest and 40 the fastest.

The droop feature is used in applications that have two or more motors that are mechanically connected via the load. Each drive must control only one motor for the function to work properly. The control source should supply all of the drives with an identical speed reference. This setup will allow the system load to be shared by each motor.

Application Example - Automotive Chain Conveyor

The above diagram shows a typical example for the Speed Droop feature.

The chain conveyor is used to transfer car bodies through the final assembly area. This application is usually a 5-15 HP motor with a 250:1 (typical) gear reduction. Since the motors are mechanically interlocked, they will need to load share. The “take-up” adjusts the tension of the chain but does not directly affect the load of an individual motor. Therefore, the drive must adjust the output frequency based on load changes.

Speed Control Speed Mode Speed Regulation

2-143

Gear

Box

PowerFlex

Drive

#1

TAKE UP

Gear

Box

PowerFlex

Drive

#2

To accomplish this, the PLC or other controller, will control the speed command being sent to the drives. Both drives can be programmed for droop operation. Or the lead drive may be used as the “speed regulator” with the second drive used as a “torque helper” to share the load. The speed regulator will be used to shed the load of an individual motor as the system cycles through the process.When a car is finished and removed from the line, the load on drive #1 will decrease. At this time, another vehicle is added to the conveyor causing drive #2 to see an increase in load. Drive/ motor #2 will decrease its output frequency causing more of the load to be taken by drive/motor #1.

2-144

Speed Reference

Speed Reference

Speed Reference Scaling

[Speed Ref A, B Sel]

[TB Man Ref Sel]

The reference generation function is to provide a reference to the drive. Its purpose is to determine which reference source should be used based on parameters and logic command. Seven references can be selected by logic command. The first two references (A & B) have selectable sources.

References A & B can be trimmed by a trim that has selectable sources. The other five are fixed at preset frequencies three to seven. The user will be able to select if the reference is unipolar, which is limited to a positive value and enables the direction bit or bipolar which disables the direction bit allowing the reference sign to command direction. The min and max speed limit the final reference going to the skip band module.

Seven references can be selected through logic command.

Logic command (drive control command) is a bit enumerated parameter, which contains the final command after it has been funneled through a command evaluation module of masks, owners, and transitions. Logic commands come from the terminal block, DPI peripherals, and HIM all at the same time. Logic command could consists of stop, start, jog, accel , decel ,MOP inc/dec, direction, etc. The command evaluation module is not within the scope of this document and will be covered in another document.

The first two references are programmable. The user can select which source they would like for each reference. If an analog input reference or pulse input reference (PowerFlex 700 Only) is chosen, two scale parameters are provide to scale the reference. The scale min/max are based on other parameter (uni/bipolar, analog in config, etc.). See also

Analog Inputs for

more information.

The last five are fixed references, preset frequencies 3-7.

Reference A & B can be trimmed with a selectable source trim. If an analog input reference or pulse input reference (PowerFlex 700 Only) is chosen, two scale parameters are provide to scale the reference. The trim is a +/– reference which can be set to trim none, A, B, or Both.

Auto / Manual

Many applications require a “manual mode” where adjustments can be made and setup can be done by offering local control of the drive speed.

Typically, these adjustments could be made via a “local” HIM mounted on the drive. When all setup is complete, control of the drive frequency command is turned over to automatic control from a remote source such as a PLC. Also see

Auto / Manual on page 2-22 .

Speed Reference

2-145

Trim

[Trim In Sel]

Reference A and Reference B can be trimmed with a selectable source. The trim is an input signal value (+/-) which ia added to the reference. If an analog input is chosen as the trim source, two scale parameters are provide to scale the trim signal.

The choices for Trim source select are:

LED HIM

DPI Peripheral 1 (LCD HIM)

DPI Peripheral 2 - 5

MOP

Preset Speed 1 - 7

Analog Input 1 - 2

Trim Enable Select

Trim

A

B

Both

None

Reference A

Reference B

+

+

+

+

Trimmed

Reference A

Trimmed

Reference B

Min / Max Speed

[Max Speed]

Max and min speed limits are applied to the reference. These limits apply to the positive and negative references. The min speed limits will create a band that the drive will not run continuously within, but will ramp through. This is due to the positive and negative min speeds. If the reference is positive and less than the positive min, it is set to the positive min. If the reference is negative and greater than negative min, it is set to the negative min. If min is not 0, hysteresis is applied at 0 to prevent bouncing between positive and negative mins. See below.

Max Spd Max Spd

Min Spd

Min Spd

– Min Spd

Band

– Max Spd – Max Spd

2-146

Speed Reference

Follower/Leader

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

HIM Speed Reference

This section is under construction. If further information is required, please contact factory.

Maximum frequency

The maximum frequency defines the maximum reference frequency. The actual output frequency may be greater as a result of slip compensation and other types of regulation. This parameter also defines scaling for frequency reference. This is the frequency that corresponds to 32767 counts when the frequency reference is provided by a network.

Start Inhibits

Start Inhibits

2-147

The [Start Inhibits] parameter indicates the inverted state of all start permissive conditions. If the bit is on (HI or 1), the corresponding permissive requirement has not been met and the drive is inhibited from starting. It will be updated continually, not only when a start attempt is made. See also

Start Permissives on page 2-148 .

2-148

Start Permissives

Start Permissives

Start permissives are conditions required to permit the drive to start in any mode – run, jog, auto-tune, etc. When all permissive conditions are met the drive is considered ready to start. The ready condition is available as the

drive ready status.

Permissive Conditions

1. No faults can be active.

2. No type2 alarms can be active.

3. The TB Enable input (if configured) must be closed.

4. The DC bus precharge logic must indicate it is a start permissive.

5. All Stop inputs must be negated (See special Digital Inputs Stops

Configuration issues below).

6. No configuration changes (parameters being modified) can be in-progress.

If all permissive conditions are met, a valid start, run or jog command will start the drive. The status of all inhibit conditions, except for item

6

above, are reflected in the output parameter Start Inhibits. The configuration change condition is a transient (short-term) condition and not directly user controlled. It is therefore not reflected in the Start Inhibits parameter.

Note that the Start Inhibits conditions do not include any of the functionality imposed by the DPI logic such as owners, masks, local control, etc.

Start-Up

Start-Up

2-149

Start-Up Routines

PowerFlex drives offer a variety of Start Up routines to help the user commission the drive in the easiest manner and the quickest possible time.

PowerFlex 70 Drives have the S.M.A.R.T Start routine and a Basic assisted routine for more complex setups. PowerFlex 700 drives have both of the above plus an advanced startup routine.

S.M.A.R.T. Start

During a Start Up, the majority of applications require changes to only a few parameters. The LCD HIM on a PowerFlex 70 drive offers S.M.A.R.T.

start, which displays the most commonly changed parameters. With these parameters, you can set the following functions:

S - Start Mode and Stop Mode

M - Minimum and Maximum Speed

A - Accel Time 1 and Decel Time 1

R - Reference Source

T - Thermal Motor Overload

To run a S.M.A.R.T. start routine:

Step

1. Press ALT and then Esc (S.M.A.R.T).

The S.M.A.R.T. start screen appears.

2. View and change parameter values as desired. For HIM information, see

Appendix B.

3. Press ALT and then Sel (Exit) to exit the S.M.A.R.T. start.

Key(s)

ALT

ALT

Esc

Example LCD Displays

S.M.A.R.T. List

Start Mode

Stop Mode

Minimum Speed

Sel

Basic Start Up

The Basic Start Up routine leads the user through the necessary information in a simple question and answer format. The user can make the choice to execute or skip any section of the routine. Below is a complete flow chart of the routine.

2-150

Start-Up

Basic Start Up (Top Level)

HIM

Main Menu:

<Diagnostics>

Parameter

Device Select

Memory Storage

StartUp

Preferences

Startup

Drive active?

Esc

Yes

0-2

PowerFlex 70

StartUp .

The drive must be stopped to proceed. Press

Esc to cancel.

Abort

No

Stop

7. Done

/Exit

Startup previously aborted?

No

0-0

PowerFlex 70

StartUp .

This routine is to help setup a drive for basic applications.

Parameter access through other menus may be necessary to setup advanced features.

Enter

0-1

PowerFlex 70

StartUp .

Complete these steps in order:

1. Input Voltage

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

3. Motor Tests

4. Speed Limits

5. Speed Control

6. Strt,Stop,I/O

7. Done / Exit

Backup

Yes

Startup Menu

1. Input

Voltage

2. Motor

Dat/Ramps

3. Motor

Tests

4. Speed

Limits

5. Speed

Control

6. Strt,Stop,

I/O

'Esc' key

0-3

PowerFlex 70

StartUp .

Make a selection

Abort

<Backup>

Resume

StartUp Menu

Any state

Resume

Backup

Go to previous state

Go to Backup screen for previous state

Go to 1-0

Go to 2-0

Go to 3-0

Go to 4-0

Go to 5-0

Go to 6-0

Backup

Backup

Basic Start Up (Input Voltage)

1-0

StartUp

1. Input Voltage

This step should be done only when "alternate voltage" is needed (see user manual). It will reset all drive parameters with specific choice of Volts and Hz.

Enter

Backup

Rated Volts

>300?

1-1

StartUp

1. Input Voltage

Enter choice for

Input Supply

400V, 50 Hz

<480V, 60 Hz>

Yes

Enter

1-3

StartUp

1. Input Voltage

Reset all parameters to their defaults?

<Yes>

No

Enter

Yes

1-4

StartUp

1. Input Voltage

Clear fault to continue.

No

1-2

StartUp

1. Input Voltage

Enter choice for

Input Supply

208V, 60 Hz

<240V, 60 Hz>

Fault Clear

No

Go to 0-1 (2)

Start-Up

2-151

2-152

Start-Up

2-0

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Use motor nameplate data and required ramp times for the following steps.

Enter

2-1

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter choice for

Mtr NP Pwr Units

Enter

2-2

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Motor NP Power

123.4 kW xxx.x <> yyy.y

Enter

2-3

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Motor NP FLA

+456.78 Amps xxx.xx <> yyy.yy

Enter

2-4

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Motor NP Volts

123.4 Volt xxx.x <> yyy.y

Enter

2-5

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Motor NP Hertz

60.0 Hz x.x <> y.y

Enter

2-6

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Motor NP RPM

+456 RPM xxx <> yyy

Basic Start Up (Motor Data/Ramp)

2-7

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter choice for

Stop Mode A

Backup

Enter

Enter

Backup

Stop Mode A

= "DC Brake" or

"Ramp to

Hold"?

Yes

2-8

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

DC Brake Level

1.0 Amps

0.0 < 30.0 Amps

Enter

Backup

Stop Mode A

= "DC

Brake"?

Yes

2-9

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

DC BrakeTime

1.0 Secs

0.0 < 90.0 Secs

No

2-10

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter choice for

DB Resistor Type

None

Internal

External

No

Enter

2-11

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Accel Time 1

6.0 Secs

0.0 < 60.0 secs

Enter

Enter

2-12

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

Decel Time 1

6.0 Secs

0.0 < 60.0 secs

Enter

2-13

StartUp

2. Motr Dat/Ramp

Enter value for

S Curve %

0 %

0 < 100 %

None - Bus Reg Mode A = Adj Freq.

Intenal - Bus Reg Mode A = Both, DB 1st.

External - Bus Reg Mode A = Both, DB 1st.

Enter Go to 0-1 (3)

Start-Up

2-153

Enter/

Backup

3-0

Startup

3. Motor Tests

This section optimizes torque performance and tests for proper direction.

3-4

Startup

B. Directn Test

Press Jog or Start to begin.

Basic Start Up (Motor Tests)

Direction

Test

Enter

Startup

3. Motor Tests

Complete these steps in order:

<A. Auto Tune>

B. Directn Test

C. Done

3-1

Done

Auto Tune

Startup

A. AutoTune

Rotate Tune only with no load and low friction.

Static Tune when load or friction are present.

3-2

Go to 0-1 (4)

Enter/

Backup

Fault Clear

Enter

3-3

Startup

A. AutoTune

Make a selectioon

<Rotate Tune>

Static Tune

3-8

Startup

A. Auto Tune.

Static Tune will energize motor with no shaft rotation. Press

Start to begin.

Static

Tune

Rotate

Tune

Startup

A. Auto Tune

Rotate Tune will energize motor, then cause shaft rotation. Press

Start to begin.

3-9

3-12

Startup

3. Motor Tests

Test aborted due to user stop.

Clear fault to continue.

Start

3-5

Startup

B. Directn Test

Is direction of motor forward?

<Yes>

No

Enter/

Backup

Yes

(stops drive)

3-6

Startup

B. Directn Test

Test complete.

No

(stops drive)

3-7

Startup

B. Directn Test

Press Enter.

Then power down and swap 2 output wires to motor.

Start

3-10

Startup

A. Auto Tune

Executing test.

Please wait....

Start

Rotate/Static

Tune complete

(stops drive)

3-11

Startup

A. Auto Tune

Test complete.

Stop or Esc

(stops drive)

Fault

3-13

Startup

3. Motor Tests

Test aborted!

Clear the fault.

Check motor data settings. Verify load is removed.

2-154

Start-Up

4-0

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

This section defines min/max speeds, and direction method

Basic Start Up (Speed Limits)

Backup

Enter

4-1

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Disable reverse operation?

Yes

<No>

No

4-2

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Enter choice for

Direction Method

<Fwd/Rev Command>

+/- Speed Ref

Yes

4-3

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Enter value for

Maximum Speed

+60.00 Hz xxx.xx <> yyy.yy

Enter

Enter

Backup

MaxSpd + OSL

> MaxFreq?

Yes

4-5

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Maximum Freq and

Overspeed Limit will be changed to support your

Maximum Speed.

No

Backup

4-4

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Enter value for

Minimum Speed

+5.78 Hz xxx.xx <> yyy.yy

Enter

4-6

StartUp

4. Speed Limits

Rejecting this change will prevent starting

Accept

Reject

Accept

MaxSpd + OS

Lmt > 400Hz?

Reject

MaxFreq = MaxSpd

+ OS Limit

No

OS Limit =

MaxFreq - MaxSpd

MaxFreq = 400Hz

Enter

Yes

Go to 0-1 (5)

Start-Up

2-155

5-0

StartUp

5. Speed Control

This section defines a source from which to control speed.

5-2

Adapter

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Comm Adapter

Port 5-internal

Port 2-external

Port 3-external

Enter

Go to 0-1 (6)

Enter

5-3

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Remote HIM

Port 2 (common)

Port 3

5-4

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 1

5.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-5

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 2

10.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-6

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 3

15.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-7

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 4

20.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

Basic Start Up (Speed Control)

5-1

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Speed Control

<Analog Input>

Comm Adapter

Local HIM-Port 1

Remote HIM

Preset Speeds

MOP

Remote

HIM

Preset

Speeds

Local HIM-

Port 1

Go to 0-1 (6)

MOP

Analog Input

5-14

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Digital Inputs

5 & 6 will be set to MOP Inc &

MOP Dec.

Enter

5-15

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Save MOP speed at power down ?

<Yes>

No

5-11

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Note: Factory default settings provide preset speed operation from the digital inputs, unless you change their function.

Enter

5-16

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Save MOP speed at stop ?

<Yes>

No

Enter/

Backup

Preset

Speed 1

Preset

Speed 2

Enter

5-12

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Make a selection .

<Preset Speed 1>

Preset Speed 2

Preset Speed 3

Preset Speed 4

Preset Speed 5

Preset Speed 6

Preset Speed 7

Done

Preset

Speed 3

Preset

Speed 4

Preset

Speed 5

Preset

Speed 6

Done

Preset

Speed 7

Enter

5-17

PF70 StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

MOP Rate

5.0 Hz xx.x < yy.y

Enter

Go to 0-1 (6)

5-8

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 5

25.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-9

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 6

30.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-10

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Preset Speed 7

35.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-21

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Speed Ref A Hi

60.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

Enter

5-22

StartUp

5. Speed Control

The next two parameters link a low speed with a low analog value.

5-23

Enter

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Analog In 1 Lo

0.0 V

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-24

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Speed Ref A Lo

0.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

5-13

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Input Signal

Analog Input 1

Analog Input 2

5-18

Analog

Input 1

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Signal Type

Voltage

Current

Analog

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter choice for

Signal Type

Voltage

Current

5-25

Enter

5-19

StartUp

5. Speed Control

The next two parameters link a high speed with a high analog value.

5-20

Enter

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Analog In 1 Hi

10.0 V

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-26

StartUp

5. Speed Control

The next two parameters link a high speed with a high analog value.

5-27

Enter

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Analog In 2 Hi

10.0 V

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-28

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Speed Ref A Hi

60.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-29

StartUp

5. Speed Control

The next two parameters link a low speed with a low analog value.

5-30

Enter

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Analog In 2 Lo

0.0 V

xxx.x < yyy.y

Enter

5-31

StartUp

5. Speed Control

Enter value for

Speed Ref A Lo

0.0 Hz

xxx.x < yyy.y

2-156

Start-Up

6-0

StartUp

6. Strt,Stop,I/O

This section defines I/O functions including start and stop from digital ins

Backup

Enter

6-3

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Inputs

1-4 will be set to defaults.

Yes

Enter

6-1

StartUp

6. Strt,Stop,I/O

Complete these steps in order:

<A. Dig Inputs>

B. Dig Outputs

C. Anlg Outputs

D. Done

A. Dig Inputs

6-2

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Make a selection

<Easy Configure>

Custom Configure

Easy Configure

DigIn 5,6 = MOP

Inc, Dec?

No

Enter

Dir Mode =

Reverse

Disable?

Yes

6-6

Backup

6-4

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Inputs

1-6 will be set to defaults.

No

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Control Method

<3-wire>

2-wire

Yes

C. Anlg

Outputs

D. Done

B. Dig

Outputs

Go to 6-29

Custom Configure

Backup

Dir Mode =

Bipolar?

6-7

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 1 will be set to

Not Used.

2-wire

Enter

6-8

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 2 will be set to

Run/Stop.

Enter

3-wire

6-9

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 1 will be set to

Stop.

Enter

6-10

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 2 will be set to

Start.

Enter

Go to 6-1 (B)

Basic Start Up (Start,Stop,I/O)

Go to 0-1 (7)

Go to 6-24

No

No

6-5

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Is reverse required from digital inputs?

<Yes>

No

Yes

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Control Method

<3-wire>

2-wire

6-11

Enter

Go to 6-1 (B)

6-12

2-wire

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 1 will be set to

Run Forward.

6-13

Enter

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 2 will be set to

Run Reverse.

Done

6-17

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Make a selection

<Digital Input 1>

Digital Input 2

Digital Input 3

Digital Input 4

Digital Input 5

Digital Input 6

Done

Enter

Enter/

Backup

Digital In 1

Digital In 2

Digital In 3

Digital In 4

Digital In 5

Digital In 6

3-wire

6-14

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 3 will be set to Fwd/

Reverse.

Enter

6-15

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 1 will be set to

Stop.

Enter

6-16

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Digital Input 2 will be set to

Start.

6-18

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In1 Sel

6-19

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In2 Sel

6-20

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In3 Sel

6-21

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In4 Sel

6-22

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In5 Sel

6-23

StartUp

A. Dig Inputs

Enter choice for

Digital In6 Sel

Start-Up

2-157

Basic Start Up (Start,Stop,I/O [2])

Go to 6-1 (C)

Done

6-24

StartUp

B . Dig Outputs

Make a selection

<Digital Out 1>

Digital Out 2

Done

6-25

StartUp

B. Dig Outputs

Enter choice for

Digital Out 1 Sel

Digital

Out 1

Digital

Out 2

6-27

StartUp

B. Dig Outputs

Enter choice for

Digital Out 2 Sel

No

Enter

Enter Enter

Digital Out 1 Sel

= ENUM choice that uses

"Level"?

Yes

6-26

StartUp

B. Dig Outputs

Enter value for

Dig Out 1 Level

Backup

Backup

Digital Out 2 Sel

= ENUM choice that uses

"Level"?

Yes

StartUp

B. Dig Outputs

Enter value for

Dig Out 2 Level

No

Enter

6-29

StartUp

C. Anlg Outpts

Enter choice for

Analog Out 1 Sel

Enter

6-30

StartUp

C. Anlg Outpts

Enter value for

Analog Out 1 Hi

Enter

6-31

StartUp

C. Anlg Outpts

Enter value for

Analog Out 1 Lo

Enter

Go to 6-1 (D)

2-158

Stop Modes

Stop Modes

[Stop Mode A, B]

[DC Brake Lvl Sel]

[DC Brake Level]

[DC Brake Time]

1. Coast to Stop - When in Coast to Stop, the drive acknowledges the Stop command by shutting off the output transistors and releasing control of the motor. The load / motor will coats or free spin until the mechanical energy is dissipated.

Output Voltage

Output Current

Motor Speed

Time

Coast Time is load dependent

Stop

Command

2. Dynamic Braking is explained in detail in the PowerFlex Dynamic

Braking Selection Guide, presented in

Appendix A .

3. Brake to Stop is selected by setting [Stop Mode A] to a value of “3.”

The User can also select the amount of time the braking will be applied and the magnitude of the current used for braking with [DC Brake Time] and [DC Brake Level]. This mode of braking will generate up to 40% of rated motor torque for braking and is typically used for low inertia loads.

When in Brake to Stop, the drive acknowledges the Stop command by immediately stopping the output and then applying a programmable DC voltage [DC Brake Level] to 1 phase of the motor. This voltage is only removed by one of two events;

– Opening an Enable digital input

– Reissuing the Start command

Caution must be used when setting [DC Brake Level]. Excess motor current could damage the motor.

Caution must also be observed, since motor voltage will exist even though a Stop command was issued.

Output Voltage

Output Current

Motor Speed

DC

Hold Level

Time

DC Hold Time

Stop

Command

Stop Modes

2-159

4. Ramp To Stop is selected by setting [Stop Mode x]. The drive will ramp the frequency to zero based on the deceleration time programmed into

[Decel Time 1/2]. The “normal” mode of machine operation can utilize

[Decel Time 1]. If the “Machine Stop” mode requires a faster deceleration than desired for normal mode, the “Machine Stop” can activate [Decel Time 2] with a faster rate selected. When in Ramp to

Stop, the drive acknowledges the Stop command by decreasing or

“ramping” the output voltage and frequency to zero in a programmed period (Decel Time), maintaining control of the motor until the drive output reaches zero. The output transistors are then shut off.

The load/motor should follow the decel ramp. Other factors such as bus regulation and current limit can alter the decel time and modify the ramp function.

Ramp mode can also include a “timed” hold brake. Once the drive has reached zero output hertz on a Ramp-to-Stop and both parameters [DC

Hold Time] and [DC Hold Level] are not zero, the drive applies DC to the motor producing current at the DC Hold Level for the DC Hold

Time.

Output Voltage

Output Current

Motor Speed

Output Current

Output Voltage

DC

Hold

Level

Time

Stop

Command

DC Hold Time

Zero

Command

Speed

The drive output voltage will be zero when the hold time is finished

2-160

Stop Modes

5. Ramp To Hold is selected by setting [Stop Select x]. The drive will ramp the frequency to zero based on the deceleration time programmed into [Decel Time 1/2]. Once the drive reaches zero hertz, a DC Injection holding current is applied to the motor. The level of current is set in [DC

Brake Level]. The DC hold is removed only by removing the “Enable” input or by a valid start input.

Motor speed during and after the application of DC depends upon the combination of the these two parameter settings, and the mechanical system. The drive output voltage will be zero when the hold time is finished.

Output Voltage Output Voltage

Output Current

Motor Speed

Output Current

Motor Speed

Output Current

Output Voltage

DC

Hold Level

Time

Stop

Command

Zero

Command

Speed

Re-issuing a

Start Command

Test Points

Thermal Regulator

234

236

235

237

32

[Testpoint 1 Sel]

[Testpoint 2 Sel]

Selects the function whose value is displayed value in [Testpoint x Data].

These are internal values that are not accessible through parameters.

See Testpoint Codes and Functions on page 4-10 for a listing of available codes and functions.

[Testpoint 1 Data]

[Testpoint 2 Data]

The present value of the function selected in [Testpoint x Sel].

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

Default:

Min/Max:

Display:

499

0/999

1

Read Only

0/65535

1

Table 2.V Testpoint Codes and Functions

4

5

2

3

0

1

Code Selected in

[Testpoint x Sel]

6

7

8-99

Function Whose Value is

Displayed in [Testpoint x Data]

DPI Error Status

Heatsink Temperature

Active Current Limit

Active PWM Frequency

Lifetime MegaWatt Hours

Lifetime Run Time

Lifetime Powered Up Time

Lifetime Power Cycles

Reserved for Factory Use

See

Drive Overload on page 2-71 .

Test Points

2-161

2-162

Torque Performance Modes

Torque Performance

Modes

[Torque Perf Mode]

V/Hz Control

V/Hz

Current

Resolver

Voltage

Control

Inverter

+

+

Current

Limit

Motor

Flux

Vector

Control

Voltage Feedback

Slip

Estimator

V/Hz

When torque performance is set to Custom V/Hz the following parameters are used to define the relationship between frequency and voltage. The following examples are for a 480v class drive.

Maximum Voltage

Base Voltage

(Nameplate) Voltage

Break Voltage

Start/Accel Boost

Run Boost

Break

Frequency

Base Frequency

(Nameplate)

Maximum

Frequency

The performance of the V/Hz modes and SVC mode are outlined below.

These specifications do not apply to Economize mode due to weakened field conditions. Slip compensation incorporates the effects of field weakening so as to minimize the speed regulation error due to either economize mode or operation above base frequency. The specifications below are applicable over the constant torque speed range.

Specification

Speed Regulation/accuracy (w/ slip compensation)

Operating Speed Range (w/slip compensation)

Dynamic Speed Accuracy

(speed response to a 95% step load change)

Velocity Bandwidth (w/slip compensation and no encoder)

Minimum settability of velocity bandwidth/slip compensation

Normal Duty

Fan/Pump and

Custom V/Hz

0.5% (40:1 speed range)

40:1

0.5% base speed

10 rad/s

0.1 rad/s

SVC

0.1% (60:1 speed range)

120:1

0.1% base speed

Heavy Duty

Fan/Pump and

Custom V/Hz

0.5% (40:1 speed range)

40:1

20 rad/s (50 rad/s desired)

0.1 rad/s

10 rad/s

0.1 rad/s

SVC

0.1% (60:1 speed range)

120:1

0.5% base speed 0.1% base speed

20 rad/s (50 rad/s desired)

01 rad/s

Torque Performance Modes

2-163

This curve is intended for applications such as fans and pumps where the load increases as the speed increases. This mode is intended to have a V/Hz profile that more closely matches the developed torque to the load torque.

Maximum Voltage

Base Voltage

(Nameplate)

Run Boost

Base Frequency

(Nameplate)

Maximum

Frequency

Allowable Output Frequency Range -

Bus Regulation or Current Limit

Allowable Output Frequency Range - Normal Operation

1

Allowable Speed Reference Range

Maximum

Voltage

Motor NP

Voltage

Frequency Trim due to Speed

Control Mode

Overspeed

Limit

Break

Voltage

Start

Boost

Run

Boost

0 Minimum

Speed

Break

Frequency

Motor NP Hz Maximum

Speed

Output

Frequency

Limit

Maximum

Frequency

Frequency

Note 1: The lower limit on this range can be 0 depending on the value of Speed Adder

Sensorless Vector

In sensorless vector control the drive maintains a consistent magnetizing current up to base speed, the output voltage increases as a function of load.

Maximum Voltage

Base Voltage

(Nameplate) ve

Apppro ximate Full Load Cur

Apppro ximate No Load Cur ve

Ir Voltage

Base Frequency

(Nameplate)

Maximum

Frequency

2-164

Torque Performance Modes

Autotune

[Autotune]

The purpose of Autotune is to identify the motor flux current and stator resistance for use in Sensorless Vector Control and Economizer modes. The result of the flux current test procedure is stored in the parameter [Flux

Current]. The product of [Flux Current] and the result of the stator resistance test procedure will be stored in the parameter [IR Voltage Drop].

There are two options for autotuning:

Static - the motor shaft will not rotate during this test.

Dynamic - the motor shaft will rotate during this test.

The static test determines only stator resistance, while the dynamic

Autotune procedure determines both the stator resistance and motor flux current.

[IR Voltage Drop] is used by the IR Compensation procedure to provide additional voltage at all frequencies to offset the voltage drop developed across the stator resistance. An accurate calculation of the [IR Voltage

Drop] will ensure higher starting torque and better performance at low speed operation.

If it is not possible or desirable to run the Autotune tests, there are two other methods for the drive to determine the [IR Voltage Drop] and [Flux Current] parameters. One method retrieves the default parameters stored in the power

EEprom, and the other method calculates them from the user-entered motor nameplate data parameters.

If the stator resistance and flux current of the motor are known, the user can calculate the voltage drop across the stator resistance and directly enter these values into the [Flux Current] and [IR Voltage Drop] parameters.

The user must enter motor nameplate data into the following parameters for the Autotune procedure to obtain accurate results:

[Motor NP Volts]

[Motor NP Hertz]

[Motor NP Power]

In addition to the motor nameplate parameters, the user must also enter a value in the [Autotune] parameter to determine which Autotune tests to perform.

The following options for the [Autotune] parameter are as follows:

0 = Ready

1 = Static Tune

2 = Rotate Tune

3 = Calculate

The procedure to identify the motor flux current, stator resistance, and IR voltage drop is started with the [Autotune] parameter. The tests are initiated

Torque Performance Modes

2-165

after a value is entered (1 for static or 2 for dynamic) into this parameter and the start button is pressed. When the tests are finished, the [Autotune] parameter is set to 0 (ready), the drive is stopped, and the Autotune procedure is complete.

If any errors are encountered during the Autotune process drive parameters are not changed, the appropriate fault code will be displayed in the fault queue, and the [Autotune] parameter is reset to 0. If the Autotune procedure is aborted by the user, the drive parameters are not changed and the

[Autotune] parameter is reset to 0.

The following conditions will generate a fault during an Autotune procedure:

Incorrect stator resistance measurement

Incorrect motor flux current measurement

Load too large

Autotune aborted by user

When the drive is initially powered up, the [Autotune] parameter is defaulted to a value of 3(calculate). With this setting, any changes made by the user to motor nameplate HP, Voltage, Frequency, or Power activates a new calculation, which will update the [IR Voltage Drop] and [Flux

Current] parameters. This calculation is based on a typical motor with those nameplate values. The Autotune parameter will not be reset to zero after this calculation is performed; calculations will continue to be performed every time motor nameplate values are changed.

Flux Current

This parameter displays only the flux producing component of output current. It displays the amount of current that is out of phase with the output voltage. This current is reactive current and is used to produce flux in the motor.

Flux Up

[Flux Up Mode]

AC induction motors require flux to be established before controlled torque can be developed. To build flux in these motors, voltage is applied to them.

PowerFlex drives have two methods to flux the motor.

The first method is a normal start. During a normal start, flux is established as the output voltage and frequency are applied to the motor. While the flux is being built, the unpredictable nature of the developed torque may cause the rotor to oscillate even though acceleration of the load may occur. In the motor, the acceleration profile may not follow the commanded acceleration profile due to the lack of developed torque.

2-166

Torque Performance Modes

Figure 2.18 Accel Profile during Normal Start - No Flux Up

Frequency

Reference

Rated Flux

Stator

Rotor

0

Oscillation due to flux being established

Time

The second method is Flux Up Mode. In this mode, DC current is applied to the motor at a level equal to the lesser of the current limit setting, drive rated current, and drive DC current rating. The flux up time period is based on the level of flux up current and the rotor time constant of the motor.

The flux up current is not user adjustable.

Figure 2.19 Flux Up Current versus Flux Up Time

Flux Up Current = Maximum DC Current

Rated Flux

Current

Rated Motor Flux

Motor Flux

T1

T2

T3

T4

Flux Up Time

[Flux Up Time]

Once rated flux is reached in the motor, normal operation begins and the desired acceleration profile is achieved.

Figure 2.20 Rated Flux Reached

Flux Up

Voltage

Motor Flux

Flux Up

Ir Voltage - SVC

Greater of IR Voltage or

Voltage Boost - V/Hz

Normal

Operation

Stator Voltage

Rotor Speed

Motor Flux

Stator Freq

Time

Torque Performance Modes

2-167

Torque Current

This parameter displays only the torque producing component of output current. It displays the amount of current that is in phase with the output voltage. This current is real current and is used to produce torque in the motor.

IR Drop Volts

[IR Voltage Drop]

The test to identify the IR drop of the drive and motor does not require the load to be uncoupled from the motor and should be run even if the flux current identification procedure is skipped.

Flux Current

[Flux Current Ref]

The test to identify the motor flux current requires the load to be uncoupled from the motor to find an accurate value. If this is not possible and the no load current is know then the value can be entered into the flux current parameter and this step in the drive commissioning can be skipped. If it is not possible to uncouple the load and the no load current is not known, then a value of zero is entered into flux and this step in the drive commissioning can be skipped.

2-168

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting

Power Up Marker

Copy of factory “drive under power” timer at the last power-up of the drive.

Used to provide relevance of Fault 'n' Time values with respect to the last power-up of the drive.

This value will rollover to 0 after the drive has been powered on for more than the hours shown in the Range field (approximately 47.667 years).

Unbalanced or Ungrounded Distribution Systems

2-169

Unbalanced or

Ungrounded

Distribution Systems

Unbalanced Distribution Systems

This drive is designed to operate on three-phase supply systems whose line voltages are symmetrical. Surge suppression devices are included to protect the drive from lightning induced overvoltages between line and ground.

Where the potential exists for abnormally high phase-to-ground voltages (in excess of 125% of nominal), or where the supply ground is tied to another system or equipment that could cause the ground potential to vary with operation, suitable isolation is required for the drive. Where this potential exists, an isolation transformer is strongly recommended.

Ungrounded Distribution Systems

All drives are equipped with an MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) that provides voltage surge protection and phase-to-phase plus phase-to-ground protection which is designed to meet IEEE 587. The MOV circuit is designed for surge suppression only (transient line protection), not continuous operation.

With ungrounded distribution systems, the phase-to-ground MOV connection could become a continuous current path to ground. Energy ratings are listed below. Exceeding the published phase-to-phase or phase-to-ground energy ratings may cause physical damage to the MOV.

Three-Phase

AC Input

R

S

T

Ground

Joules (J)

Joules (J)

Joules (J)

Joules (J)

1 2 3 4

Phase-to-Phase MOV Rating

Includes 2 Phase-Phase MOVs

Phase-to-Ground MOV Rating

Includes Phase-Phase & Phase-Ground MOVs

Device Rating (V AC)

Phase-Phase Total

Phase-Ground Total

240 480/600

160J 320J

220J 380J

240/480 600

280J 320J

360J 410J

240/480 600

280J 300J

360J 370J

2-170

User Sets

User Sets

After a drive has been configured for a given application the user can store a copy of all of the parameter settings in a specific EEPROM area known as a

“User Set.” Up to 3 User Sets can be stored in the drives memory to be used for backup, batch “switching” or other needs. All parameter information is stored. The user can then recall this data to the active drive operating memory as needed. Each User Set can also be identified with a programmable name, selected by the user for clarity.

There are two operations to manage the operation of User Sets, “Save To

User Set” and “Restore From User Set.” The user selects 1, 2, or 3 as the area in which to store data. After data is successfully transferred, “Save

User Set” returns to a value of 0. To copy a given area back into the active

EEprom memory, the user selects Set 1, 2, or 3 for “Restore User Set.” After data is successfully transferred, “Restore User Set” returns to a value of 0.

When shipped from the factory all user sets have the same factory default values. Reset Defaults does not effect the contents of User Sets.

Figure 2.21 User Sets

Reset Defaults

PowerBoard

EEprom

Factory

Default Data

Drive Rating & Motor

Parameters

1

Reset

Active EE

Non Drive Rating & Motor

Parameters

Flash Memory

SaveUserSet

400V

Default Data

2

1 User Set 1

Save

User set

480V

Default Data

3

Active EE 2 User Set 2

Restore

User set

3 User Set 3

RestoreUserSet

Load

Application

Set

Flash Memory

Application Set

Voltage class

Voltage class

2-171

PowerFlex drives are sometimes referred to by voltage “class.” This class identifies the general input voltage to the drive. This general voltage includes a range of actual voltages. For example, a 400 Volt Class drive will have an input voltage range of 380-480VAC. While the hardware remains the same for each class, other variables, such as factory defaults, catalog number and power unit ratings will change. In most cases, all drives within a voltage class can be reprogrammed to another drive in the class by resetting the defaults to something other than “factory” settings. The

[Voltage Class] parameter can be used to reset a drive to a different setup within the voltage class.

As an example, consider a 480 volt drive. This drive comes with factory default values for 480V, 60 Hz with motor data defaulted for U.S. motors

(HP rated , 1750 RPM, etc.) By setting the [Voltage Class] parameter to

“low Voltage” (this represents 400V in this case) the defaults are changed to

400V, 50 Hz settings with motor data for European motors (kW rated, 1500

RPM, etc). Refer to

Figure 2.21

.

2-172

Watts Loss

Watts Loss

The following table lists watts loss data for PowerFlex drives running at full load, full speed and a factory default PWM Frequency of 4 kHz. Data for other load/speed/PWM combinations can be determined using the calculator on the PowerFlex e-Library.

PowerFlex 70

For PowerFlex 70 drives, Internal Watts are those dissipated by the control structure of the drive and will be dissipated into the cabinet regardless of mounting style. External Watts are those dissipated directly through the heatsink and will be outside the cabinet for flange mount and inside the cabinet for panel mount.

Table 2.W 480V Watts Loss at Full Load/Speed, 4kHz

(1)

3

5

7.5

10

1

2

Normal Duty HP Internal

0.5

17.9

19.5

21.6

15

20

24.0

28.2

27.8

32.0

34.2

42.9

External

11.5

27.8

43.6

64.6

99.5

140.0

193.3

305.4

432.9

Total

29.4

47.3

65.2

88.6

127.7

167.8

225.3

339.6

475.8

Table 2.X 240V Watts Loss at Full Load/Speed, 4kHz

(1)

3

5

7.5

10

1

2

Normal Duty HP Internal

0.5

19.2

20.5

22.6

25.4

33.2

34.2

48.1

External

12.2

30.7

44.6

67.3

141.3

205.7

270.4

Total

31.4

51.2

67.2

92.7

174.5

239.9

318.5

PowerFlex 700

For PowerFlex 700 drives, a flange mount version is not offered - only total watts are shown (see

Table 2.Y

).

(1) Includes HIM.

Table 2.Y 480V Watts Loss at Full Load/Speed, 4kHz

(1)

15

20

25

30

40

3

5

7.5

10

1

2

Normal Duty HP Total

0.5

43.9

54.2

66.4

84.8

157.2

187.6

213.1

326.3

397.9

445.8

464.3

619.7

Watts Loss

2-173

(1) Includes HIM and Standard I/O Board.

2-174

Watts Loss

Appendix

A

Dynamic Brake Selection Guide

The Dynamic Braking Selection Guide provided on the following pages contains detailed information on selecting and using dynamic brakes.

Dynamic Braking

www.abpowerflex.com

Selection Guide

A-2

Dynamic Brake Selection Guide

Important User Information

Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. “Safety Guidelines for the Application, Installation

and Maintenance of Solid State Controls” (Publication SGI-1.1 available from your local Allen-Bradley Sales Office or online at

http://www.ab.com/manuals/gi

) describes some important differences between solid state equipment and hard-wired electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of uses for solid state equipment, all persons responsible for applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.

In no event will the Allen-Bradley Company be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this equipment.

The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements associated with any particular installation, the Allen-Bradley Company cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and diagrams.

No patent liability is assumed by Allen-Bradley Company with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this manual.

Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of the Allen-Bradley Company is prohibited.

Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.

!

ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.

Attentions help you:

• identify a hazard

• avoid the hazard

• recognize the consequences

Important: Identifies information that is especially important for successful application and understanding of the product.

Shock Hazard labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert people that dangerous voltage may be present.

Burn Hazard labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert people that surfaces may be at dangerous temperatures.

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

Table of Contents

What This Guide Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

How Dynamic Braking Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

Dynamic Brake Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

How to Determine Dynamic Brake Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

Determine Values of Equation Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Example Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9

Evaluating the Capability of the Internal Dynamic Brake Resistor . .

3-1

How to Select an External Dynamic Brake Resistor . . . . . . . . . 4-1

ii

Notes:

Table of Contents

Section

1

What This Guide Contains

This Selection Guide contains the information necessary to determine whether or not dynamic braking is required for your drive application and select the correct resistor rating.

Section 1 provides an overview of dynamic braking principles.

Section 2 steps you through the calculations used to determine if dynamic braking is required for your drive application.

Section 3 steps you through the calculations used to determine if the internal dynamic brake option is adequate for your drive application.

Section 4 steps you through the calculations needed to select an externally mounted dynamic brake resistor for your drive application.

How Dynamic Braking Works

When an induction motor’s rotor is turning slower than the synchronous speed set by the drive’s output power, the motor is transforming electrical energy obtained from the drive into mechanical energy available at the drive shaft of the motor. This process is referred to as

motoring. When the rotor is turning faster than the synchronous speed set by the drive’s output power, the motor is transforming mechanical energy available at the drive shaft of the motor into electrical energy that can be transferred back to the drive. This process is referred to as

regeneration.

Most AC PWM drives convert AC power from the fixed frequency utility grid into DC power by means of a diode rectifier bridge or controlled

SCR bridge before it is inverted into variable frequency AC power.

Diode and SCR bridges are cost effective, but can only handle power in the motoring direction. Therefore, if the motor is regenerating, the bridge cannot conduct the necessary negative DC current, the DC bus voltage will increase and cause an overvoltage fault at the drive. More complex bridge configurations use SCRs or transistors that can transform DC regenerative electrical power into fixed frequency utility electrical energy. This process is known as line regeneration.

A more cost effective solution can be provided by allowing the drive to feed the regenerated electrical power to a resistor which transforms it into thermal energy. This process is referred to as dynamic braking.

1-2

Dynamic Brake Components

A Dynamic Brake consists of a Chopper (the chopper transistor and related control components are built into PowerFlex drives) and a

Dynamic Brake Resistor.

Figure 1.1

shows a simplified Dynamic Braking schematic.

Figure 1.1 Simplified Dynamic Brake Schematic

+ DC Bus

Dynamic

Brake

Resistor

FWD

Voltage

Divider

To

Voltage

Control

Signal

Common

To

Voltage Dividers

Chopper

Transistor

Chopper Transistor

Voltage Control

FWD

Voltage

Divider

To

Voltage

Control

– DC Bus

Chopper

The

Chopper

is the Dynamic Braking circuitry that senses rising DC bus voltage and shunts the excess energy to the Dynamic Brake Resistor. A

Chopper contains three significant power components:

The

Chopper Transistor

is an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT).

The Chopper Transistor is either ON or OFF, connecting the Dynamic

Brake Resistor to the DC bus and dissipating power, or isolating the resistor from the DC bus. The most important rating is the collector current rating of the Chopper Transistor that helps to determine the minimum resistance value used for the Dynamic Brake Resistor.

1-3

Chopper Transistor Voltage Control

regulates the voltage of the DC bus during regeneration. The average values of DC bus voltages are:

375V DC (for 240V AC input)

750V DC (for 480V AC input)

Voltage dividers reduce the DC bus voltage to a value that is usable in signal circuit isolation and control. The DC bus feedback voltage from the voltage dividers is compared to a reference voltage to actuate the

Chopper Transistor.

The

Freewheel Diode

(FWD), in parallel with the Dynamic Brake

Resistor, allows any magnetic energy stored in the parasitic inductance of that circuit to be safely dissipated during turn off of the Chopper

Transistor.

Resistor

The

Resistor

dissipates the regenerated energy in the form of heat. The

PowerFlex Family of Drives can use either the internal dynamic brake resistor option or an externally mounted dynamic brake resistor wired to the drive.

The internal resistor kit for the drive may be used for the application if the required energy, deceleration time, and duty, all are small enough to be within the capabilities of the resistor.

The internal resistor is protected by drive software so that its duty cycle capability is not exceeded. The duty cycle is attenuated by the magnitude of the ‘DB Suppress’ signal coming from the Thermal Model algorithm.

The Thermal Model algorithm uses resistor thermal property constants to compute DB resistor temperature from applied resistor power that is computed from knowing the DB transistor duty cycle (DutyDB ). When the Thermal Model computes that the DB resistor temperature is nearing the maximum rise allowed, the ‘DB Suppress’ signal begins to rise reaching full value when maximum temperature rise is reached..

When the internal resistor cannot provide the required braking capability an external resistor may be supplied by the user that has more capability

A DB Resistance Auto-Detect algorithm is used. This algorithm is executed as part of the ‘power-up’ diagnostics and is only re-enabled until the drive is fully powered down again. This algorithm checks that the resistance measured across the DB terminals of the power board is within limits that are stored in the power board EEPROM.

1-4

The algorithm runs as follows:

Opens the precharge relay if not already open.

Pulses the DB transistor on in a series of increasing width pulses.

Measures the resulting capacitor bank voltage drop during each pulse.

Verifies the drop is within allowed limits (stored in the power board

EEPROM).

If the resistance measured is out of limits and the DB regulator is enabled then the ‘DB Resistance Out of Range’ fault is set. If the DB

Regulator is not enabled with this out of limits condition, no fault is set.

But, if some time after power-up the [Bus Reg Mode] parameter is set to enable the DB Regulator, the fault is set at that time.

Section

2

How to Determine Dynamic Brake Requirements

When a drive is consistently operating in the regenerative mode of operation, serious consideration should be given to equipment that will transform the electrical energy back to the fixed frequency utility grid.

As a general rule, Dynamic Braking can be used when the need to dissipate regenerative energy is on an occasional or periodic basis. In general, the motor power rating, speed, torque, and details regarding the regenerative mode of operation will be needed in order to estimate what

Dynamic Brake Resistor value is needed.

The Peak Regenerative Power of the drive must be calculated in order to determine the maximum resistance value of the Dynamic Brake

Resistor. Once the maximum resistance value of the Dynamic Brake

Resistor current rating is known, the required rating and number of

Dynamic Brake Resistors can be determined. If a Dynamic Brake

Resistance value greater than the minimum imposed by the choice of the peak regenerative power is made and applied, the drive can trip off due to transient DC bus overvoltage problems. Once the approximate resistance value of the Dynamic Brake Resistor is determined, the necessary power rating of the Dynamic Brake Resistor can be calculated.

The power rating of the Dynamic Brake Resistor is estimated by applying what is known about the drive’s motoring and regenerating modes of operation. The Average Power Dissipation must be estimated and the power rating of the Dynamic Brake Resistor chosen to be greater than that average. If the Dynamic Brake Resistor has a large thermodynamic heat capacity, then the resistor element will be able to absorb a large amount of energy without the temperature of the resistor element exceeding the operational temperature rating. Thermal time constants in the order of 50 seconds and higher satisfy the criteria of large heat capacities for these applications. If a resistor has a small heat capacity (defined as thermal time constants less than 5 seconds) the temperature of the resistor element could exceed its maximum.

Peak Regenerative Power can be calculated as:

Horsepower (English units)

Watts (The International System of Units, SI)

Per Unit System (pu) which is relative to a value

The final number must be in watts of power to estimate the resistance value of the Dynamic Brake Resistor. The following calculations are demonstrated in SI units.

2-2

Gather the Following Information

Power rating from motor nameplate in watts, kilowatts, or horsepower

Speed rating from motor nameplate in rpm or rps (radians per second)

Motor inertia and load inertia in kg-m

2

or lb.-ft.

2

Gear ratio

(GR)

if a gear is present between the motor and load

Motor shaft speed, torque, and power profile of the drive application

Figure 2.1

shows the speed, torque, and power profiles of the drive as a function of time for a particular cyclic application that is periodic over t

4 seconds. The desired time to decelerate is known or calculable and is within the drive performance limits. In

Figure 2.1

, the following

variables are defined:

ω

(t)

= Motor shaft speed in radians per second (rps)

ω

=

2

π

N

----------

60

N(t)

= Motor shaft speed in Revolutions Per Minute

(RPM)

T(t)

= Motor shaft torque in Newton-meters

1.0 lb.-ft. = 1.355818 N-m

P(t) = Motor shaft power in watts

1.0 HP = 746 watts

ω

ω

-P b o b

= Rated angular rotational speed

Rad

--------s

= Angular rotational speed less than

ω b

(can equal 0)

Rad

--------s

= Motor shaft peak regenerative power in watts

2-3

Figure 2.1 Application Speed, Torque and Power Profiles

ω

ω

(t) b

ω o

0 t1 t2 t3 t4 t1 + t4

T(t)

0

P(t) t1 t2 t3 t4 t1 + t4

-Pb

0 t1 t2 t3 t4 t1 + t4 t t t

2-4

Determine Values of Equation Variables

Step 2 Total Inertia

J

T

=

J m

+

(

GR

2

×

J

L

)

J

T

J m

= Total inertia reflected to the motor shaft (kg-m

= Motor inertia (kg-m

2

or lb.-ft.

2

)

2

GR = Gear ratio for any gear between motor and load

(dimensionless)

J

L

= Load inertia (kg-m

2

or lb.-ft.

2

)

1.0 lb.-ft.

2

= 0.04214011 kg-m

2

or lb.-ft.

2

)

Calculate Total Inertia:

J

T

=

[ oooooooooo

]

+

( oooooooooo

× oooooooooo

)

Record Total Inertia:

J

T

=

2-5

Step 3 Peak Braking Power

P b

=

J

T

[ ω

( b

( t

3

ω

– t

2

)

ω ) ]

----------------------------------------

P b

= Peak braking power (watts)

1.0 HP = 746 watts

J

ω

ω

T b o

= Total inertia reflected to the motor shaft (kg-m

2

)

= Rated angular rotational speed

Rad

--------s

=

2

π

N

------------

60 b

= Angular rotational speed, less than rated speed down to zero

Rad

--------s

= Rated motor speed (RPM) N b t

3

– t

2

= Deceleration time from

ω b

to

ω o

(seconds)

Calculate Peak Braking Power:

P b

=

[ ooooooooo

] × [

( ooooooooo ooooooooo

]

× ( ooooooooo ooooooooo

)

– ooooooooo

)

Record Peak Braking Power:

P b

=

Compare the peak braking power to that of the rated motor power. If the peak braking power is greater that 1.5 times that of the motor, then the deceleration time

(t

3 go into current limit.

– t

2

) needs to be increased so that the drive does not

2-6

Step 4 Minimum Power Requirements for the Dynamic Brake

Resistors

It is assumed that the application exhibits a periodic function of acceleration and deceleration. If

(t

3

– t

2

)

equals the time in seconds necessary for deceleration from rated speed to

ω o

speed, and t

4

is the time in seconds before the process repeats itself, then the average duty cycle is (t

3

– t

2

)/t

4

. The power as a function of time is a linearly decreasing function from a value equal to the peak regenerative power to some lesser value after (t

3

– t

2

) seconds have elapsed. The average power regenerated over the interval of

(t

3

– t

2

)

seconds is: P

-----

2

×

( ω b

+

ω b

ω

------------------------

)

P b

ω b

ω o

P av

= Average dynamic brake resister dissipation (watts) t

3

– t

2

= Deceleration time from

ω b

to

ω o

(seconds) t

4

= Total cycle time or period of process (seconds)

= Peak braking power (watts)

= Rated angular rotational speed

= Angular rotational speed,

Rad

--------s less than rated speed down to zero

Rad

--------s

The Average Power in watts regenerated over the period t

4

is:

P av

=

( t

2

)

-----------------t

4 t P

-----

2

( ω b

+

ω b

ω

------------------------

)

Calculate Average Power in watts regenerated over the period t

4

:

P av

=

( oooooo

– oooooo

[ oooooo

]

)

×

[ oooooo

]

2

×

( oooooo

[

+ oooooo oooooo

]

)

Record Average Power in watts regenerated over the period t

4

:

P av

=

2-7

Step 5 Percent Average Load of the Internal Dynamic Brake

Resistor

Skip this calculation if an external dynamic brake resistor will be used.

AL

=

P

-------100

P db

×

AL = Average load in percent of dynamic brake resistor

P av

= Average dynamic brake resistor dissipation calculated in

Step 4 (watts)

P db

= Steady state power dissipation capacity of dynamic brake resistors obtained from

Table 2.A

(watts)

Calculate Percent Average Load of the dynamic brake resistor:

AL

=

[

[ oooooooooo

----------------------------------oooooooooo

]

]

×

100

Record Percent Average Load of the dynamic brake resistor:

AL =

The calculation of AL is the Dynamic Brake Resistor load expressed as a percent.

P db is the sum of the Dynamic Brake dissipation capacity and is obtained from

Table 2.A

. This will give a data point for a line to be

drawn on one the curves provided in

Section 3 .

Table 2.A Rated Continuous Power for Internal DB Kits

Drive Voltage Frame

P db

Internal Resistor Continuous Power (watts)

230

230

230

230

A

B

C

D

48

28

40

36

460

460

460

460 (15HP)

460 (20HP)

C

D

A

B

D

48

28

40

36

36

2-8

Step 6 Percent Peak Load of the Internal Dynamic Brake Resistor

Skip this calculation if an external dynamic brake resistor will be used.

PL

=

P

-------100

P db

×

PL = Peak load in percent of dynamic brake resistor

P av

P db

= Peak braking power calculated in Step 2 (watts)

= Steady state power dissipation capacity of dynamic brake resistors obtained from

Table 2.A

(watts)

Calculate Percent Peak Load of the dynamic brake resistor:

PL =

[

[ oooooooooo

----------------------------------oooooooooo

]

]

×

100

Record Percent Average Load of the dynamic brake resistor:

PL

=

The calculation of

PL

in percent gives the percentage of the instantaneous power dissipated by the Dynamic Brake Resistors relative to the steady state power dissipation capacity of the resistors. This will give a data point to be drawn on one of the curves provided in

Section 3 .

2-9

Example Calculation

A 10 HP, 4 Pole, 480 Volt motor and drive is accelerating and decelerating as depicted in

Figure 2.1

.

Cycle period t

4

is 40 seconds

Rated speed is 1785 RPM and is to be decelerated to 0 speed in 15.0

seconds

Motor load can be considered purely as inertia, and all power expended or absorbed by the motor is absorbed by the motor and load inertia

Load inertia is 4.0 lb.-ft.

2

and is directly coupled to the motor

Motor rotor inertia is 2.2 lb.-ft.

2

Calculate the necessary values to choose an acceptable Dynamic Brake.

Rated Power

=

10 HP

×

746 watts

=

7.46 kW

This information was given and must be known before the calculation process begins. This can be given in HP, but must be converted to watts before it can be used in the equations.

Rated Speed

=

ω b

=

1785 RPM

=

2

π ×

1785

----------

60

=

186.98 Rad

------------------------s

Lower Speed =

ω o

= 0 RPM = 2

π ×

0

-----

60

=

0 Rad

------------s

This information was given and must be known before the calculation process begins. This can be given in RPM, but must be converted to radians per second before it can be used in the equations.

Total Inertia = J

T

= 6.2

lb.-ft.

2

= 0.261 kg-m

2

This value can be in lb.-ft.

2

or Wk

2

, but must be converted into kg-m

2 before it can be used in the equations.

Deceleration Time

=

( t

3

– t

2

)

=

15 seconds

Period of Cycle = t

4

= 40 seconds

2-10

V d

= 750 Volts

This was known because the drive is rated at 480 Volts rms. If the drive were rated 230 Volts rms, then V d

= 375 Volts .

All of the preceding data and calculations were made from knowledge of the application under consideration. The total inertia was given and did not need further calculations as outlined in

Step 2 .

Peak Braking Power

=

P b

=

J

T

[ ω

( b

( t

3

ω

2

) o

)

----------------------------------------

– t

ω ]

P b

=

[ (

15

– 0

) ]

=

608.6 watts

Note that this is 8.1% of rated power and is less than the maximum drive limit of 150% current limit. This calculation is the result of

Step 3

and determines the peak power that must be dissipated by the Dynamic

Brake Resistor.

Average Braking Power = P av

=

( t

3

– t

2

) t

4

P

-----

2

( ω b

+

ω b

ω )

P av

=

15

-----

40

608.6

------------

2

186.92

+ 0

------------------------

186.92

= 114.1 watts

This is the result of calculating the average power dissipation as outlined in

Step 5

. Verify that the sum of the power ratings of the Dynamic Brake

Resistors chosen in

Step 4 is greater than the value calculated in

Step 5 .

Refer to

Table 2.A

to determine the continuous power rating of the

resistor in the given drive frame you are using. You will need this number to determine the Percent Average Load and the Percent Peak

Load.

Percent Average Load

=

AL

=

100

×

P

--------

P av db

AL

=

100

×

114.1

------------

285%

40

=

This is the result of the calculation outlined in

Step 6 . This point is

plotted at the decel time of the application moving up vertically to this percentage.

2-11

Percent Peak Load

=

PL

=

100

×

P

--------

P db

PL

=

100

×

608.6

------------

40

=

1521%

This is the result of the calculation outlined in

Step 6 . This point is

plotted at zero seconds moving up vertically to this percentage.

Figure 2.2 Resistor Power Curve

2000

1800

1600

1400

1200

1000

800

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

PL (Peak Percent Load) = 1521%

600

AL (Average Percent Load) = 285%

400

200

0

Decel Time = 15.0 Seconds

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

AL and PL are plotted and connected with a dotted line. This is the Motor

Power Curve. If any portion of this curve lies to the right of the constant temperature power curve of the Dynamic Brake Resistor, the resistor element temperature will exceed the operating temperature limit. The drive will protect the resistor and shut down the Chopper transistor. The drive will then likely trip on an overvoltage fault.

2-12

Notes:

Section

3

Evaluating the Capability of the Internal Dynamic Brake Resistor

Record the values calculated in

Section 2 .

AL =

PL

= t

3

– t

2

=

PowerFlex 70 Drives

Find the correct Figure for your PowerFlex 70 drive rating.

Drive Voltage

240

240

240

480

480

480

Frame(s)

A and B

C

D

A and B

C

D

Figure Number

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

1. Plot the point where the value of AL (Average Load), calculated in

Step 5 , and the desired deceleration time

(t

3

– t

2

)

intersect.

2. Plot the value of PL (Peak Load), calculated in

Step 6

, on the vertical axis (0 seconds).

3. Connect PL at 0 seconds and AL at (t

3

– t

2

) with a straight line. This line is the power curve described by the motor as it decelerates to minimum speed.

If the power curve lies to the left of the constant temperature power curve of the Dynamic Brake Resistor, then there is no problem with the intended application. If any portion of the power curve lies to the right of the constant temperature power curve of the Dynamic Brake Resistor, then there is an application problem. The Internal Dynamic Brake

Resistor will exceed its rated temperature during the interval that the transient power curve is to the right of the resistor power curve capacity.

3-2

Figure 3.1 PowerFlex 70 – 240 Volt, A and B Frames

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

1400

240A/B

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

Figure 3.2 PowerFlex 70 – 240 Volt, C Frame

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

240C

1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

3-3

Figure 3.3 PowerFlex 70 – 240 Volt, D Frame

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

1400

240D

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

Figure 3.4 PowerFlex 70 – 480 Volt, A and B Frames

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

480A/B

1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

3-4

Figure 3.5 PowerFlex 70 – 480 Volt, C Frame

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

1400

480C

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

Figure 3.6 PowerFlex 70 – 480 Volt, D Frame

3000

2800

2600

2400

2200

2000

1800

1600

480D

1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

0

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Decel Time (Seconds)

Section

4

How to Select an External Dynamic Brake Resistor

In order to select the appropriate External Dynamic Brake Resistor for your application, the following data must be calculated.

Peak Regenerative Power

(Expressed in watts of power.)

This value is used to determine the maximum resistance value of the

Dynamic Brake Resistor. If this value is greater than the maximum imposed by the peak regenerative power of the drive, the drive can trip off due to transient DC bus overvoltage problems.

Table 4.A Minimum Dynamic Brake Resistance for PowerFlex 70 Drives

Drive Voltage

230

Frame

A

Minimum External Resistance (Ohms 10%)

32.9

230

230

230

460

B

C

D

A

32.9

28.7

21.7

63.4

460

460

460 (15HP)

460 (20HP)

D

D

B

C

63.4

71.1

42.3

29.1

Power Rating of the Dynamic Brake Resistor

The average power dissipation of the regenerative mode must be estimated and the power rating of the Dynamic Brake Resistor chosen to be greater than the average regenerative power dissipation of the drive.

4-2

Record the Values Calculated in Section 2

P b

=

P av

=

Calculate Maximum Dynamic Brake Resistance Value

R db1

=

0.9

×

V

2

P b

R db1

= Maximum allowable value for the dynamic brake resistor

(ohms)

V d

P b

= DC bus voltage the chopper module regulates to

(375V DC or 750V DC)

= Peak breaking power calculated in Section 2:

Step 3

(watts)

Calculate Maximum Dynamic Brake Resistance:

R db1

=

0.9

[

× ( ooooooooo ooooooooo

]

)

2

-----------------------------------------------

Record Maximum Dynamic Brake Resistance:

R db1

=

The choice of the Dynamic Brake resistance value should be less than the value calculated in this step. If the value is greater, the drive can trip on DC bus overvoltage. Do not reduce P b

by any ratio because of estimated losses in the motor and inverter. This has been accounted for by an offsetting increase in the manufacturing tolerance of the resistance value and the increase in resistance value due to the temperature coefficient of resistor element.

4-3

Select Resistor

Select a resistor bank from

Table 4.B

or

4.C

or your resistor supplier that has:

• a resistance value that is less than the value calculated ( R db1 in ohms)

• a resistance value that is greater than the minimum resistance listed in

Table 4.A

• a power value that is greater than the value calculated in

Step 4

( P av

in watts)

!

ATTENTION: The internal dynamic brake IGBT will be damaged if the resistance value of the resistor bank is less than the minimum resistance value of the drive. Use

Table 4.A

to verify that the resistance value of the selected resistor bank is greater than the minimum resistance of the drive.

4-4

110

110

85

85

110

110

110

110

Ohms

154

154

154

154

154

154

59

59

59

59

85

85

85

85

59

59

Watts

182

242

408

604

610

913

255

338

570

845

850

1278

326

438

730

1089

1094

1954

473

631

1056

1576

1577

2384

Table 4.B Resistor Selection for 240V AC Drives

Catalog

Number

222-1A

222-1

225-1A

225-1

220-1A

220-1

222-2A

222-2

225-2A

225-2

220-2A

220-2

222-3A

222-3

225-3A

220-3A

225-3

220-3

222-4A

222-4

225-4A

225-4

220-4A

220-4

32

32

20

20

32

32

32

32

Ohms

45

45

45

45

45

45

20

20

20

20

Watts

617

827

1378

2056

2066

3125

875

1162

1955

2906

2918

4395

1372

1860

3063

4572

4650

7031

Catalog

Number

222-5A

222-5

225-5A

220-5A

225-5

220-5

222-6A

222-6

225-6A

225-6

220-6A

220-6

222-7A

222-7

225-7A

220-7A

225-7

220-7

181

181

181

181

237

237

181

181

237

237

237

237

342

342

342

342

439

439

342

342

439

439

439

439

Ohms

615

615

615

615

615

615

1577

2373

2068

2055

620

822

3108

1385

1096

1088

435

734

473

628

1057

1570

Watts

242

404

602

605

915

180

254

339

568

847

848

1281

329

1645

Table 4.C Resistor Selection for 480V AC Drives

440-4A

440-4

440-5A

445-5

442-5A

442-5

440-5

445-5A

440-3A

445-3

442-3

445-3A

442-4A

442-4

445-4A

445-4

Catalog

Number

442-1

445-1A

440-1A

445-1

440-1

442-1A

442-2A

442-2

445-2A

445-2

440-2A

440-2

442-3A

440-3

29

29

29

29

44

44

29

29

44

44

44

44

56

56

56

56

81

81

56

56

81

81

81

81

Ohms

128

128

128

128

128

128

440-9

442-9A

442-10

445-10A

440-10A

445-10

440-10

442-10A

440-8

445-8

445-8A

442-8

442-9

445-9A

445-9

440-9A

Catalog

Number

442-6A

442-6

445-6A

445-6

440-6A

440-6

440-7A

440-7

445-7

442-7

442-7A

445-7A

440-8A

442-8A

12784

2561

5130

8487

12667

12826

19396

3800

10045

6642

4490

2657

3381

5720

8454

8537

Watts

874

1162

1951

2906

2912

4395

4629

6944

4592

1837

1389

3102

6702

2010

4-5

4-6

Notes:

To contact Drives Technical Support . . .

Tel: (1) 262 512-8176, Fax: (1) 262 512-2222

Email: [email protected]

Online: www.ab.com/support/abdrives

Reach us now at www.rockwellautomation.com

Wherever you need us, Rockwell Automation brings together leading brands in industrial automation including Allen-Bradley controls,

Reliance Electric power transmission products, Dodge mechanical power transmission components, and Rockwell Software. Rockwell Automation's unique, flexible approach to helping customers achieve a competitive advantage is supported by thousands of authorized partners, distributors and system integrators around the world.

Americas Headquarters, 1201 South Second Street, Milwaukee, WI 53201-2496, USA, Tel: (1) 414 382-2000, Fax: (1) 414 382-4444

European Headquarters SA/NV, Boulevard du Souverain 36, 1170 Brussels, Belgium, Tel: (32) 2 663 0600, Fax: (32) 2 663 0640

Asia Pacific Headquarters, 27/F Citicorp Centre, 18 Whitfield Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, Tel: (852) 2887 4788, Fax: (852) 2508 1846

Publication PFLEX-SG001A-EN-P – March 2001

Copyright 2001 Rockwell International Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in USA.

A

AC Supply Source Considerations,

2-1

Accel Mask,

2-92

Accel Owner,

2-104

Accel Time,

2-1

Accel Time 1, 2,

2-1

,

2-45

Agency Certification,

1-1

Alarm x Code,

2-5

Alarms,

2-2

Alarms Group,

2-5

Altitude Derates,

1-3

Ambient Temperature Derates,

1-3

Analog In Config,

2-6

Analog In Hi,

2-9

Analog In Lo,

2-9

Analog In1 Value,

2-15

Analog In2 Value,

2-15

Analog Inputs,

2-6

Analog Out1 Sel,

2-18

Analog Outputs,

2-18

Analog Outputs Group,

2-18

Anlg In 1, 2 Loss,

2-14

Anlg In Config,

2-3

Anlg In Loss,

2-4

Anlg In Sqr Root,

2-13

Armored Cable,

2-33

Auto / Manual,

2-22

,

2-144

Auto Restart,

2-24

Auto Rstrt Delay,

2-24

Auto Rstrt Tries,

2-24

B

Bipolar Inputs,

2-15

Bus Reg Gain,

2-26

Bus Reg Mode A, B,

2-26

C

Cable

I/O, Analog,

2-15

I/O, Digital,

2-46

Power, Armored,

2-33

Power, Shielded,

2-33

Cable Entry Plate

SHLD Terminal,

2-87

Cable Termination,

2-101

Cable Trays,

2-36

Carrier (PWM) Frequency,

2-36

CE

Conformity,

2-37

Requirements,

2-37

Circuit Breakers,

2-83

Clear Fault Owner,

2-104

Coast,

2-158

Common Mode Interference,

2-15

Compensation,

2-127

Conduit,

2-36

Contactors

Input,

2-100

Control Wire,

2-46

Copy Cat,

2-39

Current Limit,

2-40

Current Lmt Gain,

2-40

Current Lmt Sel,

2-6

,

2-40

,

2-134

Current Lmt Val,

2-40

D

Datalinks,

2-42

DC Brake Level,

2-158

DC Brake Lvl Sel,

2-158

DC Brake Time,

2-158

DC Braking,

2-158

DC Bus Voltage,

2-44

Decel Mask,

2-92

Decel Owner,

2-104

Decel Time,

2-45

Derating Guidelines,

1-3

Diagnostics Group,

2-24

Dig Out1 Level,

2-64

Dig Out1 OffTime,

2-66

Dig Out1 OnTime,

2-66

Dig Out2 Level,

2-64

Dig Out2 OffTime,

2-66

Dig Out2 OnTime,

2-66

Digital In1 Sel,

2-47

Digital In2 Sel,

2-47

Digital In3 Sel,

2-47

Digital In4 Sel,

2-47

Digital In5 Sel,

2-47

Digital In6 Sel,

2-47

Digital Inputs,

2-46

Digital Inputs Group,

2-47

Digital Out1 Sel,

2-4

,

2-63

Index

Index-2

Digital Out2 Sel,

2-4

,

2-63

Digital Outputs,

2-63

Digital Outputs Group,

2-47

Dimensions

Flange Mount,

1-8

Mounting

PowerFlex 70,

1-5

PowerFlex 700,

1-16

Direction Control,

2-67

Direction Mask,

2-92

Direction Owner,

2-104

Distribution Systems

Unbalanced,

2-169

Ungrounded,

2-169

DPI,

2-68

Drive Output Disconnection,

2-101

Drive Overload,

2-71

Drive Ratings,

2-75

Dynamic Braking,

2-158

,

A-1

E

Economizer,

2-76

Efficiency Derates,

1-3

EMC

Directive,

2-37

EMC Instructions,

2-37

EMI/RFI Filter Grounding, RFI Filter,

2-87

exclusive ownership,

2-104

F

Fan Curve,

2-77

Fault 1-8 Time,

2-79

Fault Clr Mask,

2-92

Fault Config 1,

2-80

Fault Config x,

2-134

Faults,

2-78

Filter, RFI,

2-87

Flange Mount, PowerFlex 70,

1-8

Flux Current,

2-165

,

2-167

Flux Current Ref,

2-167

Flux Up,

2-165

Flux Up Mode,

2-165

Flying Start En,

2-81

Flying Start Gain,

2-81

Flying StartGain,

2-81

Fuses,

2-83

G

Grounding

Filter,

2-87

Safety, PE,

2-87

Shields,

2-87

Group

Alarms,

2-5

Analog Outputs,

2-18

Diagnostics,

2-24

Digital Inputs,

2-47

Digital Outputs,

2-47

Masks & Owners,

2-92

Power Loss,

2-109

Speed References,

2-3

H

HIM Memory,

2-88

HIM Operations,

2-88

Human Interface Module

Language,

2-88

Password,

2-88

User Display,

2-88

I

I/O Wiring

Analog,

2-15

Digital,

2-46

Input Contactor

Start/Stop,

2-100

Input Devices,

2-89

Contactors,

2-100

Input Modes,

2-90

Input Potentiometer,

2-17

Input Power Conditioning,

2-91

Input/Output Ratings,

1-2

IR Drop Volts,

2-167

IR Voltage Drop,

2-167

Isolation Transformer,

2-91

J

Jog Mask,

2-92

Jog Owner,

2-104

L

Language Select, HIM,

2-88

Local Mask,

2-92

Local Owner,

2-104

Logic Mask,

2-92

Low Voltage Directive,

2-37

M

Masks & Owners Group,

2-92

Max Speed,

2-145

Maximum frequency,

2-146

MOP Mask,

2-92

MOP Owner,

2-104

Motor Cable Lengths,

2-31

Motor Nameplate,

2-96

Motor NP FLA,

2-96

Motor NP Hz,

2-96

Motor NP Power,

2-96

Motor NP Pwr Units,

2-96

Motor NP RPM,

2-96

Motor NP Volts,

2-96

Motor OL Factor,

2-98

Motor OL Hz,

2-97

Motor Overload,

2-97

Motor Start/Stop,

2-100

Mounting Dimensions,

1-5

O

Output Current,

2-101

Output Devices

Output Reactor,

2-101

Output Frequency,

2-102

Output Reactor,

2-101

Output Voltage,

2-102

Overspeed,

2-103

Owners,

2-104

P

Parameter access level,

2-106

Parameters

Accel Mask,

2-92

Accel Owner,

2-104

Alarm x Code,

2-5

Analog In1 Value,

2-15

Analog In2 Value,

2-15

Analog Out1 Sel,

2-18

Anlg In Config,

2-3

Anlg In Loss,

2-4

Auto Rstrt Delay,

2-24

Auto Rstrt Tries,

2-24

Clear Fault Owner,

2-104

Current Lmt Sel,

2-134

Decel Mask,

2-92

Decel Owner,

2-104

Dig Out1 Level,

2-64

Dig Out1 OffTime,

2-66

Dig Out1 OnTime,

2-66

Dig Out2 Level,

2-64

Dig Out2 OffTime,

2-66

Dig Out2 OnTime,

2-66

Digital In1 Sel,

2-47

Digital In2 Sel,

2-47

Digital In3 Sel,

2-47

Digital In4 Sel,

2-47

Digital In5 Sel,

2-47

Digital In6 Sel,

2-47

Digital Out1 Sel,

2-4

,

2-63

Digital Out2 Sel,

2-4

,

2-63

Direction Mask,

2-92

Direction Owner,

2-104

Fault Clr Mask,

2-92

Fault Config x,

2-134

Flying Start En,

2-81

Flying Start Gain,

2-81

Flying StartGain,

2-81

Jog Mask,

2-92

Jog Owner,

2-104

Local Mask,

2-92

Local Owner,

2-104

Logic Mask,

2-92

MOP Mask,

2-92

MOP Owner,

2-104

Power Loss Mode,

2-109

Reference Mask,

2-92

Reference Owner,

2-104

Speed Mode,

2-139

Speed Ref A Sel,

2-3

Start Mask,

2-92

Start Owner,

2-104

Stop Owner,

2-104

Testpoint 1 Sel,

2-161

Testpoint x Data,

2-161

Password, HIM,

2-88

PE,

2-87

PE Ground,

2-87

PET Ref Wave,

2-106

PI Config,

2-116

PI Control,

2-116

PI Error Meter,

2-116

PI Feedback Meter,

2-116

PI Feedback Sel,

2-116

PI Integral Time,

2-116

PI Output Meter,

2-116

Index-3

Index-4

PI Preload,

2-116

PI Prop Gain,

2-116

PI Ref Meter,

2-116

PI Reference Sel,

2-116

PI Setpoint,

2-116

PI Status,

2-116

PI Upper/Lower Limit,

2-116

Potentiometer, Wiring,

2-17

Power Loss,

2-107

Power Loss Group,

2-109

Power Loss Mode,

2-109

Power Up Marker,

2-168

Power Wire,

2-33

Process PI Loop,

2-116

R

Reactors,

2-91

Reference Mask,

2-92

Reference Owner,

2-104

Reference, Speed,

2-48

,

2-52

,

2-144

Repeated Start/Stop,

2-100

Reset meters,

2-129

RFI Filter Grounding,

2-87

S

S Curve,

2-130

Safety Ground,

2-87

Sensorless Vector,

2-163

Shear Pin,

2-134

Shielded Cables

Power,

2-33

SHLD Terminal,

2-87

Signal Loss,

2-14

Signal Wire,

2-15

Skip Freq 1-3,

2-135

Sleep Mode,

2-137

Specifications

Agency Certification,

1-1

Control,

1-2

Derating Guidelines,

1-3

Electrical,

1-2

Environment,

1-2

Heat Dissipation,

1-2

Input/Output Ratings,

1-2

Protection,

1-1

Speed Control,

2-139

Speed Mode,

2-139

Speed Pot,

2-17

Speed Ref A Sel,

2-3

Speed Ref A, B Sel,

2-144

Speed Reference,

2-48

,

2-52

,

2-144

Speed References Group,

2-3

Start Inhibits,

2-147

Start Mask,

2-92

Start Owner,

2-104

Start/Stop, Repeated,

2-100

Start-Up,

2-149

Stop Mode A, B,

2-158

Stop Modes,

2-158

Stop Owner,

2-104

T

TB Man Ref Sel,

2-144

Test Points,

2-161

Testpoint 1 Sel,

2-161

Testpoint x Data,

2-161

Thermal Regulator,

2-161

THHN wire,

2-33

Torq Performance Modes,

2-162

Torque Current,

2-167

Torque Perf Mode,

2-162

U

Unbalanced Distribution Systems,

2-169

Ungrounded Distribution Systems,

2-169

User Display, HIM,

2-88

User Sets,

2-170

V

Voltage class,

2-171

W

Watts Loss,

2-172

Wire

Control,

2-46

Signal,

2-15

Wiring

Potentiometer,

2-17

www,

1-1

www.rockwellautomation.com

Corporate Headquarters

Rockwell Automation, 777 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1400, Milwaukee, WI, 53202-5302 USA, Tel: (1) 414.212.5200, Fax: (1) 414.212.5201

Headquarters for Allen-Bradley Products, Rockwell Software Products and Global Manufacturing Solutions

Americas: Rockwell Automation, 1201 South Second Street, Milwaukee, WI 53204-2496 USA, Tel: (1) 414.382.2000, Fax: (1) 414.382.4444

Europe: Rockwell Automation SA/NV, Vorstlaan/Boulevard du Souverain 36-BP 3A/B, 1170 Brussels, Belgium, Tel: (32) 2 663 0600, Fax: (32) 2 663 0640

Asia Pacific: Rockwell Automation, 27/F Citicorp Centre, 18 Whitfield Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, Tel: (852) 2887 4788, Fax: (852) 2508 1846

Headquarters for Dodge and Reliance Electric Products

Americas: Rockwell Automation, 6040 Ponders Court, Greenville, SC 29615-4617 USA, Tel: (1) 864.297.4800, Fax: (1) 864.281.2433

Europe: Rockwell Automation, Brühlstraße 22, D-74834 Elztal-Dallau, Germany, Tel: (49) 6261 9410, Fax: (49) 6261 17741

Asia Pacific: Rockwell Automation, 55 Newton Road, #11-01/02 Revenue House, Singapore 307987, Tel: (65) 351 6723, Fax: (65) 355 1733

U.S. Allen-Bradley Drives Technical Support

Tel: (1) 262.512.8176, Fax: (1) 262.512.2222, Email: [email protected], Online: www.ab.com/support/abdrives

Publication PFLEX-RM001C-EN-E – December, 2001

Supersedes PFLEX-RM001B-EN-E dated May, 2001 Copyright © 2001 Rockwell Automation. All rights reserved. Printed in USA.

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